Podcast appearances and mentions of Steve Young

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American football quarterback

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Steve Young

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Best podcasts about Steve Young

Latest podcast episodes about Steve Young

Athlete Maestro | Sports Education | Sports Psychology | Mental Toughness | Athlete Development | Mental Training | Master Th

If you find this episode helpful, share it with a fellow athlete to help them on their quest to achieve their sports goals. MORE IMPORTANTLY: Join our exclusive facebook group for like minded athletes where we delve deeper into the episodes of the podcast, www.athletemaestro.com/group If you're a parent and you'll like to learn how to nurture your child's sporting talent sign up for my FREE MASTERCLASS athletemaestro.com/sportsparenting There are a ton of podcasts you could listening to right now but you chose Athlete Maestro. What should I talk about next? Please let me know on twitter or in the comments below Subscribe for FREE lessons on Itunes: athletemaestro.com/itunes If you found anything useful on the podcast, please leave a RATING AND REVIEW so other young athletes like yourself can find and benefit from the podcast. To learn how to SUBSCRIBE AND LEAVE A RATING on the show, head to www.athletemaestro.com/subscribe. For more on Athlete Maestro visit athletemaestro.com If you have any questions, feel free to send an email tola@athletemaestro.com Get the Athlete Maestro Daily Planner, www.athletemaestro.com/dailyplanner Find me on social media Instagram - @tolaogunlewe Twitter - @tolaogunlewe Thanks for tuning in.

Niners Nation: for San Francisco 49ers fans
49ers in Five: Steve Young says to trust Kyle Shanahan to develop Trey Lance

Niners Nation: for San Francisco 49ers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:17


In today's episode we listen to Steve Young with KNBR earlier this week talk about Trey Lance's development, how the 49ers can do a better job calling running plays for him, and where Trey's ceiling can get to in the future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

KNBR Podcast
10-13 Steve Young breaks down Trey Lance's first career NFL start & how he can improve going forward

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:56


Steve Young breaks down Trey Lance's first career NFL start &  how he can improve going forward See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast
10-13 Steve Young breaks down Trey Lance's first career NFL start & how he can improve going forward

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:56


Steve Young breaks down Trey Lance's first career NFL start &  how he can improve going forward See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Michael Kay Show
Steve Young: 10/11/21

The Michael Kay Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 34:15


The birthday boy, Steve Young, joins the guys to share his thoughts on the Giants defense's shortcomings, Daniel Jones' propensity to run, over-the-top roughing the passer penalties and much much more!

Tootell & Nuanez
Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty - October 4, 2021

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 38:34


Each Monday during the 2021 fall football season, Colter Nuanez of ESPN Missoula will be joined for the second hour of Nuanez Now by Marty Mornhinweg for the Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty. Coach Mornhinweg, a University of Montana alum, spent 25 years as one of the most respected offensive minds in the National Football League. Mornhinweg coached Brett Favre in Green Bay, Steve Young in San Francisco, Donovan McNabb, Michael Vick, Carson Wentz and Jaylen Hurts in Philadelphia and, most recently, NFL MVP Lamar Jackson in Baltimore. Nuanez and Mornhinweg give you the best in NFL commentary each Monday during the 5 o'clock hour on Nuanez Now.  This episode is from Monday September 27, 2021 

Tootell & Nuanez
Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty - September 27, 2021

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:09


Each Monday during the 2021 fall football season, Colter Nuanez of ESPN Missoula will be joined for the second hour of Nuanez Now by Marty Mornhinweg for the Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty. Coach Mornhinweg, a University of Montana alum, spent 25 years as one of the most respected offensive minds in the National Football League. Mornhinweg coached Brett Favre in Green Bay, Steve Young in San Francisco, Donovan McNabb, Michael Vick, Carson Wentz and Jaylen Hurts in Philadelphia and, most recently, NFL MVP Lamar Jackson in Baltimore. Nuanez and Mornhinweg give you the best in NFL commentary each Monday during the 5 o'clock hour on Nuanez Now.  This episode is from Monday September 27, 2021 

Tootell & Nuanez
Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty - September 20

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 34:09


Each Monday during the 2021 fall football season, Colter Nuanez of ESPN Missoula will be joined for the second hour of Nuanez Now by Marty Mornhinweg for the Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty. Coach Mornhinweg, a University of Montana alum, spent 25 years as one of the most respected offensive minds in the National Football League. Mornhinweg coached Brett Favre in Green Bay, Steve Young in San Francisco, Donovan McNabb, Michael Vick, Carson Wentz and Jaylen Hurts in Philadelphia and, most recently, NFL MVP Lamar Jackson in Baltimore. Nuanez and Mornhinweg give you the best in NFL commentary each Monday during the 5 o'clock hour on Nuanez Now. 

Tootell & Nuanez
Monday Afternoon QB with Coach Marty - September 13, 2021

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 32:19


Each Monday during the 2021 fall football season, Colter Nuanez of ESPN Missoula will be joined for the second hour of Nuanez Now by Marty Mornhinweg for the Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty. Coach Mornhinweg, a University of Montana alum, spent 25 years as one of the most respected offensive minds in the National Football League. Mornhinweg coached Brett Favre in Green Bay, Steve Young in San Francisco, Donovan McNabb, Michael Vick, Carson Wentz and Jaylen Hurts in Philadelphia and, most recently, NFL MVP Lamar Jackson in Baltimore. Nuanez and Mornhinweg give you the best in NFL commentary each Monday during the 5 o'clock hour on Nuanez Now. 

BYU Sports Nation
Remembering Gordon Hudson

BYU Sports Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 49:43


Steve Young joins to discuss his memories of his All-American teammate and friend Gordon Hudson. Coach Heather Olmstead joins to discuss Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Match, Win streak, team development, and Whitney Bower as a defensive setter.

A New Angle
Football School with Marty Mornhinweg

A New Angle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:34


Today's guest is Marty Mornhinweg, University of Montana Hall of Fame quarterback and a long time coach in the NFL. During Marty's career, he coached five different pro-bowl quarterbacks, including Brett Farve, Steve Young and Donovan McNabb, won a Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers in 1997 and served as the head coach of the Detroit Lions in 2001 and 2002. Marty recently launched the Camp Marty Quarterback School Podcast where he speaks with some of the most innovative offensive minds in football. Our conversation some of the behind-the-scenes aspects of football: from the game's captivating nature, to the hitches and Hail Marys of coaching, and broader challenges facing the sport. https://www.anewanglepodcast.com/ Transcript here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1K-p6v5YDLTfYooP7jfW7A8Y907LrPjvIBhVGvzd2_T0/edit?usp=sharing

KNBR Podcast
10-6 Steve Young talks about Trey Lance reminding him of an early version of Tampa Bay Steve Young, how they handle situation moving forward

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 39:15


Steve Young, the Hall of Famer joined the guys and talked all things Trey Lance, Jimmy G and what the 49ers look like as the Cardinals loom  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast
10-6 Steve Young talks about Trey Lance reminding him of an early version of Tampa Bay Steve Young, how they handle situation moving forward

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 39:15


Steve Young, the Hall of Famer joined the guys and talked all things Trey Lance, Jimmy G and what the 49ers look like as the Cardinals loom  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dirty Jockstrap Podcast
Dirty Jockstrap Podcast 10.4.21: Is Stephen Belichick on bath salts?

Dirty Jockstrap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 89:29


Steve Young can't figure out why getting struck by lightning is bad. Georgia and Bama in the SEC Championship will only determine the jersey colors they wear in the Nat'l Championship Game.Astros are still cheating so the Mariners won the division.Support the show (http://paypal.me/jvwaterboys)

The Michael Kay Show
Steve Young: 10/4/21

The Michael Kay Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:43


Steve Young joins the guys in his weekly segment talking about Zach Wilson's big performance, Dak Prescott's improvement, Vic Fangio's outrage and much much more!

Who's That Girl? A New Girl Podcast

This podcast covers New Girl Season 2, Episode 18, Tinfinity, which originally aired on February 26, 2013 and was directed by Max Winkler and written by Kim Rosenstock and Josh Malmuth.Here's a quick recap of the episode:Schmidt and Nick are celebrating living together for 10 years, their tin anniversary. Meanwhile, Jess is trying to move on from thinking about Nick and his mouth and Cece is moving forward with Shivrang.We discuss Pop Culture References such as:Bert & Ernie - When told by Winston they are like Bert and Ernie, Nick exclaimed he's got dibs on Bert while Schmidt called dibs on Ernie at the same time."Save Me" by Queen - When the toast sequence was initiated incorrectly during Shivrang's proposal, the song “Save Me” by the band Queen played.Additional Pop Culture References such as:San Francisco Football [49ers] - The fictional Jax McTavish played safety for San Francisco. The National Football League team based in San Francisco is the 49ers. The San Francisco 49ers are a professional American football team based in the San Francisco Bay Area. The 49ers won five Super Bowl championships between 1981 and 1994. Four of those came in the 1980s and were led by Hall of Famers Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Ronnie Lott, Steve Young, Charles Haley, Fred Dean and coaches Bill Walsh and George Seifert.Omar Epps - The guys wondered why Winston was with Jax and thought it must be because Jax thought he's Omar Epps. Omar Hashim Epps is an American actor, rapper, and producer known for his film roles including Juice, Higher Learning, The Wood, In Too Deep, and Love & Basketball as well as his television work including the role of Dr. Dennis Gant on the series ER, J. Martin Bellamy in Resurrection, and Dr. Eric Foreman on the medical drama series House from 2004 to 2012.Homeland - Winston asked Jax if he had watched Homeland. Homeland is a TV show about a bipolar CIA operative who becomes convinced a prisoner of war has been turned by al-Qaeda and is planning to carry out a terrorist attack on American soil. We talked about the protagonist, Abu Nazir, on our podcast for S2E15 - Cooler.Tom Cruise + Iceman [Top Gun] - When Nick and Schmidt were sharing that they're equals, they mentioned both are Iceman, neither is Tom Cruise. This is a reference to the movie Top Gun, where students at the United States Navy's elite fighter weapons school compete to be best in the class. The actor, Tom Cruise, played the main character Maverick while Iceman is played by Val Kilmer and was known for being cocky and good at “picking up” women.We also cover the moment when Schmidt assigns Nick his party chores as our “Schmidtism”. For our “Not in the 2020s” we discuss how Jess dismissed a man at the bar because he said he was bisexual and Nick calling Schmidt a “nancy boy” for spitting out his alcohol. We also talk about how Jax addresses the expectations set on him and opening up was a “Yes in the 2020s”. We also give a quick look into Steve Howey (Jax) and Satya Bhabha (Shivrang), the Guest Stars we feature in this episode.Also in this episode were the following guest stars who we do not discuss in the podcast: Nelson Franklin (Robby - Previously discussed in S2E1), Matthew J Cates (Salesman), Josh Margolin (Sanders), Jimmy Bellinger (Lighting Guy), Stuart Allan (Kid), Michael Vlamis (Hipster Jerkwad), Chris Dotson (Tech Guy), Joshua Leary (Stuart), Elaine Loh (Random Partygoer), and Corinne Donnelly (Party Guest).We also discuss this article (which contains spoilers) where we learned that this episode took almost a month to film (compared to the usual 5 days) due to rain and how Elizabeth Meriweather found episodes where Jess was the b-plot to be weaker episodes. We also chat about the different anniversary themes for each year.This episode got a 7/10 Rating from Kritika whose favorite character was Schmidt and Kelly rated this episode a 7.5/10 and her favorite character was Nick!Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Episode 19!Music: "Hotshot” by scottholmesmusic.comFollow us on Twitter, Instagram or email us at whosthatgirlpod@gmail.com!Website: https://smallscreenchatter.com/

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Pastor Derwin Gray on NFL memories, intercepting Steve Young and the importance of prayer

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 51:45


Today we talk to Dr. Derwin Gray, pastor of Transformation Church near Charlotte, NC and former NFL safety about his pro football career, sacking Jim Kelly and Dan Marino, intercepting passes from Steve Young, playing in the 1995 AFC Championship Game, and how he went from being a player to a pastor.  Derwin's new book "GOD, DO YOU HEAR ME?" releases October 5, 2021.  --- Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up here.

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast
9-29 Steve Young thinks 49ers lost SNF in first half, talks Jimmy's play and what has had an effect on the running game to this point

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 33:51


Steve Young, the Hall of Famer breaks down everything 49ers from the loss to the Packers, the running game struggles and the QB play  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNBR Podcast
9-29 Steve Young thinks 49ers lost SNF in first half, talks Jimmy's play and what has had an effect on the running game to this point

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 33:51


Steve Young, the Hall of Famer breaks down everything 49ers from the loss to the Packers, the running game struggles and the QB play  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Michael Kay Show
Steve Young: 9/27/21

The Michael Kay Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 28:04


Steve Young joins the guys in his weekly segment discussing Zach Wilson's slow start, the enormous chip on Tom Brady's shoulder, the reason for the Giants' struggles and more!

Beyond The X's And O's With Trent Dilfer
Steve Young on Doing What You Love & the State of Quarterbacking in the NFL | Beyond the X's and O's

Beyond The X's And O's With Trent Dilfer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 65:47


Hall of Famer and Trent's close friend Steve Young joins the show and tells the story of his disastrous first start in high school. Young reveals that he didn't know how to throw a football until he got to college and learned by watching Jim McMahon. Young shares tales of memorable recruiting trips, including watching a freshman Dan Marino play against Army, and explains the philosophy he uses to power through difficult times. Young shares his perspective on how the NFL has changed to enhance offenses by resembling college, and the state of football today, stressing Bill Walsh's importance in creating a greater community in the NFL and how teams can improve their organizations to help develop young quarterbacks. Young believes that the most successful QB's are sophisticated passers, and encourages Zach Wilson to improve after throwing four interceptions this past weekend.

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast
9-22 Steve Young describes why he's excited with early 49ers defensive play, what he thinks of the Brandon Aiyuk situation

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 27:37


Steve Young, the Hall of Fame QB breaks down everything from the 49ers and around the league and also tells a great story about his day as a towel boy at BYU  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNBR Podcast
9-22 Steve Young describes why he's excited with early 49ers defensive play, what he thinks of the Brandon Aiyuk situation

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 27:37


Steve Young, the Hall of Fame QB breaks down everything from the 49ers and around the league and also tells a great story about his day as a towel boy at BYU  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Michael Kay Show
Steve Young: 9/20/21

The Michael Kay Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 31:37


Steve Young joins the guys to share his thoughts on Zach Wilson's 4 interception day vs New England. Plus, why this could be an epic year for Tom Brady and is it time for Jon Gruden to fully back Derek Carr?

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast
9-15 Steve Young discusses 49ers week 1, Trey Lance & Jimmy G and his business trip to Qatar

Tolbert, Krueger & Brooks Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 33:52


Steve Young the Hall of Fame Quarterback joined the guys for his first weekly conversation and talked about everything from meeting a KNBR listener in Qatar to how he sees the Trey Lance and Jimmy G situation playing out  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNBR Podcast
9-15 Steve Young discusses 49ers week 1, Trey Lance & Jimmy G and his business trip to Qatar

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 33:52


Steve Young the Hall of Fame Quarterback joined the guys for his first weekly conversation and talked about everything from meeting a KNBR listener in Qatar to how he sees the Trey Lance and Jimmy G situation playing out  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How to Build an App
Marketing and Growth Hacks With Steve Young (App Masters)

How to Build an App

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 48:51


Welcome back to How To Build An App!I'm your host Austin Betzer and I'm here with Bowdrie Price. Our guest this week is Steve Young, the founder and CEO of App Masters.Not to be confused with Steve Young, the football player haha!Steve has kind of a cool backstory that he'll share with you during this episode, but just to give a little teaser, it starts with Steve running growth for a startup in San Francisco and follows him through his entrepreneurial journey to success with App Masters.Just to give you an idea of what that success looks like, App Masters has become the #1 app business podcast, and scaled into a highly successful marketing agency. App Masters has helped dozens of clients get featured by Apple, hit the #2 paid app overall, and get coverage by major publications like Techcrunch and Mashable.In this week's episode, Steve shares his first-hand knowledge of how to make it in the app industry with action-packed advice about product design, app marketing, and business and app design. ---Learn more about App Masters here: https://appmasters.com/  App Masters Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AppMasters App Masters Podcast:https://appmasters.com/app-marketing-podcast/ Follow Steve on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevepyoung/ ---This show is produced by Strides Development, a full-service app development agency. We specialize in taking your ideas and turning them into a finished app in only a few months. If you have an app you're building, we would love to talk to you. You can schedule your free strategy call by clicking here.Make sure you're following Strides:Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/strides.dev/Linkedin:https://www.linkedin.com/in/betzeraustin/  

Songcraft: Spotlight on Songwriters
Ep. 175 - VAN DYKE PARKS ("Heroes and Villains")

Songcraft: Spotlight on Songwriters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 74:17


SUMMARY:Our guest on this episode of Songcraft is musician, songwriter, arranger, and producer Van Dyke Parks. Best known for his work with Brian Wilson on The Beach Boys' legendarily ill-fated Smile album, Parks has released a number of solo albums, scored several films, arranged countless sessions, and worked with a long list of artists, including The Byrds, Randy Newman, Harry Nilsson, Little Feat, U2, Fiona Apple, Joana Newsom, and many others. PART ONE:Scott and Paul chat about why they're approaching this episode a little differently than usual, the saga of The Beach Boys' Smile, and why Paul should stop checking stuff out from the library. PART TWO:Our in-depth interview with the legendary Van Dyke ParksABOUT VAN DYKE PARKSVan Dyke Parks is one of the more unique American musicians, songwriters, arrangers, and record producers to emerge in the 1960s. Born in Mississippi, he attended the American Boychoir boarding school in Princeton, New Jersey, in his formative years. His first career was as a child actor, appearing on over 100 episodes of various TV shows, including his role as “the kid from downstairs” on The Honeymooners. He did theater and appeared in films, including The Swan with Grace Kelly and Alec Guinness, before going on to study music at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, where he briefly studied with Aaron Copland. In the early 1960s Van Dyke began playing acoustic guitar, and moved to the West Coast where he and his brother Carson performed on the coffee house circuit as a duo known as The Steeltown Two. He landed his first arranging job with “The Bare Necessities” for Disney's The Jungle Book in 1963 before a brief stint as an MGM recording artist in the middle of the decade.  He is perhaps best known, however, for his collaborations with Brian Wilson with whom he worked as a lyricist on The Beach Boys' ill-fated Smile album. The pair revisited their work with the release of Brian Wilson Presents Smile in 2004. Though the Smile recordings weren't released at the time, Van Dyke signed with Warner Bros. Records and, in 1967, released his album Song Cycle, an ambitious debut that incorporated a wide range of traditional American musical influences with experimental recording techniques. He went on to produce the debut albums by Ry Cooder and Randy Newman, and took a job as an executive at Warner Bros. Records in the 1970s. He became enamored with calypso music in that era, releasing a couple of albums as an artist showcasing the genre, and producing The Esso Trinidad Steel Band. Toward the end of the decade he began composing film soundtracks before returning in the 1980s with two albums of original material, Jump!, which explored the Uncle Remus and Br'er Rabbit stories, and Tokyo Rose, which explored the intersection between Japanese and American culture in the context of a trade war. In the 1990s, he and Brian Wilson teamed up once again to release the album Orange Crate Art. His most recent full-length album as a solo artist is 2013's Songs Cycled. The long list of musicians Van Dyke has worked with includes The Byrds, Tim Buckley, Harry Nilsson, Little Feat, Steve Young, Phil Ochs, Frank Zappa, Ringo Starr, U2, Fiona Apple, Joanna Newsom, Skrillex, and many others.  

The Michael Kay Show
Steve Young: 9/13/21

The Michael Kay Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 20:45


One of our favorites, Steve Young, joins the guys for his breakdown of Week 1 in the NFL. How worrisome is the Jets o-line? Why does Daniel Jones continue to turn the ball over? And have you even seen Aaron Rodgers play like that?

Speak For Yourself with Whitlock & Wiley
Confidence in Dak, Aaron Rodgers/Packers tension, Lamar Jackson, Deion Sanders joins

Speak For Yourself with Whitlock & Wiley

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 93:47


00:00 How confident are you in Dak Prescott heading into Week 1? 15:48 Who's at fault for the tension between Aaron Rodgers and the Packers? 31:35 Expect the league to figure out Lamar Jackson this season? 37:41 Deion Sanders joins to discuss the legacy of HBCU football. 49:11 Will Cam's absence impact the Patriots QB battle? 1:00:49 Is it a good idea for the Jags to start Trevor Lawrence Week 1? 1:15:07 Did the Buccaneers have the best offseason? 1:21:33 Agree with Steve Young that Trey Lance “needs to be on that field”? 1:28:51 What sport would you go back to college to play? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Intimate Conversations
Receiving your ideal match, Dr. Steve Young

Intimate Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 50:48


What is the possibility that not only do I get to share the AMAZING Dr., Healer and inspiration of Unconditional Love Dr. Steve Young to you... but also his new beloved Sara, a Spiritual Teacher Priestess Shaman Witch extraordinary! When we booked this interview, Steve and Sara hadn't met. Yet the Universe gifted us with not only their own wisdom, but their inner journey of what it took to come Home to Wholeness with their own Aloneness. The inner healing each of them have been on personally led to this exquisite partnering. This conversation will provide you with inspiration to keep showing up knowing the Divine is guiding you every step of the way. We spoke of sharing with children that the ending of a marriage is "making more room for even more love to come in." We spoke of letting go of the 'list' of what our ideal partner will look like... and truly embodying RECEIVING the knowing, the feeling, the most ideal match for not just you, but for humanity with a partner beyond your wildest dreams. For me, many tears were shed in gratitude for these beings who have contributed to the success of my relationship with Chris. I can't wait to shower them with love in support of their exquisite partnership for humanity. AH!!! This is a juicy conversation! You will FEEL what's possible for you. xox --------------------------------- p.s. Take our FREE Assessment. Our Intimacy Blindspot Assessment is a quick, simple yet effective assessment so you can discover how to have the sexual freedom, healthy communication, and deep connection you deserve - https://allanapratt.com/quiz  Gentlemen - End the Fear of Rejection. Enjoy your "How To Be A Noble Badass" Complementary Training at www.GetHerToSayYes.com Ladies - Be irresistible. Feel sacred. Attract him now. Enjoy your "Vulnerability is the New Sexy" Complementary Training at http://allanapratt.com/vulnerability  

4th & Gold Podcast
Rip Off The Band-Aid

4th & Gold Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 87:11


The 49ers are 1-1 in the preseason and Kyle Shanahan is not yet ready to announce his Week 1 starter. Steve Young chimes in on the matter and does not hold back at all. Javi and Fern dissect it all and take your questions. #49ers #NFL --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/4thgold-podcast/support

Damon, Ratto & Kolsky
DRK - Hour 1 - 8.24.21

Damon, Ratto & Kolsky

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 47:26


Ryan Covay, Ray Ratto, and John Dickinson open the show with Trey Lance vs. Jimmy Garoppolo, Steve Young's perspective on the QB battle, the tight NL West race, and more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - David Koenig - Police and Media Question Credibility of Psychics

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 41:28


Baby Lisa Irwin has been missing for two months, but the one-year-old's parents, Deborah Bradley and Jeremy Irwin, continue to maintain that their daughter was kidnapped. Bradley and Irwin have come under fire for failure to cooperate with the Kansas City police department, sparking suspicions that baby Lisa might be dead or that the parents might have been involved. A Dallas psychic, Stephanie Almaguer, made claims on her blog that the missing one-year-old died accidentally in her home and was then dumped in an area resembling the Kansas City location. The self-proclaimed psychic claims she had a vision that Lisa Irwin was buried by a river and a tower. She then posted a drawing of what she saw in her vision. Locals identified parts of the drawing as the region surrounding Sam's Town Casino at Interstate 435 and Highway 210, reported KCTV 5. Kansas City Police Capt. Steve Young told KCTV 5 that the police were aware of Almaguer's reported visions and that, in fact, authorities have been contacted by numerous psychics. However, he claims the information has not been useful and police would not search the former Sam's Town Casino. While police refused to pursue the lead, the public and media sources were quick to consider the tip. Megyn Kelly of Fox News invited Almaguer onto her show in order to discuss her "psychic ability" prior to the abandoned casino's search. The failure of psychics, like Almaguer, to accurately provide information to police calls into question why they repeatedly turn up in the cases of missing people reports. If psychics tend to be unreliable, why do people continue to listen, trust and follow them? Has the seeming hopelessness of Lisa's case lead to the acceptance of all, and any, possible sources of information? Or, is there something greater? ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - David Koenig - Police and Media Question Credibility of Psychics

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 41:28


Baby Lisa Irwin has been missing for two months, but the one-year-old's parents, Deborah Bradley and Jeremy Irwin, continue to maintain that their daughter was kidnapped. Bradley and Irwin have come under fire for failure to cooperate with the Kansas City police department, sparking suspicions that baby Lisa might be dead or that the parents might have been involved. A Dallas psychic, Stephanie Almaguer, made claims on her blog that the missing one-year-old died accidentally in her home and was then dumped in an area resembling the Kansas City location. The self-proclaimed psychic claims she had a vision that Lisa Irwin was buried by a river and a tower. She then posted a drawing of what she saw in her vision. Locals identified parts of the drawing as the region surrounding Sam's Town Casino at Interstate 435 and Highway 210, reported KCTV 5. Kansas City Police Capt. Steve Young told KCTV 5 that the police were aware of Almaguer's reported visions and that, in fact, authorities have been contacted by numerous psychics. However, he claims the information has not been useful and police would not search the former Sam's Town Casino. While police refused to pursue the lead, the public and media sources were quick to consider the tip. Megyn Kelly of Fox News invited Almaguer onto her show in order to discuss her "psychic ability" prior to the abandoned casino's search. The failure of psychics, like Almaguer, to accurately provide information to police calls into question why they repeatedly turn up in the cases of missing people reports. If psychics tend to be unreliable, why do people continue to listen, trust and follow them? Has the seeming hopelessness of Lisa's case lead to the acceptance of all, and any, possible sources of information? Or, is there something greater? ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The Morning Roast with Bonta, Kate & Joe
The Morning Roast - 8/23/21 - Final Hour - Jim Kozimor

The Morning Roast with Bonta, Kate & Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 48:32


Bonta and Shasky react to Steve Young saying Trey Lance should be a starter and speak with the one and only Jim Kozimor. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

For Keeps: A Podcast About Collections And Connections
72. Industrial Musicals, Celebrated by Steve Young

For Keeps: A Podcast About Collections And Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 37:38


Working as a staff writer on "The Late Show with David Letterman," Steve Young began collecting records of industrial musicals — obscure productions commissioned by large companies and performed for their executives or distributors. Since then, he's co-written a book on the subject and starred in "Bathtubs Over Broadway," a touching documentary about his obsession with the shows and their creators. Industrial Musicals, Steve's website: www.industrialmusicals.com "Bathtubs Over Broadway" documentary: www.bathtubsoverbroadway.com Opening theme: "Keepers" by Still Flyin' Closing theme: "Slow Draw/Feeling In My Heart" by Eric Frisch Additional music by Aaron Kenny, Blue Dot Sessions, and Serge Quadrado www.forkeepspodcast.com

The 2-Pt Conversation
Episode 571 - 2021 Preseason Week 1 Recap/ What If? Joe Montana went to the CFL

The 2-Pt Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


Love the NFL? Like to listen to a good conversation? Tune in to superfan and host, Matt Johnson, alongside his team of Andrew Lenz, Brian Finch, Ryan Holt Bailey, Jack and David Talebkhah, Nick Wojton, Walker Fluhart and Jacob Miller, and their takes on the NFL in his football talk podcast, “The 2-pt Conversation” , featuring daily content Monday through Saturday! Matt recaps Week 1 of the Preseason with stats and more, and in the second half of the episode, Matt and Andrew explore a reality where Joe Montana heads to the CFL after Steve Young replaced him as QB1! Find us on the web and social media: BICBP-RADIO.com

Retrologic
Ep 44 - Atari Jaguar, Gameye Printed Materials, Feat. Steve Young

Retrologic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 116:51


RetroLogic - Episode 44   And this week we've got a special guest Steve Young from Certain Affinity with us to talk about…    Today we'll be chatting about … Gameye printed materials Update Nintendo's Indie Direct Steve's development history. RetroLogic isn't just a podcast, It's a retro game store! Visit Retrologic.games to check out our growing inventory of Cleaned, Tested, and 100% Authentic Retro Games! And now Merch!   “Literally Dinosaurs” Icebreaker - what did you buy? And what did you play?   Steve: Death's Door, Horizon Chase Turbo, Drakan: the Ancient's Gates   Sam: Sega Mega Sg! Played: Dokapon Kingdom.  More pokemon Unite, Neo TWEWY, board games John: Wild Arms Reloaded, Metal Slug Anthology wii, House of the Dead 2 and 3 Wii, Risk of Rain 1 and 2, SSX Tricky GC, and Prince of Persia Two Thrones GC Played: Same Stuff   Dan: Donkey Kong Country GBC, Sonic Adventure, Mario & Luigi Superstar Saga. Played Minecraft   The price is RETRO   Steve's list John's list Dan's list Sam's list Flightsy's list Weekly Topics This day in gaming history 21 Years Ago (August 9, 2000) Dreamcast -     Seaman   5 Years Ago (August 9, 2016) PlayStation 4 No Man's Sky Old News Gameye updated to include printed media   Nintendo Indie Direct: - Bomb Rush Cyberfunk - Axiom Verge 2 - Metal Slug Tactics Break   Retro Rewind Our Retro Rewind game for August is Claymates!Available on the Switch NSO app   Question of the week 16bitnomad: Here's a question for everyone…what do you prefer when collecting…games that are CIB or not? Do you prefer games with manuals or without? Or are you a “loose” character who takes carts and discs as they are? I prefer games that are CIB but for NES and N64 I'll collect just the carts. Spotlight Mini interview with Steve about his work.   Outro   Thanks for listening to the RetroLogic Podcast! We are proudly part of the Nintendo Dads family of podcasts. If you like what you hear, check me out on Twitter and Instagram @RetrologicGames. You're also welcome to jump into our friendly and 100% non-toxic Discord Community! The link to that is in my twitter bio. You can also find everything on our website Retrologic.games

Greeny
Hour 2: Bigger Than They're Making It?

Greeny

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 42:30


Melo signs to the Lakers after LeBron calls him up. This is how the NBA works; friends want to play with friends. Greeny isn't sure if this is good or bad. Also, is Bryce Harper over or underrated and should we be more concerned about Dak than what the Cowboys are leading on? Greeny implies this is a bigger deal than what they're suggesting. Plus, HOF quarterback Steve Young joins the show.

HISTORY This Week
Pop Music Pirates

HISTORY This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 32:01


August 14, 1967. Off the coast of England, a group of pirate ships has been fighting to stay afloat. These are pirates of a particular kind—less sword fighting and treasure hunting, more spinning records and dancing late into the night. For the past few years, these boats have made it their mission to broadcast popular music from international waters. But at the stroke of midnight, a new law will make these pirate radio DJs criminals. Some of them, aboard Radio Caroline, are willing to risk it. How did a group of young rebels launch an offshore radio station that gave the BBC a run for its money? And how did they change the course of music history?Special thanks to our guests, former Caroline pirates Nick Bailey, Gordon Cruse, Roger Gale, Patrick Hammerton, Keith Hampshire, Dermot Hoy, Colin Nichol, Paul Noble, Ian Ross, Chris Sandford, and Steve Young. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

BYU Sports Nation
Flip Flops or Thongs?

BYU Sports Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 49:52


Spencer and Jarom are joined by pro football hall-of-famer, Steve Young, to talk all things Zach Wilson and BYU, and chat about something never spoken of before on BYUSN

Time Capsule Show
The Actor's Guide to Hollywood |Entrepreneur | Steve Young | Time Capsule Show Ep. 48

Time Capsule Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 31:17


This week, we chat with acting and accent coach Steve Young! Steve talks to us about how people can best navigate pursuing a career in entertainment, the values you need to succeed in pursuing your passions, and, of course, about what it takes to make a great accent!⁠ ⁠ Please make sure to like, share, and subscribe! Hosts: Joenrhuz T. Producer: Joerenz Bolina Editor: Joerenz Bolina Music: Toby Tranter Follow us on social media! Website: https://www.timecapsuleshow.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tcshow21 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tcshow21 Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/tcshow21 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6TpWc11lh8hwIOksnwER7p?si=yg3chrAjRrGGe_pIMsNlVQ&nd=1 Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/time-capsule-show/id1550413804 DISCLAIMER: The views expressed by our guests are held solely by the guest. We do not endorse or necessarily support the views of our guest but give them the platform to speak.

Gut Check Project
This neuroscientist KNOWS that the gut powers your brain!

Gut Check Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 90:56


Eric Rieger  0:00  Hello gut check project fans and KB MD Health family. I hope you're having a great day. It's your host, Eric Rieger, soon to be joined by my awesome co host, Dr. Kenneth Brown. It's Episode 59. And we have an awesome guest. This is Dr. Kristen Willeumier. She is a neuroscientist. That's right. a neuroscientist. She has groundbait goodness can talk groundbreaking, science driven plan for revitalising nourishing and rejuvenating your most essential asset, your brain. And she is the author of biohack your brain how to boost cognitive health, performance and power. It's essentially the first book to outline a strategy for COVID long hollers including those dealing with neurological issues. So you can see this is going to be an incredible episode. Let's get to our sponsors. Of course, it's artron to go to artron to calm or easy enough. Just go to love my tummy, calm and get your daily polyphenols. Guess what? This neuroscientist Dr. Wilma? Yeah, she says it's a great idea to do it for your brain. Also, we're not even making it up. So head to love my tummy, calm, pick up your own artron to today, not just for yourself, but for your family for your kids. Get them on it, protect them, given the polyphenols that they need daily artron to love nighttime e.com and of course, you can get Incredible Food unrefined bakery.com That's correct, unrefined bakery.com get 20% off of your entire first order. Just by using code, get check. That's the show that you're listening to get check 20% off your entire first order from unrefined bakery. It's incredible food. It's doesn't matter if you're keto, paleo, gluten free. And you're like me, I don't know if I can ever have an awesome tasting muffin again. Guess what they have developed incredible food at unrefined bakery. I don't know why I'm giving y'all such weird pauses in between zone my words, I guess because I'm looking at my notes and we're falling down regardless. last not least go to KB Md health.com kB Md health.com and use code GCP to take 20% off of any order, anytime. from Dr. Chris Brown's CBD or his combo signature packages, you can take 20% off of any order at any time at KB MD health calm. So just so you know is we had an episode number 59. We do an intro several minutes into a discussion with Dr. Willa Meyer. We started recording and just didn't want to lose some of the exchange that we had at the very beginning. So without further ado, here's Episode 59. With Dr. Kristen, will, Mr. neuroscientist.Unknown Speaker  3:10  Oh my god, I had a patient last night who has ulcerative colitis and fainted and just got sent to the hospital. So she's in the hospital as we speak. Her colon is horrific. her brain. When I imaged it, it's it is off the charts anxiety. And so she's sort of the perfect illustration of, you know, the gut brain connection. And was it her anxiety that led to you know, the issues with a colon in the gut? I think so. Because she's very lean and fit and thin and healthy. But I said to her last night, I'm like you need to stay in the hospital, because she didn't she didn't want to stay but she fainted. And her her colon and her. It is it is a scary, you know situation that she's going through and and then I have a patient when I found out about your supplement, who he has horrible gas and bloating. I'm talking horrific. And he follows a lot of the dietary and nutraceutical recommendations. I mean, I've he's been a patient for my god almost a decade. But I'm learning about yourself and I'm like, wait, he needs to try this. So, you know, I was curious about the efficacy and yeah, I mean, I hear I'm like oh, I have questions for you.Ken Brown  4:32  Oh yeah, we'll send you will send you our resorts and all that stuff. And yeah, the whole backstory of that what's really hilarious is because I'm I was going to do the same thing to you. Okay, because I am giving a talk to the ataxia society this Saturday. Oh, wow. I had off the record. I had sort of forgot that I committed to it and yeah, happens to be the person that started this is a very good friend of mine actually was by a med school roommate. That She allowed her to. And so her why now in life is yes, try and help those that have a taxi. And so that's why I applaud her. It's not to let you know it's a small population of people, but it's, you know, horrific for people who are only present. But the beauty is because of your book when talking about the total volume of the cerebellum versus having 50% of the neurons. So the whole talk I'm, I'm, if you don't mind, I wanted to ask before I do this, I would like to quote you in the book and sure, do some stuff and put it in the talk specifically, I would love for sure your supplements and your brain health diet and all that other stuff,Unknown Speaker  5:43  I would be honoured. And the beautiful thing about the book, you know, sometimes people ask me why I wrote it. It's like, you know, there's brain health books out there there. People know about supplements, you can go on the internet, but I am, I am blown away by what I have seen using neuroimaging. So it's like the book was really guided by what we've seen clinically with imaging. And as you saw, when you read in the book, you There was a time I didn't believe in supplements, like, Oh, my God, these really weren't yet right there. Right. Yeah. It's, it's, it's amazing. So I think, you know, probably both you and I, when you're in the profession, and you actually, you can look up all the research papers in the world. But when you see the changes in patients, and you see it, the measurable changes, whether it's imaging or whether it's your labs that you do you know, I'm a huge fan, so So, yes, please go quote, I'm happy to help you, you can email me if you have any questions.Ken Brown  6:49  I love that. Because I think that when I read your book, I was like, holy cow, we are speaking the same language here. Yeah. And the whole gut brain thing. And you know, what we should do is what that will just flow into this. Because Yeah, I think you're giving away a lot already kind of talking about everything. So here's what we're gonna do. I'm gonna Eric introduce you, but the podcast actually started about six minutes ago. Perfect. So if you're tuning in now, rewind it and do this. SoEric Rieger  7:23  a very late introduction. This is taken away, Eric. Thank you. And this is episode number 59 of the gut check project. And if you've tuned in now, you've heard an awesome guest. This is Dr. Kristen Willem your she is a neuroscientist and she created this awesome book that that will actually she wrote this awesome book that Browns been holding up here. This is biohack your brain.Ken Brown  7:49  Yay. And look how much handsomer I am with the book over my face. I love it. Okay, yeah. colour. Colour coordinated to the book as well, which I love.Eric Rieger  8:05  Definitely, he definitely has. And basically this is biohack your brain and it's how to boost cognitive health performance and power. The first book to outline a strategy for COVID long hauls, including those dealing with neurological issues, cognitive decline, and brain fog. For years. Dr. William year has worked alongside with Dr. Daniel Amen. Rahman. Amen. Amen. who published over 30 books 70 articles just to just to prove the importance of brain health. Dr. Christian, William, your thank you so much for joining us on the gundry project. And I mean, what an awesome this is the probably one of the most unique coolest kickoffs of any podcast we've had yet. Amen. Amen. Amen.Unknown Speaker  8:52  Well, well, first of all, thank you, too, both of you for inviting me to come on the podcast. I love talking to all things brain health, and gut health. And truth be told, I am a huge fan of gut health. I think brain health begins in the gut and it begins with every single item of food that you are putting into your mouth. Now, Eric gave a lovely introduction and I I should also share with your listening audience. So my background, I was the director of research for psychiatric clinic, outpatient psychiatric clinic, and I ran their clinical neuro imaging department. And so I have seen 1000s of brain scans are, by the time I left the clinic, we had over 130,000 scans. Why I love taking care of your gut and gut health is in psychiatry. One of the foundational principles we have whether we're addressing ATD ADHD, autism, anxiety, depression, OCD, PTSD, by Polar issues, the first thing we have to do is work on the eating patterns. What are the things that you are putting in your mouth? Because a lot of these psychiatric issues have inflammatory components. And where does inflammation start? in the gut? Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding. That's right. So it's really such a pleasure to come here and speak with experts today, you know, in this field, and we can have a nice sort of melding of the minds of things that you've done things that we've done to really help support people's long term health.Eric Rieger  10:35  Well, I was fired up whenever can ask if I mean, we always talk about guests we're going to bring on in. And we've been really fortunate to have some some awesome ones. But essentially, when he brought up your name, we began to delve into it the we've talked about gut brain access for real really since episode one.Ken Brown  10:54  Yeah, it's just I thinkEric Rieger  10:57  it's Cornerstone as aKen Brown  10:58  gastroenterologist. So Alright, so let me tell you a little bit about how I found you. Oh, wait, love. Okay, please. Oh, my family is a tennis family. But and I mean, like tennis family like the family is in Florida right now playing and clay court nationals, I got both my daughter and my son doing it. And we got into this huge discussion with Naomi Osaka and the French Open, said that she was going to just sit out because the anxiety of doing the press conferences and all this stuff. So it became it became a dinner table discussion with my family, because the pressures that go on with the individual sports and this and that, and so I like I do, I'm like, oh, man, I gotta like help my kids. So let's up. How do I biohack sports performance and a PDF of somebody that did this interview with the Montana State Bobcat magazine. Like, this is a great article, and I didn't read your name until the very end, you know, you know, the interview performed by Kristen Wilmore. And I was like, Who is that? look you up and I'm like, holy cow. She's got a book called biohack. Your brain just came out. I'm all about edit all about working with professional athletes. And so then that turned into I actually have a very close friend Jr, who played for the San Francisco 40 Niners for 12 years and was, was the NFL player representative for CTE for a few years. And he's still works with Steve Young, and he had his he had his zoom 50th birthday party not too long ago, and the whole, there was like 40 people on there, and it was just Hall of Famers all over. So I called Jr. And I was like, dude, you should have done this whole aim. inclement thing. And oh, yeah,Unknown Speaker  12:43  yeah. It's I'm still taking care of football players from I started back in 2009. You know, where we did our work with the first 100 players. But my God, we've had hundreds of players come in, and I've watched them over the course of time, some of them are getting better. Now, unfortunately, if you play collision based sport, and you don't really proactively take care of your brain health, you know, some of them now have ALS, Alzheimer's disease at younger ages than we see in the general population. So we start to expect to see these diseases of ageing and your sixth decade of life, seventh decade of life, but in the professional athletes, we're seeing them in their fifth decade of life. And the reason why it's not surprising and this sort of goes into my background as a neurobiologist was sort of the first 10 years of my career, I'm in the academic setting. And I'm a neurobiologist, studying things at the level of the single cell and working in Parkinson's and understanding how neurons communicate with one another, and also having a great concept of synaptic plasticity, right. We read about it in the literature, but I've actually watched my beautiful neurons make contacts with their neighbours, it's, it's really extraordinary when you have the the perspective of what synaptic plasticity is, and and the ability of these beautiful neurons, one single neuron in our central nervous system can make between 10,000 to 40,000 connections. And that's 86 billion neurons we have.Ken Brown  14:18  I just want to clarify one thing. So like when you we hear about this like, and there's been a lot of discussion about neuroplasticity. Huberman has his podcast and people are talking about it. Could you just define that?Unknown Speaker  14:31  Yeah, neural plasticity is just the ability of a neuron to make additional connections with its neighbours. So what As I was saying, one neuron can extend a branch out dentre and dendritic branch out and connect with other neurons. And the way that we sort of increase our brain capacity over time is to be able to make as many of those connections as we can. This is why as we get older, this concept of synaptic play density or neuro plasticity is just the ability of, again, a single neuron to continue making branches. And how does that happen? That happens when we learn new information. That's why it's so important to continue to learn as we age, because that's how we grow these connections. Other ways to grow new connections is through exercise. But I like the new learning piece. Because the one thing that people don't realise, and I know I tell a lot of these fun little I call them fun facts, but they're really important. Because the brain reaches full maturity around the age of 2530. After the age of 40, our brain volume, right starts to decrease about 5% per decade. So your brain volume can get smaller. And you know, that's one thing that could concern people, but it the synaptic plasticity can continue on throughout life. So that's why, you know, there's certain interventions we can do to help maintain brain volume, which is where the exercise is important. omega three fatty acids are really important. And then there's things we can do to help maintain synaptic plasticity so that we retain our memories, you know, and we have the ability to live and be centenarians and still be happy, like Betty White, who I love bringing up because the woman is 99 years old, actually, she she comes and visits people in the building that I live in here in Los Angeles. And she's beautiful, right? So I see her often. She just turned 99. And she thanked her agent, because her agent continues to give her scripts and continues to get her job. So this is a woman who is still memorising scripts at age 99. So that's somebody who is able to retain her memory. So when people who were in their 60s are like, Oh, I forget where I put things. She's actually working her memory consistently because it's a part of her job. So this is something that all of us just need to remember to do. Maybe we should all start memorising scripts, or grocery list or memory.Ken Brown  17:11  I thought you wanted to be I thought you you wanted us to become an actress. I didn't know. We've already been told that we have faces for radio. Oh, that's right. Oh my gosh. So I heard I digress. No, I love what you're saying there because the new synapses. One of the coolest, Michael Pollan, and you quoted him in his book, The I don't remember all the books he's done, but he did did a series on he just came out with a new book about some anyways, how plants interact with our synapses and stuff. He quote, he said something that kind of made sense what you're talking about, he goes, it's been described that if you imagine a, a hill, that guts that had snow on it, everybody starts to sled on it, if you if you go down enough times, eventually makes a groove. And then you sat in that groove. And by doing certain things, you need to lay some new snowdown so that you can find a new path. And that's kind of what you're describing.Unknown Speaker  18:15  That's what new learning is. It's creating new paths. And then we're, I apologise if you're hearing the lovely fire. Can you hear the fire trucks out there?Ken Brown  18:28  It's la bursting in your door, we're gonna we're gonna raise the bond money for youUnknown Speaker  18:33  might actually hear the Sons of Anarchy out there as well, sometimes. motorcycle gangsKen Brown  18:39  are a little different right now. We didn't quite have the effect in LA in New York. Yeah.Unknown Speaker  18:46  But no, he's absolutely correct. It's, you know, in neuroscience, we have this phrase neurons that fire together, wire together. And it's the circuits that get repeated the things that we do every day, the thoughts that we think the the information that we take in whether we're reading or learning something new, it's all our brain is a dynamic organ that is continuing to grow and change every single second with every input that we get light sound, what we read, right, what comes in through our visual centres, everything. So part of why I wrote this book is to make us more consciously aware of the things that are in our environment that are impacting our health and our well being and our brain health. And because most people want to figure out how to retain their memories as they age, that was another reason for the book. But really the biggest reason you you noted it is working with the athletes who are really struggling with brain issues at very early ages. And the fact that we saw we could restore brain function through various Simple dietary and lifestyle modifications that anybody listening to this podcast could do. I mean, there's, you know, we've got all the bells and whistles in the clinical setting the neurofeedback, the current transcranial magnetic stimulation, the hyperbaric oxygen therapies, you've got the IV therapies. But even doing all of those, everybody still has to do the lifestyle piece. And that's as important, as all of these other technologies that we have that for some people could be cost prohibitive, which is why I, you know, I put those things more towards the back of the book, but we can still talk about them, because a hyperbaric oxygen chamber can actually revascularize the brain. So you can grow new new vasculature. And if you think about participating in a collision based sport, like football, now, I was an equestrian. So I spent 10 years showing horses falling off of horses. So when I speak about working with athletes, they're very much I'm very connected with them, because I've had my fair share of head impacts. The difference being in football, you know, they've put accelerometers inside the helmets. And I've studied how many impacts football players are taking in high school in college. So on average, do you want to take a guess? This is kind of fun. Since I have you too. I'm going to average so guess the average number of impacts a high school football player is having per season,Eric Rieger  21:37  I would imagine it's gonna be a few 1000. I don't know though.Unknown Speaker  21:39  It's actually lower. So it's around 650. So per season. And then college is about 1300. So then, if you're talking about a football player who's played four years of high school, four years of college, you're getting about 8000 impacts. But then you've got the G force.Ken Brown  22:02  So that so the impact is now you've got bigger, stronger people. So the impact is much greater at the college level.Unknown Speaker  22:11  at the college level, exactly. So the average g force in high school is around 28 G's per impact. So you can say anywhere between 10 and impact could be as low as whatever note 10 G's as high as 150 G. So they're lower impact and high school in college, they were averaging around 68 G's.Unknown Speaker  22:33  Yeah,Eric Rieger  22:34  I got a quick question on that. I think that long ago, I heard that. Not only is obviously the increase in the impact, obviously can be more damaging, but the sheer repetitive nature of it itself is quite damaging. Even if it happens to just be over and over again, it's kind of like water torture,Unknown Speaker  22:54  you hit the nail on the head. So that's the biggest issue. It's the repetitive sub concussive impacts that are damaging the individual cells. So you get the shearing and the tearing of the axons and the cells. And they now need the time to, you know, restore back to, you know, sort of try to get back to normal function. And, of course, if you're playing a game where football players are hitting, you know, every play of the game, the lineman might have three or four impacts per play. There was a paper that came out that actually not only measured the number of impacts, but measured the linear and rotational forces. And it was I think, across both high school and college, the average linear acceleration in G forces was 188,000, g forces to the very delicate neurons in your brain, the rotational acceleration was over 3 million, like radians per second squared. So you know, somebody can go through a whole High School and collegiate career and maybe not have a diagnosed concussion, because the concussion is just a temporary alteration of mental status after an impact to the head or chest with or without the loss of consciousness. So, you know, 10% of the people might have, you know, a loss of consciousness or amnesia, but they recover quite quickly. But it's all those repetitive sub concussive impacts that you're talking about Eric that are causing the damage at the level of the neurons that are then causing the tauopathy. That's what the chronic traumatic encephalopathy is, it's just a tauopathy right, an accumulation of this misfolded abnormally folded tau protein phosphorylated tau protein, they're starting to see it first stage one CTS in the frontal lobes. And that shouldn't be surprising because football players hit the front part of their head right? The that's why they're spacey at first in the frontal lobes then stage two gets into the temporal lobes. And some parietal lobe stage three gets into the deeper cortical structures like the amygdala, hippocampus and Toronto cortex. And then stage four is now getting into the brainstemEric Rieger  25:12  changed since then, but I mean, I can remember playing and you didn't know to complain, unless, you know, unless you're injured, you know, Are you injured? Are you hurt? And that was kind of the, the thought process, you know, almost 30 years ago was to make certain that you don't complain unless you actually could show an injury. But nobody was really doing anything about brain injury that at that point in time, and I know that it's improved somewhat, but unless I'm falling down and throwing up or they feel like the spots, nobody ever stopped,Unknown Speaker  25:45  you probably went back in the game after you throw up because I've watched you watch men play sports, rugby, it's like, Okay, I'm ready to go back. And plus, you have the adrenaline. I mean, I. So I was a competitive show jumper, I had several horses, one of my horses was a thoroughbred, off the racetrack, and I the fences, I would jump were four foot three, four foot nine. And I would race at them. I mean, I was a crazy, sort of, I was a maverick, I loved it. So I and I've fallen off hundreds of times. The differences, you know, the differences with football, that's a game where the impacts are coming. You know, you've got repetitive impacts on every play. Well, you may not you may only play 12 or 14 or 16 games a season. It's also the practice games. So you if you start to read the papers and say sometimes there's 95, practice games, and then 12 games in your season. So that's actually a lot of impacts that are happening. Now. You know, I don't I don't know what is going to happen with football. And there are certainly people who you know, have an extended career. I mean, we've worked with players, one of the players that was in our study, played 12. So he went to UCLA defensive lineman, his name's Fred McNeil. He played for the Minnesota Vikings was a first round draft pick, I believe pick number 17. Played 12 seasons on the Vikings played in a Super Bowl, they never won. When he left the NFL, he went to law school, I can't remember where he went. He went to law school, graduated valedictorian of his class, then became a partner in his law firm. So here's somebody who, right high school, I think he had a 22 year lifetime, sort of risk of from playing football, so 22 years in the game, but still was able to go to law school afterwards. It was clearly really smart. At the age of 57, is when he came in to our study, and he just came in to see what his brain look like. And when we did the brain imaging, the scan showed Frontotemporal dementia. So we saw low blood flow in the frontal lobe and the temporal lobes, he did not know he had that. But he knew he was struggling with depression, he was having memory issues, but he was still working. So then we sent him to the neurologist worked with him for seven years, he ended up getting diagnosed with ALS, and passing away at the age of 63. The reason why I share his story is he's the illustration of somebody can play football, and then have a 20 year 25 year period where they're just living their life. And then all of a sudden, you have the degenerative disease hit quickly. And we know you know in the world of neurology and neuroscience and neuroimaging, we know degenerative changes happen in the brain 1520 years at the cellular level before you have a symptom. So that's what's happening with the players. It's just happening earlier, which is why I think anybody who plays a collision baseboard should be on a brain health protocol. And that's just about being really mindful about the foods you eat. You know, I really wouldn't recommend drinking a lot of alcohol. It's not great for the brain. I mean, there, there's a lot of very intuitive things, and I talked about that in the book. But you have to be serious about it if you don't want to spend your 6/7 or eighth decade of life dealing with these issues. And because I was in a psychiatric clinic, we also worked with the underlying psychiatric problems, right? That they have a greater risk of depression and anxiety. So getting those things treated, is really helpful, and sort of having a better quality of life.Ken Brown  29:38  So I just want to say this. After reading the book, I want to eat your brain right now. Because what you're talking about is so cool. But in your book, you do a step wise process to prevent this from happening. So anybody that's listening, even if you're not into the science that we're going to get into because it's it's it's beautiful. Well, I think that the, that when a neuroscientist like yourself comes from a background of research and you, you're wise to protect the brain. And my why actually, and we've talked about this is if I had one goal that I can do in my lifetime would be to prevent dementia. And the reason is, is that I believe that memories have no price, I would prefer to buy a memory than buy a thing. And I gotta teach my kids this that yes. And so as we live our life, if those memories get stolen from you, in my mind, that is, that is a life wasted in your own mind, although it isn't for the others around you, but in your own mind. So if I could do one thing, and what we are seeing in my world is gastroenterologist is that when we see Alzheimer's, dementia and Parkinson's, present with gut issues 20 years before.Unknown Speaker  30:53  So you see the 20 year language, you see the 20 year note you saw, and I wrote about this in my book, my father ended up having Parkinson's. And you will appreciate this. And I didn't really go into it in the book, but you know, he, so he's a combat helicopter pilot in Vietnam, two tours, but exposed to Agent Orange. And then was a pilot for Pan American. So of course, there's all of the exhaust and things that you're exposed to and was a fireman. But my dad six for healthy, lean fit, no issues, no Parkinson's in our family, no psychiatric issues in our family. So I found it interesting about the age of 50 is when the tremor started coming on. You know, he was diagnosed later in his 70s and then passed away at 78. But he ate very healthy My dad was one of those people who is juicing and clean eating, I feel the glyphosate, whatever, the roundup whatever's in the Agent Orange, I feel my dad's issues really stem from that. And that all eradicates the healthy bacteria in your gut. And so I really for him, I feel environmental exposure was, you know, predominant in his parkinsonian issues. And, you know, I'm, I'm really about how do we help people live their healthiest life. And in the book I go into when it comes to food, I really talked about the Mediterranean diet with a plant based, sort of, they call it plant predominant, you know, it's, I still would allow for people to have meat, but really when I was working with the player, so I talked about running a brain directed weight loss group for football players, which is really quite comical, because when, when Dr. Ayman said I was doing that I thought he was crazy. I'm like, these guys are elite athletes, they already know how to work out be lean, but they actually weren't lean. When we were working with them, some of them work because they were active players. And some of them were older, so I had to get them slim. So it would help their brain health because we know excess inflammation in the body damages the brain and we publish research on that. But where does the information come from? It comes from the food. And it comes in the gut. And this is such a great teaching moment. And I'm here because I would love to learn from you. I mean, the meat What can I just ask you? What is your stance on me?Ken Brown  33:37  My staff. So I've tried to be open minded about everything. And it's like all things. So when game changers came out on Netflix, yeah, like that's it. I'm all plant based. I'm going to be an elite athlete and I did the stupid thing which was I tried to do the meat substitutes and stuff like that, which I didn't possible burger. I didn't even well not that but whatever it was, I mean, and so then I realised that in there so I'm a big I'm gluten intolerant and didn't realise that they use gluten as fillers all sort of stuff. So that was I Eric will laugh at this pretty much everything I do I will just dive into an obscene levels now pretty much.Eric Rieger  34:23  Pretty much that's just the male brain I applaud that.Ken Brown  34:28  They come out with these scars be like don't do that. But like don't do it that way. I actually believe the way that I try to eat is mostly I'm okay with me. I tried to do grass fed grass finished beef. brasco originally, so it would My my, my dad would roll over in his grave. He was actually a butcher so it would be difficult to actually deny.Unknown Speaker  34:56  a butcher Okay, I find okay. This is really fascinating. Your dad was a butcher and your gastroenterologist, and you read books like The China Study, which talk about the inflammatory nature of meat, and how it can release the bacterial endotoxins in your gut, and that can be inflammatory. So do you recommend that people keep meat down to one meal per day? limited to once per week.Ken Brown  35:31  So this is a great jumping off point and spotlight off me real quick, because one of the things I loved in your book was chapter one was pretty much or maybe it was chapter two, where you're like, if I can ask you to do one thing, it's quit eating processed food. Yep. Yeah. So yes, I'm the same way. So when you say what do you tell your patients I, I struggle with? Let's avoid high fructose corn syrup, and saturated fatty acids. Let's get rid of those emulsifiers everything that you talked in your book? Yeah, that's hard enough to do. That's people doing that. So once you get into the it's like, a comedian was joking about it. He's like, yeah, my, my trainer neighbour was saying, maybe you're eating too much fruit as I was eating a doughnut, like, that's the problem.Unknown Speaker  36:19  Right? The more fruit gets thrown out. And I'm like, No, you need the fruit. My God, you we need the antioxidants. As you know, in your supplement, which is polyphenols, right, we need our brain needs antioxidants, we need them from the diet, I feel it's the number one way to help preserve your long term brain health. Because the there's such a delicate balance between free radical production in the brain and antioxidant capacity. And free radicals are produced just by you know, metabolism. So we need to make sure our diet in our diet every single day, we're getting antioxidants. And I sort of made when I taught the Mediterranean diet to the football players and the patients in our psychiatric setting, it was very prescriptive. And I outlined the prescriptive nature of it in the book I I should have gone into it in more detail because people really seem to like it. But I make it like a pilot's checklist with people. And I just say, Hey, here's the things that I want you to get into your diet every day. We can modify, you know, if you're loving me, you know, well, meat can be inflammatory. And people, I'm going to find a really creative way, because I want them to stick with it for a lifetime. So I have a really sort of fun way of doing upgrades, but making it work for them. But the I really had a checklist for people, it was like, you know, three green leafy vegetables per day check, you know, one orange, red or yellow vegetableKen Brown  37:52  that was that was your adaption to the it's the mediterr.Unknown Speaker  37:56  It's the Mediterranean diet.Ken Brown  37:59  But but this is but this was your adaption when, in the part of the book where you said, This is my brain health diet. And yeah, you're saying that it's the Mediterranean with a checklist, youUnknown Speaker  38:10  I gave it sort of in a prescriptive way. So people knew, you know, because like you said, everybody's unique, and they have the things that they love. And if you make it too difficult, they're just not going to do anything. And so sometimes the initial barter was, you know, if I was trying to limit somebody drinking too much coffee, and I talked about coffee in the book, because coffees a vasoconstrictor. And in the brain imaging world, we don't want to cause too much vasoconstriction. So I would make a barter, I'd say for every cup of coffee, I'd love for you to do a fresh green juice. And I would actually make it or I have, you know, sometimes they come in the clinic if I'm teaching it to a group of patients and be like, here, here's what it tastes like. You got to make it fun and accessible. So that's what I would do with following the diet. The The point being I need to get more clean, healthy nutrients in and let's try to get some of those processed foods and sugars and the things that you're very sort of used to eating out. AndKen Brown  39:15  while I was just gonna say that what's interesting when you say used to eating as zero scientist, we know that if you look at the food industry, they hire very intelligent scientists to make junk food work on your brain. I've met with food chemists, I met them. Oh, yeah. Can you expand on that?Unknown Speaker  39:35  Well, I just when we were designing supplements, sometimes you you know, you meet with people who are hired for that specific reason. And what do people love fat, sugar, salt, you know, it's very easy to put all of those things into, you know, a packaged food that's gonna sit on the shelf for however, you know, however long to be on the shelf, one of the most important things I would teach people, if anything, sometimes you just got to get down to the basics, right? Because if I can help somebody change one bad habit, we're already going to make progress. You know, sometimes my, the one habit that I would have everybody do is change how much the amount of fluids they were consuming in water. That's why I actually dedicate one chapter to water. It is so important. And I have my glass right here, you know, cheers. It's, you know, before food, sometimes I think the hydration piece is the piece that always gets lost. And when I made people chart there, how much water they were drinking, this was so fun. As a scientist, I charted everything, because I can't help somebody change something if I don't know what you're doing. And you might say, Oh, yeah, I drink enough water. And I'm like, Oh, I bet you don't. So let's, let's track how much water you're drinking and make sure you're drinking the right amount. And I would we, in my groups that I taught, I would say, let's not drink our calories. So let's get rid of all the juices, the sodas, let's just do water. And it's amazing how people who love soda, if that was the only thing they got rid of in one year, they could easily lose 20 pounds. So for me, for Burbank brain health perspective, if I'm getting you to just drink clean water every day with even if it's from your tap with a filter, fantastic. Let's get it out of a plastic bottle, because the BPA you know, from the plastics are not going to be great for your gut health. Number one, let alone your brain health. So let's try to have it in a glass. And, you know, I talk about I now get water bottled water, you know, that's actually a hyper oxygenated and slightly alkaline, I mean, you know, I can't help myself being in this field, you sometimes know too much. So you're going to go for the best. But I clean up the water, I try to get more of the green juicing in, because we know how important vegetables are. And if somebody just does not want to have a vegetable, a lot of times I can get them to do a fresh green juice that has lots of great enzymes. And you know, and we can get fruit in there. So I was really working on how do I unwind some of the really destructive habits that people just do repeatedly, you know, multiple times a day over the course of weeks, months, years, that are not really serving you. And that was I think that was the fun part of teaching those groups. It's like, Oh, my God, I Wow. And not only do I change their habits, then they're dropping weight like crazy. That's why I put a bunch of stories in there about people that had lost over 100 pounds. With me not. That's not even my area of expertise. And it was just happening becauseKen Brown  42:47  I mean your areas to change habits, which is changing brain, that'sUnknown Speaker  42:52  my area, my area of expertise is brains and brain imaging. But I you know, it was this really fascinating experience of watching people change their diet and very quickly lose weight. And seeing people who were in their 50s and 60s who didn't even think they could lose 10 pounds, lose 60 pounds in a year. Like, wow, I just shifted a few things in your diet, you just you I'm a cheerleader, probably like you. So I get really excited for people success. So I'm sure there was a synergy between myself and the players and the patients I work with and the you know, let's help you clean up the foods you're eating. And you know why they're important, especially because everybody that I work with, you know, to psychiatric clinic, we're also working to improve their mood. And the only way we can do that is by cleaning up those foods. Right, bringing the saturated fats down trying to bring down the saturated animal fats, bringing in more of the mono and polyunsaturated right healthy fats from plants and marine based, you know, omega threes and just it's about fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, Whole Foods. It's not hard.Eric Rieger  44:09  I got a quick question for you. Yeah, mentioned the green juice. Yes. And the you've mentioned also a few times that there may be technologies that may not have access because of cost. And for some people even time, right, you've mentioned green juice a couple of times what was an ideal green juice for someone to make at home.Unknown Speaker  44:28  I love that. You know I mentioned green juice so much I started doing it 20 years ago. So I'm 4848 Now, every single day I've done some kind of green juice. Now I throw beets in it as well because I think it's an easy way to get a red you know something red in there. But I tell people just think green you know the base is typically celery or cucumber. And then you add kale, parsley, spinach edge, all throw in. I love pear So I put in a boss pair sometimes I put an apple in, sometimes they put a red bead in. The reason why I mentioned it is not only is it hydrating, so I drink usually 32 ounces of juice. So this morning, I start my day with two eight ounce glasses of water. The first is a water is clean water the second I usually put a little lemon in, then I do my juice, which is 32 ounces. So I you know the hydration is really how I like to start my day. And I feel that the juicing over time and I'm asking you the gastroenterologist and I've read about this, I'm actually priming my gut with these very healthy, nourishing enzyme rich fluids because the polyphenols and the vitamins and the nutrients that are in the greens are critical for your gut health and every single food you eat. Correct is helping to populate either good or bad bacteria. Dr. Brown?Ken Brown  46:04  Yes. Read in your book when I told my patients to do this. And they said, What do you mean by green? I'm like, I don't know if it's green. Just do it. And so then they were like I'm doing green m&ms. I'm doing green Skittles with thisUnknown Speaker  46:16  Skittles.Ken Brown  46:16  So maybe I should have looked more into what you meant by the greens. Thank you for asking that question, Eric. Yeah, IEric Rieger  46:22  just wanted to set you straight because I knew this was a problem.Ken Brown  46:25  My patients were gaining weight, and they're just like, I'm like, so what are you doing now? They're like, I do one sprig of spinach, one sprig of kale and green m&m.Eric Rieger  46:33  Yeah, I was doing today. green juice out of a sour patch. And I got diabetes. Yeah.Unknown Speaker  46:40  I'm coming after you, Dr. Brown. Yeah. You know what, I had fun having the football players do it, they all the coolest thing about working with pro athletes is they will do anything you tell them. And because they trust me, so I'm like, Come on, guys, here's what we're going to do, right, to get them to lose weight, I had to the volume of food that they were eating each day was around 4500 calories. So first of all, we're, you know, we're not at training table anymore. So you know, bring that down. And I did sort of the creative thing where, you know, if you can keep your meals from 500 calories, you know, if you can, you can have a burrito, that's 2000 calories. That's, that's a whole day's worth of calories in one meal. So I would creatively say, hey, whatever you're eating at noon, let's cut it in half and have your first part at noon, I say, you can have your second part at 130. If you're still hungry, and I did that at dinner, I said dinner, you can have your dinner, whatever at seven, and then at 815, if you're still hungry, you can have the other half. So you have to get I just had so much fun being creative with how in all my players were losing weight, so players were losing weight. And my mentor was like you're teaching this in our psychiatric clinic, I'm like I am okay. And it just kept going. It was this really beautiful. Because watching people change their foods, their bodies change, I knew their brain health would change for the better. And then we used the nutraceuticals. For the for the pro athletes, really to help support blood flow to the brain boost certain neurotransmitters, right? that are really important in memory. Because most people don't realise after the age of 40 is when our neurotransmitters, systems, we don't tend to make as many and that's how we start getting diseases like Parkinson's, that's the dopamine, you know, system is not functioning as optimally as it could and, you know, all simers, you know, we're talking about acetylcholine. So, you know, I mentioned in my book, you know, everyone over the age of 40 would probably be smart to take a whole food multivitamin, just for your brain health. So there was a nutraceutical component here. That was again very helpful for the players, but the goal being to really help improve perfusion to the brain and, you know, help to you know, omega three fatty acids, for example, are really important in building the cells, the neurons in your brain and for that synaptic plasticity, you need to have the building blocks which are in the omega three fatty acids.Ken Brown  49:25  Yeah, and in your book you do a fantastic job of describing these are your basics. This is the the first line startingUnknown Speaker  49:32  lineup starting Yeah, kind of made it a fun word analogy, like starting lineup where you know, here six, basic nutraceuticals pretty much everybody can take them. You know, I always tell people run this by your doctor. I mean, I was the director of nutrition in nutraceuticals. So not only was I responsible for helping to create and study the efficacy of these products using brain imaging, but I worked with our psychiatric A population who is trying to get off of medications and using nutraceuticals as a way to support their, you know, manage anxiety, depression add. So this is why I really became a fan of them because I saw how effective they could be. And if we could do a nutraceutical approach versus a medicine that has more side effects. A nutraceutical approach is sort of a wiser way to go. But then you started to see, okay, here's your starting lineup, the basics everybody could do, I did what I call all star team. So if you want to take your nutraceuticals to the next level, here's, you know, five other things that I think are really important. And then what I did what I call the injured reserve, which is, these are the nutraceuticals, we use for patients with brain imaging, or I'm sorry, with brain injuries, or say you had chemotherapy, and you have chemo brain, you know, or we're working on, you've had a toxic exposure, too much alcohol, these are the things that can help to restore blood flow to the brain.Ken Brown  51:06  What I loved about it is that you addressed initially, that you understood that people may not have the resources to get these, right to get these supplements. And then in addition to that, at each end of the paragraph, this is what you need to look for in the supplement which was awesome. Also, I was gonna do this. Yeah, look for GMP look for this, you if you're going to get a fish oil, look for the symbol for non mercury and this and that, that was beautiful. so that people can do their homework and not just walk into target, and go, Oh, this is what I'm going to grab our Walmart or whatever, and I'm right. But um, you know,Unknown Speaker  51:40  thank you for that. It's, you know, it's really hard. You walk into a whole foods and you have just sort of the shelves that are lined with nutraceuticals. And you just don't know, what do I take? What don't I take the you ask the person there who's working there? Hey, which one's good? And I because I've seen how these things work in our patients and know the levels. You know, it's very nuanced. And, you know, prior to being in the brain imaging space, I you know, I wasn't really using nutraceutical so I have a very, I really appreciate how they work in the brain. And a consistent use of certain nutraceuticals over time can really support brain health. And I think more people, even those who are on the fence. I've watched some doctors who work more in that sort of traditional medic Western medical world who I know a lot of them still aren't on the nutraceutical bandwagon. But I've seen the older doctors who are in their 70s or 80s, pretty much everybody starts taking a nutraceutical at some point for their joints. I mean, omega three fatty acids and our NFL population when we started just giving them they had a minimum of two grammes of fish oil per day, they started to have less joint pain. Because omega threes are anti inflammatory. They're like, Wow, I didn't even know that. So it's some of these little things that I think are really very valuable.Ken Brown  53:14  Absolutely. There's one thing that I do want because I need your help on this. Yes. After reading your book, so I'm a I'm a morning habit person, and I'm an evening habit person. Yes. And my OCD wife nuts that I will do the same thing, which well,Unknown Speaker  53:31  really, I would think she'd like that as a person of ritual.Ken Brown  53:34  ritual. It's how I how I end the ritual that bothers her. So for instance, I have tea every night, I've candle meal tea, but I hate enormous Amazon mug, and I will make it and I will sit and after a long day and we'll try and watch some TV. And inevitably I'll start dozing off and she'll fall asleep. Just go to bed and I will drink about this most of the tea. And then she gets mad at me. She's like, you waste all this to you after reading your book. I'm like, No, no, no, no, no. Dr. William, you're said after a night of sleeping, you have not had anything to drink. That's when I'm going to get up. That's why I make it so I can wake up and then I chugged my tea in the morning. So that's where I start my hydration process. You do i do do the Kevin meal tea in the morning as well. I do that. Not a health reason. But just because I don't want to be yelled up on the wife. I love eventually I will drink that.Unknown Speaker  54:27  I love how she's like, okay, we're gonna make sure all of this tea gets drunk, do not fall asleep and not finish that tea. And I love it that it works very well for you as a sleep aid.Ken Brown  54:39  Well, I think working really hard throughout the day, we're probably well, you know,Unknown Speaker  54:45  I'm so coming from psychiatry, like more than 50% of people need help with sleep. It's just such a common thing. I was like, oh, it really works well for you. You're just exhausted. But they came a meal teas probably helping toKen Brown  54:59  say Hearing scientists and writing books and everything you just fall asleep. Yeah.Unknown Speaker  55:06  tell you something in our household. My husband is the real sensitive sleeper. He was super like, wakes up. He can wake up with me breathing like I could breathe too loud. He's like, Uh huh. And I fall asleep anywhere and everywhere. It's like a full shutdown.Ken Brown  55:23  You know, what I think is going on with your husband that maybe you could comment that is okay. Your book? I believe? He has a large amygdala. Oh, yes. He probably. Yes, that chapter on that. And the whole amygdala thing, because I have Eric. We watched free solo with Alex hormone huddled hahnel. Three. Oh, have you seen free solo? No. Oh my gosh. Oh, my gosh. Oh, my gosh. Okay. So basically, it's a movie about a guy who climbed El Capitan, with no gear at all, totally free solo.Eric Rieger  56:05  He does it all the time.Ken Brown  56:06  First person ever do it, and he just completely. But what was amazing is that he fell one time and it was a documentary. So his friend was, Oh, my, they didn't, you're gonna love this. They did an MRI on him. And they found that he has a little tiny amygdala, I no fear. No fearUnknown Speaker  56:23  can probably if I'm probably impulsive, like there's that in our frontal lobes, you know, I think having a lower frontal lobe function might make you more impulsive and more of a risk taker. We see that with firefighters and police officers. I mean, what, what sane human being wants to run into a burning building like my father or, you know, be a chopper pilot in Vietnam? And, you know, yeah, I'm just going to go down and, you know, drop some people out picks up people, or a police officer or a free climber who has no gear and feels perfectly comfortable in that position. Somebody who, well feels very, you know what, that's somebody who does not fear deathKen Brown  57:09  100% now? Uh huh. So he's a complete, unique individual. But in her book, you described how cortisol affects the amygdala can you get into that a little bit?Unknown Speaker  57:21  Well, and how cortisol affects our brain, in general, my God, too much cortisol. So we have glucocorticoid receptors, a lot of them on our hippocampus, the area of the brain that is critical to learning and memory. So when we have chronic, unrelenting release of cortisol, like probably like most of us have done during the global pandemic. You know, our big our hippocampus can shrink. And we were talking about neuroplasticity, and synaptic plasticity, that that absolutely stops. So you have lower amounts of what we call BDNF or brain derived neurotrophic factor, which is what we need to help grow new neurons. Or that'sKen Brown  58:07  another question, we're gonna talk about that next, just grow new neurons, neurons, because that was new to me. I was taught in med school, we can't do that. Okay, sorry,Unknown Speaker  58:15  course you were taught in med school. No, but now we know the hippocampus, you can grow new neurons until you're 90. And I'll tell you, we need them in the hippocampus By that time, because, you know, I've seen a lot of, you know, we do volumetric, MRI, hippocampal, MRIs on people who are older with dementia, and you see that, you know, they shrink to the 14th percentile or fifth percentile. And then you wonder, you know, 100%, is where we want it. And, you know, as we age, that structure shrinks. And, you know, so I know, I'm getting off topic, I'm talking about the hippocampus, it's really important, because if we, if we don't maintain the hippocampal volume, we aren't going to be able to take all of the things that we learned during the day that are in our short term memory, all the new things, when we sleep, we take that information, and we consolidate it into our long term memory, but it has to go through the hippocampus. And so it's really essential that that region of the brain, we want to continue to work it and continue to do the things to help those neurons grow. And that's exercise and new learning. Those are like the two amazing ways to do it. But back to our friend who's the free climber. So you're talking about stress and he clearly hasKen Brown  59:32  well i was i always joked with Eric that I feel like when we watched him do this and I'm just like he's got no I feel like my amygdala is like, pushed it's like it's so large. Yeah, pushing my cerebral low becauseUnknown Speaker  59:44  emotionally You're right, that amygdala gets activated during emotionally charged events. And that's what what makes it grow. So the amazing thing are the people who are able to find their centre are to be calm and to keep, you know, cortisol levels down. And my I will tell you my father was the combat helicopter pilot, he used to tell me when he was younger, he never feared dying in Vietnam, the only thing he feared was that if he died, his parents would have lost their only son. He loved it. He absolutely loved being a pilot loved it. He's like, I wouldn't even know all the death that he saw and getting shot at. And his funeral actually said, my dad took the you know, they give you the vest that you wear the bulletproof vest, he folded it sat on it, because all the firing was coming up underneath the chopper. Oh, but here's, I wish my dad was lead because he's so lovely. Just had just the beautiful spirit kind heart. And he taught me about not being afraid. He just, we can decide how we want to view things in life. I think the gentleman who's the free climber was probably not afraid of death. If he fell, he would he would fall doing something he loved. So I just think he, in his mind, his perspective on things such that, hey, I'm going to go out and have fun. I love doing this, right? It gets my adrenaline going. It makes me happy. It's my joy. It's my passion. And so, you know, he had no fear any trusted himself. He's done enough climbs with all of his gear, that he's like, I've done this, right. He's repeated the pathways. Remember you were talking earlier about Michael Pollan talking about what's you know, synaptic plasticity, and it's like going down the, the fresh snow and the sled and you keep repeating that, you know, event so that those tracks are really strong in the brain? Well, this gentleman clearly had done that as well. And he had confidence in himself. So it's more his levels were probably down, butKen Brown  1:01:57  it's so on that same line, when we're talking about repeating yourself and the tracks. Yeah, in chapter eight, you have a great chapter about controlling your emotions, both negative and positive thoughts and rumination and preventing that rumination? Can you talk about that, because that was the first time I've seen a neuroscience approach to what I would almost consider some form of meditation.Unknown Speaker  1:02:20  It is what you know, most of us don't really reflect on the thoughts that we have, you know, and thoughts. Some of them come from internally, and some of them, you know, we just get from the people that were around. That's why I also think it's really smart. As we get older, we're selective on the people that we keep company with. Because sometimes, you know, there's the people that make us happy. And then there's the people that don't write that irritate us. You get that thought cycle. And you're like, ah, but in I write the chapter on thoughts, because, again, I worked in the field of psychiatry, and what is what do we tell people have anxiety or depression, you know, anxious, people are fearing the future. depressed people tend to be thinking about the past. Oh, put rumination, ruminating thoughts. People who have ruminating thoughts, sometimes those are the ones who have the OCD, right? There's, there's a neurobiological wiring in certain people's brains where they can't get off the feedback loop. And what I've learned, this is why I talk about meditation. If you are one of those people, with there's many ways to help address thoughts. I mean, you can talk to a therapist and sort of talk through them, you know, you can take them out of your head and write them on paper. That's why journaling works for some people, or the meditation process, the whole goal of meditation is to it's, it's like observing a thought it's, you're supposed to just let the thought come through and leave come through and leave not hold on to it. We've got techniques like EMDR, they're different therapies that we can do to work with people to help them resolve a trauma or get through a negative thought. Because if you're a firefighter, and you know, you've lost a comrade, or you've, you've watched somebody die, I mean, that's a traumatic experience your amygdala is going to get, it's going to it's going to grow, your cortisol levels are going to be up and you might have a form of PTSD. And you may relive that memory. It's why sleep is so important, because sleep is one of the times our brain can actually work through those emotions. We actually does it while we're sleeping. So we're able to then get up in the morning and be able to sort of process it. So thoughts are really you know, they happen, you get 50 to 70,000. And they're just happening second by second by second. It's what we hold on to which thoughts that we're going to hold on to or let go. So meditation is the process of allowing things to just flow and to be in the present moment, not worrying about Future, not worrying about the past being here like I'm here with you to right now and fully present completely engaged, totally entertained to her awesome. And that's what we have to teach people to do is to live more in the now and not fear the future or stay stuck in the past, but I have, I have such compassion for people because sometimes there's the neurobiological wiring of the brain keeps people in these certain patterns. For example, you might have in your family, you might have OCD, or anxiety disorder. So to tell somebody with an anxiety disorder not to let your thoughts bother you. Well, that's, that's a wiring that they have. And we may need to do use some supplements like gamma to calm that region down. We might want to use some neurofeedback to help teach your brain to kind of calm that wiring down. Um, there are certain foods that you can eat, right, that can help release gabbeh that can calm that down, you can work with a therapist, so we have all of these modalities to help people redirect their thoughts. But the most important thing and I think you've probably learned that from the chapter is that our thoughts impact our body impact our physiology, right, our thoughts can increase our cortisol levels, like I could be sitting here talking to you right now and be super nervous. I'm not because you're, you two are so lovely. And it's a lot of fun. But in my mind, I could work myself up and get myself anxious and my heart rate goes up and my blood pressure goes up, my cortisol goes up, and then my gut could get all, you know, butterfly. So that's the power of our mind. AndEric Rieger  1:06:44  I was gonna ask you, do you think because what you're outlining when you talk about somebody who suffers from anxiety, or really any type of issue? Oh, do you think they're we're going to get to a point where when someone goes in for an element of depression, or anxiety, etc, it's going to be more mainstream at some point, that we begin to go through their diet history, their exercise history, and you said to yourself being present. So when you're with someone, are you putting your phone down all of these different things, before we leap into a prescriptive measure? Because it seems as if over the last 40 years, reaching for the pill, is it's just been the easy, quick fix. And in ultimately, what we're learning over the last four decades is that'sKen Brown  1:07:31  That's no way to live. Before you comment, I just want to say what's happening right now in the medical world is that in an intake evaluation, when you go to a primary care doctor, they are obligated to, to check certain boxes so that they can Yeah, when is this depression questionnaire? And if they score a certain amount? Yeah, they'll address it in the addressing is always or I shouldn't say always, almost always are often when they score a certain number if you if you're meeting certain metrics you against it. And the way to address it is by giving an SSRI, you are you obligated to do that? So it's like a DSM five. This is more of the primary care thing. So I see these when they come to me because yeah, as as you've already, you know, as you've already pointed out, I I the backwards, I don't think I ever treat a gut without treating a brain and the brain without treating the gut. So well. Yeah. But what Eric is saying is exactly right. So I just before you commented, I want you to know that the medical industry is sort of encouraging this pharmaceutical approach,Unknown Speaker  1:08:41  I have compassion, and I can sort of put myself in everybody's shoes. You know, I have a unique perspective, because I worked in a psychiatric clinic where we do brain imaging on patients. And the reason why is the kind of patients that were coming into our clinic have complex comorbid psychiatric disorders. So they've typically failed. Three previous psychiatrists, they have on average, three to four psychiatric diagnoses are on five to six meds, and they're still struggling. So we use quantitative eg, and, you know, functional imaging to see what's going on. How is their brain working? And how can we use the most natural approaches first, and we can see based on the way the wiring is, which medications are going to be better? Do they need an SSRI? Do they need an snri?Ken Brown  1:09:32  I'm so sorry to interrupt you, but what you just said is fascinating to me. You said based on the imaging, you can choose what corrections Oh, yeah, you count. That's a whole nother podcast. It was gosh, oh, yeah. And I really didn't have room in the book to get into that. But that raises the book.Unknown Speaker  1:09:52  Yeah. The book is about inspiring people to take better care of their brain health and talking about what we did with a football player. And how we were able to restore some function in their brain. But this is, yeah, I have compassion because I understand doctors who see patients, you know, there's the standard anxiety medications. There's the standard psychiatric depression, anti depressant medications. And you're basically just trying to figure it out, like which box Am I ticking, right? If you want an snri, you want to give that to somebody who has a DD symptoms, and depression, right? Because you want to stimulate and calm the brain simultaneously. Whereas an SSRI you want to give if we're just working on calming the brain, li

Top Cheddar
#46 - Steve Young - A journey from hockey to police, politics, big data & more

Top Cheddar

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 53:37


Steve Young started his junior hockey journey with the For Saskatchewan Traders of the Alberta Junior Hockey League in 1986-87. He made his Western Hockey League debut that same season with the Calgary Wranglers. When the Wranglers moved to Lethbridge to become the Hurricanes in 1987-88, Young etched his name in the record books, scoring the first goal in Hurricanes history. During that season he was traded to the New Westminster Bruins. Before the 1988-89 season started, Young was on the move again, this time dealt to the Moose Jaw Warriors. He was selected by the New York Islanders in the 5th round of the 1989 National Hockey League Draft. Young returned to the WHL for his 20-year old season, he started in Moose Jaw, was traded to the Prince Albert Raiders, was there for 10 games, then moved to the Portland Winterhawks. After his time in junior, Young went on to play four seasons with the University of Alberta Golden Bears, winning Canada West 3 times and the national championship in 1992. After hockey he has built a very successful business career including significant stops with the Edmonton Police force, Alberta politics and post secondary education including NAIT, MacEwan and the University of Alberta. Steve is currently a special project manager with AIMCO, the Alberta Investment Management Corporation. Big thanks to the awesome team at Troubled Monk. We're thrilled that they've joined us a sponsor of the Top Cheddar podcast. An amazing Alberta entrepreneurship story. Be sure to check them out and pick up some tasty beverages today! https://troubledmonk.com Top Cheddar is hosted by Cam Moon (Mooner) & Rob LeLacheur (Lolly) who chat with those who have excelled in hockey and the world of business. The entertainment is plenty as we get to hear some terrific hockey stories from all of the different hockey leagues and some Stanley Cup tales for good measure. In addition to the great hockey stories, we chat about the career(s) they've enjoyed since leaving the ice and we get to learn how hockey has helped them through their time in business and entrepreneurship. The Top Cheddar podcast is produced by Road 55, a content creation marketing firm located in downtown Edmonton, Alberta. Learn more at: https://road55.ca

Locked On Cougars
BYU football needs to 'stay the course' & 100 Seasons of BYU Football: 1982 - July 9, 2021

Locked On Cougars

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 33:00


The Locked On Cougars Podcast for Friday, July 9, 2021 "Independence Week" wrapped up on a Friday episode as Jake Hatch took to his soapbox to share his thoughts on the current state of affairs for the BYU football program and athletic department as a whole. He believes the Cougars are well-positioned now and for the future and should "stay the course" Attention then turned to the daily staple of the 100 Seasons of BYU Football Countdown with a look back at 1982 and the 8-4 season the Cougars enjoyed with Steve Young at the helm of the Cougars. Jake Hatch recapped the "down" season and what to take away from an eighth consecutive WAC championship season in Provo Finally, the podcast wrapped up with one additional note on 1982, the good news regarding running back Jackson McChesney's return from injury and responses to the query on the Locked On Cougars twitter account that asked Cougar fans to name a random BYU Cougar Support Us By Supporting Our Locked On Podcast Network Sponsors!  Built Bar - Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to BuiltBar.com and use promo code “LOCKEDON15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline.AG - There is only one place that has you covered and one place we trust to place our wagers. That's BetOnline! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use the promo code "LOCKEDON" for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto - Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Follow the Locked On Cougars podcast on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay up-to-date with the latest with regards to the podcast and BYU sports news. Please remember to subscribe, rate and review the show. Also, please consider subscribing to the Yawk Talk Newsletter that Jake writes and is delivered directly to your email inbox. If you are interested in advertising with Locked On Cougars or the Locked On Podcast Network, please email us at LockedOnBYU@gmail.com or contact us here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pick Six NFL Podcast
Lee Johnson Interview: Meet Tom Brady's oldest former teammate and the reason he didn't wear #10 in the pros (Football 7/5)

Pick Six NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 31:09


On this holiday, we bring you a Pick Six special. No surprise Will Brinson is out, but that gives John Breech the opportunity to conduct an interview with one of the most fascinating yet unheralded players in recent NFL memory. Lee Johnson was a punter that had a winding path that took him from being college roommates with Steve Young to the Super Bowl and ultimately to being teammates with Tom Brady. And while Brady wore #10 at Michigan, Johnson was donning that number when the GOAT was selected by the Patriots, hence the reason he wears #12 now. Don't miss this entertaining conversation! 'Pick Six' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  You can listen to Pick Six on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Pick Six NFL podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Pick Six NFL podcast." Follow the Pick Six team on Twitter: @picksixpod, @willbrinson, @ryanwilsonCBS, @johnbreech, @E_DeBerardinis Visit the Pick Six YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/picksix Check out the Pick Six Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/picksixpod/?hl=en Read the Pick Six newsletter here: https://www.cbssports.com/newsletters/picksix/ Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/758548147935545/ For more NFL coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Classroom
*Special Father's Day Podcast: High Truth High Love

Culture Classroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 15:37


In this episode JT and John discuss what High Truth and High Love looks like. Hear about #enCOURAGEment week for the Patriots and how #HTHL is now the hashtag for the 2021 season. JT also talks about one of Steve Young's journey as a QB in college and how HTHL played an important part in his decision to continuing to play football.

Go For Launch — Rocket Fuel for Entrepreneurs
GFL 140: How to Improve Your App Marketing and Sales

Go For Launch — Rocket Fuel for Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 31:40


Steve Young is an app marketing expert and founder of App Masters, which has helped companies 10x their downloads and revenue. Steve has worked with companies such as GoPro, Nextdoor, SpotHero and more. He also hosts the No. 1 app business podcast App Masters as well as a popular YouTube channel about app marketing.

The Fred Minnick Show
E-40 Remembers Tupac With Vintage Eagle Rare

The Fred Minnick Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 90:33


On this episode of The Fred Minnick Show, the great E-40, the legendary rapper and hip hop artist, joins the show. E-40, whose given name is Earl Stevens, is well known as a pioneer of West Coast rap, the founder of Sick Wid it Records, and a collaborator with artists like Tupac Shakur, Lil Jon, Snoop Dogg and countless others. E-40 also is a purveyor of spirits, from wine to cognac to tequila to his new bourbon brand, Kuiper Belt. During this week's interview, Earl and Fred sip whiskey (obviously) and discuss topics such as his spirits brands, how hip hop would be different if Tupac was still alive, San Francisco 49ers football, and a lot more. Whiskeys tasted: Russell's Reserve Barrel Pick (12:34) Eagle Rare Vintage 1970s (31:48) Old Schenley Vintage 1940s (53:54) EPISODE SUMMARY Fred and E-40 talk about a wide variety of things, such as: They start things off by talking about E-40's bourbon, Kuiper Belt 8 Year Whiskey, which Fred calls one of the better sourced bourbons he's had in some time. Look for more releases coming soon. Among his many ventures, E-40 even has a cookbook coming out under the moniker Goon With a Spoon. The first whiskey in the session is a Russell's Reserve barrel pick, which Fred says has a similar flavor profile to Kuiper Belt. They do a side by side tasting, and E-40 quickly exclaims, "Kuiper Belt got 'em!" Fred shifts to talking football, and the recent draft pick by the San Francisco 49ers, of which the Bay-area native E-40 is a big fan. The rapper predicts big things for Trey Lance. Talk then turns to Steve Young and Joe Montana. And then? Colin Kaepernick. Talk then turns to E-40's life in the 1990s, when he was making his ascent, along with what he was drinking in those days. Back then, he always mixed bourbon with Coca-Cola. "I wanted it to last all damn day," he says. "All gas, no brake pads." Fred asks what Tupac was drinking during the day, and E-40 offers some interesting commentary at around the 23:00 mark. The choice in those days was Hennessy Cognac. Today? E-40 feels sure it would be his brand, Tycoon Cognac. Why? Because Tupac was all about supporting black-owned business and products. E-40 mentions that he misses his friend, and also brings up another friend, Biggie Smalls. He and Fred talk about what the hip hop industry would be like if they were alive today. "One thing 'Pac did was uplift the inner-city spirits," E-40 says. "Whether it was female or male. No matter what you were going through, he had something to say that was going to uplift your spirits." Branching off a conversation about family, Fred talks about how the international bourbon community has become a family. At that point, E-40 says, "Can I stop you for a minute? I'm drunk!" He then says, "I'm getting in the studio tonight! I'll probably write the dopest rap ever." It's been a while since Fred has laughed this hard on the show. As they head into tasting the vintage Eagle Rare, E-40 collects himself and talks about why he likes to help young rappers, such as Jeezy. E-40's son Droop-E, also a rapper, comes into the conversation, along with the evolution of hip hop. We briefly get into what would happen if E-40 was a deep sea fisherman on Clubhouse. He talks about growing up with a single mother - after age 8, at least - and how life for his family was difficult. As the oldest of four, however, he knew he had to "figure it out." But, he said, "I did it." They bust out the Old Schenley to toast to E-40's mom. Then check out a story about the fate of one of his platinum records, as well as some other personal belongings. It's a story he clearly is still frustrated by, but he vowed to let it go. Fred responds with a story of his own that turned out better, but was similarly frustrating. Will Fred ever launch his own bourbon brand? Two or three years ago, he would have said "never." But covid helped change his thinking....