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  • Oct 13, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about Hudson Institute

Latest podcast episodes about Hudson Institute

Bribe, Swindle or Steal
“American Kleptocracy”

Bribe, Swindle or Steal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:25


Casey Michel with the Hudson Institute's Kleptocracy Initiative joins the podcast for a very lively discussion about his new book, American Kleptocracy: How the U.S. Created the World's Greatest Money Laundering Scheme in History. Casey discusses America's role in the problem of global kleptocracy and shares some optimism about the path ahead.

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Oct 08, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 45:19


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Dr Gordon Adams, the senior White House budget official for national security during the Clinton administration who is now a distinguished fellow at the Quincy Institute and the Stimson Center as well as an American University professor emeritus, and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute. Topics: — Update on NDAA and appropriations, increased borrowing limit that will forestall debt default until after Dec. 3, and slimmed down Democratic spending — Beijing's increasingly larger formations of aircraft that are testing Taiwanese air defenses — Risks of the new strategy as scores of Chinese fighter, bombers and patrol aircraft operate near Taiwan — Outlook for Chinese economy as Evergrande and other institutions suffer setbacks — Prospects that Beijing, sensing decline, will move against Taiwan sooner than later — Whether a shift in US policy toward Taiwan would improve deterrence or undermine it — Bombing of Shiite mosque in Afghanistan that killed 48 — USS Connecticut's mystery collision in the South China Sea that injured 11 aboard the Seawolf-class attack sub

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Oct 01, 21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 49:01


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Dr Gordon Adams, the senior White House budget official for national security during the Clinton administration who is now a distinguished fellow at the Quincy Institute and the Stimson Center as well as an American University professor emeritus, and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute. Topics — Outlook for federal budget and NDAA as lawmakers strike stopgap deal through Dec. 3 to avert government shutdown — Defense spending implications of bipartisan infrastructure deal and Democratic $3.5 trillion spending package — Beijing's sharp rhetoric against Australia, Japan, Philippines and Taiwan as Washington focuses on domestic issues — Whether China becomes more dangerous as Xi Jinping's economic policies and “wolf warrior” diplomacy undermine continued economic growth — Senate and House Afghanistan hearings and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley's defense of his conversations with his Chinese counterpart in the wake of the 2020 election — What to expect from new Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida and the upcoming German government expected to be led Olaf Schultz — Rising tensions between Azerbaijan and Turkey and Iran over access to Armenian enclave of Nagorno Karabakh — US Army's decision to reject RAFAEL's combat proven Iron Dome system for Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 in favor of AIM-9X Sidewinder based approach by Dynetics and Raytheon

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Alt Media Hawks and Neocons in Populist Clothing? w/ Robbie Martin and Connor Freeman

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 91:04


On this edition of Parallax Views, are certain segments of alt media becoming hawkish geopolitically beyond the faltering "Forever Wars"? In other words, is there criticisms to be lobbed at alt media figures who may be becoming more hawkish geopolitically as we enter what appears to be a New Cold War on China? Robbie Martin of Media Roots Radio and Connor Freeman of The Libertarian Institute join me to chat about Saagar Enjeti (formerly of Rising on The Hill and now Breaking Point w/ his former Rising co-host Krystal Ball), Cold War 2.0 with China, and alt media hawks. We discuss the Asia Pivot, The Project for a New American Century's (PNAC) long shadow, "The Realignment", neocons in populist clothing, the New "Manufacturing Consent" for a War on China, has the comedy scene got the psyop treatment?, the Hudson Institute funded by military-industrial complex heavyweights like Northrop Grumman and Raytheon,  the Institute for the Study of War, Robbie's belief that neocons have infiltrated the alt media left, the Committee on the Present Danger China, propaganda adapting to the new era of great power competition,  Bari Weiss and the "Intellectual Dark Web", Tucker Carlson, Julian Assange, and much, much more.

Work From The Inside Out
144: Build Your Promotability - Amii Barnard-Bahn

Work From The Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 51:19


When Amii Barnard-Bahn graduated from college with an English degree, she didn't know what she wanted. So she applied to law school. Amii said, “It was kind of a crazy, interesting thing to do.” Attending Georgetown Law School, she tapped the advocate within wanting to impact social change. She worked as an ACLU fellow and took the first LGBT sexual orientation class ever taught at a law school. Amii was the T.A. for Dr. Anthony Cook, a well-known scholar in critical race theory, and served as editor on her law journal. Amii's piece on the black women's anti-lynching movement in the 1890s was published in the UCLA Women's Law Journal, resulting in her coining the term critical race feminism, now used regularly. Upon graduation, Amii worked for a small employment law firm where she had the unique chance to handle both plaintiff and defendant cases. While it was a valuable experience, billable hours, and metrics were not aligned with her values. After three-plus years with the firm, Amii resigned although she did not know what she wanted to do next. She said it was the scariest thing she ever did, but Amii wanted to find a better way to help people.  Amii spent nine months exploring her options, determining that her qualifications and interests were best suited to Human Resources where she could combine her legal background with her dedication to equity, compliance, and ethics. She also pursued her graduate certificate in coaching through the Hudson Institute.  Amii served in executive roles for McKesson, the California Dental Association, and Tetra Tech. Today, Amii's an executive coach and consultant to C suite leaders at global companies like Adobe, and The Gap. Amii guest lectures at Stanford and UC Berkeley, and is a contributor to Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, and Compliance Week, and is a fellow at the Harvard Institute of Coaching. She developed the Promotability Index Self-Assessment and published The PI Guidebook that works along with the assessment results. In this week's Work From The Inside Out podcast, learn more about Amii''s  journey: Amii is recognized by Forbes as one of the top coaches for legal and compliance executives, and she is a member of Marshall Goldsmith 100 coaches.  She testified for the successful passage of the first laws in the US requiring corporate boards to include women.  Learn more and connect with Amii here:  https://twitter.com/amiibb http://www.barnardbahn.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/amiibarnardbahn/ https://www.instagram.com/barnardbahn/ https://www.facebook.com/barnardbahn/

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Sep 24 '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 54:03


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Jim Townsend, a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Europe and NATO who is now with the Center for a New American Security, Byron Callan of the independent Washington research firm Capital Alpha partners and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute. Topics: — Update on reconcilliation, debt ceiling, infrastructure and NDAA — Whether defense spending might become a casualty as debt collides with infrastructure and spending plans — Democrat's self-inflicted wound over move to block funding for Israel's Iron Dome system — Biden's UN address, Quad meeting and bilateral discussions with UK and Australia in the wake of the three-nation strategic partnership — How Beijing is responding to the deal that will furnish Canberra with nuclear attack submarines — Transatlantic links in wake of call between Biden and Macron to discuss AUKUS deal as EU calls for higher spending and more strategic autonomy — Takeaways from the Air Force Association's annual Air Space Cyber conference and tradeshow — What's next in Tokyo as Yoshihide Suga prepares to step down as prime minister

Rich Zeoli
"There Are Too Many Coincidences Here" David Asher on the Origins of COVID-19

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 13:49


Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, David Asher, joined Rich to give an update on the origins of COVID-19 and gave some insight on the Chinese defector that claims the COVID-19 virus was intentionally released at the 2019 Military Games in Wuhan.   Photo: Getty Images See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rich Zeoli
Evidence Emerges on Developments of "Super" Coronaviruses (Full Zeoli Show 09-24-21)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 185:35


Today on the Rich Zeoli Show,  Rich discussed the evidence continues to mount of a man-made coronavirus that developed into the COVID-19 pandemic. Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, David Asher, joined Rich to give an update on the origins of COVID-19 and the known Chinese Defector that is claiming the virus was purposely relapsed during the Military games in 2019 in Wuhan.  Photo: Getty Images See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast
E32. LTG H.R. McMaster on Foreign Policy Challenges

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 29:00


Ayaan speaks with LTG H.R. McMaster about foreign policy challenges and threats, the withdrawal from Afghanistan and the recent purging of members from military boards.  LTG H. R. McMaster is the Fouad and Michelle Ajami Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is also the Bernard and Susan Liautaud Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute and lecturer at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. He serves as the Japan Chair at the Hudson Institute and Chairman of the Center for Political and Military Power at the Foundation for Defense of Democracy. He was the 26th assistant to the president for National Security Affairs. McMaster served as a commissioned officer in the United States Army for thirty-four years after graduation from West Point.  He holds a PhD in military history from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is author of Battlegrounds: The Fight to Defend the Free World and Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Lies that Led to Vietnam. He is host of the podcast Battlegrounds: International Perspectives on Crucial Challenges to Security and Prosperity. Follow him on Twitter @LTGHRMcMaster.  Follow Ayaan on Twitter @ayaan.

Be Real Show
#354 - Amii Barnard-Bahn gets REAL about Culture and Changemakers

Be Real Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 34:20


A former Fortune Global 50 exec, I'm a coach and consultant who specializes in accelerating the success of legal and compliance executives and their teams. My clients include Adobe, Gap, Chegg, Boehringer Ingelheim, Lyft, FedEx, and Bank of the West. An author and frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, and Compliance Week, I previously shaped company culture and strategic initiatives as an executive (CAO, Chief Compliance Officer, and Chief HR Officer) at Fortune Global 50 companies such as McKesson and Allianz. I advise organizations on how leaders create ethical workplaces -- exceptional cultures that out behave and outperform the competition. Forbes was kind enough to call me “one of the top coaches for legal and compliance executives.” I'm a Fellow at the Harvard Institute of Coaching and member of Marshall Goldsmith's MG100 Coaches, which brings together the world's top executive coaches. ​ I guest lecture at UC Berkeley, Stanford, and The Fletcher School at Tufts University, and have extensive experience presenting to corporations, industry groups and associations such as the California Chamber of Commerce, Georgetown Alumni, The Conference Board, Association of Corporate Counsel and SHRM affiliates. I have been quoted in publications such as Forbes, the SFChronicle, NBC affiliates and other national business publications. Please see Accomplishments - Projects section below for speaking engagements. I earned my law degree with honors from Georgetown, BA from Tufts, and am a member of the California State Bar. A graduate of the Hudson Institute of Coaching, I'm a Professional Certified Coach (PCC) by the International Coach Federation. I work to ensure that women have a platform for their unique challenges and perspectives. A lifelong diversity advocate, I testified for the successful passage of the first laws in the U.S. requiring corporate boards to include women. Outside of my business, I'm active in supporting the arts as a way to bring people together and bridge differences. ✈️ You can receive my free Promotability Index® career self-assessment at bit.ly/promoteindex or text PROMOTEME to 44-222

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Sep 17 '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 50:48


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Jim Townsend, a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Europe and NATO who is now with the Center for a New American Security and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute. Topics: — Look ahead to House floor vote on National Defense Authorization Act and amendments including rejecting the $25 billion increase to Pentagon spending — Senate continues markups with plans to vote next month — Update on continuing resolution — Implications and strategic messaging aspects of the new partnership among the United States, United Kington and Australia on technology development, including furnishing Canberra with eight new nuclear-powered attack submarines — Whether Congress will endorse legislative changes to export nuclear submarine technology to Australia — Paris' rage in the wake of the surprise AUKUS deal and the abrupt cancellation of Canberra's contract with Naval Group for a dozen conventionally powered submarines — How the Biden administration can dispel the growing perception that it's as unilateralist, unpredictable and America First as the Trump administration — What Washington should do to mollify tensions with France, a key European and Pacific ally — North Korea's new missile tests — Analysis of Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley's role in contacting China to reassure Chinese leaders as tensions rose after Trump's November election loss

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
High Noon: Rebeccah Heinrichs – On the Impact of Incompetence and Forging a Uniquely American Foreign Policy (#20)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


Inez interviews Rebeccah Heinrichs, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute and an adjunct professor at the Institute of World Politics, a graduate school for national affairs. She specializes in national security, international relations, arms control, and missile defense, and she has served as an expert in that capacity in the U.S. House of Representatives. […]

The Great Books
Episode 195: ‘The Viking Sagas’

The Great Books

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 34:38


John J. Miller is joined by Arthur Herman of the Hudson Institute to discuss 'The Viking Sagas.'

大紀元新聞
美前情報高官:國防部需結構調整 應對中俄 | 大紀元 | 大纪元

大紀元新聞

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 4:49


美前情報高官埃茲拉.科恩(Ezra Cohen)在與保守智庫哈德遜研究所(Hudson Institute)9月2日的訪談中表示,美國從阿富汗撤軍令美國的信譽受到影響。美國應該向對手發出明確信息:在國防部做重大結構調整,以便在對應中共和俄羅斯的作戰中更加靈活和迅速。 更多內容請見:https://www.epochtimes.com/b5/21/9/6/n13213243.htm 大纪元,大纪元新闻,大紀元,大紀元新聞,阿富汗, 撤軍, 情報, 恐怖組織, 美國國防部 Support this podcast

Mornings on the Mall
The Vince Coglianese Show - 09.07.21

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 103:12


Vince Coglianese speaks with Dr. Ben Carson, Former Sec. of Housing and Urban Development under Pres. Trump, former Presidential Candidate, and neurosurgeon;Robby Soave, Senior Editor at the Reason Foundation; DAVID ASHER, senior fellow at Hudson Institute; and Zaid Jilani, journalist for Inquiremore.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mornings on the Mall
The Vince Coglianese Show - David Asher - 09.07.21

Mornings on the Mall

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 17:30


Vince Coglianese speaks with  DAVID ASHER, senior fellow at Hudson Institute. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sea Control
Sea Control 272 - Changing the Navy's Force Generation Model with Bryan Clark & Bryan McGrath

Sea Control

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 26:42


Links1. "Disrupt the Navy's Operational Model to Counter China," by Bryan Clark & Bryan McGrath, CDRSalamander, Aug 11, 2021.2. "Restoring American Seapower - A New Fleet Architecture for the United States Navy," by Bryan Clark, Bryan McGrath et al., Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, 2017.3. "American Seapower at a Crossroads: A Plan to Restore the US Navy's Maritime Advantage," by Bryan Clark, Timothy Walton, and Seth Cropsey, Hudson Institute, Sep 29, 2020.

Foreign Policy ProvCast
Episode #66 | The Fall of Afghanistan and Joe Biden's Withdrawal (Rebeccah Heinrichs)

Foreign Policy ProvCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 36:21


In this episode, Rebeccah Heinrichs of the Hudson Institute talks with Mark Melton about the fall of Afghanistan. She describes what went wrong in Afghanistan, the problems of nation-building, whether the “forever war” is over, and how the United States military had been conducting counter-terrorism operations in Afghanistan. They also discuss why Joe Biden's withdrawal was a debacle and problems with the “over the horizon” strategy to stop terrorism now that the US military is gone. Heinrichs also makes the case that the US should not have abandoned Bagram Air Base near Kabul and explains why this has led to tragedy. She analyzes how the US withdrawal from Afghanistan affects America's geopolitical strategy, particularly its competition with China. Finally, she offers some lessons Americans should learn from Afghanistan.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
8-30-2021 Washington Watch Live with Tony Perkins

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 54:10


Chris Smith, U.S. Representative for the 4th district of New Jersey and Senior Member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, discusses the humanitarian disaster following the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban, his evacuation efforts in Afghanistan, and how Congress can hold the Biden administration accountable for the unfolding catastrophe. Tony Perkins, FRC President and Marine veteran, gives an on the ground report on Ida Hurricane relief efforts in Louisiana. Franklin Graham, President of Samaritan's Purse, shares how Samaritan's Purse is responding to Hurricane Ida. Nina Shea, Senior Fellow and Director of the Center for Religious Freedom at Hudson Institute, talks about what's happening to Christians in Afghanistan. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Aug 27 '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 57:57


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, we take a deep dive into the events in and around the US withdrawal from Afghanistan– our guests are Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Jim Townsend, a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Europe and NATO who is now with the Center for a New American Security, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute and Chris Servello, a founder of Provision Advisors public relations firm (and Defense and Aerospace team member).

Rich Zeoli
"The Reason Why We Have to Rely on the Taliban is Because We Got Rid of our Ability to Not Rely on the Taliban"

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 19:19


David Asher joins the Rich Zeoli Show to discuss the ongoing situation in Afghanistan. Asher is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute and his work focuses on U.S. foreign policy. Zeoli and Asher go on to talk about future implications of what is currently taking place in Afghanistan as well as the lunacy of the Taliban providing security for the remaining U.S. troops in Afghanistan.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY
EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY - 2021-08-26 - EWTN News Nightly | Thursday, August 26, 2021

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 30:00


On "EWTN News Nightly" tonight: The White House says President Joe Biden has been meeting with his National Security Team, while being briefed on the latest. With 5 days left until the August 31st deadline, there was carnage near the Kabul airport earlier today, inflicted by 2 suicide bombers and gunmen who targeted crowds of people hoping to escape the Taliban's brutality and repression. White House and National Political Correspondent for Real Clear Politics, Susan Crabtree, joins to give her thoughts on the tragic developments of today and what is known about the service members who died. Lawmakers are asking questions of the Biden Administration about what is next for US involvement in Afghanistan. Some have expressed security concerns with the vetting system for Afghans arriving in the US. Nina Shea, Director for Religious Freedom at the Hudson Institute, joins to explain what Sharia law is and the type of Sharia law that was implemented by the Taliban when they first held power in the country over 20 years ago. Finally this evening, a meeting focused on the 6th anniversary of Pope Francis' encyclical Laudato Si will take place in Argentina next week. The theme will be "Caring for the Common Home." Lecturer in Theology at the Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina, Professor Emilce Cuda, joins to tell us about this meeting. Don't miss out on the latest news and analysis from a Catholic perspective. Get EWTN News Nightly delivered to your email: https://ewtn.com/enn

The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast
Biden is Losing! | 08.25.2021 #ProAmericaReport

The Pro America Report with Ed Martin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 42:15


What You Need to Know is Biden is losing! Don't be distracted by Pelosi's January 6th enemies list etc. because Biden is failing. It's so obvious in how he is mishandling Afghanistan, the southern border, the Economy, Congress (infrastructure stalled), and in polls. It's crazy because even the media seems to be frustrated with Biden. Democrats are running scared! John Schlafly, treasurer of the Phyllis Schlafly Eagles, shares the most recent column Wanton War on Early Covid Treatment. John explains the outrageous situations we are seeing when it comes to vaccines, masks, and doctors being unwilling to prescribe alternative medications to prevent or heal someone with Covid-19. Catch the column by John and Andy Schlafly every week at Townhall.com and PhyllisSchlafly.com.  Melanie Kirkpatrick, writer-journalist, senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, & author of the brand new book Lady Editor: Sarah Josepha Hale and the Making of the Modern American Woman. Melanie explains the extraordinary influence that Sarah Josepha Hale had in her day and event to now. Check out her website MelanieKirkpatrick.com.  Wrap up: Pelosi's enemies list has two goals: 1) they probably already have some of the emails they are "asking" for. When they reveal what they have they will say those who were involved "coordinated the attack;" 2) It's meant to silence the voices of people who are willing to speak up. This should be concerning to We the People! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY
2021-08-26 - EWTN News Nightly | Thursday, August 26, 2021

EWTN NEWS NIGHTLY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 30:00


On "EWTN News Nightly" tonight: The White House says President Joe Biden has been meeting with his National Security Team, while being briefed on the latest. With 5 days left until the August 31st deadline, there was carnage near the Kabul airport earlier today, inflicted by 2 suicide bombers and gunmen who targeted crowds of people hoping to escape the Taliban's brutality and repression. White House and National Political Correspondent for Real Clear Politics, Susan Crabtree, joins to give her thoughts on the tragic developments of today and what is known about the service members who died. Lawmakers are asking questions of the Biden Administration about what is next for US involvement in Afghanistan. Some have expressed security concerns with the vetting system for Afghans arriving in the US. Nina Shea, Director for Religious Freedom at the Hudson Institute, joins to explain what Sharia law is and the type of Sharia law that was implemented by the Taliban when they first held power in the country over 20 years ago. Finally this evening, a meeting focused on the 6th anniversary of Pope Francis' encyclical Laudato Si will take place in Argentina next week. The theme will be "Caring for the Common Home." Lecturer in Theology at the Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina, Professor Emilce Cuda, joins to tell us about this meeting. Don't miss out on the latest news and analysis from a Catholic perspective. Get EWTN News Nightly delivered to your email: https://ewtn.com/enn

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 477 | Why Biden Is Turning His Back on Americans in Afghanistan | Guest: Rebeccah Heinrichs

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 69:36


Today we're continuing our discussion on the unfolding situation in Afghanistan and what it means for the future of America and the world. To give us more context and information, we welcome Hudson Institute senior fellow Rebeccah Heinrichs back to the show. Heinrichs is a foreign policy expert. She explains what's going on right now as Americans and Afghanis try to escape the Taliban and also how this global show of weakness only serves to embolden our enemies, specifically China's CCP. --- Today's Sponsors: Alliance Defending Freedom needs your support now more than ever with the family, freedom, and even basic biological reality under constant attack. Join the growing number of Americans standing in solidarity to defend freedom and liberty at ADFLegal.org/ALLIE. Good Ranchers have traveled the US and met with the actual farmers that raise the livestock to ensure their craft beef and better than organic chicken they are sending to your table is the very best. Go to GoodRanchers.com/ALLIE to get $20 off & free express shipping! Or if you subscribe today, you'll save 20% on each box of mouth-watering meals. Prayer Bowls helps you pray for the people you love, people you haven't met, and circumstances you have no control over. The prayer bowl is a unique hand-crafted ceramic or wooden bowl & they come with a bundle of prayer cards. Go to PrayerBowls.com & see their beautiful selection. --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Matt Lewis and the News
Michael Pregent on Biden’s May 31 Deadline

Matt Lewis and the News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 39:36


Mike Pregent is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute and a former intelligence officer with over 28 years experience working security, terrorism, counter-insurgency, and policy issues in the Middle East, North Africa, and Southwest Asia. During this discussion, he talks about the disaster unfolding as Joe Biden seeks to evacuate troops and Americans before the August 31 deadline.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Aug 20 '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 51:17


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, we take a deep dive into the events in and around the US withdrawal from Afghanistan-- our guests are Chris Jackson, a senior vice president at Ipsos Public Affairs, Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Jim Townsend, a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Europe and NATO who is now with the Center for a New American Security, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute and Chris Servello, a founder of Provision Advisors public relations firm (and Defense and Aerospace team member).

ELECTRIC PEOPLE PODCAST
E88: Harte Logan | Executive Performance Coach | Synchronize Strategy With Culture

ELECTRIC PEOPLE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 98:22


Harte is a senior partner at CultureSync as well as an executive coach. She has a background in advertising, having worked at companies like Disney, Activision, and a skin care company. She has an MBA from Marshall School of Business at USC and her coaching certification from Hudson Institute. Tune in as she talks about synchronizing culture with strategy. You can have the best strategy, but if there's no culture to support it, you won't succeed.

Government Matters
Afghanistan evacuation, DoD & intellectual property, Defense budgeting reform – August 18, 2021

Government Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 23:11


Reviewing logistics of removing troops from Afghanistan Bryan Clark, senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, discusses management challenges involved in evacuating United States troops from Afghanistan over the next few days The importance of intellectual property and security for DoD Jerry McGinn, executive director of the Center for Government Contracting at George Mason University, discusses the importance of protecting intellectual property and security for defense innovation Reforming the PPBE process at the Pentagon Eric Lofgren, senior fellow at the Center for Government Contracting at George Mason University, explains the problems with the Defense Department's planning, programming, budget and execution process

Defense & Aerospace Report
DEFAERO Report Daily Podcast [Aug 17, 21] Countering China w/ a Disruptive Naval Deployment Model

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 35:47


On this episode of the DefAero Report Daily Podcast, Bryan Clark, the director of the Center for Defence Concepts and Technology at the Hudson Institute think tank and Bryan McGrath of The Ferrybridge Group discuss their recent article for the CDR Salamander Blog "Disrupt the Navy's Operational Model to Counter China."

Government Matters
Military AI investment in the JAIC, Navy “divest to invest” plan risks – August 16, 2021

Government Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 23:11


Boosting military technology under the JAIC Robert Work, former deputy secretary of defense, discusses funding for the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center to accelerate adoption of artificial intelligence in the military Reviewing the Navy's “divest to invest” strategy Seth Cropsey, senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, discusses potential risks and benefits of the Navy's plan to divest of some ships and invest in others within a few years

Fairygodboss Radio
DeAnne Aussem - Leadership Development & Well Being Leader, PwC

Fairygodboss Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 27:00


In this episode of Fairygodboss Radio, DeAnne Aussem shares her professional and personal journey and the lessons she learned along the way to becoming a proud wife and mom, trailblazer, inclusive leader and well-being warrior. (Recorded on June 14, 2021)  DeAnne Aussem serves as the Leadership Development & Well Being Leader for PwC US and MX. As a Managing Director, leadership development expert and credentialed well-being coach, DeAnne draws upon more than 26 years of professional services experience supporting leaders, teams and organizations across the U.S. and globally. DeAnne is a recognized dynamic and innovative business leader with deep expertise in Strategy, Global Leadership Development, Well being, Diversity & Inclusion and Human Capital which enables her to be a trusted advisor and source of strategic insight on today's most difficult leadership challenges and initiatives that champion the future of work. DeAnne recently presented at the 2019 Great Place to Work Summit and the O.C. Tanner Influence Greatness conference. In 2017 and 2016, DeAnne was a featured speaker and cited as a ‘Leading Coaching Luminary' during the World Business and Executive Coaching Summit (WBECS). DeAnne has also been featured extensively in the media including Working Mother, Forbes, The New York Post, Thrive Global, Huffington Post and Quartz at Work.  DeAnne is a National Board Certified Health & Wellness Coach (NBC-HWC) and also holds a Positive Psychology & Well-Being  certification from the College of Executive Coaching. DeAnne obtained her Executive Coaching credential from the Hudson Institute and achieved the Professional Certified Coach (PCC) designation through the International Coach Federation (ICF). DeAnne was recognized as the 2010/2011 Woman of the Year by the National Association of Professional Women (NAPW).

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Aug 06 '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 55:28


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Byron Callan of the independent Washington research firm Capital Alpha Partners, Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute, Bryan Clark, the director of the Center for Defence Concepts and Technology at the Hudson Institute think tank and Ilan Berman of the American Foreign Policy Council. Topics: — The move by Senate Majority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer to put the more than $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal to a vote — Effort by Senate Republicans to carve out $50 billion for military infrastructure investment — Economic and budget implications of spreading delta and other variants of coronavirus on national economic recovery — China's drive to build more than 200 new ballistic missile silos and field new multi-nuclear warhead intercontinental weapons to improve its nuclear deterrence capabilities — Whether recent statements by US leaders discussing American wargames and commitments to defend Taiwan will serve to deter potential Chinese aggression — Takeaways from the Navy League's Sea-Air-Space conference and tradeshow — New maritime and naval aviation strategies — Taliban gains in Afghanistan as US and foreign troops withdraw — What's next in Iraq as US changes nature of its mission in the country — Outlook for reviving the Iran nuclear deal as Tehran is accused of attacking an Israeli-managed tanker, killing American and Romanian mariners — Navy's investigation that concluded a disgruntled sailor set the fire that destroyed the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard and the firefighting lessons learned from the conflagration

WORLD OVER
WORLD OVER - 2021-08-05 - DR. STEPHEN SMITH, NINA SHEA, TOKYO OLYMPICS

WORLD OVER

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 60:00


DELTA VARIANT/COVID19 DR. STEPHEN SMITH, head of The Smith Center for Infectious Diseases and Urban Health discusses the latest COVID news including the Delta Variant and vaccine mandates in New York City. RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN CHINA NINA SHEA, director of The Center for Religious Freedom at The Hudson Institute joins us with an update on Communist China's ongoing persecution and suppression of religious liberty. TOKYO OLYMPICS DOMINIQUE DAWES, three-time Olympic gymnast joins us to talk about the Simone Biles controversy at the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

WORLD OVER
2021-08-06 - THE WORLD OVER - THURSDAY, AUGUST 5...(TAPED - ALL NEW)

WORLD OVER

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 60:00


DELTA VARIANT/COVID19 DR. STEPHEN SMITH, head of The Smith Center for Infectious Diseases and Urban Health discusses the latest COVID news including the Delta Variant and vaccine mandates in New York City. RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN CHINA NINA SHEA, director of The Center for Religious Freedom at The Hudson Institute joins us with an update on Communist China's ongoing persecution and suppression of religious liberty. TOKYO OLYMPICS DOMINIQUE DAWES, three-time Olympic gymnast joins us to talk about the Simone Biles controversy at the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

WORLD OVER
2021-08-06 - THE WORLD OVER - THURSDAY, AUGUST 5...(TAPED - ALL NEW)

WORLD OVER

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 60:00


DELTA VARIANT/COVID19 DR. STEPHEN SMITH, head of The Smith Center for Infectious Diseases and Urban Health discusses the latest COVID news including the Delta Variant and vaccine mandates in New York City. RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN CHINA NINA SHEA, director of The Center for Religious Freedom at The Hudson Institute joins us with an update on Communist China's ongoing persecution and suppression of religious liberty. TOKYO OLYMPICS DOMINIQUE DAWES, three-time Olympic gymnast joins us to talk about the Simone Biles controversy at the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

WORLD OVER
WORLD OVER - 2021-08-05 - DR. STEPHEN SMITH, NINA SHEA, TOKYO OLYMPICS

WORLD OVER

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 60:00


DELTA VARIANT/COVID19 DR. STEPHEN SMITH, head of The Smith Center for Infectious Diseases and Urban Health discusses the latest COVID news including the Delta Variant and vaccine mandates in New York City. RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN CHINA NINA SHEA, director of The Center for Religious Freedom at The Hudson Institute joins us with an update on Communist China's ongoing persecution and suppression of religious liberty. TOKYO OLYMPICS DOMINIQUE DAWES, three-time Olympic gymnast joins us to talk about the Simone Biles controversy at the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan.

Defense & Aerospace Report
DEFAERO Report Daily Podcast [Aug 02, 2021] Sea, Air & Space Day 2

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 34:35


On this first episode of the DefAero Report Daily Podcast from the Navy League's Sea, Air & Space Symposium and Trade Show, , our guest is segment one is Mike Petters, president and CEO of Huntington Ingalls Industries. In segment two we break down day two of the show with Bryan Clark, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and Byron Callan of the independent equity research firm Capital Alpha Partners.

Next Round
An Interview with Melanie Kirkpatrick, author of the new biography on Sarah Josepha Hale

Next Round

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 36:29


This week's podcast guest is Melanie Kirkpatrick, author of the new book, Lady Editor, a biography of Sarah Josepha Hale.  Hale was the editor of the most prominent ladies magazine in her day and responsible for publishing prominent American authors such as Edgar Allen Poe and Harriet Beecher Stowe.  Her influence popularized the white wedding dress, the polka, and recipes in magazines. Hale also lobbied to bring us Thanksgiving. Melanie Kirkpatrick, author, former deputy editor of the Wall Street Journal, and senior fellow at the Hudson Institute brings to life a remarkable American figure.

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Jul 30 '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 52:11


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Byron Callan of the independent Washington research firm Capital Alpha Partners, Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute. Topics: — Update on bipartisan $1 trillion infrastructure package and Jan. 6 commission — House Armed Services subcommittee mark ups and appropriations bills — Analysis of Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Gen. John Hyten's statement that Pentagon must reconsider warfighting approaches and capabilities in the wake of October wargame where US forces fared poorly in defending Taiwan from Chinese attack — Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin's first overseas trip to Asia and IISS Fullerton Lecture in Singapore — Chinese role in Afghanistan as the United States and its allies withdraw from the country — Life and legacy of former Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. Carl Levin who passed away this week at age 87

Defense & Aerospace Report
Defense & Aerospace Podcast [Washington Roundtable Jul 23 '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 49:13


On this Washington Roundtable episode of the Defense & Aerospace Report Podcast, sponsored by Bell, our guests are Bob Hale, former Pentagon comptroller, Michael Herson, President and CEO, American Defense International, Byron Callan of the independent Washington research firm Capital Alpha Partners, Becca Wasser, Defense Program fellow at the Center for a New American Security, Dov Zakheim, PhD, former DoD comptroller, now with the Center for Strategic and International Studies and Dr. Patrick Cronin of the Hudson Institute . Topics: — Senate Armed Services Committee's decision to boost defense spending authorization by $25 billion — National security implications as nation's borrowing rapidly approaching legislatively mandated debt ceiling — Update on infrastructure and Jan. 6 commission maneuvering — Registering women for the Selective Service — Whether more money forestalls vitally necessary tradeoffs in developing future capabilities — Key takeaways from the supply chain report co-chaired by Reps. Mike Gallagher, R-Wisc., and Elissa Slotkin, R-Mich. — How the Biden administration will balance Buy American tendencies against the imperative to draw the best technology and capabilities from allies and partners — White House's successful drive to unite NATO, EU, and other allies to work together to expose China's malicious activities in cyberspace — Japan's statement on Taiwan and the implications of Beijing's threat of a nuclear response against Tokyo — Whether the Biden administration should stake out a more overt commitment to the defense of Taipei and whether that would deter Beijing from taking Taiwan by force — The problematic nature of Chinese rhetoric given that Japan has potent capabilities that can rapidly field nuclear weapons as well as means of delivery — Vladimir Putin's treatise on why Ukraine should be part of Russia and how Moscow will gain control of Ukrainian territory — without military action

Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD
How mainstream media is tearing our country apart, With Saagar Enjeti from Breaking Points

Fundamental Health with Paul Saladino, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 81:44


Saagar Enjeti is the cohost of Breaking Points on YouTube. He was named 2019-20 Tony Blankley Fellow by Steamboat Institute. Saagar is also a Media Fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington DC where he co-hosts The Realignment podcast. Saagar previously served as White House Correspondent for The Daily Caller and Foreign Affairs Correspondent for The DC News Foundation. Time stamps: 0:08:52 Podcast begins and opening thoughts 0:10:19 Why did Saagar move his show? 0:14:39 The way humans communicate is far different in this day and age than it was for the past multiple thousand years 0:17:49 It is normal to hold contradictory opinions 0:21:54 Don't trust, verify! 0:24:49 What happened in 2007 that changed how we communicate? 0:29:44 Reporters, politicians, and podcasters are only human 0:30:29 Bezos bought the entire Washington media 0:34:39 The liberal ideology is pushing media to be more conformist 0:40:14 The ivermectin story 0:42:29 If we allow science to become politicized, then we are lost 0:43:29 The war on normal people 0:48:14 From my perspective: it seems that the media leans left 0:50:59 It's considered impolite to point out that our leaders are too old to leave 0:53:29 Should social media platforms announce when they have a conflict of interest just like research studies? 0:58:44 There is nothing illegal about owning Amazon and the second largest news company in the world 1:01:14 Fauci, COVID, and how this may have been released from a lab 1:09:34 Politicians will never take responsibility for their mistakes 1:11:44 Twitter, in my opinion, is the best at not restricting freedom of speech 1:13:59 People are hungry for information, just not the info the mainstream media is giving them 1:14:34 What does the White House basement look like? 1:16:14 What does Saagar's diet look like? 1:19:59 Where to find Saagar Sponsors: Eight Sleep: https://www.eightsleep.com/carnivoremd use code “CARNIVOREMD” to save $150 Primal Pastures: https://primalpastures.com/ free farm tour with code CARNIVOREMD White Oak Pastures: www.Whiteoakpastures.com, use code: CarnivoreMD for 10% off your first order Belcampo: www.belcampo.com use code: CarnivoreMD for 20% off your order

Defense & Aerospace Report
DefAero Monthly JADC2 Report Report [15 Jul '21]

Defense & Aerospace Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 31:08


On the first monthly JADC2 Report, sponsored by L3Harris, Cdr. Bryan Clark, USN Ret., the director of the Center for Defence Concepts and Technology at the Hudson Institute, Chris Dougherty, a senior fellow in the defense program at the Center for a New American Security, and Todd Harrison, the director of both Defense Budget Analysis and the Aerospace Security Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, discuss the vital importance of Joint All Domain Command and Control, the right way to interconnect the joint force and integrated legacy and future capabilities, challenges and impediments that must be overcome and more with Defense & Aerospace Report Editor Vago Muradian.

Ayn Rand Institute Live!
Perspectives on Pursuing an Intellectual Career | 2nd Panel Q&A

Ayn Rand Institute Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 20:14


As a professional intellectual or an “intellectual professional,” there is a wide variety of possible avenues for advancing Objectivism in your professional work. In this session, a panel of distinguished speakers from a variety of professional backgrounds talks about their work and careers. Adam Mossoff is Professor of Law at Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University, is Chair of the Forum for Intellectual Property at the Hudson Institute, and is affiliated with several other think tanks and policy organizations. He is a nationally recognized expert on intellectual property policy. His research has been relied on by the Supreme Court, by lower federal courts, and by federal agencies, and he has been invited five times to testify before the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives on patent legislation. Larry Salzman is the Litigation Director at Pacific Legal Foundation, a public interest law firm dedicated to advancing the principles of individual rights and limited government through law. He leads PLF's attorneys in developing and litigating cases involving property rights, economic freedom, free speech, equality, and the constitutional separation of powers. He is also a graduate of ARI's Objectivist Academic Center. Dr. Robert Mayhew, a member of ARI's board of directors, teaches philosophy at Seton Hall University. He is the author or editor of seven books in his area of specialization, ancient philosophy (most recently "Aristotle's Lost Homeric Problems"), and author or editor of ten books related to Ayn Rand and Objectivism. Alex Epstein is a philosopher and energy expert who argues that “human flourishing” should be the guiding principle of industrial and environmental progress. He is the author of the New York Times best-seller "The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels".

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #135: Hawks in Dove Feathers

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 67:20


On COI #135, Connor Freeman – writer at the Libertarian Institute – returns to the show to discuss how the popular ‘Breaking Points' podcast sells war under the guise of populism and nonintervention. Connor reviews the career of host Saagar Enjeti, who spent time in neocon hotspots like the Hudson Institute before joining The Hill's YouTube show, ‘Rising.' While Saagar – as well as co-host Krystal Ball – present themselves as members of the independent media, they often echo the empire's narrative. Odysee Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Subscribe Star – Conflicts of Interest  YouTube – Conflicts of Interest Facebook – Conflicts of Interest Twitter – Conflicts of Interest Apple Podcast – Conflicts of Interest Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
Hawks in Dove Feathers

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 67:21


On COI #135, Connor Freeman – writer at the Libertarian Institute – returns to the show to discuss how the popular ‘Breaking Points' podcast sells war under the guise of populism and nonintervention. Connor reviews the career of host Saagar Enjeti, who spent time in neocon hotspots like the Hudson Institute before joining The Hill's YouTube show, ‘Rising.' While Saagar – as well as co-host Krystal Ball – present themselves as members of the independent media, they often echo the empire's narrative. Odysee Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Subscribe Star – Conflicts of Interest  YouTube – Conflicts of Interest Facebook – Conflicts of Interest Twitter – Conflicts of Interest Apple Podcast – Conflicts of Interest Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

The Realignment
141 | Bruno Maçães: Geopolitics for the End Time

The Realignment

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 79:15


Apply to attend The Realignment's conference in Miami on October 22nd: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-realignment-conference-tickets-158996058491 Use code “realignment” to get a 50% discount to Lincoln Network's evening event with Peter Thiel in Miami on October 20th: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-peter-thiel-tickets-157672156665 Bruno Maçães, senior fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of The Dawn of Eurasia, Belt and Road, History Has Begun, and the forthcoming Geopolitics for the End Time: From the Pandemic to the Climate Crisis, returns to the Realignment to discuss the transformation of the international system before, during, and after COVID-19, and how the U.S. can accommodate the new status-quo.

Russian Roulette
Of Sino-Russian Military Cooperation: Alliance or Alignment? - Russian Roulette Episode 114

Russian Roulette

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 41:40


In this episode of Russian Roulette, Heather sits down with Paul Schwartz, research scientist in the Russia Studies Program at the Center for Naval Analyses, and Richard Weitz, senior fellow and director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at Hudson Institute. Paul and Richard are authors of the latest reports focusing on Sino-Russian cooperation, including Russia's arms transfers to China and Sino-Russian military exercises.   They discuss the strategic conundrum presented by the Sino-Russian military cooperation to the United States. They also examine the costs to Russia of this partnership, the purpose of such cooperation, and whether their relationship is based on alignment or has turned into an alliance.   Paul's report on Russian military transfers to China can be found here: https://www.csis.org/analysis/changing-nature-and-implications-russian-military-transfers-china Richard's report on Chinese-Russian military exercises: https://www.csis.org/analysis/assessing-chinese-russian-military-exercises-past-progress-and-future-trends   You can find Paul's bio here: https://www.cna.org/experts/Schwartz_P and Richard's bio here: https://www.hudson.org/experts/433-richard-weitz   Thanks for listening!

Rich Zeoli
The Afghanistan Withdrawal Was Never Going to be an Easy Decision (Full Zeoli Show 07-09-2021)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 150:58


Today on The Rich Zeoli Show, we open the show with a discussion regarding the Critical Race Theory. Zeoli addresses the repercussions of teaching our kids the lie that the United States is an institution founded on oppression and victimization. Later in the show, Zeoli discusses President Joe Biden's decision to withdraw our troops from Afghanistan and the likelihood of whether he will follow through with it. Former State Department investigator Dr. David Asher joins the Zeoli show to talk about the potentiality of the coronavirus being deployed as a bioweapon.  6:00-FDA disputes Pfizer claim of needing a 3rd booster shot for COVID-19  6:05-Captialsm and racism are the same of the left 6:10-Flashback to when the left loved Michael Avenatti  6:25-President Biden announces full withdrawal of  Afghanistan  6:35-Family movie night has become the new trip to the theater 6:40-Biden's dilemma withdrawing from Afghanistan and the  language interrupters  6:55-Biden doesn't want Afghanistan to be an issue in 2022 7:00-Guest David Asher, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, joined to discuss the idea the Wuhan lab of virology was using viruses like COVID-19 in a military aspect to see its efficiency in biowarfare and the U.S. being warned about these high risk studies back in 2018 by France.  7:30-Miltiary testing a new 'anti-aging" medication  7:33-Government run schools are still unsure how to re-open public schools  7:45-What's on the cut sheet 8:00-Author, Kevin Cook, "The Burning Blue: The Untold Story of Christa McAuliffe and NASA's Challenger Disaster" joined Rich to give a behind the scenes look into the Challenger disaster of 1986.  8:10-FBI seizes a lego replica of the Capitol building from a suspect in the January 6th riot 8:30-Dr. Nicole Saphier joined Rich to discuss a new study done in England showing the extremely low risk of children suffering from serious illness or even death if they happen to contract COVID-19 which is also low risk. 8:45-White House has to remove tweet with Taiwan's National Flag Photo By: Alex Wong/Getty Images See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.