Podcasts about Public life

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  • 412PODCASTS
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  • Jan 11, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Public life

Latest podcast episodes about Public life

Best of Today
PM under pressure over further lockdown drinks party

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 18:50


BBC News has been told that around 30 people attended a drinks party in the Downing Street garden in May 2020, during the first national lockdown. Invitations had been sent via email by the Prime Minister's Principal Private Secretary, Martin Reynolds. The email was published by ITV News. Scotland Yard says it is in contact with the Cabinet Office about the latest allegations. Today's Martha Kearney hears the thoughts of Dr Hannah White, who previously ran the Committee on Standards in Public Life in the Cabinet Office, and then the lawyer Adam Wagner. Following that, Today's Mishal Husain questions the Health Minister, Edward Argar.

#MorrisMondays
December 20, 2021

#MorrisMondays

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 28:53


Hello and Happy Monday! Welcome to a new season of #MorrisMondays, hosted by Rev. Dr. James T. Morris, Pastor of Carter Tabernacle CME Church in Orlando, FL and Presiding Elder of the Central Florida District, Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. On today's episode, Pastor Morris chats with Faith in Public Life's Rev. Joe Parramore on getting our children vaccinated. Hear the riveting conversation! We'd love to hear your thoughts! Let us know what you think. Share your thoughts to our Facebook page where you can watch the video edition: https://www.facebook.com/CarterTabernacleCME/ and comment under our post. A new edition of #MorrisMondays is available every Monday at 1pm. You can also follow us now on Twitter: @MorrisMondays. Thanks for listening! Remember, heaven is watching how we respond. We'll see you next week!

What We Can't Not Talk About
Lecture on Tradition Amid Chaos: An Evening With Sohrab Ahmari and Fr. Jonathan Raia

What We Can't Not Talk About

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 88:10


"As a young father and a self-proclaimed 'radically assimilated immigrant,' Sohrab Ahmari realized that when it comes to shaping his young son's moral fiber, today's America comes up short." During this talk, journalist and author Sohrab Ahmari will share some of his ideas about the direness of the crisis we currently face and about the ways forward (which might actually require some looking back). Enjoy this conversation! About Our Speakers Sohrab Ahmari is a contributing editor of The American Conservative and a visiting fellow of the Veritas Center for Ethics in Public Life at Franciscan University. Previously, he spent nearly a decade at News Corp., as op-ed editor of the New York Post and as a columnist and editor with the Wall Street Journal opinion pages in New York and London. His writing has also appeared in The New York Times, The Spectator, the Times Literary Supplement, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Dissent and America, among many others. His books include From Fire, by Water: My Journey to the Catholic Faith (Ignatius, 2019) and The Unbroken Thread: Discovering the Wisdom of Tradition in an Age of Chaos (Convergent/Random House, 2021). He has testified before the British Parliament and appears regularly on broadcast media on both sides of the Atlantic, including the BBC, Sky News, France 24, Deutsche Welle, EWTN and Fox News. Fr. Jonathan Raia was born and raised in Houston, Texas. He came to know Jesus Christ through his parents' faith, and he grew in relationship with the Lord through Catholic school and various opportunities for service and leadership. He was also inspired by the example of holiness he witnessed in the priests at his parish and began to consider the priesthood as a young boy. His four years as a student at the University of Texas at Austin, where he graduated with a B.A. in Plan II (Liberal Arts) and Spanish in 2002, were pivotal for his faith because of the friends he made at the University Catholic Center. The call to the priesthood grew stronger during his years at the UCC, and he entered seminary for the Diocese of Austin upon graduation. He was ordained a priest in 2009 and served for four years as parochial vicar at St. William Parish in Round Rock, then for a year as parochial vicar at St. Mary's Catholic Center at Texas A&M University, before beginning as Vocation Director for the Diocese of Austin in July 2014. Six years later, he was named Chaplain/Director of the University Catholic Center. Fr. Jonathan holds a Master's degree in Christian Spirituality from Creighton University, where he also received training in spiritual direction, a ministry that has been an important part of his priesthood. Ministry to college students has been a consistent source of joy for him, and he considers it an honor to return to his alma mater and to take on the mission of bringing Christ to the students of UT.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Gavin Grey: Germany locks unvaccinated out of public life; mandate looms

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 4:24


Unvaccinated people across Germany will soon be excluded from nonessential stores, restaurants and sports and cultural venues, Chancellor Angela Merkel announced Thursday, and parliament will consider a general vaccine mandate as part of efforts to curb coronavirus infections.Merkel announced the measures after a meeting with federal and state leaders, as the nation again topped 70,000 newly confirmed cases in a 24-hour period. She said the steps were necessary to address concerns that hospitals could become overloaded with patients suffering from COVID-19 infections, which are much more likely to be serious in people who have not been vaccinated.“The situation in our country is serious,” Merkel told reporters in Berlin, calling the measures an “act of national solidarity.”She said officials also agreed on a nationwide requirement to wear masks, new limits on private meetings and a goal of 30 million vaccinations by the end of the year — an effort that will be boosted by allowing dentists and pharmacists to administer the shots.Merkel said authorities plan to require staff in hospitals and nursing homes to be vaccinated against COVID-19, and she backed the even more contentious idea of imposing a general vaccine mandate. She said parliament would debate the proposal with input from the country's national ethics committee. The mandate could take effect as early as February.“In light of this situation, I really think it's necessary to pass such a mandate,” Merkel said, adding that she would have voted for it if she were still a lawmaker.Just months ago, Merkel suggested that a vaccine mandate would not be effective, but she did not rule out the possibility.About 68.7% of the population in Germany is fully vaccinated, far below the government's minimum goal of 75%.Austria, which recently imposed even stricter measures on unvaccinated people as part of a 20-day lockdown, also plans to have a vaccine mandate by February.In Germany, unvaccinated people will still be able to meet in private settings, but only in very limited numbers. A household with an unvaccinated person over 14 can meet with only two people from another household; the limit does not apply when everyone is vaccinated.There have been large protests against pandemic measures in the past in Germany, and the proposed vaccine mandate is likely to be opposed by some, though opinion polls show most Germans are in favor.Finance Minister Olaf Scholz, who is expected to be elected chancellor by a center-left coalition next week, has also backed a general vaccine mandate, but he favors letting lawmakers vote on the issue according to their personal conscience rather than party lines.“If we had a higher vaccination rate, we wouldn't be discussing this now,” he said.The rise in COVID-19 cases over the past several weeks and the arrival of the new omicron variant have prompted warnings from scientists and doctors that the country's medical services could become overstretched in the coming weeks unless drastic action is taken. Some hospitals in the south and east of the country have already transferred patients to other parts of Germany because of a shortage of intensive care beds.Germany's disease control agency reported 73,209 newly confirmed cases Thursday. The Robert Koch Institute also reported 388 new deaths from COVID-19, bringing the total since the start of the pandemic to 102,178.The discussion over new measures has been complicated by Germany's political structure, which leaves the 16 states responsible for many regulations, and the ongoing transition between the old and new governments at the federal level.Scholz, whose Social Democrats narrowly beat Merkel's center-right Union bloc in September, defended the latest steps as a political compromise.“We are reacting to the current situation with very far-reaching, very drastic but precise measures,” he told reporters. “Decisive action is being taken here and, what is particularly important to me...

Q Podcast
Episode 220 | Boundaries for Public Life: Annie F. Downs

Q Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 13:54


Thanks to documentaries like The Social Dilemma and an abundance of eye-opening research, we're all-too aware of the pitfalls surrounding social media. But is there a better way for us to engage? Is it possible for us to succeed at social media without losing our souls? Author and podcaster Annie F. Downs argues the answer is yes. She shares her insights and best practices with us in this talk. To engage in more culturally important conversations like this one, make plans to join us at the Culture Summit, taking place in Nashville on April 28-29, 2021. Over two days, you will hear 35+ talks on the most important ideas for Christians to engage in our moment. Register now: qideas.org/cs2022. 

Institute for Government
Angela Rayner MP: how Labour would rebuild trust in public life

Institute for Government

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 59:38


The Institute for Government was pleased to welcome the Rt Hon Angela Rayner MP, Shadow Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Deputy Leader of the Opposition and Shadow First Secretary of State, to deliver a keynote speech setting out how Labour would reform the systems that govern standards in public life. She was then in conversation with Bronwen Maddox, Director of the Institute for Government. The row over Owen Paterson's paid lobbying and the wider debate it has stimulated about MPs' second jobs have again brought into the spotlight the systems designed to uphold ethical standards in public life. As well as the codes and institutions governing MPs, the rules about how ministers should behave and the processes that uphold these standards have been called into question. In her speech, Angela Rayner set out how Labour would redesign those rules, strengthen existing standards bodies and put new institutions in place to uphold standards in public life. Angela Rayner has been the MP for Ashton-under-Lyne since 2015. She holds a number of roles including: Shadow Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office, Shadow Secretary of State for the Future of Work; Shadow Deputy Prime Minister; Shadow First Secretary of State and Deputy Leader of the Labour Party.

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny
Lies, damned lies, and election campaigns

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:02


On this episode of Democracy Sausage, journalist Bernard Keane and political scientists Judith Brett and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to discuss truth in politics, cynicism in the electorate, and what it all might mean at the next federal election.Is there a growing sense among voters that ‘all politicians lie', and what does that mean for faith in Australia's democracy? And how will the global COVID-19 situation affect the upcoming federal election? Crikey political editor Bernard Keane, La Trobe University's Emeritus Professor Judith Brett, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage to explore these questions and more.Judith Brett is Emeritus Professor of Politics at La Trobe University. Her books include Doing Politics: Writing on Public Life, Robert Menzies' Forgotten People, The Enigmatic Mr Deakin, From Secret Ballot to Democracy Sausage, and four Quarterly Essays.Bernard Keane is Crikey's Political Editor. Before that, he was Crikey's Canberra press gallery correspondent, covering politics, national security, and economics. He is also author of several books, including the recently released Lies and Falsehoods: The Morrison Government and the New Culture of Deceit.Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We'd love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Democracy Forum 11/19/21: Freedom of Religion, Freedom from Religion: Politics and Religion in America

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 58:51


Host: Ann Luther, League of Women Voters of Maine Freedom of Religion, Freedom from Religion: Politics and Religion in America -What is the constitutional foundation of the separation of church and state? -Why is it important? -Is freedom of religion in the Bill of Rights? How did the doctrine emerge and develop from the prohibition on the establishment of religion? -How is the interpretation and practice affecting modern politics? -What is the intersection of political activism and religious groups, now and in our history? Guests: Mark Brewer, Professor of Political Science and Department Chair, University of Maine Vincent Phillip Muñoz, Tocqueville Associate Professor of Religion & Public Life, Department of Political Science, Concurrent Associate Professor of Law, Notre Dame University To learn more about this topic: Memorial and Remonstrance Against Religious Assessments, James Madison, presented to the Virginia General Assembly in 1785 In U.S., Far More Support Than Oppose Separation of Church and State, Pew Research Center, October 2021 The Sleeper SCOTUS Case That Threatens the Separation of Church and State, The Atlantic, October 2021 Two Concepts of Religious Liberty: The Natural Rights and Moral Autonomy Approaches to the Free Exercise of Religion, Vincent Phillip Munoz, American Political Science Review, May 2016 Opinion | If they're going to keep passing religious laws, we're going to need exemptions, Washington Post, September 2021 The 2020 Census of American Religion, Public Religion Research Institute, July 2021 How ‘In God We Trust’ bills are helping advance a Christian nationalist agenda, The Conversation, July 2021 Relevant No More?: The Catholic/Protestant Divide in American Electoral Politics by Mark D. Brewer, 2003 The mostly volunteer team at the League of Women Voters – Downeast who plan and coordinate this series includes: Martha Dickinson, Michael Fisher, Starr Gilmartin, Maggie Harling, Ann Luther Judith Lyles, Wendilee O'Brien, Maryann Ogonowski, Pam Person, Leah Taylor, Linda Washburn About the host: Ann currently serves as Treasurer of the League of Women Voters of Maine and leads the LWVME Advocacy Team. She served as President of LWVME from 2003 to 2007 and as co-president from 2007-2009. In her work for the League, Ann has worked for greater public understanding of public policy issues and for the League's priority issues in Clean Elections & Campaign Finance Reform, Voting Rights, Ethics in Government, Ranked Choice Voting, and Repeal of Term Limits. Representing LWVME at Maine Citizens for Clean Elections, she served that coalition as co-president from 2006 to 2011. She remains on the board of MCCE and serves as Treasurer. She is active in the LWV-Downeast and hosts their monthly radio show, The Democracy Forum, on WERU FM Community Radio -which started out in 2004 as an recurring special, and became a regular monthly program in 2012. She was the 2013 recipient of the Baldwin Award from the ACLU of Maine for her work on voting rights and elections. She joined the League in 1998 when she retired as Senior Vice President at SEI Investments. Ann was a founder of the MDI Restorative Justice Program, 1999 – 2000, and served on its Executive Board. The post Democracy Forum 11/19/21: Freedom of Religion, Freedom from Religion: Politics and Religion in America first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Notable Speeches
Archbishop José H. Gomez: America's New Political Religions

Notable Speeches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 22:38


Speaking via video link to the Congress of Catholics and Public Life in Madrid, Spain, Archbishop Gomez, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, described recent "social justice" movements as "political religions" that offer a different "story of salvation" than the Christian faith. "Whatever we call these movements — 'social justice,' 'wokeness,' 'identity politics,' 'intersectionality,' 'successor ideology' — they claim to offer what religion provides," the archbishop noted. Regrettably, "these strictly secular movements are causing new forms of social division, discrimination, intolerance, and injustice," he said. Archbishop Gomez spoke in Spanish. An English transcript of his remarks is at https://archbishopgomez.org/blog/reflections-on-the-church-and-americas-new-religions José Gomez was born in Mexico and educated in Mexico and Spain. He has served as the Archbishop of Los Angeles since 2011 and was elected president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops in 2019. If you have a comment or question about the Notable Speeches podcast, email feedback@notablespeeches.com.

Undeceptions with John Dickson

This episode is sponsored by Zondervan's new book Person of Interest: Why Jesus still matters in a world that rejects the Bible by J. Warner Wallace.Meet Our Guests Nigel Biggar: Regius Professor of Moral & Pastoral Theology, and Director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, & Public Life, University of Oxford. Andrew Hastie: Australian Federal Member for Canning and Assistant Minister for Defence. Former Officer, Australian Defence Force. Links “There is no flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people," is a quote from Howard Zinn's 2011 book On War. We quote statistics from the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data Project. The Effect of War on Economic Growth, report from Cato Institute. Listen to Winston Churchill's full speech, We Will Never Surrender, from 1940. Read Nigel Biggar's book, In Defence of War.  Find out more about Augustine's City of God.  You can read more of the letters between Augustine and his Christian military officers,Marcellinus and Boniface, here. Australian war casualty statistics are from the Australian War Memorial. Read Romans 13 for yourself. Mike Bird was one of our 'phone a friend' guests for this episode. He wrote The Story of God commentary for the Book of Romans for Zondervan and is a lecturer at Ridley College. Henry Chadwick is the great Augustine biographer. He wrote the Oxford Very Short Introduction to Augustine which you can find here. Read the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reporting on the alleged war crimes committed by Australian soldiers in Afghanistan. You can find the full Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force Afghanistan Inquiry report (commonly known as the Brereton Report), here. More on Thomas Aquinas and Just War. If you're using Apple Podcasts, go to undeceptions.com for the full show notes, which cut off after 4000 characters here. We did a big, two-part episode on the Crusades in Season 4 - called 'God's War I and II'. Learn more about General William Tecumseh Sherman, the Union General who said, "War is hell".  Jarrod McKenna was another of our lovely 'phone a friend' guests for this episode. He is an advocate for non-violence direct action. Christianity Today profiled a series of 'Christian soldiers' back in 2015 for a series called Ponder Christian Soldiers.  We featured a clip from The West Wing, Season 1 Episode 3: A Proportional Response. Find out more about Carl von Clauswitz and his 1832 tome, On War. Here's the Australian Defence Force Philosophical Doctrine we quote from towards the end of the episode. Here's the plot of Shakespeare's Henry V. Watch The Hollow Crown: Henry V. 

Trinity City Church
The Restoration of Public Life

Trinity City Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


aijcast
S18E05 - Revs. Ron Bonner and Jennifer Butler

aijcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 24:16


A double-header episode from Wild Goose Festival featuring conversations with the Revs. Ron Bonner and Jennifer Butler. Ron Bonner is Associate Pastor for Community Engagement at Lutheran Church of the Redeemer. He speaks with us about the criminality of racism, and how understanding racism as "sin" has allowed white Christians to avoid confronting it. Jennifer Butler is CEO of Faith in Public Life and the author of Who Stole My Bible? She speaks with us about reclaiming scripture as a handbook for resisting tyranny.

HelloHealth Today
Interview—Natosha Reid Rice

HelloHealth Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 38:26


Action Steps: Keep the main thing the main thing. In other words, determine what feeds your soul (e.g., family, friends, prayer) and keep that central in all you do. Check in with yourself quarterly. Schedule time every three months to ensure the things you are doing line up with your purpose for that season of your life. Put your first self-check on your calendar today. Value your relationships. Invest in the ones that matter because they are the ones that will provide you with your “mirror moments.”  Create spaces to celebrate others. Even a small space to acknowledge another's commitment to positive change will help you learn to find the ways we all connect to each other. About Natosha Reid RiceNatosha Reid Rice is Habitat for Humanity International's first Global Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer and is leading the development and the execution of Habitat's global strategy for diversity, equity, and inclusion.In her previous role as Associate General Counsel, Natosha initiated and managed financing programs and strategies to generate sources of capital to enable Habitat affiliates to build affordable housing with families throughout the U.S. In addition to her work at Habitat, Natosha served as an Associate Pastor at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia for 11 years before joining All Saints' Episcopal Church as Minister for Public Life.  Prior to joining Habitat, she practiced law in the commercial real estate practices of Alston & Bird LLP in Atlanta, Georgia and of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP in New York City.  Natosha is passionate about providing a voice to the voiceless and opportunities to communities that have been historically disadvantaged. She serves on the boards of the global Harvard Alumni Association's Executive Committee, Atlanta Community Food Bank, Goodwill of North Georgia, Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, and Westminster Schools. She has also been actively involved in efforts to pass legislation and policies to protect victims of human sex trafficking in Georgia, such as the passage of the Safe Harbor/Rachel's Law in 2015.   Additionally, she is a highly regarded keynote speaker and workshop facilitator and delivered her talk “If We Are More Alike Than Unalike . . .” for TEDx CentennialParkWomen.Natosha received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her B.A. in government with honors from Harvard/Radcliffe College. Natosha is married to Corey Rice, and they are the proud parents of Kayla, Malachi, and Caleb.  For more information on Dr. Carmen Mohan and HelloHealth's services or to browse our free downloads, visit hellohealthtoday.com/hh-downloads.Follow Dr. Mohan on Instagram: @mohancarmenFollow HelloHealth on Instagram: @hellohealthtodayPlease feel free to reach out directly for more information about HelloHealth's services by contacting pr@hellohealthclinic.com.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Should our former leaders be seen and not heard?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 8:37


Once upon a time our former Prime Ministers were shipped off to be the High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, but that's not the case today. Recent political events have seen Australia with a glut of former Prime Ministers who are offering their opinions but not everyone is keen to hear what they have to say.

Rear Vision - ABC RN
Anti-corruption commissions—‘star chambers' or the best way to ensure integrity in public life?

Rear Vision - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 29:06


What role do these agencies play in ensuring that politicians and the rest of our public sector behave the right way?

Institute for Government
Keynote speech: Lord Evans, Chair of the Committee on Standards in Public Life

Institute for Government

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 60:55


The Committee on Standards in Public Life (CSPL) is an independent body which advises the prime minister on arrangements for upholding ethical standards of conduct across public life. The committee's latest review, Standards Matter 2, has been examining the institutions, processes and structures in place to support high standards of conduct. Following the publication of the review's final report, Upholding Standards in Public Life, on 1 November, Lord Evans, Chair of the CSPL, set out the committee's suggestions for improving standards in government in an opening keynote. This event was chaired by Bronwen Maddox, Director of the Institute for Government. #IfGstandards

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
Judith Brett's 'Doing politics and writing on public life'

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:48


As a keen observer and respected writer Judith Brett has seen, over four decades, political fortunes rise and fall and witnessed major shifts in our intellectual and cultural institutions. In her latest publication, Judith brings together a collection of some of her most insightful  essays and articles.

Q Podcast
Episode 215 | The State of Public Life: Jeff Pickering

Q Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:31


It can feel unproductive and hopeless to talk about the state of public life in America today. The upcoming generations are increasingly disillusioned that the world is going in a positive direction. Is it possible to overcome the divide in our nation and fight for a society that encourages the diverse thought? AEI's Faith & Public Life Director, Jeff Pickering, encourages us with what the Christian brings to the table and how college students are productively engaging the conversations of our day.   Interested in learning more about the issues facing the next generation? Join us for our free digital event, Nxt Gen Summit, at qideas.org/nxtgen.

Change the Story / Change the World
Episode 35: Jan Cohen-Cruz - Meeting the Moment

Change the Story / Change the World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 47:50


Jan Cohen-Cruz has given a lot to the field of arts-based community development. By that, I mean that there's a significant body of academic and community-based artwork, scholarship, teaching, and organizing that are absolutely covered with their fingerprints. BIOJan Cohen-Cruz was the founding editor of http://public.imaginingamerica.org/ (Public: A Journal) of Imagining America. She directed Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life (2007-12), and for 28 years before that, was a professor at NYU, directing a minor in applied theatre and initiating socially-engaged projects and courses. She wrote Engaging Performance: Theatre as Call and Response and Local Acts: Community‑Based Performance in the US. She edited Radical Street Performance and co‑edited Playing Boal: Theatre, Therapy, Activism and A Boal Companion. Jan was also a University Professor at Syracuse University. In 2012, she received the Association for Theatre in Higher Education's Award for Leadership in Community-Based Theatre and Civic Engagement. Here latest book, https://nyupress.org/9781613321546/meeting-the-moment/ (Meeting the Moment: Socially Engaged Theater, 1965 To 2020) written with https://nyupress.org/author/rad-pereira (Rad Pereira) will published by https://www.newvillagepress.org/about-us/mission-statement/ (New Village Press )in May 2022. Notable Mentions (in order of appearance)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augusto_Boal (Augusto Boal,) was a Brazilian theatre practitioner, drama theorist, and political activist. He was the founder of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theatre_of_the_Oppressed (Theatre of the Oppressed), a theatrical form originally used in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radical_Party_of_the_Left (radical left) popular education movements. Boal served one term as a Vereador (the Brazilian equivalent of a city councillor) in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rio_de_Janeiro (Rio de Janeiro) from 1993 to 1997, where he developed https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theatre_of_the_Oppressed#Legislative_theatre (legislative theatre).https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augusto_Boal#cite_note-PTO-1 ([1]) https://imaginingamerica.org/ (Imagining America:) “The Imagining America consortium (IA) brings together scholars, artists, designers, humanists, and organizers to imagine, study, and enact a more just and liberatory ‘America' and world. Working across institutional, disciplinary, and community divides, IA strengthens and promotes public scholarship, cultural organizing, and campus change that inspires collective imagination, knowledge-making, and civic action on pressing public issues.” https://public.imaginingamerica.org/about/ (Public): “Public is a peer-reviewed, multimedia e-journal focused on humanities, arts, and design in public life. It aspires to connect what we can imagine with what we can do. We are interested in projects, pedagogies, resources, and ideas that reflect rich engagements among diverse participants, organizations, disciplines, and sectors.” https://nyupress.org/9781613321546/meeting-the-moment/ (Meeting the Moment Socially Engaged Theater, 1965 To 2020): https://nyupress.org/author/jan-cohen-cruz (Jan Cohen-Cruz) and https://nyupress.org/author/rad-pereira (Rad Pereira): Curated stories from over 75 interviews and informal exchanges offer insight into the field and point out limitations due to discrimination and unequal opportunity for performance artists in the United States over the past 55 years. In this work, performers, often unknown beyond their immediate audience, articulate diverse influences. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Open_Theater (Open Theater): The Open Theater was an https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Experimental_theatre (experimental theatre) group active from 1963 to 1973. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trial (Franz Kafka's The Trial:) The Trial is a novel written by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Kafka (Franz Kafka) between 1914... Support this podcast

Leading Forward: Building Healthy Leaders for Healthy Organizations
Bill Haslam on Leadership, Public Life and Faithful Presence

Leading Forward: Building Healthy Leaders for Healthy Organizations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 45:03


Bill Haslam served two terms as the 49th governor of Tennessee (2011-2019) and as mayor of Knoxville (2003-2011). Prior to that, he spent a career in the corporate world, leading at a senior level in a number of businesses. In this episode, he joined Matthew Hall and Andrea McDaniel Smith to discuss his recent book, Faithful Presence: The Promise and Peril of Faith in the Public Square, and to reflect on some important principles for leaders in any context.  Links from this episode:Governor Bill HaslamFaithful Presence: The Promise and Peril of Faith in the Public Square (Bill Haslam)@BillHaslam (Twitter)Review Leading Forward in Apple Podcasts and let us know what you think of the show.Keep up with the show on social media: Twitter // Facebook // Instagram

YUTORAH: R' Moshe Taragin -- Recent Shiurim
A Neziv for Chayei Sara: Hazards of Public Life; Value of Communication Within Marriage

YUTORAH: R' Moshe Taragin -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 11:53


Future Hindsight
The Social Contract - History of a Big Idea: Melissa Lane

Future Hindsight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:34


The Social Contract The state of nature is a human condition that exists in any space that lacks a civil authority. With the social contract, we're prepared to make a deal with each other in order to live together as best we can and exit the state of nature. Philosophers such as Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau expressed versions of the social contract that influence governments around the world today. Co-Creating Reality We are all co-creators of our community politics and social outcomes. The ancient Greeks embraced civic thought as a pervasive and abiding concern for the matters belonging to the community in common. Classical ideas can provide a lens for choosing to embrace or to abandon the obligation to sustain and participate in a mutually beneficial reality. Mutual Aid Where is the social contract working today? In response to the pandemic, mutual aid sprung up to meet people's needs in many communities. Members participate as much as they're able to and ask for what they need. In doing so, the group can work together to sustain and provide for its members.  FIND OUT MORE: Melissa Lane is the Class of 1943 Professor of Politics and the Director of the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. Her research and teaching are focused in the area of the history of political thought, with a special expertise in ancient Greek thought, and in normative political philosophy, including especially environmental ethics and politics. She is an associated faculty member in the Princeton Department of Classics and Department of Philosophy. Her books include The Birth of Politics: Eight Greek and Roman Political Ideas and Why They Matter (PUP, 2015); Plato's Progeny (Duckworth, 2001); and Method and Politics in Plato's Statesman (CUP, 1998). At Princeton, she was the first director of the Program in Values and Public Life, and is co-chair of the Steering Committee for Service and Civic Engagement and of the Climate Futures Initiative. She received a Phi Beta Kappa teaching prize in 2015. Before joining the Princeton faculty in 2009, she taught in the Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge and was a Fellow of King's College, Cambridge. She is a Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Royal Historical Society, and the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce (RSA).

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
WTTW Chicago politics reporter Heather Cherone: There is disagreement of whether Rahm Emanuel should be disqualified from public life

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


WTTW Chicago politics reporter Heather Cherone joins John Williams to explain the points of contention in Rahm Emanuel’s nomination to the role of Japan ambassador. That’s given the lack of transparency over the Laquan McDonald shooting during his administration.

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast
WTTW Chicago politics reporter Heather Cherone: There is disagreement of whether Rahm Emanuel should be disqualified from public life

WGN - The John Williams Uncut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


WTTW Chicago politics reporter Heather Cherone joins John Williams to explain the points of contention in Rahm Emanuel’s nomination to the role of Japan ambassador. That’s given the lack of transparency over the Laquan McDonald shooting during his administration.

Israel Studies Seminar
Atalia Omer - Pathways toward a Jewish Israeli Restorative Ethics

Israel Studies Seminar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:45


Atalia Omer discusses restorative justice practices and the possibilities (and limits) of Jewish critiques of Zionism. In the same way that it is no longer possible to talk about antisemitism without also thinking about Israel/Palestine, it is no longer possible to imagine Jewish ethics outside the realities of Jewish power. My focus here is on when such thinking unfolds through a restorative justice prism or carries a restorative justice potential. At stake is not only a Jewish critique of Zionism, but also justice for Palestinians. The two issues are forever enmeshed. Examining Judith Butler's relational ethical analysis of Zionism in her Parting Ways and Michael Manekin's recent The Dawn of Redemption, I argue that, to the degree that restorative justice practices are missing from ethical Jewish reflections on Zionism and Israelism, the sources of such Jewish critiques of Zionism remain diasporic. Butler approaches it from the comfort of diasporic “authenticity,” while Manekin reclaims a Jewish (Israeli) ethics from within the realities of Jewish Israeliness and with an effort to reimagine religious Zionism as gentle and kind. At the same time, focusing on Jewish Israeli restorative justice practices and potentials, including Zochrot, young “refusniks,” and the petition of Jewish Israelis against Israel apartheid propelled by the escalation of violence in May 2021, offers a pathway for unsettling the diasporic as the primary source of ethical critique of Israelism. These restorative pathways constitute sources for Jewish ethics from the ground up where the experiences of Jewish power and Israelism can no longer be bracketed or magically theorized out of existence as “inauthentic.” Atalia Omer is a Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame in the United States. She is also the Dermot T.J. Dunphy Visiting Professor of Religion, Violence, and Peace Building at Harvard University and a senior fellow at the Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative at Harvard University's Religion and Public Life program. She earned her PhD in Religion, Ethics, and Politics (2008) from the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University. Her research focuses on religion, violence, and peacebuilding with a particular focus on Palestine/Israel as well as theories and methods in the study of religion. Omer was awarded an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship in 2017 to complete a manuscript titled Decolonizing Religion and Peacebuilding. Among other publications, Omer is the author of When Peace is Not Enough: How the Israeli Peace Camp Thinks about Religion, Nationalism, and Justice (University of Chicago Press, 2015) and Days of Awe: Reimagining Jewishness in Solidarity with Palestinians (University of Chicago Press, 2019). She is also a co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Israel Studies Seminar
Atalia Omer - Pathways toward a Jewish Israeli Restorative Ethics

Israel Studies Seminar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:45


Atalia Omer discusses restorative justice practices and the possibilities (and limits) of Jewish critiques of Zionism. In the same way that it is no longer possible to talk about antisemitism without also thinking about Israel/Palestine, it is no longer possible to imagine Jewish ethics outside the realities of Jewish power. My focus here is on when such thinking unfolds through a restorative justice prism or carries a restorative justice potential. At stake is not only a Jewish critique of Zionism, but also justice for Palestinians. The two issues are forever enmeshed. Examining Judith Butler's relational ethical analysis of Zionism in her Parting Ways and Michael Manekin's recent The Dawn of Redemption, I argue that, to the degree that restorative justice practices are missing from ethical Jewish reflections on Zionism and Israelism, the sources of such Jewish critiques of Zionism remain diasporic. Butler approaches it from the comfort of diasporic “authenticity,” while Manekin reclaims a Jewish (Israeli) ethics from within the realities of Jewish Israeliness and with an effort to reimagine religious Zionism as gentle and kind. At the same time, focusing on Jewish Israeli restorative justice practices and potentials, including Zochrot, young “refusniks,” and the petition of Jewish Israelis against Israel apartheid propelled by the escalation of violence in May 2021, offers a pathway for unsettling the diasporic as the primary source of ethical critique of Israelism. These restorative pathways constitute sources for Jewish ethics from the ground up where the experiences of Jewish power and Israelism can no longer be bracketed or magically theorized out of existence as “inauthentic.” Atalia Omer is a Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and at the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame in the United States. She is also the Dermot T.J. Dunphy Visiting Professor of Religion, Violence, and Peace Building at Harvard University and a senior fellow at the Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative at Harvard University's Religion and Public Life program. She earned her PhD in Religion, Ethics, and Politics (2008) from the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University. Her research focuses on religion, violence, and peacebuilding with a particular focus on Palestine/Israel as well as theories and methods in the study of religion. Omer was awarded an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship in 2017 to complete a manuscript titled Decolonizing Religion and Peacebuilding. Among other publications, Omer is the author of When Peace is Not Enough: How the Israeli Peace Camp Thinks about Religion, Nationalism, and Justice (University of Chicago Press, 2015) and Days of Awe: Reimagining Jewishness in Solidarity with Palestinians (University of Chicago Press, 2019). She is also a co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Faithful Politics
"Why our preferred pronoun for God should be ‘they'" - w/Mark Silk

Faithful Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 54:04


If you are a person of faith, especially a monotheistic faith, you probably have always thought of God as singular, and have even referred to God as a "He/Him", but is there another, more accurate pronoun to use? Mark Silk,  Director, Leonard Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life and Professor of Religion in Public Life, recently wrote an article called, "Why our preferred pronoun for God should be ‘they'" where he explores this topic in detail. We had a chance to chat with him and learn why his article seemed to strike a nerve among those who have commonly considered God's pronoun to be, well, less vague. We also talk about why he felt compelled to write a follow up article to his first one.Here are the article we referenced:Why our preferred pronoun for God should be ‘they'https://religionnews.com/2021/09/29/why-our-preferred-pronoun-for-god-should-be-they/Why calling God ‘they' shouldn't upset youhttps://religionnews.com/2021/10/04/why-calling-god-they-shouldnt-upset-you/Guest Bio:Mark Silk graduated from Harvard College in 1972 and earned his Ph.D. in medieval history from Harvard University in 1982. After teaching at Harvard in the Department of History and Literature for three years, he became editor of the Boston Review. In 1987 he joined the staff of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he worked variously as a reporter, editorial writer and columnist. In 1996 he became the first director of the Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life and in 1998 founding editor of Religion in the News, a magazine published by the Center that examines how the news media handle religious subject matter. In June 2005, he was also named director of the Trinity College Program on Public Values, comprising both the Greenberg Center and a new Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society and Culture.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/faithpolitics)

Re-integrate
Thoughtful Christians Engaging in Public Life with Matthew Kaemingk

Re-integrate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 43:27


How does our faith inform our public life? We know it addresses our personal lives, our personal holiness, our families, our churches.  But does our faith inform our work? Our enjoyment of art? Of fashion? Of architecture?  Instead of simply relying on the political pundits on the cable news channels, do we have access to theologically shaped ideas to issues like political ideologies, immigration, race relations, and economics?  Our guest on this episode of the Reintegrate Podcast is Dr. Matthew Kaemingk. He is the Richard John Mouw Assistant Professor of Faith and Public Life at Fuller Theological Seminary where he also serves as the Director of the Richard John Mouw Institute of Faith and Public Life. His research and teaching focus on marketplace theology, Islam and political ethics, and public theology. His latest publication is a book he edited as a festschrift to honor the life and work of Richard Mouw, Reformed Public Theology (Baker Academic, 2021). The book has essays written by experts from all over the world offering insights on issues facing us in the 21st Century, everything from immigration, euthanasia, economics, art, race, Christian practices like prayer, communion, baptism, confession, and piety, as well as political ideologies, populism, and activism.  Other books from Matthew Kaemingk include Christian Hospitality and Muslim Immigration in an Age of Fear (Eerdmans, 2018) and Work and Worship: Reconnecting Our Labor and Liturgy, cowritten with Cory Willson,(Baker Academic, 2020). Check out our podcast from April 2021 where we discuss that excellent book with Matt. Buy these books from Independent Bookseller, Hearts & Minds Bookstore. You can order online through their secure server or call 717-246-333. Mention that you heard about these books on the Reintegrate Podcast and get 20% off!  Thanks for listening! Your hosts are Brendan Romigh and Dr. Bob Robinson, the Executive Director of Reintegrate. Go to re-integrate.org for the latest articles on reintegrating your callings with God's mission and online resources for further learning. There is a Bible study book that you can use in your small group or individual devotions: Reintegrate Your Vocation with God's Mission by Bob Robinson. On Reintegrate's podcast page, you'll find more episodes and ways to email us to comment on this podcast.

JayZoModcast » My Public Life As An American Nerd Podcast
My Public Life As An American Nerd Season 5 #018_With Artist Jenna Sparks

JayZoModcast » My Public Life As An American Nerd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 123:43


Eddie sits down with Artist, Jenna Sparks! https://www.jennasparksart.com/ BUY SCAREFAIRE TICKETS AT: PCEHD.COM

Best of Today
What role should Science play in public life?

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:49


Radio 4's Day of the Scientist explores the role of science in our culture, after its resurgence in public interest over the past 18 months. Has its role changed at all? Amol Rajan speaks to Kate Bingham, leader of the Covid vaccine rollout, shadow Science Minister Chi Onwurah and Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter, the statistician.

JayZoModcast » My Public Life As An American Nerd Podcast
My Public Life As An American Nerd Season 5 #017 With After Hours Fun

JayZoModcast » My Public Life As An American Nerd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:14


Eddie Sits down with After Hours Fun!

WeeklyTech Podcast
A conversation with Dr. Marc LiVecche on the morality of war

WeeklyTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 41:08


In this episode, I am joined by Dr. Marc LiVecche, executive editor of Providence and author of a new book The Good Kill: Just War and Moral Injury and we talk about the morality of war.Meet Dr. LiVecche: Marc LiVecche serves as the just war and global statecraft scholar with the Institute on Religion and Democracy along with his duties at Providence. He also serves as the McDonald Visiting Scholar at the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life at Christ Church College and is a Leadership Research Fellow at the United States Naval Academy. His first book, The Good Kill: Just War and Moral Injury, was published in the summer of 2021 with Oxford University Press.Resources:The Good Kill by Marc LiVeccheAchilles in Vietnam by Jonathan ShayOdysseus in America by Jonathan ShayIn Defence of War by Nigel BiggarWhat It Is Like To Go Into War by Karl MarlantesMatterhorn by Karl Marlantes

JayZoModcast » My Public Life As An American Nerd Podcast
My Public Life As An American Nerd Season 5 #016 With Drastik - The Entertainer

JayZoModcast » My Public Life As An American Nerd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 56:07


Eddie sits down with Drastik!

WeeklyTech Podcast
A conversation with Dr. Matthew Kaemingk about public theology and ethics

WeeklyTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 37:06


In this episode, I am joined by Dr. Matthew Kaemingk, an ethics and theology professor at Fuller Theological Seminary and editor of Reformed Public Theology: A Global Vision for Life in the World. Today, we talk about a reformed vision for public theology and ethics.Meet Dr. Kaemingk: Dr. Matthew Kaemingk is a public theologian who explores questions facing Christians serving in politics, culture, and the marketplace. He teaches ethics and public theology at Fuller Theological Seminary, where he holds the Richard John Mouw Chair of Faith and Public Life. He also serves as a research fellow at the Center for Public Justice.Resources:Reformed Public Theology by Matthew KaemingkWork and Worship by Matthew KaemingkLectures on Calvinism by Abraham KuyperCalvinism for a Secular Age by Robert and Jessica JoustraAll That God Cares About by Richard MouwWhen the Kings Come Marching in by Richard MouwCulture Making by Andy Crouch

The Thomistic Institute
The City As Eschaton And Sacrament | Prof. Philip Bess

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 72:34


This lecture was delivered for the Civitas Dei Summer Fellowship on 6/17/2021. Slides for this lecture can be found at: tinyurl.com/k2f6372d For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the Speaker: Prof. Philip Bess (University of Notre Dame) lectures widely, and is the author of numerous articles and three books: City Baseball Magic: Plain Talk and Uncommon Sense About Cities and Baseball Parks (Knothole, 1991); Inland Architecture: Subterranean Essays on Moral Order and Formal Order in Chicago (Interalia / Design, 2000); and Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architecture, Urbanism, and the Sacred (ISI, 2006). He holds an undergraduate degree in philosophy from Whittier College, a graduate degree in church history from Harvard, and a graduate degree in architecture from the University of Virginia. In 2013-14 he was a William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life in Princeton University's James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions; in May 2015 he received the degree Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa from The Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley, California; and he was a Fall 2019 Fellow of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study.

The Thomistic Institute
Urban Formal Order, Natural Law, and Positive Law | Prof. Philip Bess

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 72:10


This lecture was delivered for the Civitas Dei Summer Fellowship on 6/16/2021. Slides for this lecture can be found at https://tinyurl.com/rue8mrvw. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the Speaker: Prof. Philip Bess (University of Notre Dame) lectures widely, and is the author of numerous articles and three books: City Baseball Magic: Plain Talk and Uncommon Sense About Cities and Baseball Parks (Knothole, 1991); Inland Architecture: Subterranean Essays on Moral Order and Formal Order in Chicago (Interalia / Design, 2000); and Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architecture, Urbanism, and the Sacred (ISI, 2006). He holds an undergraduate degree in philosophy from Whittier College, a graduate degree in church history from Harvard, and a graduate degree in architecture from the University of Virginia. In 2013-14 he was a William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life in Princeton University's James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions; in May 2015 he received the degree Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa from The Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley, California; and he was a Fall 2019 Fellow of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study.

This Week in Mormons
EP 547 – Constitution Day & Religion in Public Life | Eleesha Tucker of the Utah 3Rs Project

This Week in Mormons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021


Latter-day Saints can do more to recognize Constitution Day and embrace religion in the public sphere. The Utah 3Rs project makes it happen.

The Thomistic Institute
Urban Formal Order: Space, Anti-Space, Junkspace | Prof. Philip Bess

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 69:09


This lecture was delivered for the Civitas Dei Summer Fellowship on 6/15/2021. Slides for this lecture can be found at https://tinyurl.com/4sjjt6wt. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the Speaker: Prof. Philip Bess (University of Notre Dame) lectures widely, and is the author of numerous articles and three books: City Baseball Magic: Plain Talk and Uncommon Sense About Cities and Baseball Parks (Knothole, 1991); Inland Architecture: Subterranean Essays on Moral Order and Formal Order in Chicago (Interalia / Design, 2000); and Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architecture, Urbanism, and the Sacred (ISI, 2006). He holds an undergraduate degree in philosophy from Whittier College, a graduate degree in church history from Harvard, and a graduate degree in architecture from the University of Virginia. In 2013-14 he was a William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life in Princeton University's James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions; in May 2015 he received the degree Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa from The Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley, California; and he was a Fall 2019 Fellow of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study.

The Thomistic Institute
Cities And Human Flourishing | Prof. Philip Bess

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 72:15


This lecture was delivered for the Civitas Dei Summer Fellowship on 6/14/2021. Slides for this lecture can be found at https://tinyurl.com/zfa34prs. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the Speaker: Prof. Philip Bess (University of Notre Dame) lectures widely, and is the author of numerous articles and three books: City Baseball Magic: Plain Talk and Uncommon Sense About Cities and Baseball Parks (Knothole, 1991); Inland Architecture: Subterranean Essays on Moral Order and Formal Order in Chicago (Interalia / Design, 2000); and Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architecture, Urbanism, and the Sacred (ISI, 2006). He holds an undergraduate degree in philosophy from Whittier College, a graduate degree in church history from Harvard, and a graduate degree in architecture from the University of Virginia. In 2013-14 he was a William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion and Public Life in Princeton University's James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions; in May 2015 he received the degree Doctor of Humane Letters honoris causa from The Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology in Berkeley, California; and he was a Fall 2019 Fellow of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study.

PM full episode
Public life to resume in NSW

PM full episode

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 30:00


Just how risky is the New South Wales plan for the resumption of some public activities? We'll explain what's happening and when and the tension around limiting freedoms for the fully vaccinated. And we speak with a GP in Sydney who's concerned about the care provided to those with COVID.

Crossover Church
Nehemiah-Building Walls, Building People-Part 6: The Public Life of An Effective Leader

Crossover Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021


This sermon was preached by Terry Little, Senior Pastor of Crossover Church on Sunday, September 5th, 2021.

R-Soul: Reclaiming the Soul of Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice
The Water We Swim In: Harm Reduction, Abolition, & Reproductive Justice

R-Soul: Reclaiming the Soul of Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 32:34


Special guest Blyth Barnow from Faith in Public Life joins Ohio RCRC Faith Organizer Kelley Fox to discuss the oppressive systems that continue to harm those who are simply trying to survive & live their lives. From substance use to abortion access, this episode breaks down the white supremacist logic that insists there is only one path to a good and moral life. Links to discussed content: Faith in Public Life: www.faithinpubliclife.org/ Beyond Survival: www.akpress.org/beyond-survival.html Rat Park: www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/what-does-rat-park-teach-us-about-addiction Chasing the Scream: https://chasingthescream.com/ Guys Are Waffles, Girls Are Spaghetti: https://bookshop.org/books/guys-are-waffles-girls-are-spaghetti/9781400315161 Faith in Harm Reduction: https://harmreduction.org/our-work/action/faith-in-harm-reduction/ Join our "Abolition Reads" book club as we discuss We Still Here on August 31st: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUscOyqrTgiGt3BniTieir3bHqMAI9_qg4y Music by Korbin Jones

Partnering Leadership
Working to end poverty in the community by learning to say YES with Msgr. John Enzler | Greater Washington DC DMV Changemaker

Partnering Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 38:21


In this episode of Partnering Leadership, Monsignor John Enzler, President and CEO of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, shares impactful stories from his childhood, his journey becoming a priest, and leadership lessons he's learned through leading many charitable initiatives. Father John also explains the power of “yes” and the importance of collaborating with organizations of different faiths to fulfill a shared purpose.Some highlights:-Monsignor John Enzler's childhood and how his parents impacted his life-Why Fr. John Enzler decided to become a priest-On becoming Monsignor and why Fr. John Enzler prefers not to use his title-Fr. John Enzler's leadership in charities and the many lives he's helped through them-On welcoming Pope Francis to Catholic Charities in 2015-Why Fr. John Enzler believes learning to say “yes” defines his mission as a priestMentioned in this episode:-Stephen F. Riley, executive director of the Potomac Community Resources-John Carr, founder and co-director of the Initiative on Catholic Social Thought and Public Life at Georgetown University-David Brooks, political and cultural commentator & writer for The New York Times-Michael Gerson, former White House director of speechwriting-John Veihmeyer, former global chairman of KPMG ( Listen to John Veihmeyer's Partnering Leadership Podcast Episode here)Connect with Fr. John Enzler:Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington WebsiteFr. John Enzler on LinkedInFr. John Enzler on TwitterConnect with Mahan Tavakoli:MahanTavakoli.comMore information and resources available at the Partnering Leadership Podcast website: PartneringLeadership.com

Community Signal
Here's How Anti-Vaxxers Are Spreading Misinformation Despite Your Best Moderation Efforts

Community Signal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 33:43


What moderation tactics have you used or seen as a mechanism to curtail the spread of misinformation in communities and on social media platforms? Word detection, link blocking, and digital stickers promoting legitimate information sources may immediately come to mind. But what would happen if you ran your moderation tools against URLs shared in link-in-bio services used in your community? Or what if you learned that folks on your platform were using specific codewords to circumvent word detection? Or posting screenshots of misinformation rather than using plain-text? People are getting creative with how they share all types of information online, misinformation included. Are our moderation strategies keeping up? In this discussion, Patrick chats with Joseph Schafer, an undergraduate student of Computer Science and Ethics at the University of Washington and Rachel Moran, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington's Center for an Informed Public. They discuss their research and how anti-vaccine advocates are circumventing content moderation efforts on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and large social networks. Some of their findings might surprise you! For example, specific folk theories have emerged that define how some believe social platforms and algorithms work to moderate their content and conversations. And whether these theories are true or not, the strategies forming around them do seem to help people keep questionable content up long enough for researchers to come across it. So, where do we start? How can we detect misinformation if people are using codewords like pizza or Moana to get around our tools and teams? There may not be precise solutions here just yet, but Rachel and Joseph both offer ideas to help us down the right path, which starts with deciding that the engagement that brews around misinformation is not safe for the long-term health of your community. Among our topics: Why Linktree needs community guidelines and how link-in-bio sites have become a vector for misinformation The folk theories that are informing how we perceive and operate around social media algorithms Adapting your moderation strategies to better find misinformation Our Podcast is Made Possible By… If you enjoy our show, please know that it's only possible with the generous support of our sponsor: Vanilla, a one-stop shop for online community. Big Quotes Using lexical variation to circumvent moderation filters (2:45): “They found this big group of people who were using ‘dancing' or other kinds of verbs to mean getting the vaccine. Complete replacement of the word [vaccine]. You wouldn't know that that meant vaccination unless you were a member of that community and had the institutional knowledge that comes with being a member. We see [lexical variation] on a spectrum.” –@rachelemoran Emojis, code words, and symbols can form the insider language of a community (3:08): “We see ‘v@ccine' where the A is an @ sign or people using the vaccine emoji rather than using the word at all. They believe that if they put that instead of spelling out vaccine, … they'll avoid being caught up in the algorithmic moderation that happens on platforms.” –@rachelemoran Misinformation finds a hiding place in link-in-bios (5:05): “There's a variety of ways that you can … get around [link blocks]. One might be, for example, using a screenshot of an article or something that is vaccine misinformation, rather than putting in the text of the misinformation directly. … There's also various websites like URL shorteners or URL compilers, or even just a Word document … that is filled with links to sites that maybe these major platforms are moderating and blocking.” –@joey__schafer Using vaccination promotion tools to promote anti-vaccine content (10:56): “[On Instagram stories, you can use] that little sticker that says, ‘Let's get vaccinated.' Then Instagram collates those of your friends that have [used that] sticker … and it goes at the top of your [stories section]. … [We're seeing people] put a sticker over the top of that sticker or they are like, ‘Let's not get vaccinated.'” –@rachelemoran The engagement surrounding misinformation isn't good for the long-term health of your community or your business (32:06): “Part of the problem with misinformation is that it's really engaging. When you're making money off of engagement, there's only so far you're going to go to take down misinformation without going too far into your bottom line. … I feel like there is a tide-turning moment happening where the bigger platforms are realizing that misinformation is a vulnerability that degrades the product that can have economic disadvantages.” –@rachelemoran About Joseph Schafer and Rachel Moran Joseph Schafer is a fourth-year undergraduate student at the University of Washington, studying Computer Science and Ethics. He has also worked as a research assistant for the university's Center for an Informed Public since January of 2020, studying various forms of online misinformation and disinformation. Joseph hopes to pursue graduate school in information science, in order to understand how misinformation takes advantage of recently developed socio-technical systems, like social media, to influence our society. Rachel Moran is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington's Center for an Informed Public. Moran received her doctoral degree from the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California. Her research explores the role of trust in digital information environments and is particularly concerned with how trust is implicated in the spread of mis- and dis-information. Her research has been published in academic journals and been covered by the New York Times, Vox, Vice, and others. She was also an affiliate fellow at George Washington University's Institute for Data, Democracy, and Politics and UNC Chapel Hills' Center for Information, Technology, and Public Life. Related Links Sponsor: Vanilla, a one-stop-shop for online community Joseph Schafer on Twitter Joseph Schafer's website Rachel Moran on Twitter University of Washington's Center for an Informed Public Content moderation avoidance strategies, via The Virality Project Anti-vaccine groups changing into ‘dance parties' on Facebook to avoid detection, via NBC News Linktree's community guidelines First I “like” it, then I hide it: Folk Theories of Social Feeds Dr. Jennifer Beckett on Community Signal A top spreader of coronavirus misinformation says he will delete his posts after 48 hours, via the New York Times Election Integrity Partnership, which Joseph and Rachel both worked on Jay Rosen on Community Signal Transcript View transcript on our website Your Thoughts If you have any thoughts on this episode that you'd like to share, please leave me a comment, send me an email or a tweet. If you enjoy the show, we would be so grateful if you spread the word and supported Community Signal on Patreon.

Better Together
The Church's Role in Public Life in the New LGBT Environment (Eddie Moody, Matthew McAffee, Matthew S. Bracey, Matthew Pinson)

Better Together

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 30:14


Mere Fidelity
‘What's Wrong with Rights?' with Dr. Nigel Biggar

Mere Fidelity

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 50:06


Is the theory of natural rights really the best way to protect ourselves from tyrannical governments? This is the big question of Dr. Nigel Biggar's book, What's Wrong With Rights? Dr. Biggar is Regius Professor of Moral & Pastoral Theology, and Director of the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, & Public Life, University of Oxford. Matt and Alastair push on this argument with Dr. Biggar to examine the relationship between morality and law. Fun connection: Dr. Biggar is Dr. Matt Anderson's former Ph.D. advisor! Full show notes at merefidelity.com

Common Ground Meditation Center: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Patrice Koelsch: The Paramis in Public Life - Meditation

Common Ground Meditation Center: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 28:31


(Common Ground Meditation Center)

Common Ground Meditation Center: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Patrice Koelsch: The Paramis in Public Life - Talk

Common Ground Meditation Center: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 52:41


(Common Ground Meditation Center)

The Michael Berry Show
Sickening, Just Sickening | PM Show

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 71:02


Michael Berry exposes Dr. Anthony Fauci on his flip-flopping statements regarding vaccines and face masks; Alex Epstein, founder of the Center for Industrial Progress, joins the show to discuss his recent testimony before Congress about a coal mine in Puerto Rico; Christopher Bedford, senior editor at The Federalist, makes an appearance to talk about a recent article he wrote entitled "Why Saving Comedy Is So Crucial To Saving America"; Dr. Benjamin Wiker, Senior Fellow at the Veritas Center for Ethics and Public Life at Franciscan University, joins Berry to discuss his new book "10 Books That Screwed Up the World And 5 Others That Didn't Help"; Jennifer Stefano, Chief Strategist and Vice President at the Commonwealth Foundation, makes an appearance to talk about Critical Race Theory.

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com
Monday, June 21, 2021

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 24:05


DOCUMENTATION AND ADDITIONAL READING PART 1 (0:0 - 15:38): ────────────────── Debate Continues in the Roman Catholic Church Over Communion Rights for Politicians Who Support Abortion: The Necessity of Moral Coherence in One's Personal and Public Life NEW YORK TIMES (JASON HOROWITZ) Vatican Warns U.S. Bishops: Don't Deny Biden Communion Over Abortion THE CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH Doctrinal Note on Some Questions Regarding the Participation of Catholics in Political Life PART 2 (15:39 - 21:14): ────────────────── Benjamin Netanyahu Is Out as Prime Minister of Israel — And There's Theology Here Under the Headlines NEW YORK TIMES (DAVID M. HALBFINGER) Netanyahu, ‘King of Israel,' Exits a Stage He Dominated PART 3 (21:15 - 24:5): ────────────────── NEW YORK TIMES (DAVID E. SANGER AND FARNAZ FASSIHI) For Biden, Iranian Hard-liner May Be Best Path to Restoring Nuclear Deal