Podcasts about chairs

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Latest podcast episodes about chairs

Bob & Sheri
Whales and Cows and Tennis Balls Oh My (Airdate 1/31/2023)

Bob & Sheri

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 79:55


Tennis Balls on the Chairs. A Blue Whale. Morons in the News. Women More Real with Friends Than Men.   Everyone Needs a Laugh. Down the Rabbit Hole. Don't Give Out Your Email.   Small Plates. True Crime Time. Can You Believe This S***?   People Who Don't Want Children. From the Vault.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stacking Chairs: A Youth Ministry Podcast
Ep. 41 The Camp Counselor Question

Stacking Chairs: A Youth Ministry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 45:44


What's the best way to ensure that your youth ministry kids are fed spiritually during camp? We talk about the vision behind camp counselors and the pros and cons of who you choose to trust your students with. Find all things Stacking Chairs here

The Darwin Awards
Camel Punchers, Cock Fighting, Cliffside Urinations, and Loose Chairs in Truck Beds - ep. 148

The Darwin Awards

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 37:44


On this, the 148th episode of the The Darwin Awards podcast, we discuss some of the awe-inspiring ways that people have recently eliminated themselves from the gene pool. These include a guy who punched a camel, a couple of cock-fighting deaths, a man peeing off a cliff, and a guy riding on a loose chair in the back of a truck.CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE TO DARWIN AWARD PLUS ON APPLE PODCASTShttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-darwin-awards-plus/id1619901000If you enjoy the episode, CLICK BELOW AND JOIN US ON OUR PATREON for more content!https://www.patreon.com/thedarwinawardspodcastYou can email us at Thedarwinawardspodcast@gmail.comSupport the show

Stacking Chairs: A Youth Ministry Podcast
(Revisited) Ep. 8 Making the Camp Impact Actionable

Stacking Chairs: A Youth Ministry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 39:35


Hey everyone! We're getting ready for camp, so we'll be back with a brand new episode next week. In the meantime, listen back to one of our older episodes talking about making the camp impact actionable!

Capitol Ideas:  The Washington State House Democratic Caucus Podcast
Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self chairs the House Democratic Caucus, which in November was handed its largest majority in years. We'll find out how she balances her leadership duties with her job of representing the people of Washington's 21st legislative distri

Capitol Ideas: The Washington State House Democratic Caucus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 18:18


Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self is a school counselor, a mental-health counselor, a state representative, and chair of the House Democratic Caucus in Olympia. Not surprisingly, she's passionate about education and young people. Give Capitol Ideas 15 minutes today and you'll hear all about it. And more.

The Salcedo Storm Podcast
S3, Ep 47: Texas House Leadership's Slimy, Shady, Weak Betrayal of GOP Voters

The Salcedo Storm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 36:24


On this Salcedo Storm Podcast:Representative Brian Harrison represents the 10th district in the Texas State House. Prior to that he was President Trump's Chief of Staff at HHSANDRepresentative Bryan Slaton is a conservative, currently representing Texas House District 2.

The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies
What to do when you have had enough of the Corporate BS

The Nonprofit Exchange: Leadership Tools & Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 30:43


What to do when you have had enough of the Corporate BS: The role of heart-centred governing leadership on Not for Profit Boards with Lisa Colletta Lisa Colletta is the Founder and Managing Director of The Governance Collective Pty Ltd. Australia's leading corporate governance organization with a fresh approach. After more than two decades as a corporate governance change leader in the private and public sectors, I recognized the need for a more holistic approach for small-medium businesses. They need help to shape, drive and implement heart-centered and right-sized governance policies, frameworks, and processes – aligning their people and enabling them to reach business goals faster. Governance can make or break an organization Over the course of my career, I've seen how critically important excellent governance is for effective decision making that leads to successful outcomes. My team and I advise, coach, mentor, guide and provide thought leadership to Chairs, Boards, Committees, Managing Directors, Executives, and governance professionals on how to enhance their personal effectiveness and mindsets, and implement heart-centered corporate governance at strategic and operational levels. Extensive experience you can trust I specialize in supporting large corporations, family-run businesses, not-for-profits, and associations. I have recently endorsed organizations to identify and deliver appropriate levels of governance policy and practices to enable the application and reinstatement of government funding. I hold a master's degree in Management and a Post Graduate Diploma of Applied Corporate Governance from the Governance Institute. I am a graduate of the Governance Institute's Effective Director Course and the Australian Institute of Company Directors, Company Directors Intensive Course. I am also a certified Neuro Linguistic Programming Coaching Practitioner, a Fellow of the Governance Institute is a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and the Australian Board of Neuro-Linguistic Programming. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AFA@TheCore
Speaker McCarthy cleans house for committee chairs…and explains why

AFA@TheCore

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 48:18


Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline
High Tech Massage Chairs And More From Human Touch At CES 2023

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 11:54


Dave talks to David Wood, CEO of Human Touch about their high tech massage chairs, more.

Indiana Basketball Podcast - The Hoosier Network
Throwing Chairs Podcast: Is It Time To Panic?

Indiana Basketball Podcast - The Hoosier Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 47:37


Join Throwing Chairs Podcast Host Griffin Epstein as well as The Hoosier Network's own Zak Ibrahim & Zion Brown! In this week's edition, the guys look back at a horrible week for Indiana Men's Basketball where the team lost two straight & now many questions arise. Is it time to hit the panic button, is the team now on bubble watch, what is wrong with their defense, and how can they turn things around?

Fabulous Folklore with Icy
The Folklore of Furniture: Beds, Tables and Chairs

Fabulous Folklore with Icy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 21:13


Furniture tells us a lot about a period, people, or place. It's solid, so it can often be the only tangible artefact left. It often bears the impression of human activity through use, and they tell stories. Items of furniture also carry their own traditions through the ways in which we use the things that we inherit. Quilts, that cosiest of furnishings, carry so much energy from one generation to the next. But what about the folklore of furniture? Individual items of furniture, such as beds, chairs, and tables, also carry their own superstitions and rites. Let's explore them in this week's episode of Fabulous Folklore! Find the images and references on the blog post: https://www.icysedgwick.com/folklore-of-furniture/ Water, Water, Everywhere class for Miskatonic London: https://miskatonicinstitute.com/events/water-water-everywhere-british-sea-based-folklore/ Get your free guide to home protection the folklore way here: https://www.icysedgwick.com/fab-folklore/ Become a member of the Fabulous Folklore Family for bonus episodes and articles at https://patreon.com/bePatron?u=2380595 Enjoyed this episode and want to show your appreciation? Buy Icy a coffee to say 'thanks' at: https://ko-fi.com/icysedgwick Request an episode: https://forms.gle/gqG7xQNLfbMg1mDv7 Tweet Icy at https://twitter.com/IcySedgwick Find Icy on Mastodon: @IcySedgwick@mastodonapp.uk Get extra snippets of folklore on Instagram at https://instagram.com/icysedgwick 'Like' Fabulous Folklore on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fabulousfolklore/

Two Towns Over: An Urban Legends Podcast
Corner Café Gossip: The Devil's Chairs

Two Towns Over: An Urban Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 26:06


It's been two weeks since we recorded and we had two additional people in the studio with us, so this midweek is a lot like herding cats. Don decided to take it easy with a simple yet slightly underwhelming urban legend, "The Devil's Chair" because after over a year he knew it would be like this. So sit back and enjoy the chaos you've come to know and love as our first recording of 2023 go off with a bank. Also, Don gets scolded by the grammar police. So that's fun.

Unsportsmanlike Conduct
Jan 4 - 1 - Crossover W/ Conner Happer

Unsportsmanlike Conduct

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 24:00


Horses, Heights, & Chairs

American Institute of CPAs - Personal Financial Planning (PFP)
Happy 2023 from the PFP EC and PFS CC chairs! {PFP Section}

American Institute of CPAs - Personal Financial Planning (PFP)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 30:52


PFP Executive Committee (EC) chair, Brooke Salvini, CPA/PFS, and PFS Credential Committee (CC) chair, Oscar Vives, kick off the new year in this episode of the PFP Section podcast. They answer the following questions: What are their 2023 resolutions that may inspire you? What are the objectives of the PFP EC and PFS CC and how do they support members in financial planning? What were the committee focuses in 2022 and what is their vision going into 2023? How can you get connected with the PFP community and the resources to help you help your clients? Access resources related to this podcast: Note: If you're using a podcast app that does not hyperlink to the resources, visit https://pfplanning.libsyn.com/pfp to access show notes with direct links.  Join your AICPA PFP community at the next PFP Summit in Austin, TX on January 30th through February 1st, 2023. Listen to the Deeper CPA financial planner connections series to hear from other members in the PFP community. Find the resources like Broadridge Advisor, Bob Veres Inside Information, technical and practice guides, and more. Learn about the multiple pathways to the PFS credential. Save the date for the next PFS Live workshop in advance of PFP ENGAGE on June 3rd and 4th, 2023. If you are interested in running a PFS Live for your firm or group, send an email to financialplanning@aicpa.org. Save the date for the next Building Your PFP Business workshop in advance of PFP ENGAGE on June 3rd and 4th, 2023. This episode is brought to you by the AICPA's Personal Financial Planning Section, the premier provider of information, tools, advocacy and guidance for professionals who specialize in providing tax, estate, retirement, risk management and investment planning advice. Also, by the CPA/PFS credential program, which allows CPAs to demonstrate competence and confidence in providing these services to their clients. Visit us online at www.aicpa.org/pfp to join our community, gain access to valuable member-only benefits or learn about our PFP certificate program. Subscribe to the PFP Podcast channel at Libsyn to find all the latest episodes or search “AICPA Personal Financial Planning” on your favorite podcast app.

Hacks & Wonks
Senator Manka Dhingra: Addressing Law & Safety Issues with Data-Driven Best Practices

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 50:02


On today's midweek show, Crystal welcomes Senator Manka Dhingra, Chair of the Senate Law & Justice Committee, to preview the tough issues her committee will take on in the upcoming legislative session. Senator Dhingra walks through her data-driven and community-informed approach to legislating and how this lens guides her thinking on revisiting the Blake decision fix, a temporary solution put in place by the Legislature in 2021 when the Washington Supreme Court struck down the state's drug possession law as unconstitutional. Despite widespread recognition of the need for a public health approach to substance use disorder, Crystal and Senator Dhingra lament the unfortunate political truth that the public is often ahead of elected officials and that the Blake fix will likely not be based on best practices.  The two then discuss the pushback from some in law enforcement interests in response to bills that restricted their use of high-speed vehicle pursuits and sought to hold officers liable for taking wrong actions. Senator Dhingra stands by these policies that solve the issues of unnecessary bystander deaths and community demands for reduction in police violence. Finally, the show wraps up with what a trauma-informed criminal justice system could look like, where implementation of the 988 crisis system is, and Senator Dhingra's delightful tradition of introducing legislation from teenagers in her district. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Senator Manka Dhingra at @Dhingrama.   Senator Manka Dhingra Manka Dhingra is Deputy Majority Leader of the Washington State Senate. She brings two decades of experience as a prosecutor to her role as Chair of the Senate Law & Justice Committee. She also serves on the Senate Health & Long Term Care Committee and Senate Ways & Means Committee.  In November 2017, Dhingra was elected to the Senate by the constituents of the 45th Legislative District, the first Sikh legislator in the nation. Since then, she has sponsored and passed legislation addressing a wide range of issue areas, including: curbing domestic violence and sexual assault, preventing firearm violence, providing property tax relief for seniors and people with disabilities, prosecuting financial fraud, and reforming the criminal justice system with an evidence-based approach.  During her time in the Senate, Dhingra has helped pass legislation and funding to transform the Washington State behavioral health system, reorienting it around prevention rather than crisis response. She continues to strive to ensure that Washingtonians with behavioral health needs get the treatment they need and deserve. As a member of the Special Committee on Economic Recovery, she is helping the state craft an economic plan to lead an equitable recovery from the COVID economic downturn. She also serves on several task forces dedicated to reducing poverty, reforming the criminal justice system, improving equity in state government, and providing a sound and fair fiscal footing for the state.  Dhingra continues to serve as a Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney with the King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office. As Chair of the Therapeutic Alternative Unit, Manka helped develop and oversee the Regional Mental Health Court, the Veterans Court, and the Community Assessment and Referral for Diversion program. As a mental health and crisis intervention expert, she has also been an instructor at the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission for the 40-hour Crisis Intervention Training for law enforcement officers to reduce the risk of tragedy and improve the response to people in crisis.  Outside the courtroom, Dhingra is a community leader and anti-domestic violence advocate on the Eastside. She co-founded Chaya, an organization that assists South Asian survivors of domestic violence and led the organization's work to end systemic violence through education and prevention. She also serves on the board of Hopelink.   Resources Senator Manka Dhingra | Washington Senate Democrats   “With Dhingra's Win, Democrats Take Control of the State Senate” by Hayat Norimine from SeattleMet   Q & A: The Blake Decision | ACLU of Washington   “In Last-Minute Move, Legislature Adopts New Approach to Drug Possession” by Paul Kiefer from PubliCola   “WA lawmakers try to thread needle on drug possession, to mixed reviews” by David Kroman from Crosscut   “Washington Voters Want to Decriminalize Drug Possession and Fund Substance Abuse Resources” by Anika Dandekar with Data For Progress   State v. Blake: ESB 5476 and behavioral health expansion | Washington Health Care Authority   “Not all crimes merit high-speed chases that risk bystanders' lives” by Manka Dhingra in The Seattle Times   “Pursuits and Fatalities in WA since 2015” by Martina Morris from Next Steps Washington and Washington Coalition for Police Accountability   2021-2022 Washington State Legislature Policing Bills Explainer | People Power Washington   “State leaders prepare for implementation of the 988 call line” by Shane Ersland from State of Reform   “Meet the students who fought for free menstrual products at Washington schools — and won” by Sara Gentzler from The Olympian   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. So today I'm absolutely thrilled to have joining us the Deputy Majority Leader of the Washington State Senate, Manka Dhingra. Welcome. [00:00:47] Senator Manka Dhingra: Thank you so much. It is such a pleasure to be here with you. [00:00:50] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely a pleasure to have you - have followed your work and admired your work for quite some time. So you are also the Chair of the Senate Law & Justice Committee, you've done a lot of work. I just wanted to start off with - what was your path to the State Senate and what have you been working on? [00:01:11] Senator Manka Dhingra: So I'll just say my path to the State Senate has been extremely unusual. I don't know anyone else who came into politics the way I did. I, as a young person, knew very early that I wanted to go to law school and that I wanted to be a prosecutor. I got involved in gender-based violence early on because my grandmother used to help survivors of domestic violence back in India. And so I went to law school, became a prosecutor with King County. I actually created and ran the first ever Therapeutic Alternative Unit where we really took a look at alternatives to incarceration, crisis intervention. I helped train law enforcement in the 40-hour crisis intervention training at the Criminal Justice Training Center. And I considered myself a good Democrat because I voted. And then we had our 2016 national election. And for the first time in my life, I was actually having an Election Night party at my house because I really wanted my children to see the face of the first U.S. woman president. Clearly the night did not go as I had planned. And so I went to my first Democratic Party meeting that December. And when I went there, I can tell you that the room was full - packed - with women. When I looked around that room, I recognized so many of the PTSA moms. And most of us were there, again, for the very first time because we felt we had to do something. And I didn't know what that something would look like. And a very good friend of mine who was on city council saw me there and she said, We have to have coffee. And so we sat down for coffee and her first question was, Do you want to run for office? And my response was, I don't think I'm qualified. And she literally fell off her chair laughing. And later I realized what a cliché my response was because apparently that's what all of us women say - we think we're not qualified. So she kind of worked on me and we had a Senate seat that was available. And February 14th, I announced I was running for the Senate. So my entire political engagement from the time from my first meeting to me announcing for Senate was two months. [00:03:25] Crystal Fincher: Wow. Well, and then you ran in a district where your victory was certainly not guaranteed - very competitive race - where you were successful and victorious and a first yourself, the first Sikh member of our state Senate. How did you use all of your lived experience in the Senate and how was your first term? [00:03:56] Senator Manka Dhingra: So the election was exciting because my seat actually flipped our State Senate. So our Senate was controlled by the Republicans and when I won, Democrats got in control. So the first session was actually pure chaos because we'd had gridlock in Olympia for so many years because we really couldn't pass meaningful bills. We had a session that would go into special session year after year because budgets couldn't be agreed upon. The year I was running, there were three special sessions and they still did not have all their budgets passed. And so when I won, normally people have orientation or some kind of onboarding. But when I won - because of the change - we had new Chairs, all this legislation that had been blocked for so many years like the flood gates had opened. So it was a very exciting time because I think we just passed such amazing progressive legislation and really were this beacon of light for the entire country on what a progressive legislation could look like or what a progressive state can look like. But I got to tell you, I was kind of lost in the mix there. But luckily I was able to hold my own and was very proud of the nine bills I passed my first session. [00:05:16] Crystal Fincher: And what were some of those bills? [00:05:17] Senator Manka Dhingra: So a lot of those bills were things that had really irked me for a very long time as an attorney and as a prosecutor. So there were a lot of bills around helping survivors of domestic violence, there were bills around sexual assault, around trafficking, and I had a Medicaid fraud unit bill, work around behavior health because I have been very concerned about mental illness and substance use disorder in our state. And normally when you're a first-time legislator, they do this thing on the Senate floor where your first bill - people actually kind of tease you a little about it or kind of give you a hard time. And when they looked at all my bills, they were all of such serious matters that they couldn't figure out which one should be my first bill. And so actually the Medicaid fraud unit was my first bill because that was the least serious about my other bills. But this was legislation that I knew that had to be fixed and we needed to do it. And frankly, I think the reason why I was so successful is because most of my bill ideas come from people who do the work and are able to really articulate what the problems are and then have the solutions because they're the experts in that field. And so I have maintained that manner of doing my work - is really making sure I hear from the people on the ground doing the work. [00:06:42] Crystal Fincher: And you have built that reputation of being very in touch with the community, of reaching out to stakeholders for your various bills, making sure that you speak with, inform, get feedback from people who are involved with and impacted by legislation you're proposing and the issues you're trying to address. One such issue was spurred by the Blake decision - that the Supreme Court found in our state - that essentially decriminalized personal use possession. And because of some challenges that that presented, like a potential patchwork of different laws passed by different cities all throughout the state, the Legislature decided to take action to try and pass one uniform policy all across the state. What was your approach to that and where did that end up? [00:07:30] Senator Manka Dhingra: Thank you. That is really the issue and the question that has been - people have been interested in for the last two years. Any time legislation is required, my question always is why? And what you gave in your question was really one of the reasons why we knew that legislation - is because we wanted a uniform way of making sure enforcement is the same for people, that they're not treated differently because they're using at a different intersection down the street. So that's why we wanted to make sure we had state legislation. This decision came out in the middle of session, so the timing was not optimal. And then it was very important to me to have a solution that is based on best practices and that is practical. So the original bill that I had was actually based on what the policy of the King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office was, along with a lot of the other prosecuting attorney's offices around the state. Because what we found at that time is - a lot of people doing this work had realized - that dealing with substance use disorder, it's not a criminal justice issue, it's a public health issue. And treating it like a criminal justice issue is what has really led us to where we are today. But you have to make sure you're focused on getting people into the treatment that they need. And so I was really trying to come up with a solution that said you have to have public health lead. And you also have to understand that while using the substance shouldn't be illegal, if there's criminal activity around that - like theft, criminal trespass, possession of weapons - that is still a criminal offense, but really being able to focus on treatment. So after a lot of negotiations, because I'll tell you, elected officials are very nervous of criminal justice issues. And I come from it differently because I practiced for 17 years. And we unfortunately did not get a bill that was based on best practices. We came close, but not quite. So what became the law of the land is that law enforcement was going to offer diversion the first two times that they came into contact with an individual. And then only after that would they refer that for a criminal case. And we took this opportunity to really provide a lot of resources for treatment - so we ensured that we had substance use disorder navigators who can help get people into treatment, we provided funding for treatment like Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, to wraparound teams like HOST - Homeless Outreach Stabilization Teams, PACT - these assertive community treatment models. So really making sure that those resources go hand-in-hand, because if people have no place to go and they don't have treatment, nothing's going to really work. I also wanted to make sure that because we were creating this in the middle of session, that we had an expiration date. So I insisted that this law expire in three years. And we created a committee or task force made up of a wide variety of individuals - people with lived experience, people in the treatment community, housing people, law enforcement, prosecutors, defense - everyone who deals with this issue to come together to come up with recommendations. So those recommendations have officially been made. And our law expires this 2023, so we as the Legislature have to actually pass another substance use disorder law to make sure that we're, again, pushing ourselves to doing things that are based on - with best practices. [00:11:16] Crystal Fincher: Now the bill did not end up - at that time what passed - was not what you were ultimately happy with and didn't earn your vote at that time. But you did say that - because of some of those things that were funded, you really wanted to focus on getting those implemented and working across the state, because it's important to - if someone is going to make a referral for treatment or for services, that those services be available. And we were in a situation where those were not available in sufficient quantities around the state and people may not have been able to get their needs met. Where do those stand today? How far have we made it in terms of implementation and availability of services? [00:12:02] Senator Manka Dhingra: So I'll just say - on paper - the funding, the availability of services looked amazing. And then COVID hit. And one of the biggest barriers became COVID, because we weren't really able to implement everything that we wanted to. We had inpatient treatment services that had to be dramatically reduced because of social distancing - they had to limit their bed capacity. And so it's very challenging to talk about how successful or not successful this program could have been because it was greatly hampered by COVID. And we know from years and years of data and just knowing how humans behave - that when there is a huge incident like COVID - people do tend to self-medicate because of anxiety and depression. And we saw that. We saw use of alcohol and drugs go up exponentially because people were dealing with trauma. And so the combination of factors made it a lot more challenging. And so the resources weren't able to be deployed as timely as we would have liked. Now we're in a position - with this summer, we were able to do statewide deployment of the substance use navigators, so now they're around. We have funded a lot more options for law enforcement assisted diversions. So we have this program set up, but unfortunately we also had a lot of inpatient treatments that actually closed - because of COVID and their not being sustainable. The other issue also became is - there are a lot of individuals who really feel that there has to be an option for court-directed treatment - the court has to force you to do treatment. And so one of the things we had talked about is - if you want the option of that, you still have that through Drug Court, Mental Health Court, Veterans Court - if people engage in other criminal activity in addition to substance use disorder. We also have a civil commitment statute - we have Involuntary Treatment Act - we have assisted treatment where if you really want it to be court-ordered, you can do it through the civil system. And so we were really hoping to ramp up our civil system to do that. And again, due to COVID and what happened with our judicial system, we weren't really able to get there. So I would say where we are now from when the bill was passed - not as far along as we would have liked. And we simply haven't had the time to give these programs the setup that they actually needed. So in an ideal situation, I would have liked to see one more year of us working under this bill to really see what's working and what's not, and then come up with a different solution. But unfortunately we don't have that time and COVID did make things more challenging in terms of implementation. [00:15:00] Crystal Fincher: So in terms of these programs and what was funded and addressing the capacity and now increased staffing issues with a lot of these services, is there going to be a push for increased funding? Does the existing funding already cover the implementation? What action needs to be taken from the legislature to ensure that in another year's time we are where we do want to be? [00:15:24] Senator Manka Dhingra: So absolutely the funding needs to continue and it will. The cities and the counties that do have the programs up and running - because it was a gradual start - have actually shown really positive results. We are seeing individuals getting the help they need. We have had law enforcement in those areas actually appreciate the resources that have been provided to the community to do this work. We also have to take a look at - how do we staff inpatient units? The way we pay them for per bed usage doesn't really work when you have pandemics because a third of the beds can't be used. So if you're only paying them for the beds, they can't do full staffing if they're not allowed to use a third of their beds. So we really have to rethink what that payment for treatment looks like. And there've been some really interesting ideas on integration, and paying for the whole person, and paying for programs rather than for each beds. And that's what COVID really taught us - being really creative on how we are supporting some of our community clinics, so I think you're going to see some really exciting stuff coming in on more integrated community-led efforts. Our federal government, in the last two years under President Biden, has really made a lot of federal dollars available for us to do this work. And Washington is really set up very well to take advantage of these federal dollars. I think it's still an exciting time and - it always gets darkest before the light, but I do think we are going to be turning the corner on the opioid epidemic. [00:17:06] Crystal Fincher: I hope so. And so now you're going to be taking up this legislation again - you're forced to - and many people were supportive of the sunset and revisiting of this legislation this session. It looks like there, once again, is a mixed variety of opinions on the right way forward this session. And it looks like there are a growing amount of people, supported by what looks like changing public sentiment, or absolutely a number of polls in support of a public health approach as opposed to a criminalized approach to substance use disorder and possession of personal amounts. Is there the opportunity this session to move towards a full public health approach and move away from criminalization of personal possession of substances? [00:17:59] Senator Manka Dhingra: I wish I could tell you there was. This is unfortunately the truth in politics that I've learned - is that normally the public is way ahead of elected officials. Over and over again, I've heard from the public that when they see their loved one, their neighbor, their friend, or even the stranger struggling with substance use disorder, they want treatment. The first response isn't to send someone to prison. And so the recommendation out of this committee - it's actually called SURSAC [Substance Use Recovery Services Advisory Committee] - was for decriminalization of personal use. And so the bill that I will be sponsoring is based on the committee's recommendation, because I think it's really important to honor that work. That work and their conclusions are based on best practices, it's data driven through looking at what has worked around the world - not just in the United States - because we know this is a worldwide problem. We don't have the votes for that in the Senate or in the House. So I'll have my bill, which is based on best practices and data. We are going to have another bill by Senator Robinson, who is going to take a lot of the treatment recommendations coming out of that group, but it does make possession of personal use a gross misdemeanor. It encourages diversion, but that's where it's at. We're going to have other individuals who may want to make it back as a felony - I don't think there's appetite at all to have it be a felony because that has failed so miserably. And I know there's some interest in making it a misdemeanor. All of those have issues, right? No one is going to agree on one version of it, but I think the best decisions are always the decisions that are made when they're data-driven. I don't think our legislature is there. I don't think the Blake fix is going to be evidence-based or data-driven. It will criminalize personal drug use with a lot of options for diversion. And the hope really is that the prosecutors, the judges are in a position to make those referrals. The hope really is that community resources come in and are able to help people outside of the criminal justice system. I'm a little disappointed, but that's human nature. All you can do is continue to make the case on trying to do things that work. [00:20:40] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. [00:20:41] Senator Manka Dhingra: But people are driven by fear. [00:20:43] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. And appreciate your continued work to continue to make the case and for standing by that when it comes to voting. Is there the opportunity with this to implement another sunset - for as you said, as we get more infrastructure set up around the state, accounting for the COVID delays and challenges, that maybe we get to revisit this in another couple of years? [00:21:08] Senator Manka Dhingra: You know, I'm not sure about that - we'll have to see how it works. The reality is you can have whatever laws you want - it depends on what implementation looks like. So when the Blake decision came out, the current individuals who were charged with drug possession cases - all those cases had to be dismissed. And if they were in custody, they had to be released. Now, I was very curious to know how many of those individuals currently existed, because I had heard and know that most of these cases weren't being prosecuted - that they were actually being deferred. And that was actually true. People thought the Drug Courts would close - they didn't. There were very few Drug Courts that actually had individuals that were only there for drug possession cases, because the culture of enforcement has changed so much. Because the people that do that work know that having someone go through the court system or look at incarceration does not improve the substance use disorder. It actually makes it worse. And so practically, there were not people in Drug Court to any significant degree when this decision came out. And that's why I tried to tell people - that there was already that recognition in our criminal justice system that said, We're not prosecuting these individuals, they're being offered diversions at the time of booking. Or they end up pleading guilty to a reduced sentence and finish that time in jail and leave. So there is a disconnect between the laws on our book and what is being implemented. And I think all we can do is actually make that community treatment program really robust and provide those resources, and destigmatize substance use disorder so that people can actually feel comfortable going for treatment and acknowledging that they have a problem. [00:22:56] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. Another issue that has been an issue that has been talked about throughout the community has been those surrounding police pursuits. High speed vehicle chases - I suppose some may not be at high speeds - but pursuing people who they suspect of fleeing because of some crime or being wanted for a reason. And lots of talk in the community and data and evidence about the injuries and deaths caused by police pursuits - and really weighing whether the risk of pursuit is worth it in cases where someone is not wanted for a violent crime and people's health and wellbeing seem to be in immediate jeopardy, as opposed to a property crime or something else like that. What is the work that you've done on that? And do you anticipate that being an issue? Where do you stand on that? [00:23:53] Senator Manka Dhingra: I go back to the way I deal with legislation - I start off with what is the problem you're trying to solve? So when it came to police pursuits, the question was - what is the problem we're trying to solve? And the problem we were trying to solve is data that came out that said 50% of the people that are killed during police chases are individuals that have nothing to do with the incident. These are innocent bystanders who get killed. And that number is at 50% in the state. That is an unacceptable number. So we took a look and said, OK, how can we reduce that number? And so the police pursuit bill that was passed by the Senate and the House and signed into law is one that's actually based in best practices. It was based on a policy that very closely mirrored what a lot of our cities were already doing. So we do have some cities that had very similar policies and others that frankly were not good partners in doing this work. And so we passed that. There were a few cities who didn't really have to change their policies because that is what their official policy was. And there were others that were forced to change their policy. And this is exactly what you mentioned, Crystal - it is about doing that analysis. We made sure that if it's a domestic violence case, you can pursue the vehicle. If it's a case involving violence, you can pursue the vehicle. If it's a DUI, you can pursue the vehicle. But when it comes to property, we said, No, you can't - because there are other ways to catch an individual in today's day and age. And guess what? We haven't had innocent people dying since this policy was enacted. So did we solve the problem of not having 50% of the fatalities be uninvolved? We absolutely did. We do not have innocent people dying in vehicle pursuits. And I've heard criticism that, Oh, people are just fleeing and not getting caught. And I've asked the question, Are they not getting caught in that instant? Are they getting arrested the next day or a few days later? Guess what? They're being arrested, they're just arrested a few days later. And now they're being charged with a felony - attempting to elude - because they fled. So I know that there are cities and law enforcement agencies that want us to go back on our vehicle pursuit bill. And I have asked them for data - because I do tend to be data-driven - and I've said, Show me how many people have not been caught because of this data. The only data they can show me is the number of pursuits is up. And I'm like, And what happens the day after? Because when they share the stories with me, they always end with, Oh, yes, and we caught the guy two days later or the next day. And so again, I think for those who want us to change our policy, I come back with what is the problem you're trying to solve and where is the data supporting that? And I have not seen the data that tells me that this is the wrong policy. [00:26:53] Crystal Fincher: Well, and I appreciate the approach you take in being very data-driven because really - there's a lot of conflicting information out there. There's a lot of people who sometimes are scared just by change. And so looking at what the situation actually is based on evidence makes a lot of sense. This was an issue with a number of bills around public safety in prior sessions where there - in 2020 - where a number of accountability bills passed. And then following that, some seeming cold feet amid pushback from some law enforcement officials and others saying, Well, you have prevented us from being able to do our jobs and you're putting public safety at risk by holding us more accountable. What was your take on that, and on some of the legislation that rolled back some of the accountability progress that was made? [00:27:53] Senator Manka Dhingra: When people started saying - Oh, the Legislature prevented us from doing our work, my question was - No, we made sure you can be held liable for taking wrong actions. If they choose not to act because they're afraid of liability, that is not the Legislature preventing them from doing their job. It's that they have to relearn how to do their job. Or go back to best practices that they were taught - but over time, those practices have kind of gone away because you just kind of start doing what everyone else does and not really focus on best practices. And the bottom line is this. We had to do all of that work because of George Floyd. And the years and years and years of Black people telling us that they're being killed at the hands of law enforcement and frankly, the world not listening - until we had COVID, was stuck in our house, didn't have any new Hollywood movies coming out or new TV shows coming out - and we had to watch the video that was captured. And finally acknowledge and say, Yes, what people have been saying is true and real. We, as elected officials, have to do something about it. So it comes down to, again, what is the problem that we were trying to solve? And the problem is that Black and Brown men and women are treated unfairly with law enforcement. And when you see that so blatantly and so starkly that you cannot make excuses for it anymore, like we have been for decades, you have to do something and you cannot do business as usual. There has to be accountability. And like you said, change is hard. People don't like making change. But unless they do it themselves, it is thrusted upon them and that is - the job of electeds and the Legislature is to make sure we are standing up for each and every human being. I represent cities like Duvall and Woodinville, Redmond, Kirkland - each and every one of these cities had a Black Lives Matter protest - down in Duvall, Woodinville, Redmond, Kirkland. I was there at all of them. This is something that our population demanded and the Legislature provided. And it's going to take a while for people to make the changes, but these are changes that are needed. We are an outlier in the United States when it comes to fatalities at the hand of law enforcement. No other country has that rate like the US does. And it's time we took it seriously and put in practices that are going to prevent it. [00:30:46] Crystal Fincher: Agreed. And as you talked about before, lots of times the public is more in tune with data and reality - because they're living it - than some of the elected officials. We just saw in these past elections in November where we had a county prosecutor race where people with two very different views were running. One focused on more punitive punishment measures, focused a lot on criminalization and focusing on that. Another one who's saying, Okay, we're not going to not follow the law, but we need to follow the evidence and start to pursue policies, or continue the path of pursuing policies like diversion that have been shown to be more successful in helping people get on a productive path to not commit any more crimes and to reduce the amount of people who are victimized. As you continue through this path of various legislation in this session, what is your message to people who do say that police accountability gets in the way of public safety? [00:31:54] Senator Manka Dhingra: And I just say that is absolutely not true. Holding someone responsible for bad actions has nothing to do with public safety. Public safety is about your perception of safety. You can talk about domestic violence and I can tell you, and I'm going to say mostly women - because we are talking mostly women who are victims or survivors - they have not felt safe in their house for decades. And people will not say that that is a public safety issue because they're thinking about what happens when they walk down the street, not what is happening in their own home. When we talk about sexual assault, it's a different concept of public safety. When we talk about trafficking, it's different. And so we have to - when we talk about public safety, it's not about property crimes. It's about individuals feeling safe - at home, in their school, or out in the street. And so we have to be focused on human safety and them feeling safe in whatever environment they're in. Right now when people talk about public safety, they're only talking about car thefts, and thefts from businesses, and graffiti, and seeing people using drugs on the street - that's not public safety. Those all tend to be public health issues and systems that aren't funded appropriately. And frankly, the systemic racism that has occurred in this country for generations that has allowed these wealth inequities. So we have to talk about public safety as the human feeling safe. And I can tell you - it is women, women of color who are most at risk of being victims of public safety, but we don't talk about that. I do. And that is how I frame these issues is - we have done a terrible job when it comes to investigating, reporting, prosecuting sexual assault. Same thing about domestic violence, same thing about trafficking. And when you take a look at the ills in our society, it comes down to gender-based violence. It comes down to our children being raised in households where they see domestic violence, the trauma that occurs through there. So public safety is a lot more complicated than seeing there's a rise in their concerns about public safety - because when you really take a look at the holistic concept of public safety, there isn't. And I'll just say for decades, crime in our country has been reducing. Then the last three years, because of the pandemic, you've seen a rise in violence and a rise in crimes, but overall, when you take a look at trend over decades, we are at a downward trend. It is still the best time to live in America right now than it ever has been. That is actually true. Technology is there to help us, we have more access to resources, there are more people being fed, and there are more people who are actually safe. So let's try to change that conversation on public safety because the sound bites are not based in reality. [00:34:55] Crystal Fincher: They really aren't. And it looks like by these - once again - most recent election results, the public recognizes that and wants to move towards more evidence-based solutions. I also want to talk about - you talk about who are most often victims of crime. And when we talk about victims, so often it's in the context of, Well, victims would want this person punished. And what are you going to say to the victims if this person doesn't spend a whole bunch of time in jail? But it seems like we engage less on - how do we actually best support victims? How do we do that? And how can we do better? [00:35:32] Senator Manka Dhingra: That is such a great question. Thank you so much for framing it the way you just did because that's absolutely true. People - because of TV shows - mostly have this image of this victim who's like this innocent, fragile, vulnerable person who has never done anything wrong in her life. That is not who the victim is. Victims are as complicated as any single human being. And many times when you take a look at a victim of crime, especially in our society, they're not strangers. You normally know the perpetrator of violence, and there's that connection. And so when you talk about what the victim wants, it isn't necessarily punishment or prison time for 20 years. It is much more nuanced and much more complicated. As I mentioned, I used to run the Therapeutic Alternative Unit, and we really used to make sure - we were the first in the country, actually, to not have any criminal history that's a bar to participate in this program. But I insisted that part of this program, we have a victim advocate. And that when there were crimes involving victims, that the victim's voice would be part of what the resolution is. And I cannot tell you - over and over again, when you provided victims the resources and the services and you explained the program, they wanted that defendant to go through that program. Because they want that person to get better, they want to make sure that what happened to them doesn't happen to anyone else. And when the victim feels supported and has resources on their own, they can actually deal with their own trauma and move on - because no one wants to hold on to that hurt and that anger. It is not good for anybody. But unless we as a society can provide those resources and that support, the victims aren't going to get better. And when they don't, you just have that cycle over and over again. And one of the bills that I'm really proud of - I passed a couple of years ago - and it was about making sure that if you are a survivor of domestic violence, sexual assault or trafficking, when you are on your path to recovery, you can get your criminal history, your convictions expunged. And the reason I really wanted that bill is because - trauma exerts itself as a reaction, not just as a memory. And so there are so many people in the criminal justice system who are survivors - they're survivors of violence. And they're engaging in the criminal justice system because of that trauma. And we don't have a criminal justice system that is trauma-informed. We're trying to get there. But being trauma-informed means you have to understand that anyone coming into that system may and most probably has suffered trauma. And unless you deal with that underlying trauma, you're going to continue on that cycle. So I think there's a lot more work we need to do in being trauma-informed throughout our criminal justice system. [00:38:31] Crystal Fincher: Well, I appreciate that and appreciate your work. And also, your work on the 988 system. Can you explain what that is and where that stands in terms of implementation? [00:38:43] Senator Manka Dhingra: Absolutely - you're asking about my favorite bills. I've been working with the mental health community for a very long time in my other job as a Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney. And one of the things people have wanted for a very, very long time is a mental health crisis line. Because it's not illegal to be mentally ill, yet we call 911 and have law enforcement show up. And so 988 is a national number that went live in July. And we took this opportunity in the state of Washington to create an entire crisis system around 988. So right now, if anyone who needs help - if they're suicidal or in crisis, that's a mental health substance use disorder crisis - they can call 988. The 988 phone number is actually staffed by mental health professionals - individuals who are trained in how to deescalate and help with situations. And so we made sure that we provided funding for the people responding to the calls - that they had the credentials needed to do this work. We made sure that these hubs of 988 are actually going to - in the next few years, they are going to have a mobile response team that is made up of community mental health professionals along with peers. We are connecting 911 and 988 in the sense that there's cross-training - because a lot of the calls that come to 911 are actually mental health calls. So we want them to be able to transfer those calls through 988. And there may be times when a call comes into 988, but there's a weapon involved or a gun involved, and they need that help from 911. So we're working on cross-training and some kind of cross-mobilization. But what we have found is - from other states that have done some of this work - is that when you have a mental health professional answering these calls, 90% of the calls are able to be resolved. The 10% that need someone to show up for them - 7% can be handled with a mental health professional going out along with a peer, and only 3% need law enforcement. And so being a lot smarter about how we are responding to people in crisis - because they don't need to go to jail, most of them don't even need to go to an emergency room. We also took this opportunity to set up a structure where we can have more technology and data. We would love to do a bed tracking system, so someone who needs help - the 988 operator can take a look and know that there is a bed available for them, that they can connect them to treatment. Come January, our state mandates next-day appointments. So if you call the crisis line, your insurance or Medicaid - whatever it can be - is mandated that the next day you are going to go see somebody. And that's going to be a game changer because you're making sure people get the treatment they need when they need it. So I am super excited about this system. More work to be done on it, but we are well on our path to do it. We - normally, in the state of Washington, while we can be proud of so much, we are not the state that is in the top 10 for mental health services, but our 988 bill is the national model in the country. And I have to say, I was very proud - with Representative Orwall who sponsored the bill, and I - both of us got an award, actually a national award, recognizing us for our 988 bill. So very, very exciting time and so much more to come on this. [00:42:20] Crystal Fincher: Excellent. And what do you say to people who are concerned that - who are trying to avoid a situation that may be escalated, especially with some of the challenges that law enforcement have in responding to and deescalation, deescalating situations - whether it's people of color, or disabled people, or people in crisis - that calling 988 could result in a law enforcement response or an involuntary confinement for behavioral health treatment. [00:42:53] Senator Manka Dhingra: When I said the numbers on the percentage of calls and the manner in which they're dealt with, what you find is when you have the right resources right at the beginning, you don't need law enforcement, you don't need civil commitment because you are able to, again, use your motivational interviewing skills. You're able to offer people services and support. That next-day appointment is critical. Because if they're willing to go see someone - a doctor, a nurse, a mental health specialist, whoever that person may be - they don't need to be involuntary treatment, ITA'ed as they call it, because they're going in for treatment. So you have to make early intervention options available as much as possible. There are always those individuals who may need a high level of care, so you have to make sure that you are able to meet them wherever they are - but you got to make sure you're providing early intervention. I will have a bill next session that actually sets up these facilities called 23-hour facilities. And so the hope really is that those individuals who can't wait for the next-day appointment, that we are actually able to take them to these 23-hour facilities where the hope really is that they're there for 23 hours - because they can't stay there longer than that - and then you have to have a transition plan on how you're going to get them connected to other services and support. And that's what we have found is that - the right intervention at the right time - really, people want help, that's why they're calling. They're not calling because they actually want to kill themselves. It's because they're like, Help me, I'm afraid I'm going to do this. And so you have to provide the help that they're asking for. [00:44:31] Crystal Fincher: Much appreciated. I appreciate you taking the time to go through all of this with us today. As we close, I wanted to talk about one of my favorite things that you, or any legislator does - and that is working with youth. How do you do that? And what were you able to accomplish? [00:44:49] Senator Manka Dhingra: I love working with our youth. When I first ran for office five years ago - at that time, my kids were 13 and 15. And I used to coach Destination Imagination, and Math Team, and a lot of teams. And so I had to tell them that, Hey, I'm going to run for office, so I'm going to have to step aside from coaching these teams. And the teens were like, Can we help? And I'm like, Yes. So I had 250 teenagers helping me on my first and second campaign - no one had heard, seen so many teenagers working on a campaign. And so my promise to them was - I will continue engaging with them. So I sponsor bills that have been brought to me by teens every year for the last five years. And my favorite bill for next session is going to be one - is one - that's been brought to me by teens in my district. And that's around eliminating gender-based pricing. They literally went to Target and Costco and took pictures of a bike helmet that's pink in color and the exact same helmet - same company, same everything - that's blue in color. And the blue helmet is for $20 and the pink helmet is for $25. And they even did that with adult diapers. I didn't know this, but apparently women's adult diapers are much more expensive than men adult diapers - no clue why. So I'm going to have that bill next session - I'm super excited about it. But these teens are the ones that made sure we now have menstrual products in all our schools and college bathrooms. We no longer, in Washington, pay taxes on menstrual products. And it's not just this stuff they care about - they care about access to mental health treatment and services, and substance use disorder, and criminal justice reform. You name it, and these teens want to make positive changes. And I cannot tell you how excited I feel looking at the next generation. [00:46:44] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And this isn't even the first bill that they've brought to you. In fact, we have better access to menstrual products because of youth bringing up legislation, correct? [00:46:54] Senator Manka Dhingra: Absolutely. They really want to make sure that they can change the world. And that bill came about because of a conversation I was having with some of the teens. And the teens in the Redmond High School said they have menstrual products in their school. And I knew that teens in Kent and Moses Lake did not. And they started talking about how that's just not fair - that our school districts in more affluent communities are actually providing menstrual products than schools that are not in affluent areas. And guess who needs it more? And so just the fact that these teens think about access - and think about who is getting services and resources and who isn't - is just heartwarming for me. And the fact that they're willing to fight for others. So yes, all schools in Washington and colleges provide menstrual products in bathrooms now. [00:47:51] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And if people want to learn more about the work that you're doing or support legislation that you have, what's the best way for them to get engaged? [00:48:00] Senator Manka Dhingra: The best way is to email my office, or get a hold of me on social media, and subscribe to my newsletter. If anyone is interested in any particular bill or issue, my office can help you get connected to how to get more information. But check out our website, leg.wa.gov - they have a lot of resources on how you can follow a bill, how you can sign up to testify. Our hearings are all hybrid, so you can testify on an issue from the comfort of your home or your car - as long as you're not driving. And if you don't want to testify, you can send in written testimony or simply show your support for a bill or opposition to a bill - and all of that gets counted. And democracy is not an individual sport - it is a team sport. You got to play and you got to be part of a team - and that's the only way we make our world better. [00:48:56] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you so much today, Senator Manka Dhingra, for joining us and for sharing all of the work that you're doing. [00:49:02] Senator Manka Dhingra: Thank you so much. This was a great conversation and I loved absolutely chatting about these tough issues with you. [00:49:09] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you and we will stay in touch. Thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler. Our assistant producer is Shannon Cheng, and our Post-Production Assistant is Bryce Cannatelli. You can find Hacks & Wonks on Twitter @HacksWonks, and you can follow me @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered right to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

In the Breakroom with TWU Local 555
s3e02 Getting to Know Your Committees: F.L.O.C. Future Leaders Organizing Committee part 2

In the Breakroom with TWU Local 555

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 8:58


In episode one, we met the Chairs of F.L.O.C. Now let's meet the rest of the committee.... Your Future Leaders Organizing Committee: Chair & Board Liaison D.C. Chriss-MDW, Founder and Co-Chair Chris Lampe-MCI, Co-Chair Nicole Salinas-DAL, Recording Secretary Daja Ruiz-PHX, Social Media Coordinator Cypress McFadden-BWI, Zach Urgento-ALB, Michael Crouch-TPA, Chalmers Tyler-MDW, and Mike West-SEA. (FLOC'er Justin Prellwitz-LAS had a scheduling conflict and will join us in a future interview) Join their Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/428933321400243 Website: www.twu555.org Youtube: TWU Local 555 Facebook: TwuLocal555 Instagram: @TWU555 Twitter: @TwuLocal555 *music by Skilsel from Pixabay

Real Estate Finder
Ep. 64 - Furnished or Unfurnished?

Real Estate Finder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 42:35


On today's Real Estate Finder Podcast, Matthew Maschler and and Jill Glanzer talk about what to do when the Buyer and Seller want to make a side deal for the furniture.   Real property is land and anything built on it, or fixed to it.  Personal property is the rest of your stuff.  Televisions, Tables, Chairs, Art.   Generally, the real estate contract covers the "real property."  It can include some “personal property” but when there is a significant amount of “personal property” often a separate agreement can be made, and the price of that property would not be included in the contract price or the recording price.  There are many reasons why a Buyer or Seller would want to keep the "personal property” separate and we discuss some of them.  We also discuss ways to do it, whether it should be included on the closing statement and how to protect the customer.   Thanks for joining us on the Real Estate Finder Podcast! 

Horrifying History
Bonus Episode 35 - Devil Chairs

Horrifying History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 21:35


They sit in cemeteries amongst the tombstones.  They look innocent enough; an ornate chair or bench where you can rest your feet for a moment.  But if there is a hint of truth in this urban legend - these objects wait for unsuspecting mourners to take a seat.   Welcome to Bonus Episode 35 - Devil Chairs.   We got merch!  Shop now: HorrifyingHist1.redbubble.com www.horrifyinghistory.podbean.com Support our show at https://www.patreon.com/horrifyinghistory   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/horrifyinghistory Instagram: https://instagram.com/horrifying_history Twitter: https://twitter.com/horrifyinghist1   Horrifying History would like to thank the following sponsors for this episode: Cause of Crime Podcast: This true crime podcast focuses on giving you all information on cases while also adding their own opinions, and whimsical witty banter.  Check out their new episodes each week wherever you find your favourite podcasts. The Mystery of Life Podcast: This mystery podcast is for both skeptics and believers.  You can find The Mystery of Life wherever you find your favourite podcasts or on their website www.mysteryoflifepodcast.co.uk. Producers Happy Hour Podcast: If you want to learn how to become a great producer, check out the Producers Happy Hour wherever you listen to your favourite podcasts.  Understanding Politics Podcast: Hosts Michael and Alexander educate their listeners on the world of American politic, and the issues you see daily in the news in fun ways.  You can find Understanding Politics wherever you find your favourite shows.     Horrifying History is part of the Darkcast Network.  Check out their other amazing podcasts at www.darkcastnetwork.wixsite.com         

SMac Attack
Ep 234 Angela McArdle And Nick Brana: Chairs of the LP and People's Party

SMac Attack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 48:32


No better time than the present to work together to stop WW3. Today I'm joined by the chairs of both the libertarian party and the people's party to discuss how we might do just that If you are interested in sponsoring Liberty Lockdown in 2023 please email me: LibertyLockdownpodcast@gmail.com To support my work please go to https://libertylockdown.locals.com/

Wrestling At Random - Reviews of Randomly Chosen Classic Content
WWE TLC TABLES, LADDERS, & CHAIRS 2011 - December 18th 2011

Wrestling At Random - Reviews of Randomly Chosen Classic Content

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 73:56


Adam & Jeremy review the WWE Pay Per View event TLC 2011.  This show featured:- World Heavyweight Championship, Champion Mark Henry Vs Challenger Big Show- WWE Championship TLC Match, Champion CM Punk Vs The Miz Vs Alberto Del Rio- Daniel Bryan cashes in the Money in the Bank briefcase- Zack Ryder, Air BOOM, Cody Rhodes, & MoreFor Exclusive Bonus Episodes, subscribe via out Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/wrestlingatrandomOr subscribe directly in Apple PodcastsEvery week we will fire up the randomizer, & will review a classic wrestling event from a streaming service. Follow us on Twitter & Instagram for the reveal of what show will be reviewed each week. Music by Devin Davis, download his album at http://devindavis.bandcamp.com/

Commonwealth Poetry Podcast
Next Stop Trinidad & Tobago for a Christmas Day Special Episode with Floella Benjamin

Commonwealth Poetry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 60:10


Join Gyles and Aphra Brandreth for a special Christmas episode with Baroness Floella Benjamin OM DBE. The Trinidadian born actress, presenter, broadcaster and parliamentarian, currently Chairs the Windrush Commemoration Committee and was recently awarded the Order of Merit. She has written over 30 books with her memoir ‘Coming To England' now studied in schools. In this episode she shares her memories of growing up as a young child in Trinidad before moving to Britain, and the huge culture shock and difficulties that she faced when she arrived. Bringing her energy, joy of singing and passion for inspiring children and young people, she shares and sings traditional Trinidadian folk songs and rhymes from her childhood including Brown Girl in the Ring, Clap Hands for Mammy and T'is Long Time Gal Me Never See Yuh 

Keen On Democracy
Lev Golinkin: Should Stanford and Harvard Really Be Naming Fellowships and Academic Chairs in Honor of Nazi War Criminals?

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 32:15


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Lev Golinkin, author of A Backpack, a Bear, and Eight Crates of Vodka. Lev Golinkin is the author of A Backpack, a Bear, and Eight Crates of Vodka. Mr. Golinkin, a graduate of Boston College, came to the US as a child refugee from the eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkov (now called Kharkiv) in 1990. His op-eds and essays on the Ukraine crisis have appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, and Time.com, among others; he has been interviewed by WSJ Live and HuffPost Live. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Love Conquers Alz
DR. KELLYN LEE: MATERIAL CITIZENSHIP - Functional Objects Make Lives Meaningful for People Living with Dementia

Love Conquers Alz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 69:43 Transcription Available


In Episode 66, Hosts Susie Singer Carter and Don Priess have a fantastic meeting of the minds with their guest from the UK, Dr. Kellyn Lee, as she breaks down her new approach to dementia care – Material Citizenship - which focuses on the important role and function of everyday - personal - physical objects & tasks make a HUGE positive impact  in the caring process. Dr. Lee is the founder of WISER Health & Social Care Ltd and The Dementia Care Hub - supporting people living-well with dementia, both at home and in formal care settings. Dr. Lee is an accomplished academic with a BPS Chartered Psychologist and over 11 years-experience in “research in aging” and dementia. She has lectured in psychological research methods & fundamentals in older persons' complex care, Chairs the Innovation and Impact Board for the Institute of Health & Social Care Management,  and is the former Co-Director of the Doctoral Training Centre for Dementia Care at the University of Southampton. Support the showFollow us on Twitter, FB, IG, & TiK Tok

Life's a Chore
Couches vs Chairs

Life's a Chore

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 66:55


The usuals (Uriel, Chityah, Mar'quae, and Dalton) are joined by Josh, Laila, and Nicole to talk driving, high school, and play Family Feud. Enjoy!

Ken Webster Jr
FRI-7A-SECRET DRAG EVENTS AND CUCK CHAIRS

Ken Webster Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 35:51


Wrestling History 101
Tables, Ladders and Chairs 2015

Wrestling History 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 42:59


This week, Justin and Ben watch Tables, Ladders and Chairs 2015 to end the year! A very fun card...except for the old people galore. Like...ECW Originals, REALLY?!ALSO, We will be taking a short hiatus due to the holiday. We will be back on Jan. 13th with the start of 2016! Have a wonderful holiday, a great new year, and see you in a few weeks!If you like the show, don't forget to rate, review and subscribe and follow the show on Instagram and Twitter @themcmahoncult, or follow our hosts at @benhertell and @justinborak.This show is a part of Audio Mint. If you want to follow us, check us out on Instagram and Facebook, @audiomintchi, and if you want to support us, check out our Patreon by searching, “Audio Mint” on the app or website!Special thanks to bensound.com for the Intro/Outro music.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 176 Part 2: How Linda Orlick Helped Put the Jewelry Industry on the Map

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 19:27


What you'll learn in this episode: How the jewelry industry has changed over the last 50 years How the Women's Jewelry Association helped women jewelry professionals get the recognition they deserved What it was like to work with Elizabeth Taylor and Hilary Clinton to design iconic jewels for them Linda's advice for young jewelry designers About Linda Orlick Linda Orlick is a longtime public relations expert in the jewelry industry as well as an accomplished business executive with experience branding high-end products, people and companies. She is co-founder of the influential Women's Jewelry Association, a volunteer organization founded in 1984 that began with 10 women in an apartment in Manhattan and blossomed to become a formidable entity and powerful voice for women in the jewelry industry worldwide. Linda served as its President for a four- year term. Additional Resources: Instagram LinkedIn Photos available on ThejewelryJourney.com Transcript: Linda Orlick entered the jewelry industry when gold was $35 an ounce and jewelry designers were unknowns who worked behind the scenes. Due in no small part to Linda's passion for the industry and her work to brand and promote emerging designers, retailers and shows, jewelry is now a respected part of the American fashion scene. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the history of the Women's Jewelry Association; why it's so hard for people to leave the jewelry industry once they enter it; and how she helped facilitate the design of the 4.25 carat canary yellow diamond ring Hilary Clinton wore to the 1993 inauguration. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the second part of a two-part episode. If you haven't heard part one, please head to TheJewelryJourney.com. My guest is Linda Orlick. Linda has spent her whole career in jewelry. She has been very successful as a retailer and a consultant to retailers. She's one of the cofounders of the Women's Jewelry Association, and she helped build it into a powerhouse. Welcome back. Linda: I think I was also instrumental in launching the American Jewelry Design Council. That was founded by Jose Hess and Jean Francois Albert, with a lot of wonderful designers. As a matter of fact, I'll tell you a story. We used to meet once a year and have a retreat. I must include Michael Van Danzer. as one of the outstanding designers. One year, we had an appointment to meet at De Beers in London to talk about jewelry design and diamonds. There were 30 of us. I have to mention Susan Helmich, Susan Fabric as well. They were also women that were very much a part of the American Jewelry Design Council. Those were the women that stood out. That morning, one of my good friends called me and said, “You can't go to London,” and I said, “Why?” They said, “Princess Diana just died.” Well, too late, we were all on our way to London. We arrived in London and were walking to Kensington Palace, not knowing if we were going to have our meeting De Beers. Everything was up in the air. It was the most sorrowful experience that we all shared together. My group did meet at De Beers. It was a very short meeting. Chairs were abundant, but there was just no stopping them. Although we had time enough to meet, there was also the trip home at Heathrow Airport, when the funeral procession was going on. Every person in that airport was hysterically crying and cried all the way home. It was such a personal tragedy for so many of us, but we carried on as best we could. Another retreat we went to was in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. We went there in September, when the aspen trees were golden in their bloom. These retreats really gave the designers a chance to talk about how they were going to continue their designs and how they were going to keep building, how they were going to invite new designers to come in, and how they were going to expand the world of jewelry design. One of the things they did was pick a theme, whether it be a wheel or a teardrop, and every designer that was part of the American Jewelry Design Council would a create piece with this theme. Then one of us had the idea to display them in different museum settings as an exhibit. It was also at the JA Show and eventually the JCK Show. Now, I had been on the board of Kent State University School of Design for 18 years. When I first joined the board, I fell in love with the school, and Henry and I were invited to be guest speakers. It was then called the Shannon Rogers and Jerry Silverman School of Design. We were invited to their fashionomics course that happened every Friday. So, we would get on a plane from New York to Cleveland, which is an hour flight, and spend the day at the school speaking to the students, answering questions, having a lovely dinner, and then getting on a flight that night and going back to New York. I continued that for 18 years. Every Friday in the fall semester, I would bring different designers or an editor from Vogue Magazine or another magazine and then come back the same day. I loved it. One day, the amazing president—her name was Elizabeth Rhodes—said to me, “We'd like to rebrand the school. Jerry Silverman is such a big name. How can we do that?” I said, “I have an idea. Come to my office in New York, and let's have a branding session. Let's talk about a strategy to rename the school, since it's more about design.” My dear colleague Michael Carter sat with the deans and the professors. Every one of the teaching professionals of Kent State was in a New York conference room, and we renamed the Kent State School of Design. It was that simple, and it's been that way ever since. For many years after that, I continued to travel to the school, bringing other guest speakers to their fashionomics course. It was very rewarding. I also helped them develop a New York program, where students worked in a studio in New York in the garment district. They housed students, and they had students come to FIT or be assigned to different designers, like Donna Karan or Diane von Furstenberg, to work with them so they could increase their skills as designers. That was an exceptional time to see the emergence of this wonderful talent come to life. Sharon: Wow! It sounds like you have quite a history. What is your connection to jewelry today? Do you have a connection? Linda: I will always have a connection. When I went to school and studied to be a medical technician, I worked for an amazing doctor on Park Avenue and 78th Street until I was almost nine months pregnant. I had the privilege of having patients like Neil Simon, Mel Brooks, Anne Bancroft. I once gave flu shots to all the cast of a Broadway show. I never in a million years thought I would be in the jewelry industry. My uncle, my mom's brother, had a company called Raquel and Landy. He was one of the first jewelry manufacturing companies to make high jewelry in platinum and diamonds. He said to me, “Your great uncle was the founder of the first jewelry boutique on the Bowery of New York. He used to make jewelry for the Duchess of Windsor.” I said, “Hm. Jewelry, my great uncle, my uncle, my cousins.” It was meant to be for me. Most people who go into the jewelry industry, especially in the beginning, if you ask them, “Did you study to be in the industry?” they would say, “It just happened. I happened to fall into it.” Once you fall into it, you love it. I can call anybody I met back in the 70s as if I was with them yesterday. The jewelry industry has a special bond. Once they love you, once you give them your integrity and your honesty, you have friends for life. I worked with the well-known Mark Hanna, who is now with Warren Buffet's company. In the very beginning, he and I worked for a company and developed jewelry. We have maintained our friendship throughout the years. There isn't a person I've met that I'm not still in touch with. When I moved to Florida in August of 2019, purely by accident, we were about to have a hurricane, which never happened. My best friend said to me, “Come on, we're going to the mall. I'm going to show you what it's all about.” This is the first time I ever lived outside of New York City. We walked into the mall and into Neiman Marcus. Keep in mind that Henry Dunay was the most important jewelry designer at Neiman Marcus for probably close to 50 years, and along with him I used to make personal appearances. I used to help them with many of their promotional campaigns. I helped them with their events. In fact, there were times when they hired me to create in-store promotions for them or tie-ins with other designers. We used to have in-store events and try to bring the store together, which I was very involved with. I can't remember what I was thinking about. Sharon: Neiman Marcus. Linda: We walked into Neiman's, and I walked straight into the fine jewelry department. Neal Acartio, who was one of the managers in another store was there, and he looked at me and said, “What are you doing here?” I said, “Well, I just moved to Florida. There's no hurricane, so my girlfriend took me shopping.” He said, “You know, there's a position open as a sales associate.” I said, “But I never did retail,” and he said, “It doesn't matter. They're interviewing tomorrow.” I got the job. I was working the next week just like that. I had so much fun. It wasn't easy being on your feet for eight hours, but I met childhood friends. I immediately made strong relationships with beautiful clients that had me shopping for them. I absolutely loved it, and I probably would still be there, but on March 17, 2020, everything closed down, the store, the mall, the country. The pandemic was here. Everything closed. There was no place to go. I stayed in the house for 18 months. Neiman's started to hire very slowly afterwards, but it took a very long time. I can happily say I'm still very involved in the industry. I most recently volunteered to work with my friends and colleagues at the Women's Jewelry Association, which is coming up on our 40th anniversary, which I can't believe. The Women's Jewelry Association is going to be 40 years old next year, so I'm going to be actively involved and will attend the 40th anniversary of the Women's Jewelry Association. Through my Facebook connections, through my social media connections, I would say I am as involved in the industry as I could be. Living here in Florida, I have a deep love for it, a deep respect for the way it's grown. I watched these designers, who tried to lead with all the different and beautiful works they put out, getting better and better each year. To any young designer coming in, do it. Embrace it with both hands. One of the schools that stands out is FIT. Their jewelry department has expanded dramatically. I used to guest lecture. We started the Women in the Know Conferences at FIT through the Women's Jewelry Association. That's something that happens every year. The other design schools out there are very good, like Parsons. USC has a very important program. Kent State, when we went back, expanded their jewelry department. It was very impressive. It's exciting to have seen it from the 1970s. It's now close to 2023. I have another story I'd love to tell you about. My dear colleague at the Diamond Information Council called me one day and said, “Linda, Elizabeth Taylor needs a mask to wear for an event in honor of AIDS, to raise funds for AIDS research.” I said, “O.K., let me think about this for a second.” I went to Henry and said, “Henry, Elizabeth Taylor needs a mask.” When you say that to somebody with a wealth of designer possibilities like Henry Dunay, you can't image what's coming next. You'll see by the picture of Elizabeth holding the mask that he didn't just create a little pin and mask. It was a life-size mask with 936 diamonds supplied by dear friends at William Goldberg Diamonds and platinum from the Platinum Guild. The Gold Council donated the gold. This extraordinary mask, which was valued at over $1 million, was supposed to be carried by Elizabeth the day of the event. She wanted to auction it off at Christie's. The night before, she got the flu, so she couldn't attend the event. A model was the one who wound up carrying it, but Elizabeth's connection with the mask was strong. We had beautiful photography that shows her with the mask. Henry designed mini mask pins for her and several of the guests, like Anna Wintour, so they would always have a keepsake from that evening. The mask went all over the world. It went to Wichita, Kansas, to raise funds for pediatric AIDS. In about two hours, it raised over $88,000 for AIDS. It was absolutely breathtaking, as you will see in the pictures. Sadly, the mask was pulled apart because the diamonds had to given back. Though Henry's intention was to replace it with other diamonds, I don't think it ever happened. Everybody used to say, “Oh, Elizabeth Taylor, she's such a diva. You're going to have such a hard time working with her.” I couldn't tell you how absolutely wonderful and genuine she was. The few times we met her, when we presented the mask to her and at another event, where Henry designed a special necklace for her, she was as loving and generous and warm and friendly as anyone could imagine. Her dedication to raising awareness for AIDS was like none other. I will never forget those moments I had with her. It was very exciting. Sharon: It must have been. Linda, thank you for sharing all the history and different perspectives you have. You've seen a lot, and you'll see a lot more, I'm sure. Thank you so much for being here today. Linda: Thank you so much. It's been a wonderful journey to share with you. Sharon: We will have photos posted on the website. Please head to TheJewelryJourney.com to check them out. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Leading Improvements in Higher Education with Stephen Hundley
s03e03: The Role of Chairs in Leading Higher Education Institutions with Representatives from The Department Chair, a Wiley Publication

Leading Improvements in Higher Education with Stephen Hundley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 56:08


In this episode, we discuss the role the Department Chair plays in higher education institutions with representatives from the Wiley publication entitled The Department Chair.  Our guests are Carolyn Allard, Trey Guinn, Juston Pate, and Halley Sutton.  Carolyn is Editor of The Department Chair; Trey is Associate Professor and Program Director in the School of Media and Design at the University of the Incarnate Word; Juston is President and CEO of Elizabethtown Community and Technical College; and Halley is Managing Editor for Wiley's suite of higher education publications.Learn more about The Department Chair at this link:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/19364393.This season of Leading Improvements in Higher Education is sponsored by the Center for Assessment and Research Studies at James Madison University; learn more at jmu.edu/assessment.Episode recorded: November 2022.  Host:  Stephen Hundley.  Producers:  Chad Beckner, Caleb Keith, and Shirley Yorger.  Original music:  Caleb Keith.  This award-winning podcast is a service of the Assessment Institute in Indianapolis; learn more at assessmentinstitute.iupui.edu.

Charlotte Talks
Charlotte City Council committee chairs look ahead to 2023 goals

Charlotte Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 41:32


We meet with the heads of some key committees on Charlotte City Council to assess where we are with the major issues facing the city and where we go from here in 2023.

The Matt Balaker Podcast
Family Office Investing - Ron Diamond

The Matt Balaker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 57:41


Early in his career, Ron Diamond witnessed the effects of mass layoffs. It changed his attitude and motivated him to forge his own path. Longtime investor and entrepreneur Ronald Diamond is the Founder and Chairman of Diamond Wealth. He represents over 100 Family Offices ranging in size from $250 million and $30 billion. Diamond Wealth invests in private markets (private equity, venture capital, real estate). In addition, Diamond Wealth has divisions that focus on philanthropy, wealth transfer, investment banking, social impact, and governance. Ronald serves on the Advisory Board of 10 privately held companies and acts as Chairman for 4 of them. Ronald is also the Chair of two TIGER 21 chapters in Chicago and Chairs a newly created Family Office Group for TIGER 21. A frequent speaker at Family Office and Alternative Investment Conferences, Diamond has spoken at over 100 conferences around the globe. Mr. Diamond is also the Founder of Family Office World — (www.familyofficeworldpodcast.com) a podcast whose mission is to educate the market about Family Offices. Earlier in his career, Mr. Diamond founded Pinnacle Capital — a $250 million hedge fund that outperformed the S & P index 10 out of 10 years — before ultimately selling his company to an international investment firm. Previously, Diamond served as a Senior Managing Director at Bear Stearns. He began his career as an analyst at Drexel Burnham Lambert. Deeply committed to giving back, Diamond is an active philanthropist and civic leader. He serves on the Leadership Circle of the Aspen Institute and sits on the Board of several other charities and non profit organizations in his community. Diamond studied at Northwestern University, graduating Magna Cum Laude and earning his degree in Economics.

Les Nuits de France Culture
Le destin des footballeurs "chairs à ballon", entre réussite et grande précarité

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 56:09


durée : 00:56:09 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Albane Penaranda - En 2012, France Culture proposait une série intitulée "Histoire de footballeurs". L'épisode 1/4, "Chairs à ballon" raconte le parcours semé d'embûches de jeunes footballeurs venus d'Afrique, comme Joseph Lopy ou d'autres moins chanceux qui connaissent souvent un destin tragique.

DocPreneur Leadership Podcast
Ep 492. More Comfy Lobby Chairs

DocPreneur Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 7:37


By Editor-in-Chief, Concierge Medicine Today/Host, The DocPreneur Leadership Podcast LISTEN TO AND BROWSE OTHER CONCIERGE MEDICINE TODAY PODCASTS ... OTHER RESOURCES FOR PHYSICIANS https://members.fordoctorsforum.org/ www.ConciergeMedicineFORUM.com www.ConciergeMedicineToday.org www.ConciergeMedicineToday.net DISCLAIMER AND USE: In no event is this information considered medical, legal, tax, financial, accounting or other professional advice (Please see full disclaimer below). This Podcast Is Subject to the Terms and Conditions of Use (https://conciergemedicinetoday.org/tcpp/) and is recorded/hosted by Concierge Medicine Today, LLC. Concierge Medicine Today, LLC., our representatives, agents or employees accept no responsibility or liability for direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential damages or financial costs or claims made by the Physician(s) interviewed or our guests.

Shackbaggerly
Shackbaggerly 93. Boiled cheese and cheese dreams. The I Hate To Cook Book. Designer wrapping paper and white leather chairs.

Shackbaggerly

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 40:02


Howard Middleton considers wearing a cushion cover. Katie Johnson is on the hunt for a comfy chair and ends up with two... in white leather. There's boiled cheese and cheese dreams. Designer Christmas wrapping paper and from 1960 the 'I Hate To Cook Book' Yes it's a typical week in the world of Shackbaggerly... loose and disorderly. Katie and Howard are on Instagram, Facebook and Pintrest. Look for The Shackbaggerly podcast. This week you can vote for the tune to be used for the Shackbaggerly Christmas Song 2022. Episode 94 will be available from Friday 16th December. Just pop over to your favourite podcast provider and subscribe to Shackbaggerly, they'll then send you a reminder when any new episodes are available. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/katie-johnson73/message

One Minute Governance
149. Great board chairs are like great dinner hosts

One Minute Governance

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 1:37


Let's let go of comparing board chairs to orchestra conductors. A dinner host is a way better analogy.   SCRIPT Back in episode 91, I made an argument against comparing great board chairs to orchestra conductors. But if an orchestra conductor isn't a good analogy, what is? I think I have something. It's not perfect, but to me it's a much better description of an excellent chair. Imagine you arrive at a dinner party. The lighting is comfortable, the temperature is right. The host takes your coat, puts a drink in your hand, and skillfully introduces you to someone you don't know with a fun conversation prompt. By the time you've had a chance to meet everyone, dinner is served. The food is delicious, and beautifully paired with the wine. The conversation flows. There is disagreement – maybe even tension – but everyone feels comfortable to participate and nobody feels attacked. You learn a lot. More than you expected. And before the conversation loses steam, the evening wraps up. You don't feel too full, or too drunk, or too tired. It might feel a bit like magic, but to the host it was all just intentional and difficult work – before, during, and after the party. The host, of course, is our board chair analog. I know that if you think about it enough you'll find lots of flaws with the analogy, but none of them as glaring as the orchestra conductor. The dinner host's work is in service of creating a vibe, of getting the right combination of people engaging with each other in the right ways, of managing countless intersecting variables that may change without notice, and to do so with grace, humour, and empathy. No standing ovation. No spotlight.

The CEO Story
250 Million Dollar Hedge Fund Success with Ron Diamond

The CEO Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 30:23


On this episode of The CEO Story, we have Ron Diamond.  Ron is a Longtime investor and entrepreneur Ronald Diamond is the Founder and Chairman of Diamond Wealth. He represents over 100 Family Offices ranging in size from $250 million to $30 billion. Diamond Wealth invests in private markets (private equity, venture capital, real estate). In addition, Diamond Wealth has divisions that focus on philanthropy, wealth transfer, investment banking, social impact, and governance. Ronald serves on the Advisory Board of 10 privately held companies and acts as Chairman for 4 of them. Ronald is also the Chair of two TIGER 21 chapters in Chicago and Chairs a newly created Family Office Group for TIGER 21.  He is the past Chairman of the Advisory Board for the Disruptive Technology and Digital City's Program at Stanford University and taught classes in the Entrepreneur Program at Stanford. ​A frequent speaker at Family Office and Alternative Investment Conferences, Diamond has spoken at over 100 conferences around the globe. Mr. Diamond is also the Founder of Family Office World — (www.familyofficeworldpodcast.com) a podcast whose mission is to educate the market about Family Offices. Earlier in his career, Mr. Diamond founded Pinnacle Capital — a $250 million hedge fund that outperformed the S & P index 10 out of 10 years — before ultimately selling his company to an international investment firm. Previously, Diamond served as a Senior Managing Director at Bear Stearns. He began his career as an analyst at Drexel Burnham Lambert.  Deeply committed to giving back, Diamond is an active philanthropist and civic leader. He serves on the Leadership Circle of the Aspen Institute, a global nonprofit organization committed to realizing a free, just, and equitable society. He also sits on the Board of several other charities and non profit organizations in his community. Diamond studied at Northwestern University, graduating Magna Cum Laude and earning his degree in Economics.With weekly podcasts released, "The CEO Story" takes a deep dive into the success (and sometimes pitfalls) of being your own boss! We encourage each and every individual to candidly share their stories to help other entrepreneurs understand the highs and lows that come with the journey. As always be sure to check out more of our podcast episodes!You can find Ron atInfo@DiamondWealthStrategies.comron@diamondwealthstrategies.comfamilyofficeworldpodcast.com*Podcast Website - https://ceostory.buzzsprout.com*Website: https://www.togethercfo.com/*Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TogetherCFO/*LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/together-cfo*Instagram: @Togethercfo

The Ankler Hot Seat
Rearranging the Deck Chairs

The Ankler Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 38:11


Three months into the job as AMC Networks, CEO Christina Spade was shown the door — a shorter tenure than even ousted Disney CEO Bob Chapek's (26:42). “Not even a word from her. It was literally an announcement in a SEC filing,” notes host Sean McNulty. “Then, the next day they announced 20 percent of the staff is being let go.” This comes on the heels of a week of stunning reorgs at CNN, Paramount and Amazon. McNulty, joined by Richard Rushfield, Tatiana Siegel and Ankler contributor Nicole LaPorte also discussed the increasingly bleak outlook for producers (14:59) and the curious case of the Emancipation red carpet where no reporter dared breathe a word of The Slap (2:59). This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit theankler.com/subscribe

Soluna Radio
Episode 132: House Nation Air Date (11.25.2022) on 91.7 FM KRTU every Friday Night 10pm-11pm

Soluna Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 58:25


3 Chairs - "3 Chairs Theme"  Myles Bigelow - "Clarity"  Sun Palace - "Rude Movements" (Francois K Mix)  Kinane - "Heaven" (Danny Tenaglia Mix)  The X-Factor - "Peranza" DJ Gregory - "Attend 1"  J.A.E. - "Love Me Right" (Yoruba Soul Mix)  M&S feat Robbie Craig - "Special" (David Morales Mix) Kimara Lovelace - "I Love You More" (John Ciafone Dub)  Jovonn - "Random"  Kerri Chandler - "Never Thought"

CTV Power Play Podcast
Power Play #1374: Dental Benefit Launches, MAID Concerns & Treat 8 Chief on Alberta Sovereignty Act

CTV Power Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 47:14


Jagmeet Singh, NDP Leader; Dr. Valerie Taylor, Association of Chairs of Psychiatry in Canada; Heather Wright, CTV News; Mary Ng, International Trade Minister; Chief Allan Adam, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation Chief; Stephanie Levitz, Toronto Star; Ian Bailey, The Globe and Mail; Tom Mulcair, CTV News Political Analyst; and Nik Nanos, Nanos Research.

Powerlifting & Power Ballads Podcast
Ep. 118 - Becci Holcomb & Cathy Mele: USAPLGA Co-State Chairs

Powerlifting & Power Ballads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 74:57


Episode 118 (11/28/22) - Cathy Mele & Becci HolcombMusic choice when liftingSubmitted QuestionsEntry fee for StateRate term for State ChairsImprovementsCollegiate ProgramRegistration CapsVolunteerRunning Again?Process for becoming Referee/Meet DirectorGeorgia State MeetingDifferent Criteria for Team PointsContact InformationNew Best Team AwardsMore Meets to Middle/South GaProudest AccomplishmentUnfinished BusinessNew Lifter Tips15% OFF 1st 3 months of coaching from Team Rohr - find one of our lifters for their unique discount code. Offer ends 12/31/22Follow/Direct Message us @PLBalladsPodcast on Instagram & Facebook or email us at PLBalladsPodcast@gmail.comMore Information about the Podcast and Team Rohr Powerlifting: https://solo.to/plballadspodcastGet the Team Rohr Training App!The Powerlifting & Power Ballads Podcast is co-hosted by Josh Rohr and Lara Sturm and sponsored by Team Rohr Powerlifting - for all of your powerlifting coaching and meet day handling needs. The podcast covers Georgia Powerlifting information as well as National Powerlifting news. One of our more popular segments is music, specifically 80's music and Power Ballads.Team Rohr Powerlifting 100% Individualized Programming, Meet Day Preparation and Live Virtual Coaching

Marvelous Thoughts Podcast
S4 Episode 11: Bracket Madness

Marvelous Thoughts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 37:21


In the eleventh episode of Marvelous Thoughts' fourth season, the Marvel Chicks take a detour and talk chairs, Crayola, and crackers.00:00:23 – Question of the Day 00:03:49 – Game00:07:16 – Main DiscussionThis is the 55th casting of the pod.

Live Laugh or Runaway
Nothing Says Thanksgiving Like Lawn Chairs

Live Laugh or Runaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 15:46


Gary and Georgi share their Thanksgiving experiences like having Georgi's Dad bring lawn chairs for people to sit on... doesn't everyone do that? They also banter about the challenges of being old and trying to play a game that moves fast. Thanks for listening!

Daniel Ramos' Podcast
Episode 368: 29 de Noviembre del 2022 - Devoción matutina para Adultos - ¨Nuestro maravilloso Dios¨

Daniel Ramos' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 4:30


================================================== ==SUSCRIBETEhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNpffyr-7_zP1x1lS89ByaQ?sub_confirmation=1================================================== == DEVOCIÓN MATUTINA PARA ADULTOS 2022“NUESTRO MARAVILLOSO DIOS”Narrado por: Roberto NavarroDesde: Chiapas, MéxicoUna cortesía de DR'Ministries y Canaan Seventh-Day Adventist Church 29 DE NOVIEMBRE¿CUÁL ES EL MÉRITO?"¿Qué mérito tienen ustedes al amar a quienes los aman? Aun los pecadores lo hacen así". Lucas 6:32SE ACERCABA LA FESTIVIDAD DE ACCIÓN DE GRACIAS, y lo menos que Linda quería era celebrar. Desde la muerte de su padre, esa festividad había perdido su atractivo. Luego vino el divorcio y la mudanza a un apartamento más pequeño por limitaciones financieras. «¿Dar gracias por qué?», se preguntaba.El problema era que en su trabajo la gente no dejaba de preguntarle: «¿Qué planes tienes para Acción de Gracias?». Para no entrar en detalles, Linda solo se limitaba a responder: «Quizás invite a casa a unas cuantas personas». Pero ella sabía que no tenía invitados, ni pensaba tenerlos.Su plan le apareció a la perfección hasta que en el escenario apareció Jessica, una jovencita a quien ella siempre había considerado «dulce e inocente». Jessica no tenía con quien compartir esa fecha especial.--Linda, mi familia vive lejos ---dijo Jessica—. ¿Será que hay lugar para mí en tu cena de Acción de Gracias? Yo puedo llevar la crema de maiz.Linda sintió que se le movió el piso, pero ¿cómo decir que no?Ahora Linda si que estaba en problemas. Jessica iba a preparar crema se maiz como para un ejercito, pero no habia invitados, excepto Jessica, por supuesto. Sin pensarlo dos veces, Linda fue al supermercado y compró comida en abundancia. Llamó a varias organizaciones para pedirles que la ayudaran a conseguir personas que no tenían dónde comer en ese día especial. Invitó a vecinos y buscó sillas prestadas en una funeraria.Ese día, cuando todo estaba listo, primero llegó Jessica con su crema de maíz. Luego llegó una amiga. Detrás, un vecino ruso que casi no hablaba inglés. Seguidamente, un estudiante chino, de un colegio cercano. Más tarde, dos soldados en uniforme. Al final, quince personas, en su mayoría desconocidos. En cuestión de minutos, todos estaban hablando, riendo y, por supuesto, comiendo.Entonces Linda se dirigió al grupo: «Estoy muy agradecida —les dijo-porque han contribuido a hacer de este un día muy especial de Acción de Gracias». Y mientras sus «invitados» comían y reían, Linda agradeció silenciosamente a Dios por las personas, por la comida y también por las sillas. *«¿Qué mérito hay en amar solamente a los que nos aman?» —Preguntó el Señor en el Sermón del Monte-. «Esto también lo hacen los pecadores». ¿Qué te parece, entonces, si hoy nos proponemos «hacer el bien, sin mirar a quién»? De esta manera, tendremos «gran recompensa» y seremos hijos del Altísimo, quien es bondadoso incluso «con los ingratos y malvados» (Luc. 6:35, NVI). Padre celestial, capacítame hoy para tratar a los demás como me gustaría que me trataran; y para ser compasivo con mi prójimo, así como tú lo eres conmigo.* Linda Neukrug, «Personas. Pavo. Chairs», en Guidepost, noviembre de 2015, pp. 72-75.

ICFSFL Coach's Corner
Episode 18: 28 Minutes with Karen Hilo

ICFSFL Coach's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 31:09


This week I got to sit down with a friend, colleague, and Programming Committee partner, Karen Hilo. We met on a recent ICF South Florida MasterClass webinar and we hit it off immediately. Karen is an Executive Coach with a stellar history of working in all Chairs of the C-suite and she has parlayed her extensive experience into coaching and consulting. In our conversation today, we discuss working in a non-profit organization, transforming toxic work cultures, and even the miracle of clear waters. I really enjoyed our conversation, and I hope you do too. And now, my conversation with Karen Hilo. You can learn more about Karen visit her website at www.sealevelconsulting.com. You can also connect with her on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/karen-hilo-sea-level-consultant/. Learn more about ICF South Florida at: https://www.icfsouthflorida.org/.Check out the calendar of events to see what interests you and please join us as a guest with the promo code: PODCAST .  . . #icf #icfsfl #icfsouthflorida #coaching #podcast #interview

District of Conservation
EP 317: Previewing New GOP House Energy & Natural Resources Committee Chairs

District of Conservation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 10:25


In Episode 317 of District of Conservation, Gabriella previews what House of Representatives leadership under Republicans will look like in the 118th Congress next year. She focuses on the Natural Resources, Western Caucus, Energy & Commerce, and Agriculture committees. Tune in to learn more. SHOW NOTES House Natural Resources Committee - Rep. Bruce Westerman Western Caucus - Rep. Dan Newhouse Energy & Commerce - Rep. Cathy McMorris-Rodgers Agriculture - Rep. Glenn Thompson --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/district-of-conservation/support

Living Word Fellowship
The Thanksgiving Chair || CHAIRS || Pastor Doug Brady

Living Word Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 30:50


The Rise Guys
FAT KIDS IN BEAN BAG CHAIRS

The Rise Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 1:03


You know you stuck right?

The Luke Macias Show
Election Rundown and Democrat Chairs

The Luke Macias Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 15:52


We break down what you should take away from elections across the country and in Texas and talk about the growing momentum behind banning Democrat Chairs in the Texas House. The post Election Rundown and Democrat Chairs appeared first on Luke Macias.

Cornell (thank) U
Miggy Mason and Roisin Giese: The Evolution and Revolution of Twelve Chairs

Cornell (thank) U

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 40:18


It's a DEA professors's dream.Two students in a small program within DEA, meet, work well together, become best friends, and start their own successful niche interior design business.Their names are Miggy Mason and Roisin  Giese, and this is their story of realizing their dreams that started at Cornell.Plus  - they have the greatest personalities and chemistry - you will love getting to know them.Their beautiful website:https://www.twelvechairsinteriors.comInstagram:twelvechairsinteriorsPinterest:https://www.pinterest.ca/TwelveChairs/_created/Linked in:https://www.linkedin.com/company/twelve-chairsFacebook:Twelve Chairs InteriorsNot sponsored by or affiliated with Cornell University

Connections with Evan Dawson
Local party chairs and unofficial winners of this year's election discuss the impact of the results

Connections with Evan Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:09


In the second hour of "Connections with Evan Dawson" on Wednesday, November 9, 2022, we continue our conversation about this year's election results and their impact. We're joined by local party chairs and two unofficial winners.

The Kurt Angle Show
Episode 91: TLC 2017

The Kurt Angle Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 73:51 Very Popular


Kurt returns to the ring for the WWE for the first time in 11 years to become an honorary member of The Shield when Roman Reigns comes down with the mumps. What did Kurt think of coming back for the show; was he ready for it? And then the match itself: Kurt, Seth Rollins & Dean Ambrose vs. Kane, Braun Strowman, The Miz, Ceasaro & Sheamus in a 5-on-3 Handicap Tables, Ladders and Chairs match! PHYSICALLY FIT - Physically FIT is committed to providing customers, with the highest quality better-for-you protein snack nutrition the entire family will enjoy. Check out our wide variety of flavors and snacks at PhysicallyFit.com and use promo code ANGLEPOD20 for 20% off your purchase. SAVE WITH CONRAD - If you have credit card debt or in a 30 year loan? Well, we can help you get out of that pinch and save money at the same time! Head over to SaveWithConrad.com for a quick quote.  WOOOOO WINGS - Wooooo! Wings, a virtual restaurant concept from The Man himself, the Nature Boy Ric Flair. Enjoy the legendary flavors and world championship wings by ordering with your Uber Eats or Postmates app.  Wooo Wings is now open in Nashville, San Antonio, Jacksonville, Florida as well as Huntsville and Tuscaloosa in Alabama, with many more locations coming soon.  Try the only chicken wings worthy of carrying the name of the 16x World Heavyweight Champion. Kurt is just one of our many hosts on ADFREESHOWS.com, the largest collection of wrestling legends on one channel. www.ADFREESHOWS.com will have every podcast ad free and early, plus bonus content you won't get anywhere else. Join Today www.ADFREESHOWS.com If you want the world to hear about the exciting things you're doing in your business then you need to advertise on The Kurt Angle Show! We can help make a difference in your company today over at www.AdvertiseWithConrad.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices