Podcasts about Mase

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  • 622PODCASTS
  • 1,600EPISODES
  • 1h 3mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Mase

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Latest podcast episodes about Mase

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: The Mason Curse does NOT exist!

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:09


So what do you think of Travis' Fu Man Chu look? Momo is kind of against it. But how about last night's big Game 4 win over the Giants. Mase was there so there is no such thing as a Mason Curse. Plus what is on the  WHEEL OF QUESTIONS. How many times do you look at yourself in the mirror? And SEAN MCVAY – RAMS HEAD COACH calls in and dropped a joke on Mason and Momo and they didn't catch it. Mason is a stalker and saw people leaving early and he's disappointed and LeBron doesn't worry at all with this team and the 0-5 in preseason means nothing. They need time to build Chemistry.

Dan Barreiro
Mase In Your Face! Bumper to Bumper 10/13 Hour Two

Dan Barreiro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 47:07


Glen Mason joins for another controversial edition of Mase in your Face! Dan and Mase talk Iowa/Penn state, hazing and preview Gophers/Nebraska

Mason & Ireland
HR 3: Cancelled

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:07


More on Jon Gruden as he resigned as the Raiders Head Coach, he also has lost all of his endorsements and has been taken out of the Bucs Ring of Honor. Also, Mase will be at Game 4 tonight at Dodger Stadium, he believes there is no Mason Curse. Plus, working with Mason and Ireland has produced a lot of people working in sports today. And another edition of GAME OF GAMES

Dan Barreiro
Mase In Your Face! Bumper to Bumper 10/6 Hour Two

Dan Barreiro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:55


Glen Mason joins for another spirited weekly appearance talking Yankees, Gophers and previewing Iowa/Penn State this weekend.

Mason & Ireland
HR 3: Scherzer v Wainwright

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 45:35


Clinton doesn't think the Dodger fans shouldn't be afraid of Adam Wainwright. Also, an affiliate in Cleveland is getting rid of its 11 o clock news and putting a comedian in . Plus, Urban Meyer situation in Jacksonville is getting worse and worse and Mase wants him to be no part of the USC team. And the guys have a discussion about Many Saints of Newark and if we are going to watch it despite the bad reviews. Can a caller guess the LIE OF THE DAY in order to win EAGLES tickets at the Forum and another edition of GAME OF GAMES!

Mason & Ireland
HR 2: The Story of Today is Tomorrow

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 49:26


Could the Mase Curse be reversed since he wasn't there on Sunday? Plus, the story of today is tomorrow: More on the Dodgers/Cardinals game tomorrow can the Dodgers advance to the NLDS? Mase hates the Wild Card and wants to make it a 3 game serious. Should this be MLB's next move? and we continueto take your calls about the Dodgers confidence, And Producer Greg has his topics ready for JUMP BALL !

Mason & Ireland
HR 2: Clown

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 52:28


Michael Wilbon calls Lane Kiffin a clown. Does everyone agree? Also, If you wrote your own autobiography would you be honest about everyone? Plus, Mase thinks Robert Woods is going to have a breakout game this weekend and Mason gets upset that Greg sent him a constructive text in the middle of the show. What would you do if a woman spit on you at a game? and Producer Greg has his topics ready for JUMP BALL

Jon Divine Podcast
Episode 21: Alive Events Podcast | Episode 21- Hip Hop Party Vibez

Jon Divine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 56:20


This week Jon Divine takes to the decks and delivers an absolute killer party hip hop mix! Be sure to subscribe and follow on all social media! @AliveEventsEntAliveevents.com Tracklist:PODCAST PLAYLIST Kanye West - Jesus Walks (Clean - Super Short Edit) Fergie - All My Girls Get Down On The Floor (Deville Acapella Loop) Dirty  Chris Brown Feat Lil Wayne & French Montana - Loyal (East Coast Version)  Keysha Cole Ft. Missy Elliot - Let It Go-acappella Outta Control (Remix) - 50 cent ft. Mobb Deep Chris Brown ft Tyga - Ayo (Clean - Short Edit) Pop Smoke ft 50 Cent & Roddy Ricch - The Woo (Club Killers Dancehall Remix) (Intro - Clean)  Iggy Azalea ft Charli XCX - Fancy (Clean)-acappella Drake ft Swizz Beats & T.i. - Fancy (Clean - Short Edit) Cardi B - Up (DJ Nasa Twerk Rework) Clean CK Cut  Beyonce ft Swizz Beatz - Move Your Body (Lets Move! Campaign) T-Pain f. B.O.B. - Up Down (Do This All Day) (DJ Intro) (Clean) Lil Wayne ft Swizz Beatz - Uproar (Intro - Clean)   Finesse Studio Acapella - Bruno Marș  Bruno Mars ft Cardi B - Finesse RMX (Hook First - Clean - Cutdown) Mims - Like This (Clean - Short Edit) Fetty Wap f. Remy Boyz - 679 (Promo Only Clean Edit) Saweetie - Best Friend (Intro - Clean)  Zedd, Maren Morris, Grey - The Middle (Acapella - Vocals Only) Migos - Fight Night (Re-Drum - Clean) DMX ft Swizz Beatz - Get It On The Floor (Dennis Blaze Hype) (Clean Short Edit) Fugees_Anthem_Epic_Rework Ragoza_Ms_Jackson  Lauryn Hill - Doo Wop Club Killers - Ultimate Bottle Popper Break (Slam Edit - Beat Out) Clean Jay-Z - Roc Boys (And The Winner Is) (Clean) Mase - Feel So Good (Short Edit) The Notorious BIG ft Mase x Puff Daddy - Mo Money Mo Problems (Intro - Clean)  Doja Cat - Get Into It (Yuh) (Deville Twerk Mix) Clean Megan Thee Stallion - Body - Audiorokk Hype Intro (Clean) Saweetie ft Post Malone, DaBaby & Jack Harlow - TAP IN (Remix) (CK Intro - Clean)  T-Pain - Im Sprung (Club Killers Dancehall Remix) Acap In Jagged Edge - Where The Party At (Club Killers Dancehall Remix) (Intro - Clean) Major Lazer & MOTi ft Ty Dolla $ign, Wizkid & Kranium - Boom (Moombahton - Clean - Super Short Edit) Flo Rida - My House (Club Killers Dirty Money Blend) Intro - Clean Ludacris  - Stand Up (Chorus Only Short Edit) Santana - Maria Maria (Short Edit) DJ Khaled ft Rihanna & Bryson Tiller - Wild Thoughts (Clean - Short Edit) Sean Paul - Gimme The Light (Dennis Blaze Redrum) Intro - Clean 7A 108

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: Lakers Media Day

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 53:35


It's Lakers Media Day! We recap what the players talked about and what we should see from the Lakers this season? Also, Mason is dead last in his Fantasy Football league. John offered him a trade to help him out. Should he take the trade? or should he continue his losing streak to shave the eye brow? Plus, Wheel of Questions- If you could eat the same food forever what would it be? and can the Dodgers go 6-0 in the Final stretch of the season? Can they still catch the Giants for 1st place? Mase still has HOPE!

Life on Podcast
103. Long Money vs. Short Money

Life on Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 35:46


Mase said, "I don't understand the language of people with short money." We have a long associated "short money" to mean "no money".  But that's not quite accurate. In this episode we discuss the real definition and difference between short money and long money mentality and which one you should adopt in order to set yourself up for life!

In The Mix With DJ Tyler
DJ Tyler's Classic Hip Hop And R&B Mix 9.25.21

In The Mix With DJ Tyler

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 36:40


NOTHING BUT SMOOTH BLENDS OF THE HOTTEST HIP HOP AND R&B HITS OF THE 90s INCLUDING THE LIKES OF BIGGIE, MASE, TUPAC, JAY-Z AND MANY MORE. TUNE IN !!

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: 54 Outs

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 48:38


Mase says Baseball has 54 outs! but we continue with the REAL Dodgers Talk... should we prioritize the health of Both Buehler and Urias? We take your calls. Is finishing in first place a priority? or should we rest our starters for the Post Season? Plus, WHEEL OF QUESTIONS – If you are an athlete, what is your walk up song? And Dwight Howard was on the Masked Singer singing Tutti Frutti by Little Richard and he wasn't BAD. A woman at Walmart quits Half Baked style!

Best of Mile High Sports
Afternoon Drive: Garry Smits on Urban Meyer

Best of Mile High Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 14:38


Garry Smits of the Florida Times-Union on Urban Meyer's tenure thus far in the NFL, his relationships with players, and where Mase should go to the bar in Jacksonville

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: One Million Dollars

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 52:09


Last night was a great Raiders game but Why is Momo NOT happy? Also, Carl Nassib the first LGBTQ+ in the NFL had the game winning sack. Did you watch the Manning Brothers Broadcast, Momo couldn't stand it and went to the regular broadcast. Plus, We are giving away a MILLION Dollars with a correct Super Bowl prediction. We take your calls about the Raiders. And a Florida State player proposed after a loss. Could he have waited for a different game? Mase asks us how we proposed. And the Dodgers are starting to turn a corner as Bellinger and Gavin Lux are showing great life.

Shat the Movies: 80's & 90's Best Film Review
Brewster's Millions (1985)

Shat the Movies: 80's & 90's Best Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 62:04


Listener Teddy N. noticed a Richard Pryor-shaped hole in the Shat The Movies library and decided to plug it with an underappreciated classic: "Brewster's Millions." In this episode, we remember a comedic genius in his prime with a knockout supporting cast. We also find out why Big D hates the Mets, who would play a $30 million Shat on Music Festival, and which Mortal Kombat movie is superior. Along the way, we also quote Mase, celebrate a spicy John Candy, feed Big D all the rules he can stomach, hear voicemail from Hot Sauce Steve and Don Sauce, and read an "Interview with the Vampire" letter that touched our eternally damned souls.  SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW Android: http://shatthemovies.com/android Apple/iTunes: http://shatthemovies.com/itunes Social Media: Twitch, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat Website: http://shatthemovies.com/ HELP SUPPORT THE PODCAST Donate with Paypal: http://shatthemovies.com/paypal Donate With Venmo: https://venmo.com/shatpodcasts Get Podcast Merchandise: http://shatthemovies.com/shop Shop Amazon With Our Affiliate Link: https://www.amazon.com/?tag=shatmovies-20 Sponsor's Listener Survey: http://shatthemovies.com/survey Leave an iTunes Review: http://shatthemovies.com/review Vote for our Next Movies: http://shatthemovies.com/vote Feeds & Social Media: http://shatthemovies.com/subscribe-and-follow Leave a Voicemail: (914) 719-SHAT - (914) 719-7428 Email: hosts@shatthemovies.com Listen to our TV Podcasts: https://shatontv.com/shat-on-podcasts Theme Song - Die Hard by Guyz Nite: https://www.facebook.com/guyznite

Mason & Ireland
HR 2: Mr. 3000

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 48:36


A listener sent Mase a BRAND NEW Rams song but it's really a Mason Song not a Rams song. Also, Max Scherzer had a perfect game into the 8th inning last night WITH an immaculate inning and his 3000 strikeouts. Plus, BREAKING NEWS – CLAY HELTON HAS BEEN FIRED FROM USC so we ask: who should be the next Head Coach at USC ? Stoops, Bienemy, Peterson, Donte Williams. And Producer Greg has his topics ready for JUMPBALL.

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: Huge Weekend for LA Sports

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 48:48


Huge weekend that was great for the Rams and Dodgers but not so great for the Trojans. Mason waxes poetic about how amazing Sofi Stadium was as the Rams get thier first win of the season over the Bears. Mason says that the Rams will play in and win this year's Super Bowl. Also, is it time to fire Clay Helton every Year Mason gives Clay Helton a shot and a new year but is it time to move on from him? Plus, we take you calls about Clay Helton does he need to go? And more about how great the Rams have been and Scott Kaplan made John and Mase lose a bunch of mythical money by not winning the pushup contest on Friday.

Fabrizio Parisi - #italianjob podcast
#italianjob Vol 123 - Fabrizio Parisi

Fabrizio Parisi - #italianjob podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 61:47


Worldwide booking for Fabrizio Parisi: agencyshowtime@gmail.com famimusicproduction@gmail.com Fabrizio Parisi - #italianjob vol 123 mixed Live by Fabrizio Parisi Apple Podcast ➡️ bit.ly/FPthePodcast Spotify ➡️ spoti.fi/39Hp1tc Youtube ➡️ bit.ly/FaMiMusic Deezer ➡️ www.deezer.com/it/show/2317572 Instagram ➡️ www.instagram.com/fabrizioparisiofficial/ Facebook ➡️ www.facebook.com/FabrizioParisiofficial/ Tracklist: 1.Shouse - Love Tonight (Fabrizio Parisi & The Editor Remix) 2.Eldar Stuff - Back Down [RollRock Records] 3.A-Mase,Frankie,Vika Grand - Black Diamond (Extended Mix) [Try That Records] 4.Alex Inc - Don't Know (Extended Mix) [Open House Records] 5.Saint Tropez Caps - Fade (Original Mix) [Zyx Music] 6.Prodigy - No Good (Start The Dance) (Fabrizio Parisi Remix) 7.John Bounce - Fool To Your Love (Club Remix) [Zyx Music] 8.Bruno Motta, Dopelerz - Dreaming (Alley Extended Remix) [Sensoria Records] 9.Dirtyloud - Boogie (Extended Mix) [Wh0 Plays] 10.The Doberman Club - Do You Feel It (Rio Dela Duna, Maurizio Basilotta Remix) [Noo Records] 11.Serge Armon - Deep Inside (Club Mix) [Which Bottle] 12.San Sebastian,Maurizio Basilotta,IDA FLO - Anywhere (Extended Mix) [Which Bottle] 13.Fiasco & Nicely - All We Can Share [Luxury Nights] 14.Wayward Brothers - Daddy (Original Mix) [Exx Muzik] 15.Dream Funker - Born In Africa (Club Mix) [Which Bottle]

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: ESPNLA Golf Classic

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 53:39


Mason and Ireland are live from the ESPN LA Golf Classic at Black Gold Golf Club in Yorba Linda, and Mase put up an incredible performance! After the Lakers signed former All-Star center DeAndre Jordan, the team has traded Marc Gasol to the Grizzlies. How incredible is this Laker squad? The fellas talk to the Tournament Director at Black Gold Golf Club, Brian Suk. The voice of the Rams Radio Network, J.B. Long, hops on to the show to talk about the season opener this Sunday. Today's Wheel of Questions: Where would you go if you were invisible? And Katy Perry takes to Twitter to say she has jumped on the Lane Train.

In A Way, We're Right
In A Way, We're Right: Episode 26- Logan Area Lando

In A Way, We're Right

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 118:50


Shoutout to our guests Kev and Mase. On this episode we start off with the release of Donda and our thoughts. We start to reminisce on our top Kanye songs and some list may surprise you. We briefly talk about our expectations for Drakes Certified Lover Boy album (CLB had not been released during this recording). We move on and touch on upcoming NFL season. We then talk about what our mental health days are like and how we'd handle our kids mental health days. We close out with speaking to Kev about his music label Black Soul Records and his plans to grow as an artist. As always thanks for the continued supper and please like, share, comment, and subscribe!!

The Educator's Room Presents: The Teacher Self-Care Podcast
Episode 138: How Therapy and Being a Virtual Audience Member Saved My Mental Well-Being

The Educator's Room Presents: The Teacher Self-Care Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 29:31


In this episode, Franchesca interviews Tanya Boucicaut- a college professor as she discusses how the 18 months in solitude forced her to go to therapy and address her mental well-being. Tanya Boucicaut, M.F.A., M.Div. (she/hers), is Assistant Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and a licensed Baptist clergywoman. Prior to her appointment at VCU, she founded a faith-based non-profit youth theatre education organization called Perfect Love Community Youth Theatre. Boucicaut co-founded the Graduate Writing Center for Theological Studies at the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union (STVU). At STVU, she has also served as project director of STREAM, a high school youth theology institute, a member of the editorial team for the school's 2017 accreditation process, and a database consultant. She is currently a Writing and Rhetoric Ph.D. student at George Mason University focusing on the intersection of Black Church Studies, Hip Hop Pedagogy, and Community Building. Boucicaut is a lover and student of hip hop with rose gold bottoms, rapped her first rhyme in Mr. Magee's 6th health case for a presentation to the beat of Puff Daddy and Mase's "Been Around the World", and she was a playwright at 17. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teacher-self-care/support

Dan Barreiro
Bumper to Bumper Monday, August 30th: Day 3 from the Fair! Ben Johnson, Mase In Your Face, Pete Najarian

Dan Barreiro

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 138:19


Dan and JG are live the State Fair. Gophers hoops Head Coach Ben Johnson joins to talk his upcoming first year as coach, a surprise Mase in your Face goes down, and Pete Najarian joins to close!

DJ Глюк
DJ Глюк (DJ Gluk) - Руссиш Deep House In Da Mix Vol. 234 (Deep/Club House) Август 2021

DJ Глюк

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 60:38


DJ Глюк (DJ Gluk) - Руссиш Deep House In Da Mix @ DJ Глюк 1. Kapral & Dolocheeva - Who Wants To Live Forever (Cover) 2. Sandra - Mirrored In Your Eyes (NG Remix) 3. Conor Maynard - You Broke Me First (Trapforet Remix) 4. Sharapov - Sunset City 5. Denis First, EMSHE - Don't Lie 6. Fagira - Love Is Darkness (Sander Van Doorn Cover) 7. A-Mase, Natune - Stay One More Time 8. Kvinn - Runaway 9. Arash - Broken Angel (Ft. Helena) (Talyk & Veklich Remix) 10. Inna - Flashbacks (Frost & Nitugal Remix) 11. Zombie Nation - Kernkraft 400 (Voxi Remix) 12. Scooter - Break It Up (Ayur Tsyrenov Remix) 13. Kylie Minogue - Can't Get You Out Of My Head (Ayur Tsyrenov Remix) 14. Motivee, Julia Turano - Waiting For Tonight 15. Akcent x Olivia Addams - Heart Attack (Vadim Adamov & Hardphol Remix) 16. Deep Alive - No Sweat 17. Alan Walker, Imanbek - Sweet Dreams (Motivee Remix) 18. No Hopes - Frozen

Drink Champs
Episode 275 w/ Dame Grease

Drink Champs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 126:06


N.O.R.E. & DJ EFN are the Drink Champs. In this episode we chop it up with Dame Grease! The legendary producer shares his story, working for Bad Boy Records, Dame helped produce on some of the labels most notable albums. Working with Mase on “Harlem World” and The Lox “Money, Power & Respect” and more.  Working with Ruff Ryders Ent., Dame was the primary producer on DMX's iconic debut album “It's Dark and Hell Is Hot”.  Lots of great stories that you don't want to miss!! Make some noise for the Dame Grease!!!

Mase on Movies
Mase on The Bad Batch S1 Finale: Return to Kamino & Kamino Lost

Mase on Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 22:52


In this 2-part finale, The Bad Batch head back to Kamino to rescue Hunter, confront Crosshair, and struggle to make it out alive. Follow Mase on Instagram/Twitter: @maseonmovies If you like what you hear, please remember to subscribe, rate and leave a comment! Take a Chance by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4457-take-a-chance License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/maseonmovies/message

Mase on Movies
Mase on Free Guy

Mase on Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 17:32


Free Guy stars Ryan Reynolds as Guy, an NPC (non-playable character) in the game Free City, as he desires to break out of his loop and find freedom with the girl of his dreams. Follow Mase on Instagram/Twitter: @maseonmovies If you like what you hear, please remember to subscribe, rate and leave a comment! Take a Chance by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4457-take-a-chance License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/maseonmovies/message

Have You Heard George's Podcast?
Episode 23 - Back to UG

Have You Heard George's Podcast?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 30:58


At the end of 2020, George proposed to his girlfriend, Sandra, after one year of dating. Well, technically it was after years of friendship then one year of dating. When the two met as teenagers at a Ugandan event, they were both finding their place in the world. For George, Uganda provided answers that Britain couldn't. Like many in their generation, he and Sandra developed a pattern of holidaying in the Motherland before returning to their lives in the UK. However, as the harsh realities of African politics became clear to George, he began to rethink his relationship with UG. Credits: Written by George the Poet Produced by Benbrick and George the Poet Mixing, recording and editing by Benbrick. With music from: Bebe Cool - Wire Wire Flukes - Wifey Riddim (Instrumental) Fergie - Glamorous ft Ludacris Griminal (Freestyle) Dot Rotten (Freestyle) Double S (Freestyle) Chip (Freestyle) Giggs - Saw Obsessions - Jangu Madtraxx - Skaramess Bobi Wine - Maama Mbile ft Juliana The Afrigo Band - Mundeke All original music is written by Benbrick and recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra. We had the following guests: The soon to be Sandra Mpanga, my guy Mase, and my cousin Aggie Thank you to: My team Sandra, Vidhu, and Birungi. Dylan Haskins and the team at BBC Sounds, BBC Concert Orchestra, Channel 4, BMD, Mase, and Aggie. Archive: The clips of Griminal used at 08:33, Dot Rotten used at 09:17, Double S used at 10:01, and Chip used at 11:10 are all taken from their respective BBC 1Xtra Westwood freestyles. The clip used at 13:20 is taken from the Journeyman Pictures documentary “Who Is To Blame For London's Increasingly Violent Gangs?” The clip used at 21:50 is taken from the New Vision TV clip “Why Museveni went to war" The clips used at 22:46 and 23:06 are taken from the Channel 4 video “Uganda blocks internet after elections”, and the clip used at 23:26 of Museveni is taken from the Channel 4 video "Uganda election: President Museveni says opposition are agents of foreign interests“. Soundtrack: Bebe Cool - Wire Wire 00:43 - 02:29 02:50 - 03:20 Benbrick - Wire 02:30 - 02:50 03:20 - 03:31 Flukes - Wifey Riddim (Instrumental) 05:00 - 06:08 Fergie - Glamorous ft Ludacris 06:09 - 07:14 Griminal Westwood Freestyle 08:33 - 09:15 Dot Rotten - Kurrupt Freestyle 09:17 - 09:52 Double S Freestyle on Westwood 10:01 - 10:33 Chipmunk Westwood Freestyle 11:10 - 11:53 Giggs - Saw 12:00 - 13:25 Benbrick - The Phone Call 13:24 - 14:56 Obsessions - Jangu 15:08 - 15:58 Benbrick - Obsession 15:58 - 16:58 Madtraxx - Skaramess 17:00 - 18:32 Bobi Wine - Maama Mbile ft Juliana 18:34 - 19:35 Benbrick - No Message 19:35 - 20:33 Benbrick - Walt Disney 20:34 - 24:34 The Afrigo Band - Mundeke 26:58 - 28:30

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: Mason Goes To The Dodgers Game Tonight!

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 52:37


Mason is going to the Dodgers game tonight and is bringing Jorge, Laura and a lucky listener. Will Mason stay for the whole game? Also, we take your calls about Booing the ASTROS. Do we boo the whole team or just the Original 5 CHEATERS? Plus, Lindsey Thiry ESPN Rams Reporter calls in as she heard Mase say that he left her wedding early and didn't say he was leaving. And Wheel of Questions, Do you take your friends advice or do you go with your gut in decision making? And How do you start your day? Do you have a routine?

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast
DNVR Broncos Podcast: Teddy Bridgewater bounces back, narrows gap with Drew Lock in QB competition

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 69:07


On the latest edition of the DNVR Broncos Podcast, Andrew Mason and Ryan Koenigsberg are coming to you to break down all of the latest news in Broncos Country. Vic Fangio says the QB competition is "even Steven." Mase and RK dive into whether that's true and what it means as the Broncos prepare to don full pads beginning Tuesday. They also answer listener questions and dive into which other players are standing out as the Broncos complete their fifth day of 2021 training camp.

Mason & Ireland
HR 3: Rams training camp

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 48:57


It's the opening of Rams training camp . What does Rams tackle Andrew Whitworth think about his new QB Matt Stafford? Also, the Rams went and did a Clippers move, by hiring sports reporter Andy Beniot. but the guys have no idea what his real defined role is. Plus, does Tom Brady really shop at Target? The guys debate if Brady really shops there or he's just saying that. This leads to a conversation of celebrities shopping at regular places. Mase doesn't understand why Billy McKinney is in the Dodger's starting lineup. Mark Zuckerberg is trying to create a one-stop inside of Facebook called the metaverse. And GAME OF GAMES - It's Jessie game today as he plays an audio-brand game which Jorge completely runs away with it. Also, FINALLY someone caught Mase's lie of the day.

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast
DNVR Broncos Podcast: Who won the first day of training camp?

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 53:19


On the latest edition of the DNVR Broncos Podcast, Ryan Koenigsberg, Andrew Mason and Zac Stevens come to you to break down all of the latest news in Broncos Country. Mase, Ryan and Zac break down what they saw at practice, how QBs Teddy Bridgewater and Drew Lock fared, and much more as the Broncos got their 62nd training camp under way.

Mason & Ireland
HR 3: Mason's Book

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 46:30


Mase says he began to write a book a while ago, but stopped. However, after talking with Ted Sobel who released his own book, Mase wants to go back and finish the book he started. He announces that he will finish the book by the start of the next baseball season. Also, why is Gregg Popovich is such a jerk? Plus, Cody Bellinger and Max Muncy are back in the starting lineup for the Dodgers tonight! John is adamant that the Dodgers NEED to trade for Max Scherzer, but Mase is more calm about it because of his full trust in Andrew Friedman. The guys take more calls on the situation surrounding Simone Biles. GAME OF GAMES - It's John's game today as he asks the guys about the NBA draft trivia! Also, Mase's lie of the day and yet again, no one got the lie. 

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: MLB Trade Deadline Closing

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 50:43


Jorge is back after getting a spider bite, Unfortunately he says he has no super powers. In other news the MLB Trade Deadline is closing, will the Dodgers get another big name? Buster Olney says who the Dodgers might sign? Also, We take your calls to see what you think about the potential Dodgers trades? Plus, what's in the WHEEL OF QUESTIONS today? Mase asks what is your career highlight? And Simone Biles pulls out of Olympic Event due to Mental Health. Will this define her Legacy?

SuperFeast Podcast
#128 How To Live For Longevity with Mason Taylor

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 97:23


We're bringing you a special edition on the podcast today, as Mason steps out of the interviewer seat and is interviewed by Tommy Moore on the Mind Body Plants Podcast. If you've ever wanted to listen to Mason go through the entire SuperFeast apothecary in both poetic and articulate detail; What's in the mindfully curated blends, the Organ systems they nourish, how the herbs are sourced, the seasons they best connect to, and the stories behind the formulations, this episode covers it all.   Tommy asks some great questions, and Mason dives deep into the world of Daoist tonic herbalism, discussing the lineage and how these heavenly messengers oscillate through Mind/Body/Spirit to bring healing and longevity. Mason opens up about his decade-long journey with SuperFeast, from grassroots beginnings to the epic company it is has grown into; Still maintaining the same core intentions of supporting people in maintaining wellness and longevity through tonic herbs and medicinal mushrooms. In comparing the western medical system with classical Chinese medicine, this conversation goes many places. Mason lays down what you need to know about Jing herbs, cultivating Qi, Nootropics, Brain health, Di Dao sourcing, and living in harmony with yourself and nature. This episode is the reminder we all need to stand empowered in our sovereign health.   "In classical Chinese medicine what you're looking at is the capacity for Qi to transform through a particular Organ system. And so you're looking at supporting that baseline regulatory capacity for inner transformation at all times; The ability for your body to accept and enable change to constantly occur. And you can see how different that clinical approach is going to be. You can see why Western medicine likes to just go, 'Yep, do that, bang. And now we're fixed'. Whereas if you take responsibility for helping someone move through changes in their body and in their life, that's a massive responsibility, and it's harder to be effective. It takes more keeping your finger literally on the pulse. Our medical and wellness system doesn't focus on or value that right now. It seems boring to focus on that constant capacity of 'this too will change'... Why? Because then you can't be right, and you can't dominate".   -Mason Taylor     Tommy and Mase discuss: Mycology.  Tonic herbalism.  The Daoist lineage.  Yin/Yang cultivation.  The culture of SuperFeast. The nature of Adaptogens. The SuperFeast apothecary. Di Dao sourcing and preserving tradition. Superior herbs (lifestyle herbs) and dosage. Autoimmune conditions and medicinal mushrooms. Brain health and nootropic herbs for neuro-plasticity.  The journey of SuperFeast; 10 years on from grassroots.  Psychedelic mushrooms, micro-dosing and mental health.  Cultivating organ health, longevity, and wisdom through herbs. Western medical system and classical Chinese medical system. Mason's personal journey from a uni student starting SuperFeast.     MasonTaylor Mason Taylor is the founder of SuperFeast. Mason was first exposed to the ideas of potentiating the human experience through his mum Janesse (who was a big inspiration for founding SuperFeast and is still an inspiration to Mason and his team due to her ongoing resilience in the face of disability). After traveling South America for a year, Mason found himself struggling with his health - he was worn out, carried fungal infections, and was only 22. He realised that he had the power to take control of his health. Mason redirected his attention from his business degree and night work in a bar to begin what was to become more than a decade of health research, courses, education, and mentorship from some of the leaders in personal development, wellness, and tonic herbalism. Inspired by the own changes to his health and wellbeing through his journey (which also included Yoga teacher training and raw foodism!), he started SuperFeast in 2010. Initially offering a selection of superfoods, herbs, and supplements to support detox, immune function, and general wellbeing. Mason offered education programs around Australia, and it was on one of these trips that he met Tahnee, who is now his wife and CEO of SuperFeast. Mason also offered detox and health transformation retreats in the Byron hinterland (some of which Tahnee also worked on, teaching Yoga and workshops on Taoist healing practices, as well as offering Chi Nei Tsang treatments to participants). After falling in love with the Byron Shire, Mason moved SuperFeast from Sydney's Northern Beaches to Byron Bay in 2015. He lived on a majestic permaculture farm in the Byron hinterland, and after not too long, Tahnee joined him (and their daughter, Aiya was conceived). The rest is history - from a friend's rented garage to a warehouse in the Byron Industrial Estate to SuperFeast's current home in Mullumbimby's beautiful Food Hub, SuperFeast (and Mason) has thrived in the conscious community of the Northern Rivers. Mason continues to evolve his role at SuperFeast, in education, sourcing, training, and creating the formulas based on Taoist principles of tonic herbalism.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Mason Instagram SuperFeast Instagram   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher :)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tommy Moore: (00:00) Mason, first and foremost, welcome and thank you for joining me on this podcast. Been following your work for a little while now, and I'm certainly thrilled to be able to welcome you here and to have a chance to speak to you and get a bit of a deep dive into some adaptogenic herbs and mushrooms that I personally take on almost a daily basis. So, before we get into all of that, how do you describe what you do?   Mason: (00:28) Yeah, it's been definitely a mixed bag of what I've done in the wellness space. My company, SuperFeast is at this point, I guess what I'm most well-known for nearly, it's going to be 10 years in May that I've had that company and it has evolved somehow despite my flippancy and desire to not be shackled down by the responsibility of business, it's grown to be a very... Yeah, it's a really beautiful, healthy business. I still feel I'd still own completely. So, it's still very grassroots and just ensconced in what my original intentions back in the day were. Before I started the company, I was just in my last year at uni and just trying to find ways to just to have my body be a little less lethargic, and I was a little bit worried the way I saw it.   Mason: (01:22) It's like I worried about my trajectory and what I saw, how I was going to be at 80 years old or 90 years old, or even 60 years old. And that kind of spurred me on to, even though I was gung ho and I was jumping into the deep end of extremism of diet and detoxification and just becoming basically an extremist and a purist in the health space. Ultimately, my intention was a real long term sustainable one. And so, I had the juice to kind of go extreme back then, but because my intention is what, where SuperFeast is at still and what kind of the mission or the intent is behind it at the same, what I have for myself, which is to just find whether it's practises or capacity to continually change and evolve with at different times of life, psychologically and physically, and just to find the herb, so on and so forth, that's going to facilitate and support my deepest health intentions to come true.   Mason: (02:17) And so, that, for me, when I was in uni studying herbalism, I wanted to potentiate the body. And so, that meant I didn't go for things that were problem-solution kind of herbs. Western herbalism didn't really interest me back then because it was more clinical. You take it for this, take it for that. But Daoist herbalism, the ancient Chinese philosophy and path of the Dao, their herbs were... They had this whole dialogue about cultivating organ health and cultivating the body. And that just really made sense to me because I didn't want to have a problem solution and initial problem-solution approach to my health and life. And that's where SuperFeast is basically at. It's just this gentle, this we source medicinal mushrooms. And when a lot of people know adaptogens in a way that's based on the Daoist tradition.   Mason: (03:06) So, it's just make getting them as close to nature as possible and having them be as robust as possible, so that with the same intention that they've had for thousands of years all over the world using herbs for health, it's just to keep you that little bit healthy, go get you on the front foot that little bit more. When you get a little bit more juice in your body, and you're not having to worry about symptoms and degeneration, or even fatigue. Even though these things can still be there in variants, if it's just like a little bit less of that, if you're a little less immune compromised, you don't have to waste your energy or your Qi on surviving. Those symptoms, you can get on the front foot and develop yourself and ultimately, when you get a little bit older, you're not degenerating and hopefully, you've had the power to overcome developmental issues, psychological issues.   Mason: (03:51) So, you're a little bit less of an asshole and you're actually someone who's got some wisdom and someone who... It doesn't have to be so reliant on external stuff in order to stay healthy, and that's basically what SuperFeast is. Back in the day, I was like, "No, I just don't want to see any more degenerative disease in the world." And that's still a nice, lofty mission that probably won't ever come true because it's beautiful, it's relating to decay has been bad, but I really was mourning at the, seeing so much unnecessary degeneration and wasting away of the body and not living in harmony with yourself in nature. And so, I'm a really at a point at that SuperFeast, it's just like people have intentions around their health.   Mason: (04:38) I don't have an agenda about where that leads them, but through our education, because we have educational courses as well, and about living in harmony with nature and yourself, but then especially the herbs and the medicinal mushrooms that we saw. So specifically, they can really just help the organs flow, cultivate the organs, get the immune system nice and healthy so that there's a little bit less for people to worry about and they can go on, making their health intentions come true and becoming less of an asshole and more of their awesome selves.   Tommy Moore: (05:07) I love how you speak to the Daoist tradition because thousands and thousands of years ago, when we didn't have science, we didn't have all of this empirical evidence or clinical evidence about any of these herbal medicines or medicinal mushrooms, but that had practised this for so, so long, and they didn't necessarily need to know what a biochemical was because I guess back then, what they would call a spirit, we would now possibly call a biochemical. And so, I really, really loved this link between science and spirituality, especially when we're talking about mushrooms and herbs, that they can change how we feel. They can change how we act and our behaviour. They can make us feel more connected to each other. Now, this will be the first time that I've spoken about medicinal mushrooms and herbs. So, before we get deeper into science and philosophy, let's start with some basic definitions. What is meant by a herbal tonic? What is meant by a medicinal mushroom, and also what is meant by an adaptogen?   Mason: (06:19) Yeah, good order that you've put them in. So, tonic herbs is, that term is a rough translation over from about 2000 years ago, we get the first herbal materia medica, cataloguing herbs and their uses and categorising them. And, this is why I study a Daoist path because it's the ancient Chinese, the ancient health nuts, as I kind of refer to them. At times, they're the ones that documented it and came up with terminology, whereas right now, you don't see a [flowering 00:06:54] just yet of the Australian herbal tradition, because it was verbal. It was a bit more, I guess you'd say more spirit-based versus 3D-based, and that's in a lovely way. The Daoists documented specific, very physical practise-based health practises.   Mason: (07:15) And so, since it was written, it's like it's there on offer and able to be utilised, which is a little bit different to a verbal tradition, especially one that's been consciously wiped out and hopefully not forever. And there's beautiful people preserving that and slowly, we own the right to be able to partake in that once we get, how to do that with respect and not just to be treating it as a commodity, which is the worst thing that happens in the wellness scene, in the herbal scene as the things that are based in basically, as you said, spirit, so it shows and the science can be there, but that's doing something following a path in a way that it's complete. I guess holistic is the word that's a bit bastardised, but nonetheless, it's like, we partake in tonic herbalism and we reflect on it based on the entire system of Daoism and reflecting on where the civilization was at, not just take a scalpel, which is what Western herbalism and Western medicine does a lot of time.   Mason: (08:11) Just we'll just get a scalpel and just like... We'll take that and we'll leave the rest. And we'll talk a little bit more about that when we get to adaptogens, because that's not a bad thing, taking something out and going, this is an adaptogen used in these scenarios. As long as you leave a thread back to the complete system and where it came from. But, over 2000 years ago, we got the first materia medica by the emperor, Shennong, and it's basically an accumulation of knowledge, thousands of years of knowledge. Many, many people contribute to say, "This is what we know so far." There's three categories of herbs, as far as we kind of practise, which is the inferior herbs or lower herbs. They're the ones that are used for disease states. There's a lot of long-term symptoms. We can damage the body. They're basically using poisons, very good in emergency situations and acute illnesses.   Mason: (08:59) And then, middle herbs, regular herbs. They're long-term management of symptoms says still a little bit more... They can go in organs placing those herbs. And then, there's the superior herbs. And the superior herbs can also be used clinically. They are the ones that you can get on the front foot and utilise in the body. The Daoists would say, ``We'd use this to lighten the body or to ward off ageing, ward off premature ageing, to bring the spirit through." So, what is the spirit through is, just imagine, yes, you can develop yourself and use like, say a disease state to gain more perspective and wisdom in life.   Mason: (09:36) But if you don't have to have these disease states to be the catalyst for your growth, if you are already on a path of growth, you don't have to spend all this time going and dealing with disease or symptoms, or whatever, like mental health issues, so on and so forth. If you can do that, then you're going to be able to develop yourself psychologically, you're going to be able to work on your perspective in life, you're going to be able to transition through the initiations of life where you kind of get a little bit less about you at some point, more about the community. And that's what the Daoists were interested in. The superior herbs could be used in that instance. There were some of the grandmas for thousands of years had been, grandpas had been putting in the soup to keep everyone healthy without them knowing.   Mason: (10:17) So, they're the tonic herbs. So, tonic herbs are those that preserve life, and it doesn't mean a lot of people... I've been doing this a long time now and I've been kind of talking. It's been interesting how do I talk about these and get people engaged with these herbs while respecting them, because it's not just the herbs that you can take as much as you want of. They are like herbal foods, but they're still medicinally active. And the whole point of them is, yes, you can take them and it's not like you're going to... It's hard to do damage with these tonic herbs. And that's why they're the lifestyle herbs. But still, people need to be aware that you're going, you need to go slow with these herbs, and sometimes if you're feeling that you need, then you do trust your instinct to start taking big doses of say an extract powder and do two big teaspoons a day.   Mason: (11:05) But then, you need to be able to listen to yourself and that's time to lower that back once again. So, although these are the superior herbs, they're also very active. They're like any food. You're going to want to rotate and keep your instincts alive, but they're the herbs to preserve life. They're the anti-ageing herbs. These are the ones that they use to keep their bones healthy, mind sharp, keep their organs flowing. It's about preserving your life and the Daoist talk about you being made up and everything they made up that your body may be made up of three treasures, especially the three treasures.   Mason: (11:40) Your Jing lives in your kidneys. You're given that when you're born. It's how much wax you have to burn through the candle of your life, right? And so, if you burn the candle at both ends, bang, you're going to get rid of that wax. Yes, Western medicine can keep that flame alive, but keeping a flame alive on just a wick and having no substance there for it to burn through, it's not much of a life to live. And that's why a lot of people die for a long time once they get to 50, 60, 70, they're kept alive, but they're dying for ages. We want to avoid that if possible and that's what the Jing herb's about, not bringing that premature ageing strong bones. They're the foundational essence.   Mason: (12:16) Qi is the second treasure. Qi is like, you take fuel in, you cultivate Qi, keeps the engine going. Keeps your thoughts moving, keeps your fluids moving. This is what keeps you going through every day of life. It's your breath, it's the food that you're taking in, and you can maintain a lot of vitality and a lot of energy by keeping that Qi cultivated. And then, the final treasure is Shen, which is your spirit and your consciousness that comes through. And as you develop more wisdom, that equates to being able to develop more Shen and so more virtuous nature. So, you genuinely cultivate kindness and forgiveness and loving. And then, note that there's other aspects in from consciousness that come from the heart, especially, but there are other organs that you cultivate. Say, for instance, that are going to bring about the wisdom of having really strong boundaries by your really beautiful boundaries, so on and so forth.   Mason: (13:14) So, it's not just all pie-in-the-sky, lovey-dovey shit, quite completely. And that's the theory of Daoism in the organ system, and each organ has its own consciousness. But then, as you keep the Qi going through the organs, the idea is you are not burning through your three treasures. Your Jing, your Qi, your Shen. You cultivate life. That's what tonic herbs are, the superior herbs are. And it contains mushrooms and berries and barks and deer antler velvet, and minerals like pearl. There's some animal ones like a particular type of ant, so on and so forth. And so, in our day and age, they're the ones for like, then nootropics fall into that kind of category a lot of the time. Energy herbs, like ginseng, fall into that category. And a lot of adaptogens fall into that category.   Mason: (14:01) So, clinically, an adaptogen in the west was really identified in the 1970s by the Russians. And they classified, let me see if I've still got this, classify the adaptogen herbs as ones that are going to have an accumulative effect on the body. So, the longer you take them, you're going to accumulate benefits and it's good for everyone to be mindful that that's just not linear, the more your take, gets better. At some point, you hit a glass ceiling of how much energy you can have, and the adaptogens then kind of flesh out and can maybe help you modulate the immune system a little bit more, modulate your nervous system a little bit more. So, it's not just getting better in one direction.   Mason: (14:41) Once you restore homeostasis within your adrenal, that bottom, I'll talk about the HPA axis in a second, but say your adrenals get back into sync all of a sudden, then you might not keep experiencing more and more benefits from that ginseng or ashwagandha in that same direction. You might start opening up to being able to experience benefits in other directions, if you're not attached to just external gains coming from the adaptogen. So, I just need to flesh that one out there. Second classification of adaptogens is it can create any additional harm or stress to the body. The general rules, taking things like ashwagandha, ginsengs, schizandras, reishis, chagas, these kinds of herbs. For the majority of the population who are symptomatic and are dealing with disease states, they're not going to move you into harm or stress place. They're going to help your body adapt to stress, right?   Mason: (15:38) And so, they're regulators. And especially the mushrooms, they're immunological regulators. As well, if you're very sick, you don't just go charging into taking adaptogens. You want to still be... That's a very general kind of classification, as well, and no more harm or stress. And then, the third one I kind of touched on is their regulatory. They have a non-specific action in the body. And so, we generally know that it's going to take cortisol down and the majority of the population's say for ashwagandha cycle, a lot of these herbs, because [everyone's 00:16:11] high. But what about instances where cortisol is low? There are instances where it's actually helping the body get back and increasing that cortisol to a healthy level at appropriate times during the day.   Mason: (16:20) So, that's non-specific. That's like the medicinal mushrooms are used in auto-immune conditions. When people look at them like a reishi and cordyceps, they want to be working with a practitioner. This is you with autoimmunity. But you're looking at those herbs and you're like, "Wow, they're really incredible for lifting the immune system, helping us adapt to pathogenic influx, and fight these things off." But then, there's really solid instances and data coming through around people who are really excessive in their immune activity to the extent where the immune system attacking itself in autoimmune conditions and mushrooms are used to regulate that immune function down. Too very handy having such sophisticated medicine doing that, rather than just using a drug to suppress the immune system. You're going one step further and going where's the trigger site for this unhealthy flurry of pro-inflammatory immune activity and let's go and start regulating the immune system down on that level in an inappropriate way.   Mason: (17:18) So, you're not taking the whole immune system down. You might just be taking a certain part of the immune system down and maintaining surface immunity, right? When you take complete immune suppressants, you're going to see... And then, you're going to be more likely to get sick. That's what an adaptogen is, those three things. No additional harm or stress to the body, accumulates benefits over the time, non-specific activity in the body. And the medicinal mushrooms kind of fall under that banner of a tonic herb, right? And then, some of these herbs in the tropics, adaptogens and nerve veins, and that they're kind of have the Western herbalism, we'll kind of comment on what some of them are, but they're not all adaptogens because some of them are just pure nourishes, right? Some of them like a tremella mushroom, truly beautiful for lubricating the lungs, therefore lubricating the skin. If you've got dry skin, it's just such a nutritive, gentle herb.   Mason: (18:11) And they use a lot in post-surgery or disease states just to get a lot of juice back into the body, and fluid back in the body, and yin essence back into the body, as well as people that just value beauty and vibrance in their skin. It's not really an adaptive fact. They will discover it has slightly adaptogenic elements because it's a medicinal mushroom and feeds the immune system. But right now, it's just seen as a nutritive. So, it's not clinically adaptogenic, but it is a tonic herb. It is a herb that can be used to cultivate Jing, Qi, Shen, which is that's what a tonic herb is. So, the mushrooms come into their medicinal mushrooms, not the culinary portobello kind of brown mushroom ones that you get on your pizza.   Mason: (18:49) I'm not talking about psychedelic mushrooms. We are talking about generally tree-born mushrooms. Those mushrooms like shiitake, maitake, agaricus, poria, Reishi, lion's mane, cordyceps, is grows off caterpillars. We can't do that in terms of a product. It's generally going to be a... For us, it's a fermented cordyceps in a VAT, so that's a vegan one, but that's a kind of an example of a nontree-born medicinal mushroom. But, that's generally going to find medicinal mushrooms. The mycelia is going to grow up through the tree and utilise the carbohydrates and basically, eat those carbohydrates. And then, essentially, don't want to personify it and humanise it too much, but essentially, the genitals come out and then we pick those genitals where the spores come out of and utilise those.   Mason: (19:45) And they're so amazing for the body. They're just so regulatory, whether it's immunity, nervous system, endocrine system. And clinically, what the possibility of using these in real specific instances is just endless, but getting onto them preemptively, I mean, it's at this point, it's just too good not to be taking medicinal mushrooms. I think that's a long form answer to your question.   Tommy Moore: (20:13) That's perfect. You've answered that brilliantly. Yeah, and you're so right. There's so much about Western science and medicine that is almost exclusively looking at symptomatology. And of course, this can be effective in short term treatment or acute treatment of particular diseases and getting back to somewhat of a baseline. But what do you do from there? There's so many people who get unwell, say with cancer or a degenerative illness, and all they're doing is managing their symptoms and to me, that doesn't make any sense at all. It makes sense to the point of not causing further damage, but it isn't encouraging people to get healthier and healthier over time. And so, I appreciate how these medicinal herbs and mushrooms are working on our body as they do have that accumulative effect. They're helping us over time to get better and optimise our organ function and our circulatory system over time so that we can firstly, get to baseline and then go beyond that, because science can be quite slow in these fields.   Tommy Moore: (21:26) Often when we're trying to raise money or get funding for research, it has to treat something. And the way you described it earlier with the inferior herbs that you're looking more at disease states and getting someone to baseline level seems to be how our working science and clinical research at the moment. It has to be for someone who's already ill. And so, the Western way of looking at things is almost waiting for that clinical research to prove its efficacy. But as we mentioned earlier, there's probably thousands upon thousands of documented evidence through the Daoist traditions that prove that efficacy without having to go through the Western clinical path.   Tommy Moore: (22:10) But there's so much merit in these medicinal herbs and mushrooms because they can have such a huge impact on our health and our longevity and optimising the way our body works and improving our brain function and our performance. And it really is multidimensional how they do exert their effects in our body. And you began to allude to the anatomy of the mushroom being the mycelium and the fruiting body, because I find it incredibly interesting how both plants and animals evolved from fungus. To understand their anatomy and understand the constituents is really helping us to understand ourselves and how our body functions. So, can you speak to the anatomy of a mushroom and what are some different types of mushrooms and the different parts of the mushrooms that are working to help us?   Mason: (23:05) Yeah, I mean, this is a huge conversation. I got to the point in studying mushrooms, that I was like, there's a reason that the school of, the discipline of mycology exists because it is its own profession and I'm not going to be able to do it justice. I kind of, at one point I was like, cool, I am going to stick to my lane of tonic herbalism because once again, we've got a little bit further down the track and everyone's like, "Can you identify this mushroom and this mushroom?" And I'm like, "Oh my gosh, I definitely do not want to and cannot do that." But in terms of, it's a good question because mushrooms still have an overall stigma and people relate to the word mushrooms as in that's an appropriate blanket term.   Mason: (23:57) Whereas mushrooms are, you think of the plant kingdom and you go, "Yeah," and you know immediately you understand that there's diversity in the plant kingdom. You think in the mushroom kingdom and people are slowly starting to open up and realising that there's more, if not for people's perception of just as much diversity within the mushroom kingdom, different types of mushrooms, different evolutionary parts, styles of reproducing, so on and so forth, vastly different environments, way more so than plant matter with living within the mushroom kingdom. And so, the biggest organisms on the earth, besides the earth itself, have been mushrooms, all of a sudden you can see what our mushrooms are like. We don't even really know. There's all debate about whether they came from the spores, or came from space.   Mason: (24:51) And I know there's definitely been evidence to show that up, right up as far as you can get in the atmosphere, pretty much their spores and sitting up there. And I think that the work, the studies have been done on saying that seeds and spores can survive the vacuum of space. And so, there's all these weird and wonderful theories about them being aliens coming in and helping to... And we know that fungus basically, kind of up there, just after maybe water had such a pivotal role on helping literally everything evolve and everything is, [bay 00:25:28] is reliant on land and is reliant on that fungal system. They're helping whether it's the procreation, whether it's the sprouting of a seed, you see the mycelium within this particular spore, billions of spores, trillions of spores, just sitting dormant within the soil. And you see these symbiotic relationships as that's perf as the seed and the spore, as well as other conditions align that the seed will start to sprout. And then, you'll see a collaborative effort from that spore starting to sprout, all the mycelia coming up and finding. So, the actual body of the...   Mason: (26:03) ... its sprout or the mycelia coming up and finding, so the actual body of the mushroom coming up and helping basically encase and, again, not my area of expertise, but the way I romantically talk about it, create a womb for that seed, and go down and extract minerals from deeper down, and feed that up into the tree, and then be involved within basically that interconnectedness of a forest and interconnectedness of many elements of the world running up in through the trees. And you can see, once the symbiotic relationship evolves through helping to procreate and create a nursery, basically. And then once that tree is an existence, you see a [mycorrhizal 00:26:42] relationship where you'll see the little spindly bits coming off of the mushroom cells. They can drill essentially into the wood, and then they release enzymes so that they can then basically digest externally and then get access to those carbohydrates because there's underground darkness. There's no access to light, so the mushrooms need to get access to their energy source, the carbohydrates, in another way, and that's how they do that.   Mason: (27:09) And then from there, continues to be a collaborative effort in terms of, for many trees, the mycelium growing in through, and then sometimes sprouting out, and then as well as those mushrooms and the mycelia that just sprout their own mushrooms, coming straight up from the soil. So in terms of what they are, I mean very genetically close to humans, mushrooms. We've definitely co-evolved. That's where you can see the immune system seems literally hardwired. So a lot of people know that now we can see we have the endocannabinoid system, it seems like we're actually hardwired some way to have cannabis in our diet, whether it's regularly or not regularly, or just having a top up, or just being around the plant. It's the same way with the way particular [immunopaths 00:27:55] work, where you're taking in compounds from mushrooms. And because we've co-evolved, you can see that the immune system is there waiting to have particular receptors so it can identify fungal invasion and then take it to places where it can invade it off.   Mason: (28:14) Whereas in the medicinal mushrooms, the tree mushrooms, you take that in and, because it's got a high molecular weight, it'll bypass digestion, get into the gut, and then hit immune cells within the lymph tissue in the gut. And it's like a mystery shopper vibe, or it's like playing war games, where we're going to war ... the immune system's like I'm going to war with this, but it's not an actual threat that's coming in. And so what happens is you take on that beta-glucan within the mushroom, and then that macrophage cell will pass through particular pathways and go deeper into the immune system, metabolise that compound, and then spit it out, but it happens to be what it spits out is in perfect formation to hit deeper immune receptors within the innate immune system, which is a bit deeper to get into a constitutional level like that. And then what you see happening is rather than an activation or stimulation of the immune system, you actually see ... Stimulation was the word I meant to use there first, you actually just see an activation of the immune system.   Mason: (29:18) Whereas the lights start turning on, the intelligence starts turning on, an irregulatory capacity can start to occur. And it's just too perfect, those pathways. And it can happen with other substances, but it doesn't seem to happen with such efficacy. And it's not to say that there's definitely indigenous tribes who hadn't identified this and weren't reliant on tree mushrooms, but it's just too perfect. And so we're utilising that, but I mean I've just danced around what I do know about mushrooms, and then obviously taken it back to their implications around herbal medicine and human consumption, which is what I'm comfortable with. But it's a big, wonderful world and I think there's a lot of nostalgia there. At the moment, you can see mushrooms are going off, whether it's culinary, lots of people are back-buying shiitakes and even lion's manes, and it's really getting into mycology pages on Instagram and just going off, the weird and wonderful world of mushrooms. And so it's definitely the wave's broken on everyone.   Mason: (30:21) And huge Facebook pages, amateur identification groups, people going out and wanting to harvest their own mushrooms. It's a huge little underground thing now, and just even around here, in Byron, there's a few specialists mushroom harvesters that deliver those to some of the more fancy or progressive cafes or restaurants, and just chefs doing really cool things. Yeah, it's just nostalgic and for me, offering medicinal mushrooms to people, that's what basically I see happening is they're like, "Oh man, that feels good. It feels really good being on those mushrooms." They just feel it's very protective, it's a very safe place to be. And it just feels like we just had such a deficiency of connection to that world, that mushroom world, so it's nice to see people waking back up to it.   Tommy Moore: (31:10) Yeah, definitely. And just to continue that topic of this wonderful, intricate interconnectedness or this symbiotic relationship that we have with everything else and that everything else has with us, because it's something like 92% of trees depend on the mycelial network to exchange nutrients and to have conversations with each other. So the trees almost represent our organs and the exchange of nutrients that happens at each of those organs, and the mycelial network is, I guess, like our neural network, and our central nervous system, and peripheral nervous system that's all working together in this beautiful harmony, and creating this wonderful symphony that is our human body. I suppose, for some people, this might sound a little bit woo-woo or spiritual, but I guess it is a little bit like that.   Mason: (32:04) It is a bit, and look, there's a lot you got to ... As I said earlier, I'm quite romantic sometimes when I talk about these things and I'll just shoot past what's been shown within the data. I'm in a good place with our herbal tradition because I walk a very traditional path and chose not to become a practitioner, but rather I work with a lot of practitioners. I have a lot of practitioners coming onto my podcast. We always advise people once we get past a certain lifestyle. It's like if someone is sick and all of a sudden it's no longer just getting good sleep, and getting hydrated, and making some food changes, if that's not an appropriate thing at the moment because their symptoms have gone beyond just having that advice, that's when it also goes beyond tonic herbalism in terms of going, "Just take this and this will help." So because I've created that for myself, yes, the scientific literature is slowly catching up to what's known, and that's fine because you just get realistic about how the Western mentality works, and it's going to require that legitimization, and it's going to be scrutinised.   Mason: (33:20) And sometimes it is rightfully scrutinising because the wellness scene, and I'm guilty of this back when I first started out, you get a little bit over excited, you get a little bit counter-culture, and you start just saying these extreme things, which perhaps are rooted in truth, but you start saying them with no nuance, with such conviction, when maybe you're saying it with conviction maybe because you were in a group that believes it or because your person that you idolise says it, and you haven't actually gone back to the source of why that's been said, and so you don't know where someone might be taking a little bit of liberty to say something that's whatever. You're not at the source of it. So it's a good balancing measure, I find, but nonetheless, I mean, for me, it's just like the grandma's not scientifically adding Poria mushroom and reishi mushroom into a broth. You don't need that scientifically validated. Maybe toxicology reports are really good. People can make sure that there's no significant interactions with drugs that people are on in the family.   Mason: (34:25) But at some point, why I like the herbs is it gets you perceptive of your body. And I like sourcing in a particular way that's [Di Dao 00:34:34], where the herbs are grown as closely as possible, if not wild, in consortium with the elements around them. Living on wild spring water or completely rural areas. And people can go to superfeast.com.au and see photos and get videos of me up there, high mountains or low valleys. It's just in such a shit to get to these places in China. And why do we go to China? Because no-one's growing these tonic herbs. And you can't grow Di Dao these herbs wild on wild wood, say for the mushroom instance. And the other thing about Di Dao is the spore or the seed needs to come from the microclimate. So in that textbook I told you about earlier, the Materia Medica, [Shennong Ben Cao Jing 00:35:19]. And he says you need to go to this province and in this microclimate, that's where you get the best reishi. That's where you get the best [Schisandra 00:35:27].   Mason: (35:27) And so that's what I do. That's what we do. We can look at doing it elsewhere and in other ways, but you're not going to get the best. And I want to preserve that tradition. That's just what I'm doing. And there's other options out there. And then we test for metals, and aflatoxins, and pesticides, and all those things at TGA Labs, and so it's an extremely clean product you're going to be getting every single time. I mean when you start connecting, you're talking about there's that crossing over of spirit and science, at some point, it's rather than even crossing them over, if you have the capacity to hold your awareness of each at the same time is when you start getting this beautiful integration, you have respect, real deep ... that's not right, reverence of both of those spaces, rather in the beginning, it's nice to try and watch where they splice over. We were talking about this. Science is explaining that that's the spirit, that must be what spirit is, you watch the mind again take over. Whereas if you can just hold this spaciousness within yourself and respect both paths, and you hold them in your mind, and in your heart, and then in your gut together without trying to layer them over each other, all of a sudden you become this bridge of awareness of where the crossover is, and you don't need to try and do it too consciously. Some people are specialising in that, and it's really fascinating, but for your own benefit, because the science and the way our culture's bent, we'll generally take all the spirit and the romance out of that style of herbalism. And if you're constantly looking for gains and outputs, you go back and you check in with those things to associate yourself every now and then. It's good to document what actually happened and how they hit that goal. Maybe the herbs contributed or you can definitely see an increase, or you start taking it and you've got an aura ring on, or something like that, and you immediately see you're able to sleep longer and deeper because you're taking a herb. That shit is epic. I absolutely love it.   Mason: (37:27) But nothing beats saying when you get onto Jing Herbs, talking about Jing being the kidney foundations, you've been exhausted. You might be doing panels of cortisol levels because you might have a practitioner who lucky enough is into adaptogens, because they like measuring the HPA access, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, you know that if you've got that healthy, that axis in your body, that you are able to handle stress with much more efficacy, and therefore they get you on adaptogens, and they test your panels, and they go, "Wow, you're actually getting better." Now, that's all well and good, but they might get a new one, we've got a formula called Jing, it's just replenishing when people are exhausted. We get them replenishing back those foundations. Now yes, getting those inputs and going wow, your mind can go, "This thing is effective. We like doing that," but nothing beats your capacity to observe you building back and cultivating the functions of your organs and the flow of your chi yourself. That can never be forgotten within your body. You develop a very deep memory, and part of that memory is wow, I can do this.   Mason: (38:38) This isn't me going to a practitioner or me just taking a herb, and that practitioner or herb doing something for me. Those are good, but we don't want to do that our whole lives because that can excessively form a dependence externally. And we don't want to become too prudish in rejecting those kinds of things either because that will lead to extremism, going, "No, I never need to go and see a doctor. I never need to go. I can do it all myself," and that's when people can get into shit in the extreme wellness community, or conspiracy theory community, just that excessive world. If you can start though just to watch the fact that you are partaking in a practise, which is say herbalism or whatever, slow, gentle movement, energetic practise, you're meditating, and you watch yourself cultivate that energy and get a little bit more space from when you react to a situation, you're able to, with more ease, get yourself up out of bed in the morning, and go move, and get that yang energy moving.   Mason: (39:38) And then you're able to consciously come down and descend with the yin energy at night, and really participate in making your sleep practise better. That's all you, and even though you'd made to be taking a herbal, this Jing formula, you feel yourself building back that kidney function, which then correlates to adrenals, HPA axis, not feeling as exhausted, but it installs a sense of sovereignty and not dependence. And that's why it's nice for you to be able to go into a tradition that's grassroots and folksy, because it doesn't excessively separate you from your capacity to self-regulate, which is what the full excessive Western model does. It just creates divides and cuts things. It's a scalpel. It's just a scalpel. It's what they do in anatomy, they just cut things apart, and they can't relate then to a part of the body, like the knee relating to the neck, or the liver relating to the nervous system. They just don't get it because they've already got a scalpel and they've cut through all the fascia that connects the whole body.   Mason: (40:46) And they haven't attempted to understand the body as a whole, which is super useful at times, and super not at other times, which is why there's epidemics of degenerative disease, and metabolic disease, and people wasting away, and people just not having any capacity to look after themselves in their older age, which is bullshit, and it's extremist, and it's a dangerous perspective. It doesn't mean we throw the baby out with the bathwater. That's why we need more mature people, people that aren't married to an institutionalised way of thinking, they're not dying on the hill just because they've been educated in a certain way. It's just such a boring, immature, way of looking at the world. And I don't know who these people think they are. The amount of all-knowing people on the internet, I think, is such a crock of shit. And I think it's the benefit for everyone, why I like using these herbs, I talk about becoming less of an asshole and more of an awesome, genuine self. I talk about myself specifically a lot. I definitely don't feel any ...   Mason: (41:53) Just the next trap is feeling the superiority because you're someone that can hold that middle place. It's like no, that's another little trap there. But generally, why I like the philosophy of tonic herbalism is because it can make people not only malleable, it can keep you agile. Doesn't mean as you get more into yourself and go along this path, which so many people are doing, millions, you become more principled in your perspective but you become agile within that principle. You're not projecting. As the organs get into flow and you develop, in general, through life, which is the whole point of these herbs is to help you develop through life, through different stages. And some stages, you just need to go into fully in order to get that perspective of wow, now I can integrate that and go down another path, or go into another stage. But the whole point of these herbs is to support that development so we have people who have wisdom and we don't have these people who get so externally identified with a label, or with a profession, or with an institution that becomes their identity for life.   Mason: (43:12) And therefore, I find that person to be really boring and I find it boring when I do it. And what you want, I think, is just to go on a malleable path and just find what self agency means to you. And that's all we're doing through the herbs. That's all I can hope for. I don't necessarily have an agenda anymore because I just don't assume to know what's right for anyone out there. So that's why I'm also, I feel really open and welcoming whenever anyone here is like, "This is what I want to work on in myself," and I'm like, "Yeah, amazing." Just having a health intention, and if you trust yourself, and go in that direction of an intent, and develop yourself, and stay malleable, the whole idea of the herbs is just to uncrack that stuckness as much as possible, lighten you up so that you can further develop, and same with exercise and hydration, sunlight, and all those good things. But yeah, it's good. There've been people getting perception, which can't ever be taken away.   Tommy Moore: (44:20) Yeah, there are too many people who are very much self identified and there is a huge place for certain herbs and mushrooms to, I guess, dissolve this sense of self identity and really move away from this man made self, and be more perceptual and sensitive to bodily sensations, and be more connected to yourself. I actually want to divert this conversation-   Mason: (44:49) [crosstalk 00:44:49] psychedelic mushrooms as well, go into that conversation as well.   Tommy Moore: (44:51) Well absolutely. Yeah, it's interesting that you bring that up because I do volunteer for a charity called Mind Medicine Australia, and they're actually looking at psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy for mental illness.   Mason: (45:04) How far along are they? Mind Medicine Australia, are they doing the certifications? Is that right?   Tommy Moore: (45:11) Yeah, so we're in discussion with the TGA at the moment, so we're in the rescheduling process. There's an interim decision that's been made. So I know CBD has been accepted in that interim decision, [crosstalk 00:45:23]-   Mason: (45:24) You can put me in touch. Who's heading it? Because I'd love to chat with them a little bit [crosstalk 00:45:30].   Tommy Moore: (45:30) Yeah, totally. So it's Tania de Jong and Peter Hunt. So they're the two co-founders, but we've got a huge advisory board, from researchers, and philosophers, and people all over the world who are looking at this pretty closely. I know a lot of people in the States are, people like Rick Doblin, or Dennis McKenna, or people like that.   Mason: (45:50) Oh man, I'm so keen because this area is massive. I mean this is where people ask me all the time, "And what about psychedelic mushrooms?" and it's the same. And psychedelic mushrooms, brought it up on my podcast recently, I had someone who really explored psychedelic mushrooms, and I'm like, "Oh man, everyone always thinks just by osmosis, I'm going to be taking a lot of psilocybin-containing mushrooms," and the guy who was there, he's like, "I would never think that. I can tell straight away." And I'm not saying, "Yeah, because you're not conscious, man. You can tell that for sure." But I do get that, people like, "Oh yeah, well where can I get the psilocybin psychedelic mushrooms? You must be into them. Let's talk about them." I'm like I've got good things to say, but like mycology, I do stick to my lane now.   Mason: (46:41) And then you're working in the ... And the benefit of having that angle is it opens me up to going, "Yeah, cool." And then I'll talk to people like Tanya and yourself, who have actually got the insight of what's what's going on. I like just sitting on the sidelines, to an extent, and just be an observer of that, and just chat about it, because I mean we've been talking a lot about suicide just behind the scenes here, and on the podcast, it's been coming up. Anyway, I won't go into it right now, but just even for that preventative, I'm pretty sure ... Do you guys have that as a focus around [crosstalk 00:47:22]?   Tommy Moore: (47:22) Yeah, I mean the whole spectrum of mental health really within Australia, we look at the stats, we look at the lack of treatment options, and then we look at the statistics based on what we're seeing with psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy in trials that are happening all over the world. And the neuroimaging side of things, like Robin Carhart-Harris and David Nutt are doing over in Imperial College London.   Mason: (47:43) Who are they? The neuroimaging?   Tommy Moore: (47:46) Yeah, absolutely. So David Nutt and Robin Carhart-Harris are leading a lot of the trials over in Imperial College London. So they're, I guess, head of the Centre for Psychedelic Research as far as I'm aware. So their centre focuses on the action and clinical use of psychedelics with a particular focus on researching the treatment of depression. And they've done some really, really interesting studies there, obviously looking at the psychedelic state and what's happening at the level of the mind, or sorry, I should say the level of the brain in terms of neuroimaging, and also doing very interesting comparisons between the psychedelic state and the meditative state. They've done some comparisons of neuroimaging between Buddhist monks who have had 10,000 hours or more practise of meditation, and then comparing that to what the brain looks like during psychedelics, and some very, very awesome comparisons that they're finding and the similarities in terms of ego dissolution, and moving away from this mind-made self. But I'm certainly more than happy to chat about this.   Mason: (48:56) I was saying before, when you were talking about the mushrooms somewhat acting ... They act like an immune system. You can see tree-based immunological compounds moving between the mycelia between certain trees and sick trees, and also acting like a nervous system. My download, when I was on a medicine journey years and years ago, was that the mushrooms more relate to the fascial system. And the fact that within the Chinese herbal tradition, the mushrooms are seen as fluid regulators, and regulators of decay as well, they help move decay from the body, and allow it to be just metabolised and transformed. And I just started realising if you look at fascia in the body, just the biggest organ in the body, it's not skin, it's the fascia, and it's now I think technically classified as an organ, and it's such a regulating organ. And if you can maintain, as well as everything else, fascial health, you have a really good chance at staying really ... you have a high ability to stay more adaptable within your physicality. And I see that there's this energetic element to it, that it helps you just integrate experiences.   Mason: (50:17) And if you can stay connected in different parts of your body, which is likely you can see there almost being this photon transfer through the fascia in the body, and therefore how much light there is based on ... information there is based on light. And you can see that you can have information transfers to your body, therefore your body's going to be able to stay, basically what I can see, up to speed on what's going on elsewhere, and you can stay more unified as a whole. And then when I started bringing in mushrooms to the say the plant medicine community, and started seeing just how many of my friends, whether they were serving or whether they were regularly going into ceremonies, just felt a significant impact of taking medicinal mushrooms pre and post, pre especially, just to prepare your body and also ensure that you're not going to destroy your nervous system, that you've got this robustness to get through sometimes just how hardcore these journeys can be, but as well, the medicinal mushrooms afterwards to support the process of integration, huge, man.   Mason: (51:19) It was massive and it was this huge missing link. And I think as well, for anyone, it just goes to show it's not just plant medicines, when you're doing anything that's deep cathartic, and you're doing deep work with a therapist, whether it's plant medicine, you're deep diving in your yogic meditative practices, and so on and so forth, you can't just stay deep in these huge mind-exploding experiences. You can't get reliant, I think, long term on that being what's going to fix you or heal you. You go deep, you release the pressure valve, hopefully reduce some acute symptomatology, and then you will need to be able to catch yourself back up on ... If you've blown yourself out into the sky and you've gone deep into your psyche, you need to be able to hit that middle-   Mason: (52:03) Blind yourself out into the sky and you've gone deep into your psyche. You need to be able to hit that middle ground and come back to your lifestyle and your personal everyday practises, your own meditative practise, your own gentle movement practise and your own herbal practise in order to ensure that you're staying level and not becoming, again, externally reliant. Can happen on Western medicine, can happen on these plant medicines. It can happen with whatever, deep dive therapy, deep dive meditations. And, that's, where's the self agency. And that's where I really find the mushrooms to be super useful. And generally the tonic herbs, they're massive, and they are now that you see practitioners of all lights utilising them and getting their clients on these tonic herbs, as well as ensuring that they've just got their lifestyle factors rock solid. And you've got this constitutional discipline and the way you live your life to give yourself these basics, so as well as sleep and diet and all these things, because it's necessary, if you want to evolve in these areas, it's just paramount. Otherwise you can just keep on. You see all the good research in the beginning, because it's under watchful eyes and experts, whether it's a Shaman or whether it's a practitioner, they're a psychologist utilising psychedelic mushrooms or MDMA in all these other places. And there's a facilitation process, but if you aren't moving along on your own accord, if you keep on relying externally, you can start and you don't do so under a real watchful eye and someone that isn't just thinking, yeah, the more, the better, you come back and we'll keep you moving ahead using this thing, you start to loop in these subconscious kind of states rather than actually having the capacity to move slowly beyond them.   Mason: (53:43) And that's just important for everyone to remember that it always, from my perspective it's why I like the tonic herbals. It's like at some point, don't be relying on the external practise or the substance. Come back to your lifestyle. It's like the Buddhists and they're like chop wood carry water, that's where the magic happens when you've been chopping wood carrying water for 20 years and 30 years. And then you get a little insight, then you move past it and you just keep on doing your chop wood, carry water. Everyone needs to remember that it is in this scene because everyone's suckling at the teat of someone who does it for me. To get the research out there that discovers the therapy, that's going to help fix me inside. And I relate to it a lot in my early days as a big seeker.   Mason: (54:24) And it's just a really important reminder, I think for everyone to just constantly and now, if you can, as soon as you can, land with two feet on the ground and just keep your feet on the ground in that disciplined state. And I think then you can really start unlocking the magic. And if you're feeling dependent, unless you're in a dependent state where you find it's a really useful collaboration that you are working with it to get your head above the ground so you can work. But if you're feeling quite stable and you're still ambiguously, keep going back to look for some, there's got to be something more there for me, it helped me so much before. And now there must be other stuff. It's probably that seeking energy without acute symptomatology is there. It's probably time to just put all that aside for probably a few years. And so, anyway, just want to throw that out there.   Tommy Moore: (55:17) Yeah, absolutely. And just while we are on the topic of psychedelic mushrooms, I do think it's important that I bring across what is the therapeutic mechanism of something like psilocybin and psilocybin being the active constituent in psilocybe mushrooms. Now, I don't want to lose anyone in the chemistry of psilocybin because as we know, scientists and researchers are always using complex names. So stay with me as much as you can. I'll do my best to simplify some of the complex words that I'm going to discuss.   Tommy Moore: (55:51) But when we are studying the mind and studying the brain through material science, we do need to understand our limitations. We know that changes in brain activity or changes in blood redistribution within different areas of the brain can cause alterations in our state of consciousness, but we can't necessarily say, or don't necessarily know for sure where or how they exist. That is to say how we consciously perceive them.   Tommy Moore: (56:18) So firstly, let's just recognise the distinction or disassociate brain and mind. Do thoughts simply appear as electrical signals? Can we see thoughts through observing the brain? So I guess the three therapeutic mechanisms of something like a psychedelic mushroom, or all classic psychedelics being things DMT or LSD, neuroplasticity, functional connectivity, and modulation of the default mode network, and they're all correlating positive therapeutic outcomes of being more connected. I alluded to earlier, this feeling of connection to other people, to the greater good, to the universe, to ourselves, to everything. Feeling boundless, wonder, ineffability and a sense of gratitude for this human experience. And I did speak to the sense of ego disillusion, which is often referring to a psychedelic experience. And that is an experience that is beyond this level of mind, that we so often associate with our default state. Now, of course, people are going to have their own connotations and associated perceptions of the word ego, but let's start with that first therapeutic mechanism that I mentioned, which is neuroplasticity. And I know neuroplasticity can be linked with other herbs and medicines like lion's mane.   Mason: (57:46) There's another one. I completely mind blanking ironically when talking about herb's for neuro-plasticity. There was another one the other day and someone was using it. Maybe we're talking about niacin, we're talking about maybe the use of Ginkgo biloba rather than niacin. So more for that diluting factor using herbals rather than B3. So yeah, lion's mane, I think that's quite well established and there's a bajillion people now, thankfully doing lion's mane and microdosing in their own little settings. And I'm sure they're all legal. I was talking about neuroplasticity the other day in terms of a woman doing a masters on adaptogens and mental health. And she's a naturopath. And just going through the mechanisms in which neuro-plasticity is maintained. And it was nice because people use lion's mane and these nootropics. These other nootropics, herbal nootropics like ashwagandha and Rhodiola and Macuna and to an extent Ginkgo biloba. They use them in a way that's either healing.   Mason: (58:59) I use them on my mum on a traumatic brain injury, an acquired brain injury aneurysm. Or for study and mental output and mental acuity. And so they're good, not saying [inaudible 00:59:13] but then there's no grounding factor of just, if you can maintain your neuro-plasticity, you are less likely to find yourself in roadblocks that stop your psychological development or stop you from hopefully, we'll have to look at the data, but stop you from getting a neuro degenerative disease state later in life. And so that is exciting because I had this really calm relationship to neuro-plasticity, which is what I think it needs. I think the nootropic and the neuroplastic seen as far as herb's needs, needs to calm chop wood carry water association as well. So yeah, I'm excited about that side as well. Sorry for cutting you off.   Tommy Moore: (59:56) No, that's all good. Yeah. Just on neuroplasticity, I guess it is quite adaptogenic in a way, because the way most people think of neuroplasticity is just getting smarter or, very linked with the nootropic side of things like alertness and stimulation, but neuroplasticity in much the same way adaptogens work, is that it's progressive over time, you don't grow these neural pathways in a day or even a couple of days, it happens over weeks or months. And so if we're talking about neural pathways in the sense of a thought pattern and these neural pathways that are built up over time, it may be a negative bias that we have that is then becoming subconscious because we're using that pathway so often becomes easier to access. And it becomes part of our subconscious state or our default state when we're not necessarily doin

People's Party with Talib Kweli
Skyzoo On Being Influenced By Bad Boy And Puffy, Wrestling With Rap's Capitalism, Spike Lee, Basketball Raps, Ghostwriting, And More

People's Party with Talib Kweli

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 7:15


We've had a few guests who fall into the “your favorite rapper's favorite rapper” category, but Skyzoo certainly deserves that claim. We're talking about a man who has worked with everyone from Black Thought to Lloyd Banks to Dr. Dre to John Legend. He's versatile lyrically and career-wise and his thoughtful flows resonate on the lyrical and thematic levels.  If you like 90s hip-hop, especially NYC rap from that era, then you must hear this conversation. Bad Boy, Puffy, Biggie, Kim, and Mase are all discussed in-depth and with serious insight. Skyzoo also speaks frankly with Kweli and co-host Jasmin Leigh about how he wrestles with capitalism, his incredible list of collaborators, ghostwriting, his enduring love for The Wire, 9th Wonder and J Dilla, and so much more.  This conversation is fascinating and electric -- with tons of back and forth and a whole lot of genuine insight. 

Mason & Ireland
HR 3: NEW Name

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2021 42:13


More on Kenley Jansen's blown save. Trevor Bauer's trial got moved, leaving an almost zero chance of him returning to the Dodgers. Also, The Cleveland Indians are no more. It was announced today that the baseball team in Cleveland will be known as the Cleveland GUARDIANS! Mase is feeling it, but John not so much. He would have liked the Cleveland Spiders more. Does this put pressure on other teams with politically incorrect names to change? Plus, Happy birthday to Guns N' Roses guitar player Slash! and Texas and University of Oklahoma are potentially leaving the Big-12 and moving to the SEC. The guys debating if the remaining teams in the Big-12 would get cherry picked away if Texas and OU leave. Also, what schools from the Big-12 teams would jump to the Pac-12? GAME OF GAMES - It's John's game today! His game is centered around Space Jam: A New Legacy. Do you remember what celebrities/cartoons had a cameo in the movie? Plus, Mase tells us his ‘Lie of the day'.

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast
DNVR Broncos Podcast: As camp nears, what can we expect at QB?

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 129:31


On the latest edition of the DNVR Broncos Podcast, Andrew Mason and Henry Chisholm check in to break down all of the latest news in Broncos Country. Mase and Henry take on some burning questions about QB, head coach and owner and what could happen over the next six-to-12 months. They also take a deeper dive into how next year's draft class could look, and begin examining how the NFL's feeder system -- major-college football -- could change if Oklahoma and Texas leave the Big XII to join the SEC.

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast
DNVR Broncos Podcast: Where does Denver's skill-position arsenal stack up compared to others?

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 98:14


On the latest edition of the DNVR Broncos Podcast, Andrew Mason and Andre Simone check in to break down all of the latest news in Broncos Country. Mase and Dre talk about whether the Broncos' skill-position players are underrated, dive into the Drew Lock-Teddy Bridgewater competition and break down how the ability of college players to make money on name, image and likeness rights could impact draft classes by causing players to stay in college longer. They also take listener questions!

DYL&AL TALK NFL
DYL&AL TALK NFL VOLUME 065 NFC NORTH PREVIEW TOP 10 QBS WITH MASE AND PLAYERS WITH HOF POTENTIAL

DYL&AL TALK NFL

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 75:22


DYL&AL Discuss topics surrounding the NFC North preview then Mason joins our to talk top 10 qbs in the NFL right now then we close it out with young players with hof potential NFC North style thanks for listening hope y'all enjoy

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast
DNVR Broncos Podcast: What does Aaron Rodgers turning down a contract extension mean for Denver?

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 143:32


On the latest edition of the DNVR Broncos Podcast, Andrew Mason and Henry Chisholm check in to break down all of the latest news in Broncos Country. Mase and Henry break down the news of Aaron Rodgers turning down a contract extension from the Packers, take a look at why ESPN has the Broncos 24th in their 3-year projection power rankings, and even dive into which region of the country produces the most Division III prospects -- and why it's relevant with former Minnesota exec George Paton now running things in Denver. All that and more, plus listener questions will come at you in this two-hour show!

Culture Pop
ICYMI - Shannon Lee, Bruce Lee's daughter

Culture Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 38:22


Producer and author Shannon Lee joins Mase and Sue to talk about her Dad's legacy captured in her book "Be Water My Friend." Plus, an inside look at her television series "Warrior" which was just picked up for Season 3 by HBO Max.

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast
DNVR Broncos Podcast: Who is your dream Denver Broncos golf foursome?

BSN Denver Broncos Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 96:00


It's our favorite day of the week, casual Friday. That means another episode of Three Ring Circus. RK and Mase are joined by Henry Chisholm and Big Drive Spence from DNVR Golf to have some fun and talk all things Denver Broncos. We honor The Open Championship by looking at the Denver Broncos we would most like to golf with and then go through some precarious situations in a game called 'Either F(or)e!'.

The SDR Show (Sex, Drugs, & Rock-n-Roll Show) w/Ralph Sutton & Big Jay Oakerson
Monster Magnet (Dave Wyndorf) - Heavy Metal Goose

The SDR Show (Sex, Drugs, & Rock-n-Roll Show) w/Ralph Sutton & Big Jay Oakerson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 63:54


Monster Magnet lead vocalist Dave Wyndorf joins Ralph Sutton and James Mattern and they discuss the drastic change in music in the 60s and 70s and Dave Wyndorf's passion for FM radio, Monster Magnet's choice to release a "cover" album, how Monster Magnet got its name, making fun of the rapper Mase in a video, the connection to a Marvel character, Dave Wyndorf's story behind Space Lord, his first concert, drug and sexual experience and so much more!(Air Date: July 8th, 2021)Support our sponsors!YoDelta.com - Use promo code: Gas to get 25% off! Also check out the Yo Delta website for your chance to win a PS5!The SDR Show merchandise is available at https://podcastmerch.com/collections/the-sdr-showYou can watch The SDR Show LIVE for FREE every Wednesday and Saturday at 9pm ET at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/LIVEOnce you're there you can sign up at GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code: SDR for a 7-day FREE trial with access to every SDR show ever recorded! On top of that you'll also have the same access to ALL the shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!Follow the whole show on social media!Dave WyndorfBand Twitter: https://twitter.com/monstermagnetnjTwitter: https://twitter.com/davewyndorfBand Instagram: https://instagram.com/monstermagnetofficialJames L. MatternTwitter: https://twitter.com/jameslmatternInstagram: https://instagram.com/thejamesmatternRalph SuttonTwitter: https://twitter.com/iamralphsuttonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/iamralphsutton/The SDR ShowTwitter: https://twitter.com/theSDRshowInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thesdrshow/Shannon LeeTwitter: https://twitter.com/imshannonleeInstagram: https://instagram.com/shannonlee6982GaS Digital NetworkTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigital/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Kush, Curves And Conversation
Sn2.Ep5. Covid-19, Dating and You

Kush, Curves And Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 68:37


In this episode we caught up with second time guest of the show Mase, as we talk about dating during Covid-19 and how it has changed us.

SuperFeast Podcast
#126 Male Preconception with Peter Kington

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 60:57


Acupuncturist and Chinese medicine practitioner Peter Kington has built a successful fertility and pregnancy-focused practice, working with couples and individuals experiencing sub-fertility. In this very open conversation with Mason Peter discusses erectile function, semen analysis, reproductive health, male health literacy, lifestyle, emotional, spiritual factors of male preconception, red flags for infertility, and breaking down cultural barriers around the male role in conception. Living in a world where infertility issues and IVF procedures are increasing, one can find an array of lifestyle, biological, and environmental factors that play a role in both men and women not being as optimally fertile as they could be. But how can we get to the root of what's causing infertility if the right diagnostic tools aren't being used, and the right conversations are not being had? Looking through the holistic lens of Chinese Medicine, Peter explains why male preconception is a vulnerable topic for men to openly discuss, especially when there is an infertility factor present that lies with them. One of the things that stands out about Peter Kington as a practitioner is his approach to diagnosis and his sensitivity to understanding the male psyche. In this insightful conversation, he explains that a good diagnosis is about looking for bits of information that give insight into the patents mind/body connection and being aware of the cultural narratives around male reproductive function.   "So often I'll be presented with the situation where I'm talking to someone who's probably 33 or 34 years old. You go through everything, they drink moderately, they don't smoke, they don't do drugs, they might have a cup of coffee every day or two. They don't add sugar. They're doing all the right things. From an overall health perspective, they look healthy and okay. But then, when you drill down to the fertility results, they have these terrible outcomes".    Mase and Peter Discuss: Masturbation. Semen analysis. Low sperm count.  Male sexual health.  Healthy ejaculation. Male preconception. The lifecycle of sperm. Male physical examination. Erectile function/dysfunction.  Male vulnerability around sex. The pressure of conception.   Pornography and low sperm counts. The micro environment of the Testes.  Sperm/Semen; Whats the difference? The IVF path and options to support it.  The impact of infertility and infertility treatment on men.    Who is Peter Kington?  Peter Kington is a registered Acupuncturist and Chinese medicine practitioner who lives and practices in Brisbane, Australia. Prior to his Chinese medicine career, Peter had a short and unfulfilling career in retail before traveling the world as an international tour director. He graduated from the Australian College of Natural Medicine in 2005 when he also went into full-time practice. Initially, a generalist in his practice, but over time has built a fertility and pregnancy-focused practice that includes working with couples and individuals experiencing sub-fertility. In addition to his Chinese medicine degree, Peter also completed a Master of Reproductive Medicine. Since 2010 Peter has taught many professional development seminars to practitioners in Australia and New Zealand. He also completed a four-part series for eLotus in Los Angeles. Peter has presented papers at AACMAC, Acupuncture New Zealand's annual conference, the International Integrative Chinese Medicine Conference, and, more recently, the Rothenberg TCM Kongress and a two-part series for ATMS.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Peter Kington.com.au   Peter Kington Facebook Peter Kington Instagram   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason Taylor: (00:00) Hey there, welcome.   Peter Kington: (00:02) Thank you for having me.   Mason Taylor: (00:03) Absolute pleasure. I am quite humbled having someone of such experience on the podcast, talking to me about... Especially, I'm really excited to go into your style of talking about male preconception, which is obviously such a small aspect of what you understand and know from your expertise. Have your own practise. Nonetheless, it's an area that, just the little that I know about what you know, I just know we are going to be able to go deep into this, beyond the do this, take these herbs, work on testosterone. I just can't wait to dive into this slippery world. I don't know if you want to introduce yourself in any other way that wouldn't have been done to say hello to everybody.   Peter Kington: (00:56) So, well thank you. My name is Peter Kington. I practise in Brisbane. I've been practising since 2005 in full-time capacity. I've kind of done it all a bit. I've owned a clinic and I had that for many years. That kind of came to an end when the building got sold. I just decided to have a break from being a commercial tenant and rented rooms in another practise. I did that for three years. Then, COVID came along. It would kind of change the landscape a little bit. I think I'd been sort of getting to a point, anyway, where I felt like I wanted to develop a more sustainable way of working and living harmoniously. The risks, I guess, from a business perspective that COVID brought to us all, but had business interests, meant that I thought maybe it's time to do what I've been thinking of for a long time, and that's, relocate my practise to a home base, practise which I did. It's the best thing I've ever done.   Peter Kington: (02:03) It took a lot of stress out of my life, put a lot of joy back in my work, and I feel like I'm the practitioner I probably thought I was going to be 15 years ago. Didn't kind of get to and weaved around a little bit and got really stressed about that along the way several times. So yeah.   Mason Taylor: (02:25) I mean being a professional or a business or not, you just mentioned it's probably time for you to live a little bit more sustainably and harmoniously, which is something especially in what you're delivering to people in helping them find harmony in their own bodies. What you can see, even for what I do at times, I've gone, my God, I'm not living sustainably, I'm educating about it, I'm talking about it, but I haven't quite made those leaps. I love hearing that. I've heard a few practitioners say that when this whole thing went down, all of a sudden, it's given that little pop and that capacity to change to go, you know what, I'm going to start actioning that move back into harmony. And then just seeing the blossoming come.   Peter Kington: (03:08) I'm very mindful of being respectful of that because in this country, and certainly around the world, lots of people have had a very terrible impact from COVID. Here in Queensland, we've been very fortunate. So I'm grateful for that. But I realise in other parts of the country, that hasn't been the case. I certainly know of practitioners that have lost their businesses and their livelihoods because of extended lockdowns. I'm grateful for that, but also just from a personal point of view, being able to work from home, it's meant that I got rid of my car. So, that's one less car on the road. That's one less cost in our lives.   Peter Kington: (03:51) I've bought a little e-scooter. I don't go anywhere through the week. If I have to go somewhere, I jump on that, scoot off, go and do what I have to do, and then come back. It's actually been really good. It's allowed me to feel a little bit more, I guess like I'm living a little bit more true to the values, like you said, the types of things that Chinese medicine practitioners bang on about. The whole practitioner, heal thyself. Sometimes, the ego can get in the way of that and we don't stop to think about the bigger picture. So yeah, here we are.   Mason Taylor: (04:25) Here we are. I think holding that space, something emanates from you. Something emanates from a practitioner who is actually evolving along the road, and not just saying stuff.   Peter Kington: (04:36) Yeah. I used to run two rooms. I ran two rooms originally because I had taken on this commercial space that was a bit more expensive. I was working a lot harder. I did that and I thought this is really good. I'm successful because I'm running two rooms, that's what successful practitioners do, that's what we get told. Then, I started to get really burned out. I figured out that okay I'm running two rooms but I'm actually working a lot harder to run those two rooms. I'm actually not seeing a lot of profitability from a financial perspective, as a result of running those two rooms. I kept perpetuating that myth in my head for a long time, but with this new arrangement, I just had one room. I see one person at a time. I can have a genuine conversation with people. I can do moxibustion with them, do as much of it that I need to do, rather than having to think about the next room that I've got to run to.   Peter Kington: (05:39) When people are facing distress or discomfort, I can kind of be in that space with them and have them feel like they're heard, as opposed to me kind of looking at them and not registering what they're saying and thinking about a clock. It's taken a lot of that pressure off. At the end of the day, I think the people who come to see me get a better level of care. I can't imagine any circumstances under which I would ever revert back to that old model.   Mason Taylor: (06:05) No doubt you're getting better results and that it's like everyone going back to slow cooking, slow food, slow living, slow healing.   Peter Kington: (06:16) I call that the sourdough revolution.   Mason Taylor: (06:18) Oo, yeah. The sourdough clinic renaissance. Well look, speaking of you speaking of myth, perpetuating myths, I'm going to use that to segue into our conversation around male preconception, because, there obviously are a lot of myths, but even the myth in where you need to start, that was something I'm really interested to talk to you about, what's the context in which we need to be having this conversation before we just start getting to the list of things you need to do to make yourself more potent. Or what's the point of male preconception even? That's probably a myth that the guys don't need to worry about it. That's probably the one to start with.   Peter Kington: (06:57) Yeah. Men basically have to step up. There's a whole lot of sociocultural reasons why they don't and why they're avoidant around issues of fertility, masculinity and sexuality. They're all kind of intertwined. In this reductionist world of ours, and in a medical system that's reductionist... By the way, I just want to say [inaudible 00:07:26], I'm not an anti-medical person. Nothing I'm saying is meant to be destructive, not destructive but disrespectful to modern medicine. I think it's delivered us lots of many wonderful things. We all have our place on the spectrum of medical care. The medical model is a reductionist model in that it reduces things to a cellular level or two, a blood serum level, or if you've got a problem with your digestive tract you go and see gastroenterologists. If they can't define what's causing your irritable bowel syndrome, then there's a cause for that it excludes the other maybe lifestyle course. Then you get a person like me, you get that kind of holistic umbrella approach or nutritionist or naturopath. We kind of approach the body in a different way.   Peter Kington: (08:12) I don't tend to think of that male ego, super ego, that gets in the way of lots of things, as being separate from the person that's sitting in front of me. I guess the thing that stops people from being in that space, that point of view, is that they haven't got a framework to process that something might be wrong. They go to a medical path, which is logical because that's what happens. The doctor might send them off to say have a semen analysis, and the semen analysis might come back and say that for the very low sperm count. Immediately, it's been reduced because it's been reduced to a parameter on a semen analysis, which then opens up the door to fertility treatment.   Peter Kington: (09:09) The outcome of that will often be there's a referral for you to see an IVF specialist with the female partner. The IVF process will say well we'll just do ICSI, which is a particular type of IVF that bypasses male factor infertility and they select sperm and off they go. It bypasses the potential causes for infertility to just provide a treatment solution at the other end. It kind of gives the bloke a free pass, without having to think that the other issues follow the things that might actually be causing that low sperm count. It could be as simple as the diet they have, the stress levels they endure. That kind of thing is not always factored in.   Peter Kington: (09:54) Where someone like me will instantly go to those types of things. But then, the responsiveness of the client to that is a whole other discussion which we should probably talk about as well, because that's part of the psychology.   Mason Taylor: (10:09) Well I think that's a great place to start because it's definitely changing a narrative, a cultural narrative. Helping to evolve, it'll move it down the road, rather than going, you should be worried or you should be working, getting to the root cause, as you're saying, I'm sure where you're going to go right now, painting a broader picture that's going to allow that to happen in a more natural way and feel a little bit more empowering, rather than you're doing this wrong. You should be doing it this way.   Peter Kington: (10:42) There's a couple of scenarios. The most common one is this. Of a morning, I'll wake up and I'll have a look at my work emails. They'll be an inquiry from my website. Often, that inquiry will have been generated at somewhere around 2 AM. It'll say something like hi, my partner and I are about to go down the IVF path and we'd like to discuss the range of options to support what we're going to do. The first thing is that's happened at 2 AM, which means that the person that's been googling at 1:35 AM has been awake. There's obviously something going on that's keeping this person up and it does. Very commonly, these inquiries come in, in the morning, after this overnight thing. Secondly, nearly always, when I say always I mean always women, even if it's the issue is about a name. The initial inquiry will nearly always be from a woman about the other person.   Peter Kington: (11:50) The process then unfolds. I'll make contact with them. I'll call the person who's made the inquiry. I'll often just ask the questions, especially if the inquiry is about male factor, I'll just say ah so is the male partner on board with this, oh no he doesn't know I've contacted you. That's the third part of this evolving kind of cultural thing that, really what I've seen is, as from the beginning, it's actually a relationship issue, it's a relational issue between them, that this process is unfolding in this way.   Peter Kington: (12:31) Then, there'll be a little bit of discussion about that. Eventually, it'll get to that point, where you either need to make an appointment, or you need to go off and think about it. Often, they'll go off and think about it and they'll say I'll have a talk to my partner about it. Then it might sit for a day or two or three. And then, there'll be a phone call back, or there'll be an online booking made, and it'll be the person that you've spoken to, but they will almost always be the female half of the relationship, not the male. So then, they'll come, and then quite often, that will filter down to so how can I help you? The response will be well as far as I know, I've got nothing wrong but my partner's got infertility issues. Right? The person that's sitting in front of you is the female part of the couple, for all intents and purposes, doesn't really have anything wrong. Wrong from a medical point of view, not necessarily from a holistic point of view.   Peter Kington: (13:31) There is that evolving scenario. That's the first kind, I think. The second thing is that if you do happen to get a male, who comes to see you, what you're often confronted with is a really complex dynamic of someone who doesn't really know how to communicate about their body, doesn't really know how to communicate about their health, has a lot of trouble thinking laterally, across the spectrum of health, physical health, mental health, emotional health, social health. They often have trouble kind of thinking laterally rather than in a very linear sense. They themselves will come with a very reductionist way of thinking, which I think is probably a bloke thing, more so. I don't want to get too caught up in the men are from Mars and women are from Venus thing because it's a slippery slope. I think generally men do that, and I think they do that probably for a reason, because it helps them to bypass certain responsibilities along the way sometimes, and I say that as a man.   (14:40) But then, they'll often come and their ability to communicate about what's actually, they're experiencing or how they're feeling, is often really challenging from a clinical point of view. We're presented with the situation where you'll be talking to someone who's probably 33 or 34 years old. You go through everything. They drink moderately. They don't smoke. They don't do drugs. They might have a cup of coffee every day, or two. They don't add sugar. They're doing all the right things. From an overall health perspective, they look healthy and okay. But then, when you drill down to the fertility results, they have these terrible outcomes.   Peter Kington: (15:31) Their ability to kind of converse with you in a way that draws together the social, the emotional, the physical, all those types of things, it's often quite difficult. That's your job as a practitioner is to try and pull that together. But, there's a bit of a discord between how the male brain thinks and what it wants at the other end.   Peter Kington: (15:54) They're the two most probable scenarios that you'll either get an inquiry about a male and you'll end up seeing the female, and to be honest, that's probably 90% of the time. Then, there's another scenario where you might get 9% of the time, where it's a female who inquires about a male, and the male comes. Very, very rarely, you'll then get that 1% where it's a man that actually contacts you for himself.   Mason Taylor: (16:20) Yeah, I'm aware of the stereotype around that, blokes not wanting to talk about their issues, perhaps not being able to think laterally. But, it kind of amazes me that, that's still that extreme of a percentage that's only 1% of the guy, turning up on his own volition. In that case, would you say being really proactive and vulnerable in that situation?   Peter Kington: (16:52) First of all, about statistics, that's just my made up statistics about myself [crosstalk 00:16:55] but that's actually probably pretty close to the map, to be honest. Vulnerable, now there's a word. Geez.   Mason Taylor: (17:06) That's just relevant for me at the moment because I've got such a problem with becoming with my own vulnerability. That's maybe why I'm just putting that word in there.   Peter Kington: (17:17) No, I think it's a good word. That's actually a really good word, Mason. I think it's probably that fear of... Okay, I remember when I was a kid, I was scared of thunderstorms. There was a reason for that, because our house got struck by lightning. It was very terrifying. I could remember all the smoke filling up the room, and the house shaking. It was a terrible, terrible thing to go through as a small child. For many years, I was quite anxious when thunderstorms come. Anyone who's ever been to Brisbane from October through to about February will know that, that's quite common because we get [inaudible 00:18:01].   Peter Kington: (18:01) It took me many years to sort of get to a point where I didn't actually get quite anxious. There was a certain vulnerability because I can remember being told by adults are you a man or a mouse? That was a very commonly said thing to me. Are you a man or a mouse? I can remember someone once saying to me, if you don't learn to get over this, how are you ever going to protect your wife when you grow up? Well, I ended up being gay. That was never going to be an issue on that front. In terms of this idea of being the protector. Vulnerability, that's a really good word, because I think a lot of what I see is actually vulnerability that's masked by that socialisation that men have to have all the answers, that men have to be the providers. Here we go back to men are from Mars, and women are from Venus. I think that's actually quite a real thing that a lot of men perceive that they have to be the strong one in the relationship.   Peter Kington: (19:09) In recent years, I was invited to speak at an acupuncture conference over in New Zealand, in Wellington. I spoke a bit about this. I did some research and there was some really excellent research that came out of the University of New Castle, if I remember correctly, in New South Wales, around the impact of infertility and infertility treatment on men. The general essence of that is it actually deeply impacts men. But they don't express it. The reason they don't express it is if they have a partner who's actually undergoing the treatment, doing the injections in the belly, having the scans, having the anaesthetics to be able to have pick ups and go through all of that sort of thing, they have this feeling that they have to be the strong one. The one that stays to offer comfort when the hormones create an emotional cascade in their partner. So they have to have this strength. They keep having to demonstrate this strength over and over and over again, they don't give themselves that space to be upset, or having to grieve. They often express a very internalised guilt.   Peter Kington: (20:25) I think the research now that's starting to be done around the impact of infertility on men, does kind of align with the kind of empiric observations that I've made in my practise, and that vulnerability that you talk about. Actually that's a great word because there's this fragility. But, getting them to express that is really, really hard. I have had [inaudible 00:20:53] years that I'm happy to share a few de-identified stories around that. I certainly have had some really interesting clinical experiences around that. Would you like to hear one?   Mason Taylor: (21:04) Yeah, for sure.   Peter Kington: (21:05) Yeah?   Mason Taylor: (21:05) Yeah, yeah.   Peter Kington: (21:06) I actually think it's a really good story. It was many, many years ago. It was probably one of the first men that I ever worked with. We knew that he had a fertility issue. He was the quintessential bloke's bloke. They lived on the margins of Brisbane, in a rural lifestyle kind of environment. I think, from memory, he was a tradie or a labourer or something like that. He worked in a very sort of alpha male type of environment. He had this fertility problem. His wife was coming to see me and she said do you think you can help him? I said it was possible. He just wouldn't come. The only way that she could get him to come and see me, was on the pretence that he had a sore elbow. So he was going to come and see me for the sore elbow. She hoped that if he came and saw me enough times for the elbow and I could help his elbow, he might develop the confidence to then have a conversation with me about his fertility. We might be able to kind of give it what we do and help that.   Peter Kington: (22:21) I was quite inexperienced with this at the time. This was many years ago. I had probably only been practising for a year or two, maybe three. I hadn't had any of the experiences that I have now. He did come. We did the elbow. There was genuinely a problem with his elbow. It's not like we were just making that up. There was an actually issue there. True to how she thought it might be, the conversation started to kind of drift a little bit towards the fertility reading, we got talking about that.   Peter Kington: (22:53) He eventually agreed to taking some herbs. So, I gave him some herbs based on what I thought was going on with him. One day, he came in and he sat down, and I could tell that there was something. We'd sort of built a rapport at this point. One thing that happens, I often find, with men is they don't engage with the ideas. They don't look at you. Chinese medicine, the eyes that we look to the soul that's the heart. It's the shen. It's a way of being able to sort of get a snapshot into the connectedness between one's spiritual and emotional self and the piece of the self. We'll often avert their eyes. They'll kind of look at you but just slightly just off to your side, to the temple. They don't quite give you the gaze all the time.   Peter Kington: (23:42) He kind of used to do that. We got to a good point where we were having this good rapport. He came in on this day and he couldn't quite fix my gaze. He sat down. He used to wear this kind of cowboy hat sort of thing. He took it off and he set it down. He is just sort of sitting there and his eyes are fixed to the floor. He just wasn't communicating and it was really weird. Eventually, I said is everything alright? He went quiet. He said can I ask you a question, and I went, sure. He said I'm just wondering, and then he paused. This is a long time ago and I still remember this conversation really clearly, how it unfolded. I'm just wondering, and he paused. Uh, and he paused. I've got a little one and I'm really worried that because it's little, it's not going in far enough. Maybe that's why we can't have a baby.   Peter Kington: (24:54) It set me back because the anxiety and the stress that this man carried. It was obviously something that he had thought about a lot for his life. He was obviously aware that, for whatever reason that, in his mind, what he had was not enough. It was inadequate. Then, they got to this point. There's this infertility issue and maybe that's the reason why.   Peter Kington: (25:29) From my point of view as a practitioner, I needed to have sufficient knowledge to be able to have a conversation with him about the difference between how sperm works, how the penis works, and how the testes work. They're all very inter-related but different things. At the other end of it, I would assure him and reassure him that, so long as there was adequate penetration, that's all they needed to do. At the next point, it was the sperm that then did the next thing, carried their way through, and there's this interaction in the female reproductive tract that helps to facilitate that.   Peter Kington: (26:11) This may be probably one of the very first times I realised this really low bar that men have about their bodies and health literacy. Having a realistic understanding of their body and how it works. I've had many, many instances since then, perhaps not to that extreme way, but certainly in terms of having conversations with people about their fertility, what they know about themselves, and how little they sometimes know.   Peter Kington: (26:47) Another example is often people don't realise that what a man ejaculates is not necessarily a sign of their fertility, because the semen is the carrier. It's the agent. It's the sperm that live inside the semen, which you can't see, which are naked to the eye. That's what actually is the fertile component. Without being too visual and too crass, but I think we're among friends here so we can at least have a conversation, and you can delete me out if you want, if you need to.   Mason Taylor: (27:25) If you learned the things that have been asked on this podcast.   Peter Kington: (27:33) I'm sure. There's a point in most males' lives, when they figure out that if they touch that thing enough it's going to do what we call ejaculate. That's masturbation. It's usually done in privacy. It's usually done in the shadows of the night. It's usually done in the confines of the shower, while your parents are making dinner, or whatever. It starts at a very young age. It becomes something that males do, however frequently, or infrequently, I don't know. It certainly happens. I think that sets up a real domino effect about how men relate to their bodies because culturally, I think at least in our culture, it still seems to be something to be embarrassed about, ashamed of. Men don't certainly go out with their male friends, sit down, and say, hey by the way, when you ejaculate, how much do you produce? You know I like this look there's nothing conversation.   Peter Kington: (28:35) I know because of my female friends and my clients, who've said to me at times that they often talk with their girl friends, or class of girl friends, about what their menstrual experience is like, about [inaudible 00:28:45]. There's a little less of a to do around that. Women are possibly a little more comfortable discussing those types of things. Then you get this other thing that gets set up, where you've got these young men that figure this stuff out. I guess these days with the internet they can find that a lot more, a lot younger, unlike when I was their age. I had to go to the school library and try to look things up in an encyclopaedia. They would kind of figure these things out. They would have to experience and then they would attach to that experience the sensation it gave them, the physical sensation of orgasm and release. They would not really have any other parameter until perhaps they're starting to look at porn, which then gives them a very unhealthy and unrealistic metric because there's a reason that they're via porn stars. It's not because they're actually representing the average.   Mason Taylor: (29:43) It's just the way that it's edited. It's unfortunate. Anyway, sorry. Go on.   Peter Kington: (29:52) Well, I'll come back to that because I've got a good story about that. Then, they get to this point in their life where they become sexually active with a partner, or partners, girlfriends and boyfriends, or whatever else they're doing throughout their life. They get to this point where suddenly they're being asked to be a parent. They've never really had to think too deeply between that first orgasm when they were 12, and the one that matters most, when they're 32. There's a real golf in there. Porn stars, fun fact, I read this not so long ago, that heterosexual porn recruiters actively recruit ugly men with small penises because they want the focus, the market is to be heterosexual men, who aspire towards the women in the video. If you want to be in the gay porn industry, you have to have a big phallus and look good, because they're appealing to gay men and they sense a desperation towards that.   Mason Taylor: (31:02) The nuance of the gay porn industry, heterosexual, whatever. When you think that you're a teenager, you just stumble into it and start making these judgements on reality, and then you start hearing the stories of the way that the industry works and the way it works on psychology and the way they cut it. The order that they do the scenes in. Everything that goes into it, the injections that they do for the men.   Peter Kington: (31:33) You mean saline injections.   Mason Taylor: (31:35) Yep. You go oh my God, it's obvious now. It's so fabricated. It's so fabricated and you don't think of it when you're a little kid.   Peter Kington: (31:48) I remember the first time I heard about a fluffer. We probably should explain to people what a fluffer is in case they don't know. A fluffer is the person who's employed to keep a man erect. They fondle them. They keep them kind of going. I think in this day and age, they probably also use a lot of Cialis and Viagra medication now, because filming days for porn stars are long, long days. They start really early and they go really late. They have to kind of keep going, and going, and going. From a Chinese medicine point of view, it's appalling because it depletes the gene, which is the Chinese way of accounting for the semen and the sperm.   Peter Kington: (32:43) I remember the first sort of documentary about the porn industry, and it was on Netflix or one of those things, and I was watching it. You're right, the stuff they do have fabricated. It's basically just acting. Most of the time, it's bad acting because people in it aren't really actors, they're there because of their body. It's not because [inaudible 00:33:16].   Mason Taylor: (33:16) When it gets to this point where, because obviously you have a lot of men, who are infertile, or they're wanting to get their chances of making sure they can save during IVF. They want them to be better. I'm assuming what you're talking about, this barrier to engaging this conversation, also applies to any man who's going we're planning to conceive and I just want to ensure that I'm as healthy as possible. I've got the healthiest gene possible to contribute, to bring in this baby into the world. Is that the first barrier, the fact that there's something there. We don't talk about the insecurities about our size, insecurities about how much cum we are producing, the way we curve to the left, that we think we have funny looking pubes, whatever it is. That you're too big or whatever it is. Is it a barrier in what that's representing is we're not able to actually engage with that part of our body and therefore get into a place where we can potentially aid our fertility or become fertile.   Peter Kington: (34:27) Good question. My conversations have involved very little to do with the anatomy of that person. I always ask the question has the doctor ever examined your genitals, because it's not really within my remit to do that. I'm not trained to, and that's really out of my scope of practise. I'm not qualified to examine someone's testes, for example, to see whether they are of an appropriate size, which can be an indicator of various genetic conditions. If males don't develop through puberty and the genitals don't evolve, they can have under-sized testes, which are often infertile. It's not my place to do that, but I will always ask the question about whether they've ever had a physical examination. I can tell you that almost always they never have. Even if they've been, with their partner, to an IVF doctor. IVF doctors are trained in female health and they do IVF as some sort of specialty.   Peter Kington: (35:42) Over the years, there's been a couple of doctors I knew here in Brisbane that would have a look at the bloke's business. But by and large, that never happens. That's actually another massive problem, because women are used to having their genitals inspected because they go for their pap smear. They have to do that. Where men, unless there's a problem, it's not likely that a doctor's going to say hey pull your pants down, I want to have a look and see what's going on down there. It just doesn't figure into the Medicare seven minute increment. It's just not something that happens.   Peter Kington: (36:18) I will ask that question. I do ask questions about erectile function. I ask questions whether a man has trouble achieving an erection. I ask questions whether they have trouble sustaining the erection during intercourse. I will ask questions of whether they have trouble losing the erection, whether the erection is painful, or whether they experience pain with or after ejaculation. I'll ask those questions. From a Chinese medicine point of view, that tells me something. Also, from a red flag point of view, that would be, if there were things that came up in there, they would be red flags to me, that I might say hey probably you should talk to your doctor about this because you know x y z.   Peter Kington: (37:10) I don't ever ask questions about genital size. I don't ask them to trace it on a piece of paper and show it to me, or anything like that. That's not really appropriate. I do quite a bit, especially if men experience erectile function issues, that I kind of want to drill into that, to find out whether it's emotional or organic-   Mason Taylor: (37:34) Mm-hmm (affirmative)   Peter Kington: (37:34) In nature. I do want to find out, and this is always the case, usually, eventually it will become both. If a guy regularly is okay and performs to achieve erections and maintain them through to orgasm, and then they lose the erection after orgasm, which is normal, and that's what they're used to, and then all of a sudden, at one point, they have trouble with an erection just on a one-off, that could often just be enough to plant a seed of concern in the mind. So the next time they have to, there's this dark voice that talks in the back of their head that says what if that happens again. It almost becomes self-fulfilling.   Peter Kington: (38:27) The other thing that I've learned over the years is when a couple is actively trying, if they know they have to have intercourse at certain time, and female partner comes from work and say by the way, we're going to have sex tonight because I'm surging, I'm ovulating, and he just really had a big day at work, he's really tired and he's not feeling the love, he's got to somehow manage to conjure up the energy to have an erection and have intercourse, that could be really hard. I've had many conversations with frustrated partners who've said well that's another chance we've lost this month because he wasn't interested in having sex. There's this pattern that then comes in about the pressure of conception.   Peter Kington: (39:15) I think a part of it is that men are driven quite differently around this than women, because women feel the surge in the hormones. They know when the oestrogen is arising. They know they might be experiencing extra cervical mucus. They'll be feeling aroused perhaps which is what happens prior to ovulation because it's nature's way of saying you're ready, where men are wired differently. Sure, men can be fertile whenever because that's how men are designed. But if they are not feeling like they're just in that right space to be able to jump to attention, have an erection, and have intercourse at that precise moment, it sets up this real anxiety cascade. This stress response is often a really big cause of erectile dysfunction in men.   Peter Kington: (40:15) There's always an organic possibility as well, which could be related to low testosterone. An anecdotal wave, and by the way if it's just anecdotal, if people have a concern about this, they really do need to go to a doctor and get this tested properly. The old joke about morning wood, morning erections that men will wake up with an erection, and when they don't, that can sometimes be an indication that their testosterone is low. Typically, it should be higher in the morning, after a night of sleep. So that can be an indicator, which would be something that someone should go off and get tested via blood. That's the only way of finding that out.   Peter Kington: (40:58) Certainly that cycle of emotional impact, either through the pathway of just like a performance anxiety because of some triggering event, or outside of that, just the time of work, or there's been a global pandemic and your business has died, or there's all these other things that can happen which will trigger this emotional kind of cascade which can cause that to happen as a consequence. It's a really hard thing for men to process because when you're a teenager, the wind can change direction. That all just happens spontaneously and it's natural that as men age, the stimuli takes more stimulus to achieve. It takes more stimulus to sustain. That's just part of the natural ageing process. No one should feel shame or guilt about that. When there is a window of opportunity for a couple to conceive and there's this call, that can be a real problem because it sets up this cascade.   Mason Taylor: (42:03) We were talking earlier about living in balance or in harmony, and making those changes, because when you're not living sustainably, I just think it reflects there in that, where we as men or as a society, don't put this erectile health as just a general health ed indicator. In Chinese medicine, it's such a huge thing that, even if you're not trying to get pregnant, there's a general awareness that if you are having a little bit of erectile dysfunction, if you're not feeling like you have a libido, it's an immediate red flag. You can start to get into a bit of harmony here and have a new, better foundation for health. That definitely doesn't happen in the worst and that we get to that point where we want to get pregnant. It's like this has been building up, most of the time it's out of the emotional pressure of the situation or it's been building up a long time. Now you want to very quickly be healthy and in harmony when it might take a little bit of a lifestyle journey as well. It's, I imagine, is a pickle clinically.   Peter Kington: (43:10) Yeah, it is, because we've been acculturated to have had [inaudible 00:43:15]. Have erectile dysfunction, take Viagra. That's it.   Mason Taylor: (43:22) For you, obviously, ideal for men to come and find you and not just have a pill, and hit me up in the morning. For your ideal for men in preparing for conception, getting themselves high libido, possibly greater quality sperm, a capacity to really contribute to that inoculation, make beautiful, strongest child possible, what are your ideals? What do you want to see men doing? Whether that's lifestyle or emotional or spiritual?   Peter Kington: (44:05) I might just talk a bit generally. I think this probably scope here first to how long we talk about the aspects of this from more of a treatment type of thing we haven't really touched on in terms of a clinical setting. We could talk about that at some point with a bit more discussion about how sperm are made and how the physiology of it all happens. That's actually a really interesting discussion because I think men need to understand the physiology of their reproduction to understand sometimes how the intervention can help them.   Mason Taylor: (44:45) Gothca.   Peter Kington: (44:45) Okay. Having conversation, you and I sometime maybe around the physiological aspect and the time that into, say Chinese medicine treatment and what would happen in a clinical situation, would be in terms of probing the health of sperm. Generally speaking, the whole thing about Chinese medicine is it's predicated on a Chinese medicine diagnosis. So, the Chinese medicine diagnosis is not a biomedical diagnosis and that's the most important thing for anyone to remember.   Peter Kington: (45:15) You'll go to a doctor and they'll do a semen analysis and they'll say to you, based on these parameters you're not going to conceive, naturally. So, you've got subfertility. There's your diagnosis. It's actually quite a meaningless diagnosis because there are a myriad of parameters on a semen analysis. There are seven main ones they use. It's the volume of the semen. It's the colour. It's the scarcity of it. It's the number of sperm. It's the motility of the sperm. It's the morphology of the sperm. That's six, I'm sure there's another one somewhere. There's all these measures right. Some men might be below in one measure. More likely, most men will be below in multiple measures on the analysis. When you say subfertile, it's quite meaningless because it doesn't really clarify what that means in the first instance.   Peter Kington: (46:14) Be that as it may, someone comes and you go through the Chinese medicine framework, as a practitioner, and you ask questions, and I guess I've developed my own way of doing that after my many years of doing that, and learning lots of stuff about sperm and how it all works. You just look at the person. That's the first thing, just sitting and pointing towards the wall where my client would normally sit. You look at them. If you see someone who's got boobies and a bit of a belly, straight away you ask yourself, there could be some sort of hormonal imbalance going on there, either low testosterone or excessive amounts of oestrogen, which men in their system. There could be something going on there. Or you look at them and they are very ruddy in the face and they've got greasy skin and sort of slimy hair, or that tells me something from a Chinese medicine point of view. Or you look at them and they are pale, they're thin and that tells me something different from a Chinese medicine point of view.   Peter Kington: (47:15) Really, the diagnosis that sits on a semen analysis is just another piece of information from a Chinese medicine point of view. It's not a be all and end all. It just tells us how that person's health dynamic is impacting that particular measure. I discounted this initially because from a Chinese medicine point of view, we have actually no way of a system. Classically, in the texts that talks about the practitioner tasting the semen. Be that as it may, it's not going to happen in 21st century Australia.   Mason Taylor: (47:57) That'll be very edgy at the moment, won't it.   Peter Kington: (48:00) That would be a brave practitioner that would do that.   Mason Taylor: (48:04) Alright, requirements. Glasses of pineapple juice before coming.   Peter Kington: (48:12) That's the first. The classics used to talk about sniffing it. I mean all these things are predicated on a man giving a sample. That's just not going to happen because you're going to end up in jail, or you're going to be de-registered, because someone is going to think that's got some sort of ejaculate fetish. Did you like how I was polite when I said that?   Mason Taylor: (48:33) Yeah, absolutely.   Peter Kington: (48:39) Maintaining a certain level of professionalism here. If you don't have the semen analysis to guide you, you don't know that. So it's useful. I'm not saying it's not. As a practitioner, you need to understand that. That's the sort of thing we might talk about some other time as well, because there's a whole sort of framework around that I've worked out over the years. You've got the semen analysis and it tells you something. You're only interested in that within the context of the person. If the person sitting in front of you is clearly 20 kilogrammes overweight, slightly short of breath, and got greasy skin and red complexion, that's going to tell me something. If the person sitting in front of you is lethally thin, pale, doesn't sleep, highly wired, very anxious, and has five cups of double shots of coffee a day, and they've also got lowsy sperm, that's going to tell me something different.   Peter Kington: (49:37) The way I treat that man is going to be completely different than the way I treat the other one. Whereas bio-medically speaking, they'll go and have ICSI, which is where they get them to ejaculate in a cup, they put it under a microscope. They examine it and they actually choose the best sperm that they can find by visual inspection. They eject that into the egg. I'm not putting that down because that's clever medicine. It doesn't really go to the issues of why that man has got a low sperm count. It might be that it's just genetic. It could just be a genetic thing in which case, nothing is really going to change that. It's just the way that he was born.   Peter Kington: (50:22) If it's because he has three chicken rolls and meat pie for lunch every day, and a highly sugar lated in ice coffee on his way to work every morning and he's up until 11 o'clock at night, watching porn and masturbating, and doing all of these other things that we can work through and try to repair and replace with other activities that are more nourishing and sustaining. Then, there's a real place for that intervention to take place, over a period of time, because sperm don't just improve overnight. You don't come from one acupuncture session and suddenly you've got a splendid number of sperm at your disposal. The lifecycle of the sperm is at least three months. Mason, the sperm you're making right this second, you will ejaculate in 91 days time. Set your clock to it.   Mason Taylor: (51:14) Aww, cute.   Peter Kington: (51:18) Three months. It's a three month life cycle. That's just producing that. Realistically, it's actually longer than that. You've got to think of this as a change in life over a significant period of time, if you're wanting to have a really deep impact on improving your overall vitality over the sperm.   Mason Taylor: (51:42) As you say that, vitality of the sperm, one of the happy accidents, what happens there is you get a bunch of vitality as well and a bunch of healthy, happy sperm. Happy man.   Peter Kington: (51:54) Yes, that's true. One of the great incongruities of working with men is that a man like you, I'm looking at you because we're talking over Zoom, who looks young, virile and healthy, and actually looks a picture of health, can come in and hand you a semen analysis that is actually completely the opposite. That's actually one of the really hard things to reconcile. If a woman comes to see you and says I've got heavy menstrual loss, I have huge clogs, massive pain and the menstrual blood is purple, and then you ask the questions and you find out that she drinks a lot of coffee, drinks a lot of alcohol, has a really high stress life, does all these things, for a Chinese medicine point of view, you can actually draw a line between those things and bring them together and provide a very clear diagnostic that provides a clear treatment path.   Peter Kington: (52:54) Men have this very unusual thing where they will come and often their sperm health will be quite different from their physical health. That's the great challenge. That's what I was saying about sometime we should talk about the physiology of that. I've got this working theory that thinks of the sperm, when you think about it, testes are outside of the body. Tissue wise, the testes are the same tissue in men as ovaries in women. They call them amogalus anatomical structures. There's all these things. Men and women are basically the same thing. It's just that men have a Y chromosome and women have two X's. Men are XY. Women are XX.   Peter Kington: (53:42) That different chromosome is what gives men a penis and testes and gives us hairy chests, facial hair, and deep voices in puberty. That's why women develop breasts and the female form. Part of that is the testes sit outside of the body. Because they sit outside of the body, if we were hunters and gatherers in the bush, our testes would hang free and they would sit ideally at around 35 Degree Celsius, the temperature inside the testes would be 35 degrees. That's the optimal temperature for making sperm. For women, the optimal abdominal temperature, core temperature, is around 36.2 or 36.3 degrees. So it's significantly warmer. Ovaries need a lot more warmth. Testes need a cooler external environment. Each, there's blood flow that carries nutrients and hormones, and helps to regulate the temperature of thermodynamics and keep it at this consistent temperature.   Peter Kington: (54:47) When we think about men, we have to think about the testes as almost like a micro environment. I think that's why it is that you can have a healthy specimen as a person, but you can have unhealthy testicular outcomes because of this micro environment that's been compromised. Your job as a practitioner is to figure out what's going that's causing that and trying to rectify that. That's where some of those lifestyle things like not wearing tight underpants for instance. I'm wearing jeans right now. Well these jeans are pulling my go nads right up against my body. Fortunately, I don't need them to make babies with but you know they're pulling them up against my body. They're going to be keep them warmer than they ideally should be.   Peter Kington: (55:35) Spa baths is a classic example. Men go in and have a soak in a spa or a jacuzzi at this time, that's probably set at probably 38 or 40 Degree Celsius to keep it warm but you're frying your balls while you're in there. Oops I said it. My professional video slipped.   Mason Taylor: (55:49) I knew I'd get you eventually.   Peter Kington: (55:54) I nearly said something else. There's this micro environment. I think that's a really big part of what a good practitioner needs to be able to do. A lot of the education I've done over the years with teaching practitioners, I've run these professional development seminars over about 10 years, has been about trying to teach practitioners about how the male bits work because in our study, we almost do none of that. We get taught how the female reproductive system works but very little is given to us about the way the male reproductive system works. A lot of my professional drive has been trying to help practitioners to understand this a bit better and find a framework to work within that wall. That way they can help clients.   Mason Taylor: (56:44) I think when we first spoke, when you brought that up, it's like how there's so many oestrogen mimicking herbs established within Western Herbalism over decades and decades for women's fertility, [inaudible 00:57:04] etc. about when Stephen Buhner came along. He was like there's no androgenic herbs documented of being used in clinic whatsoever. We now understand women's preconception needs or fertility needs. There's not much going on for male fertility herbalism. I guess it kind of speaks to what you're saying. We've got to head off soon. I really can't wait to go into how the male bits work and continue to get that education out there. It's not just engagement, just getting that male engagement to begin with, not just having nothing wrong with you. It's her that needs to be worked on. Creating enough of a vulnerability. That's where this whole conversation needs to be starting.   Peter Kington: (58:01) Yeah. Just as an example, lets just say that somebody has a low sperm count.   Mason Taylor: (58:08) Mm-hmm (affirmative)   Peter Kington: (58:10) I will ask them how often they ejaculate. I never ask how often do you have sex because my experience is that most men are not truthful about the difference between how much they ejaculate and how much of that is actually related to penetrative intercourse in the guise of trying to conceive. If you've got a low sperm count, there's this idea about if you've got a normal sperm count or a healthy sperm count, whatever that is, let's say a couple of hundred million sperm, it's healthy to regularly ejaculate. What that does is, the way that the male physiology works that there are actually sperm always sitting in the background in reserve. That's why men can have multiple ejaculations in a day and be fertile, unlike women who ovulate once a month. Once that ovulation passes, they're not fertile until the next time they ovulate.   Peter Kington: (59:13) Men and women are wired differently. That's all well and good. If you're 25 years old and you've got a good healthy sperm count, it's actually not bad for you to be ejaculating fairly frequently. The general rule of thumb I say to my clients is every three days, every four days because what it does is it allows you to ejaculate, it gets rid of the sperm, and then it creates a fresh palette in that micro environment for the testes to recruit more sperm, to bringing forward ready for the next ejaculation. You're getting a good kind of replenishment for healthy sperm.   Peter Kington: (59:54) If you've got a low sperm count and you're not following that sort of framework, and you actually masturbate twice a day, morning and night, and you're doing that every day, and then in the middle of that you're having a bit of sex because it's hey presto time, we've got to have a baby, it's highly likely that you actually don't have the physical capacity to produce enough sperm based on your numbers to be ejaculating viable sperm. This semen analysis is a useless tool but it's actually quite a good tool because we can see on the numbers what someone is producing. It allows someone like me to give someone like you, or someone else, the advice that might be so how many times are you ejaculating? When you get to that point in conversation, and you might find out that it's seven or nine times a week, there's probably a conversation that needs to be had about okay we might need to pull that back for these reasons.   Peter Kington: (01:00:59) I've always found that if you could give a reason that's rooted in some sort of systemic, scientific methodology, men will listen to that. As opposed to, it's just because your genes going to be really badly affecting, which means something to me as Chinese Medicine Practitioner, that means nothing to the average person. From a professional point of view, being able to think and speak in two languages is really important. From a client's point of view, you just need to be able to give them manageable and bits of advice that they can enact.   Peter Kington: (01:01:41) I do genuinely find, if you say to men, look I think you're ejaculating too much, let's try and keep it to no more than three times a week or once every 3 or 4 days, and you can explain to them why that's the thing, they'll genuinely try that. I'm also interested in why somebody needs to feel the need to masturbate 10 times a week because they think that actually says something as well. If it's a stress mechanism or if whatever that might be, I think that's an interesting insight as well. I'm always interested to find that out because it's just another piece of evidence for my diagnosis to help me to understand the connection between that person's mind and their body.   Mason Taylor: (01:02:26) I mean it's fascinating and I always love this topic. I love talking about male preconception, infertility. I know we've got a lot of women that listen to this podcast. We've got more and more men. I know every time we talk about male sexual health, the feedback is just so positive. The guy's loving it. The wider female audience is eating it up, eating the topic up. I think that's a beautiful thing as well, is having women becoming just as engaged with this conversation, just as much as men becoming engaged in this conversation. Say vice versa, when we talk about women's fertility on this podcast and saying boys, you better be listening to his.   Peter Kington: (01:03:21) The message though is if you've got a son, you need to talk to your son from a young age and demystify his reproductive function because it will make it a whole lot easier for him as he gets older if he can talk about his penis and his testes and his ejaculate and not feel awkward about that. It's rare I think in this world to find a man who can do that. I think that's the key to it. I think the key to it is for us all to better understand, be more health literate. I think the key to it is to be confident enough to be able to have conversations with your children, whether male or female, about how their bodies work.   Peter Kington: (01:04:13) I remember once I got into a conversation with somebody. I didn't like it because it was getting towards rape blame. I just sat there, and I'm not a violent person, I'm a pacifist completely, I've never punched a person in my life, I've never hit someone in my life either, but I remember sitting there and thinking if I could just grab you right now and put your head through the wall of wood. Man was basically blaming, this wasn't to do with work, this was a social situation, blaming this woman for getting pregnant. I just sat there and I looked at him. I said you know what if you didn't ejaculate inside her, she wouldn't have been pregnant. Every unwanted pregnancy out there is actually because some bloke ejaculated. If you didn't want that baby, you shouldn't have done it in the first place. That's opening a whole other can, right on the clock.   Mason Taylor: (01:05:12) It kind of sits in that same world. It reflects from not taking responsibility for your part to play in conception and fertility on that side of things. That same cultural narrative can then lead to the emergence of I'm not taking responsibility for the fact that there's a pregnancy here. Anyway, not a nice conversation and not a nice man, but nonetheless.   Peter Kington: (01:05:40) It's that thing. The lack of awareness of consequence. You can bring it back to your word vulnerability. It is his ego driven attitude towards that was masking invulnerability and a sense of responsibility. But he didn't think of it like that. He was far too engaged in blaming her for not being careful enough. That's one of my bandwagons.   Mason Taylor: (01:06:15) I definitely see how that is perpetuated, not as extreme as that obviously, but you can see how, when it comes to the act of getting pregnant, that the entire onus is put upon the woman. Even, she's pregnant. It's just the little simple things. I remember saying when we were pregnant, and having people say well she was pregnant, and I say I had a lot to do with that as well. I feel quite involved, not to take away from the reality that Taney was actually holding the child and underwent that huge process. I physically didn't. Nonetheless, having that conversation did allow me to engage. I got to engage with my responsibility of preconception via my engagement during the pregnancy. I get to take on responsibility as well. Ultimately, be a little bit more connected. Hopefully, feel a little bit more vulnerability around the process. Hopefully, become a better dad because of it, be connected to my child. It's like a domino effect.   Peter Kington: (01:07:23) Yup.   Mason Taylor: (01:07:25) Verse that's her. That's her responsibility. I'm aware of the time. We've gone over.   Peter Kington: (01:07:32) Yes   Mason Taylor: (01:07:33) I'm really appreciative to you and really looking forward to having you back on so we can really get into it. I know we said sink our teeth into it but no that's not quite the same.   Mason Taylor: (01:07:47) Best place for people to get onto your work and use your clinic. Are you open for clients at the moment?   Peter Kington: (01:07:55) Yeah, I'm just about to go on holidays but I suspect this won't be broadcast until after I come back. I'm always, always willing to hear from people. They can find me on the web by my name, which is PeterKington.com.au   Mason Taylor: (01:08:10) Beautiful. Thank you so much for coming on. It's been a really great chat.   Peter Kington: (01:08:13) Thanks, Mason.   For more details go to: https://www.superfeast.com.au/blogs/superblog/peter-kington-ep-126  

Culture Pop
Episode 129 - Documentarian Glen Zipper

Culture Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 45:08


Fascinating conversation with one of the great documentarians in America Glen Zipper. Mase and Sue talk with him about his new shows "Dogs" and "Cat People" for Netflix. Plus, his the brand new "UFO," co-produced by J.J. Abrahms, premiering on Showtime in August.

Mason & Ireland
HR 2: Name Image and Likeness (NIL)

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 47:09


A Texas QB is using his name and likeness for good. Mason brings up a point about the NIL rule and whether it would be ok for a booster to pay a student athlete? The guys discuss NIL rules and which players would benefit most from it? Also, how much does this open the door for corruption? Plus, Mase has a friend who is coming to visit from Toledo - which LA landmarks would you take him to? What is a “must-see” for tourists? RADIO TINDER - Producer Lindsey asks the guys if they would ever participate in a clinical study for an anti-aging pill.. If a college kid is a jerk for refusing to pay rent to his parents and move out on his own… If they've ever made a similar mistake to John Sterling's home run blunder…. And if a high draft pick-turned bust should be asking for a trade after two seasons?

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: Mase is Back!

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 51:25


Mason has returned from his day off, happy that it's Friday before a three-day weekend! Ireland asks him his thoughts about the Trevor Bauer situation, now that MLB has put him on 7-day administrative leave amid sexual assault allegations. Also, Mason is bummed that he won't get to see Sha'Carri Richardson compete in the Olympics since she tested positive for marijuana. Everyone thinks it's ridiculous that they even still test athletes for it because it isn't a PED - plus, she used it to cope with the death of her mother. Any chance they change the rules any time soon? Plus, WHEEL OF QUESTIONS - What compulsive habits do you have that you have a hard time keeping under control? Mason is upset about the Heisman committee punting on whether they should give Reggie Bush his trophy back - they deferred to the NCAA, which Ireland says will NEVER return it…. Now that the new NIL rule is in affect for student athletes, Mason would like to pay a college athlete to endorse the show!

Mason & Ireland
HR 1: The Clippers are Eliminated

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 50:29


Ramona is here today, filling in for Mason, who decided to take the day off - and Ireland explains why its Lindsey's fault. Too bad Mase is out, he's not here to “celebrate” the Clippers' season ending. Now that we're heading into the Finals, a lot of teams are starting to look towards offseason moves and Ramona has some thoughts on the future of Damian Lillard, the Blazers and if she thinks he'll stay there. Also, Ireland brings up an interview with Mark Cuban where the Mavs owner explains how he can sniff out a lie. Are you good at detecting lies? WHEEL OF QUESTIONS - Would you tell your friend if you saw their spouse getting cozy with someone else out in public? NCAA Athletes are finally getting paid thanks to new NIL rule! The Dodgers put a funny spin on Max Muncy's bobblehead giveaway... If ESPN designed a bobblehead of YOU, what would you want it to be doing?

Culture Pop
Patrick Duffy, "Doomsday Mom" & "Dallas"

Culture Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021 30:40


Iconic television star Patrick Duffy joins Mase and Sue for a conversation about his legendary career. From "The Man From Atlantis" to "Dallas" to "Step By Step," he has spent his life on television. Great stories about he and Larry Hagman from the set of "Dallas" plus the famous Bobby Ewing shower scene. Plus he talks about his new Lifetime true crime film "Doomsday Mom: The Lori Vallow Story."