Podcasts about Hawaiian

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  • 3,339PODCASTS
  • 6,097EPISODES
  • 1hAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 24, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Hawaiian

Show all podcasts related to hawaiian

Latest podcast episodes about Hawaiian

The Fletcher Files: A Murder, She Wrote Podcast

Magnum meets Fletcher. Private Investigator vs world renown mystery writer. Despite his best efforts Magnum must rely on Jessica to save him from being convicted of two murders. All signs point to Magnum as the murderer and only Jessica and her investigation can uncover the real killer. Let's put on our Hawaiian shirt and tuck them into out shirt shorts and watch Jessica save the “professional investigator”. https://www.patreon.com/Thefletcherfiles

Conversations with Kelly
Anticipatory Grief

Conversations with Kelly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 20:37


In this episode, Jeffrey & Kelly talk about the important opportunities that are present when we know the loss of someone we love is inevitable. We are invited to care for our loved one and ourselves with compassion during terminal illness and throughout the dying process itself. We can use healing mantras to provide solace and support. Learn about Dr. Ira Byock's work and the Hawaiian healing prayer, Hoʻoponopono -- and how focusing on what matters most can ease our suffering in times of grief and loss.

Janey Lee Grace - Alcohol Free Life
152: Neil Shah on acceptance & forgiveness & Nunc Kombucha

Janey Lee Grace - Alcohol Free Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 46:47


Janey chats to Neil Shah from the Stress Management Society on being non judgemental, accepting of each other and practicing forgiveness.  They talk about the 'Ho,opono,pono', ancient Hawaiian chant and how to use it to help to reduce anxiety and stress. Janey also bigs up a brilliant brand Nunc who do a special 'Jun' kombucha which uses raw honey rather than sugar, lovely flavours and no chemicals. Enter to try and win a case of Nunc kombucha If you want a liver support supplement check out the new product Janey has worked on with Dr Marilyn Glenville Advanced Liver Support, order before Fri 29th and get a free Vit D3 with it and 25 per cent off using this link https://www.naturalhealthpractice.com/alslaunchjlg Don't forget to check out thesoberclub.com and follow Janey @janeyleegrace @happyhealthysober 

Hawaiian at Home
If you have the chance, learn with your keiki

Hawaiian at Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 33:29


We are starting off Season 3 with a dive back into our story and why we feel it was helpful to learn Hawaiian before we started having children. Not everyone is in the same boat as us, but if you have the chance to do it this way then our story may help you.

FourPlay
Jeff Clear Game 3

FourPlay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 12:38


If Jeff Clear! Again! It's week 3 for Jeff, so listen in and see if he'll be back again next week. 1. Green, Oil, Branch, Character in E. C. Segar comic strip. 2. Beast, Rising Sun, Drummer, Tracks. 3. Bomb, Game, Oil, Casing. 4. Tail, Sweat, Hawaiian, Top.

No Joke Podcast
Episode 287: HAWAII PART 2

No Joke Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:20


Billy and Adam spend another week in Hawaii. In this episode, they sincerely discuss why they post, or don't post, on social media. Plus, an update on Woody Harrelson, the Hawaiian wetness and Ken's House of Pancakes. Plus, two rain sticks! Theme: Send Medicine - Way to the Sea Follow Billy Scafuri: Twitter: @BillyScafuri // Instagram: @BillyScafuri Follow Adam Lustick: Twitter: @AdamLustick // Instagram: @AdamLustick See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hank Patterson's Outdoor MisAdventures
Episode 336 - Don't Let The Island Vibes Go

Hank Patterson's Outdoor MisAdventures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 71:07


Here's a super chill episode all about the super chill island vibes Hank immersed himself in while visiting the Hawaiian island of Kauai. It's a stress free episode all about being stress free. It's an episode about Hank's favorite things to do while in Kauai and all about the amazing and kind people who live and work there. It's also a crazy long rant of hilarity.  Shaka Brah! 

A Date With Dateline
The Ascension of Mother God S.30 Ep.4

A Date With Dateline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 97:48


In keeping with the tradition of Dateline's Season 30 being EXTREME, Keith is leaning into cult life! The Love Has Won “religion" is ready and willing to one-up Lori and Chad Daybell in terms of reincarnations, YouTube followers, and number of angry Hawaiians. Kimberly and Katie are learning even more about the ins and outs of cult life. It's pretty straightfoward: Hire a metal-drinking arc angel to handle the money, save up for your surgical implant removals, start recruiting dead celebrities and former presidents, and you're ready for the 5th Dimension! This episode has some very serious trigger warnings attached but if you are ready for a long strange trip then buckle up and get ready for this very special edition of A DATE WITH DATELINE: ISLAND JUSTICE! Official Description from NBCU: Insiders close to Love Has Won spiritual leader Amy Carlson speak out for the first time on network TV; new details emerge after deputies find her mummified body covered with Christmas lights in a Colorado house. Keith Morrison reports.  A HUGE congratulations to Rachel and Reilly on their wedding! Justine loves you so much, and we all wish you a magical day and an even more magical future together! Has your love cult turned into a hangry cult? Try MunkPack keto granola bars! Go to MunkPack.com and enter code DATEDATELINE for 20% off your first purchase! Download Best Fiends Free today on the App Store or Google Play, that's friends  without the R! And share your player code with Kimberly so you can be best fiend friends! Get help from a real dermatologist without leaving your home! Go to apostrophe.com/DATEDATELINE and use code DATEDATELINE to get a treatment plan for just FIVE dollars! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RoundBlock
Ashley Oyama and Trish Papalimu

RoundBlock

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 77:38


Teaching Hawaii's keiki to walk their talk.Recently Big Island teacher of the year was forced to resign because of her decision to stand firm in her beliefs. Trish opted to get tested weekly at the time of this podcast because she also believes that it should be up to the person what goes into their bodies and no government agency or job should play a part in that decision. 

RoundBlock
Daniel Mana'ai Anthony

RoundBlock

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 105:51


I had the honor of talking story with not only Daniel Anthony but fellow Kanaka farmers Kaueahu Nahoi not just about food independence but about life and choices that must be made now to insure a better tomorrow. 

RoundBlock
Michele Judy

RoundBlock

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 81:50


Michelle Judy is flight attendant and Professional body boarder but I think her most accomplished title come from three kids who call her Mom. We talked about travel, energy and living all over Hawaii and the cross roads we face as native Hawaiians who are trying desperately to save the things we enjoyed as children growing up here in Hawaii. 

Noob Spearo Podcast | Spearfishing Talk with Shrek and Turbo
NSP:170 Brian Fern | Hawaii's Unkolearnuhow

Noob Spearo Podcast | Spearfishing Talk with Shrek and Turbo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 88:16


Interview with Brian Fern Today's interview is with Brian Fern, aka @Unkolearnuhow from Hawaii! He has a genuine wealth of knowledge on gear and diving from his almost 40 years of spearfishing with a particular mindset towards sustainability and safety. In Hawaii, spearfishing is seen as more of a lifestyle than a sport - that shows in the way he speaks about spearfishing and guides others into it. He is a big advocate for buddy diving and gives us some actionable tips on how to dive safely and more effectively, how to handle Noob Spearos that don't know much about safety and how to confront experienced spearos that have unsafe dive practices. He even has some advice on avoiding and treating ciguatera poisoning! Have a listen and let us know what you think! We need to get Brian back for a 2nd episode, we didn't have time to get through everything we wanted to speak about! Important times: 00:13 Intro 01:50 Spencer Allen on 99 Spearo Recipes 04:53 Hello and welcome Brian! 06:24 Spearfishing in Hawaii is more of a lifestyle than a sport 08:08 Hawaiians seem very connected to their environment, is this true or just the tourists view? 10:40 Invasive species 12:25 Ciguatera poisoning 13:34 What was your experience of that and how did you treat it? 16:11 Alcohol and coffee making the symptoms worse 17:11 When did you start spearfishing? 19:12 Pole spears 21:42 There's no such thing as a shit fish, only a shit cook - do you agree? 22:17 Staple fish species 23:40 You have super clear water which presents it's own challenges 25:40 How did you develop your freediving to be able to hunt those fish and be safe? 28:50 "I want to dive like Ryan Myers - how long will that take me to learn?" 33:10 Learning to be patient 36:15 Diving with better divers 38:37 What about diving with someone that doesn't listen to good advice? 40:32 Learning through time and observation - how to not suck at spearfishing 41:30 Diving with bad buddies - have a game plan on the shore 42:54 How do you dive with people who can't dive as deep as you can? 44:10 How do you confront experienced divers that have bad dive practices? The dangers of experience and ego 47:40 Wrapping up buddy diving -  have a partner that's at or just above your skill level 49:18 Struggling to do one up and one down? Dive with 1 gun! 51:51 Understanding variable conditions - what do spearos need to understand about reading conditions? 54:03 How do people find spearing mentors in Hawaii? 55:59 Spearfishing clubs 57:27 How do you confront people that have decided that they know enough? 58:16 Conditions: you need to learn from local divers - talk to life guards 01:00:03 Online weather resources 01:00:56 How do you know when you are too deep? 01:03:22 The right equipment for the right job 01:05:19 Financial barrier to entry - if you have the wrong gear, you are risking your life 01:08:21 Mannysub -  what do you like about his gear? Premium gear that's been well designed with great customer service 01:11:14 Rollerguns 01:14:57 Before hunting with a new gun - DO SOME TARGET PRACTICE - properly powering your gun 01:18:16 Pipe guns vs wood guns 01:20:00 Price is a big influence - rigging and using your speargun is a big thing to learn. Mannysub gives you instruction manuals with their spearguns 01:21:32 Mannysub roller conversion kit - Brian is the US and Hawaii rep 01:23:04 How do people reach out and find you and your gear? Rollerspearguns.com and unkolearnuhow.com 01:23:56 We are out of time -  thanks for being on the show! 01:24:44 Outro Listen in and subscribe on iOS or Android Important Links Noob Spearo Partners and Discount Codes . Use the code NOOBSPEARO save $20 on every purchase over $200 at checkout – Flat shipping rate, especially in AUS! – Use the code NOOB10 to save 10% off anything store-wide. Free Shipping on USA orders over $99 + Free Shipping with promo code NOOBSPEARO at ! #ad #manscapedpod | Simple, Effective, Dependable Wooden Spearguns. Use the Code NOOB to save $30 on any speargun:) use the code SPEARO to get 20% off any course and the code NOOBSPEARO to get 40% off any and all courses! Use the code NOOBSPEARO to save $25 on the full Penetrator Spearfishing Fin Range . 28-day Freediving Transformation (CODE: NOOB28 for 15% off) | Equalization Masterclass – Roadmap to Frenzel | Free Courses | Freediving Safety Course | How to Take a 25-30% Bigger Breath! | The 5 minute Freediver | Break the 10 Meter Barrier – Use the code NOOBSPEARO to save $ | Wickedly tough and well thought out gear! Check out their | ‘Spearo Dad' | ‘Girls with Gills' | ‘Jobfish Tribute' | Fishing Trips () Subscribe to the best spearfishing magazine in the world. International subscription available! . Listen to 99 Tips to Get Better at Spearfishing

Content Strategy Insights
Jack Molisani: Content Strategy Career Management and Job Hunting – Episode 107

Content Strategy Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:07


Jack Molisani Finding the right job in the content strategy field has always been a challenge, and it's getting harder as computers take over more of the applicant screening process. Changes in the industry - especially the convergence of technical and marketing communication duties - also mean that you you have to be proactive about managing your career, even if you aren't job hunting. Jack Molisani knows how to navigate this challenging landscape. He is both the principal of a staffing agency that focuses on content talent and the organizer of the LavaCon content strategy conference. We talked about: the origin story of the LavaCon conference the content management and publishing systems used to execute omnichannel strategy the convergence of marketing communication and technical communication what content professionals need to know to prepare for emerging trends in content practice the importance of speaking to senior management in their language how to deal with applicant tracking systems when you are preparing and submitting your resume how to completely skirt the automated job application world by working your professional network and improving your visibility Jack's bio Jack Molisani is the president of ProSpring Technical Staffing, an employment agency specializing in content professionals. He's the author of Be The Captain of Your Career: A New Approach to Career Planning and Advancement, which hit #5 on Amazon's Career and Resume Best Seller list. Jack also produces the LavaCon Conference on Content Strategy and Technical Communication Management, to be held in virtually 24-27 October 2021. Connect with Jack on social media LinkedIn Video Here's the video version of our conversation: https://youtu.be/1he6YNdGkjc Podcast intro transcript This is the Content Strategy Insights podcast, episode number 107. As marketing communication and technical communication slowly begin to converge around omnichannel distribution strategies, content professionals need to stay on their toes. Both the details of the work and the ways that employers seek out content talent are changing. Jack Molisani can help you navigate this new terrain. He runs both a content staffing agency and LavaCon, a big content strategy and technical communication conference. Interview transcript Larry: Hi, everyone. Welcome to episode number 107 of the Content Strategy Insights podcast. I'm really happy today to welcome back Jack Molisani. Jack, you may know, he does a lot of stuff. He's runs ProSpring Technical Staffing, an agency that focuses on content professionals. He also organizes the LavaCon conference, which is ... Well, tell us more about LavaCon, Jack, because that's coming up pretty quick and you've been doing it how long now? Jack: This is our 19th annual conference. We've survived a dot-com crash, two recessions and a pandemic. Larry: Wow! Way to keep it going. That's amazing. I just want to observe just for the folks who are listening, that I put on a Hawaiian shirt for this because the name LavaCon comes from ... Well, tell the origin story real quick. Jack: The conference started in Hawaii back when there was STC region seven and eight. We had a combined conference in Hawaii in the year 2000 and everyone kept saying, "I can't wait till year." I'm going, "There is no next year. Hmmm. Maybe there's an opportunity here, but what's my niche?" Right? There's the STC conference. There was Win Writers at the time. I said, "There's not enough conferences with us, with a little gray in our temples." Jack: I did a content strategy conference and content documentation management, and that worked and we had it in Hawaii. That's why it's called LavaCon. That worked until the market crash in 2008. After that, I brought the conference to mainland U.S. cities, but I wanted to keep that aloha spirit that we were known for. The local music, the local foods,

Because We Are Strong
INTERVIEW: Tri Bourne Olympian & Myositis Warrior

Because We Are Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:20


Hey Peeps! It's Kristine and I am flying solo! Today we have a very special guest, Olympic volleyball player Tri Bourne! Not only is Tri an elite athlete, he also is a RARE. athlete, having been diagnosed with Dermatomyositis in 2016. This is going to be a great episode, so let's dive in_________________________________________________________________________________________________Tri Bourne is a professional beach volleyball player, former professional indoor player and NCAA Division 1 Men's Volleyball player for the USC Trojans. He has been a part of the United States indoor and beach national teams since 2005. He was born on the Hawaiian island of Oahu, where he grew up. Tri's journey has been truly RARE.  In 2016 the onset of a rare disease came and took Tri out of the game for nearly two years. Determined to make his dreams come true Tri fought back and found himself at the Toyko 2020 Olympics. Meet Tri Bourne:I'm a beach vball professional. I got an autoimmune disease back in 2017 which kept me out for 2 seasons. I later came back, after making the most of my time off, and made the Olympic team…. Find more information at my website www.tribourne.netLearn More about Tri Myositis Journey___________________________________________________________________Connect with Tri:FB: tribourne IG:@tribourne YouTube channel:  Tri Bourne ________________________________________________________________This episode is sponsored by :Consolidoc - www.consolidoc.com  That's why the BC Schizophrenia Society has launched a brand new podcast, called Look Again, Mental Illness Re-examined. Host Faydra Aldridge talks to doctors, families, and people with lived experience about how to recognize mental illness, and the specific treatments that can help. Check it out. They'll really challenge you to“look again” at what you think you know about mental illness. Support the show (https://www.patron.com/findyourrare)

Hawaiian Concert Guide
Hawaiian Concert Guide Show 621 - PidginMoji

Hawaiian Concert Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 140:54


Aloha mai kakou, Please enjoy this broadcast of new Hawaiian music, most of which you have probably never heard before. Click here to support the show: Hawaiian Concert Guide Tip Jar E Hihiwai Patrick Landeza Far Away Ka Wai o Kauaula Jonah Kahanuola Solatorio Lei Nāhonoapiʻilani: Nā Mele Hou Wai Hiwahiwa o Mokuhinia Cody Pueo Pata Lei Nāhonoapiʻilani: Nā Mele Hou Aia I Waiʻoli Ke Aloha ʻĀina Kainaniokalihiwai Kahaunaele Huliāmahi Volume 1 Na Pua Lei 'ilima Kuana Torres Kahele Nani Wai'ale Wehi O Ka Mahina (Moon Medley) Kuana Torres Kahele Nani Wai'ale Moloka'i Nui A Hina Emma Veary The Best Of Emma Liliko'i Emma Veary The Best Of Emma Te'e No'o Nei Au Robi Kahakalau Sistah Robi I Can't Make You Love Me Robi Kahakalau Sistah Robi

Dave’s Disney view
Episode #415 - Aulani

Dave’s Disney view

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 30:02


Today, I share some insights about Aulani, courtesy of a friend of mine. I admit I didn't know much about it before, but I feel like I'm ready to make a trip! Hawaiian culture and beaches sound very relaxing. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/daves-disney-view/message

The Basement Buddies Podcast
#160 Weird long pumpkins

The Basement Buddies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 69:09


Hey, Everyone. Thanks for listening. It was just the two of us down in the basement and it very quickly got out of control. YouTube thinks we should move to Idaho, the future of commuting, John hates star trek, Hawaiian pizza lovers are better people, emails from Wayne and Andy and two more questions super fan Joe. Email us with your thoughts about life. basementbuddiespod@gmail.com  

Marine Mammal Science
MMS 109: Spinner dolphins and becoming a marine mammal scientist

Marine Mammal Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 28:19


On this week's episode, Liah McPherson, a graduate student working on Hawaiian spinner dolphins, talks about her research on population abundance and age structure and her experiences entering the field of marine mammal science.

The Week in Geek Radio Show
ICYMI - Walking Dead Alum Sarah Wayne Callies : Bugs Bunny Voice Actor Jeff Bergman : Airplane! Actor Robert Hays : TWIG 10/10/21

The Week in Geek Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:40


Walking Dead Alum Sarah Wayne Callies aka Lori Grimes stops by to discuss here new Scripted Podcast #Aftershock on the iHeart Radio App. The cast includes Jeffrey Dean Morgan (Negan) and David Harbour (Stranger Things / Black Widow).Bugs Bunny, Yogi Bear and Fred Flintstone Voice Actor Jeff Bergman joins the show fresh off of his premier of "Space Jam : A New Legacy" with LeBron James. We play a game of the Hanna Barbera Bracket Challenge......D Squared barely keeps it together.Airplane! Actor Robert Hays aka Ted Striker takes time out of his Hawaiian vacation to discuss his new show "Fasten Your Seatbelts" The interview quickly goes off the rails as we spend most of the interview making fart noises.....Finally, we round out the show with a replay of friend of the show JLC Jamie Lee Curtis! FOR THE HORDE!!!All that and more on The Week in Geek with D Squared. Sunday nights at 7pm on WRNO.com and the Free iHeart Radio App. Make sure you Click the SUBSCRIBE button so you never miss a new episode. Follow us on Twitter @TWIGradio and The Week in Geek on InstagramThe Week in Geek 10/10/21

Poetry Unbound
BONUS: A Conversation with No'u Revilla

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:51


While preparing for this week's episode of Poetry Unbound, host Pádraig Ó Tuama began an email correspondence with the poet, No‘u Revilla. The exchange was so rich that Pádraig asked No‘u to join him in conversation. Together they talk about poetry, queerness and how Hawaiian language, culture, and history show up in her poetry.No‘u Revilla (she/her) is an ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian) queer poet and educator. Born and raised with the Līlīlehua rain of Waiʻehu on the island of Maui, she currently lives and loves with the Līlīlehua rain of Pālolo in the ahupuaʻa of Waikīkī on Oʻahu. She has performed and facilitated workshops throughout the pae ʻāina of Hawaiʻi as well as in Papua New Guinea, Canada, and the United Nations. She is an assistant professor of creative writing at the University of Hawaiʻi-Mānoa and is proud to have taught poetry at Puʻuhuluhulu University in the summer 2019 as she stood with her lāhui to protect Maunakea. A winner of the 2021 National Poetry Series, her debut poetry book will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2022.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Reality TV Improvised: The Improv-ision Podcast
Survivor S41 Episode 3 /90 Day Fiance: The Other Way S03 episode 7: Survivors Dan and Genie & the secret phrase, How to play ‘old school Survivor, ‘and Jenny dealing with Sumit's mom moving in

Reality TV Improvised: The Improv-ision Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:40


The idols may be non-sensical, and the couples may be all on the verge of breaking up, but we're back yet again to the Survivor / 90 Day Fiance: The Other Way Improv-ision Podcast.  So without further ado…  This week we improvise Survivors Dan and Genie arguing over who gets to say the secret phrase, How to play ‘old school Survivor, and 90 Day Jenny dealing with Sumit's mom moving in!!!.     IF YOU LIKE WHAT YOU HEAR, PLEASE HELP US OUT BY SUBSCRIBING, GIVE US A REVIEW, LIKE US ON FACEBOOK, FOLLOW US ON TWITTER AND TELL ALL YOUR BESTEST FRIENDS!! Each week we'll continue to break down every episode of some of our favorite reality TV shows and improvise those moments from the show you wish you'd seen.  We laugh along with you as we discuss our favorite reality TV shows on television and make up stuff that probably should have happened. Kerry and Rich are Hawaiian improv comedians who love to watch reality TV.  Every week, they take their favorite reality shows, discuss the episode and improvise moments that you wish you'd seen on the air.  We love TV and all the awesome characters that make it so fun to watch.  We bring to life our funny interpretations of their world. And, of course, we'll be back again next week, with more 90 Day fiancé, Survivor, other reality TV happenings, and, of course, improvised television on the Improv-ision Podcast! Follow us on Twitter: @improv_ision Like us on Facebook: @improvisionpodcast Send us an email to improvisionpodcast@gmail.com with your thoughts or questions.   And keep laughing with your funny friends Rich and Kerry every week on our Improv-ision podcast!  ‘Hangman's Noose' courtesy of Celtic Harp Robertson @ https://archive.org/details/CelticHarpRobertson Funky Element courtesy of bensound @ http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/track/funky-element ‘90 Day Fiance' music courtesy of TLC ‘Big Brother theme,' Courtesy of CBS  

Personal Development Mastery
#169 Consolidating the knowledge (part 1).

Personal Development Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 18:44


On my ongoing journey towards Personal Development Mastery, I have decided to change the format of Thursday's episodes. So instead of adding more knowledge, I will be revisiting the previous episodes and consolidating the wisdom imparted by my guests. In this episode, I revisit episodes #002 and #003. I hope you find the approach useful!  

You're Not Down
to go Claws Deep In Nachos | s.2 ep. 28

You're Not Down

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 62:53


Aloha mother f***ers! We're back with an all new episode after a short break. This week, we talk about inconsiderate animals digging their claws in your food to get the nacho you've been saving, Mike finding his duet partner in a Hawaiian bathroom, and what it'd take to kill each other during a squid game. LIKE, COMMENT, SUBSCRIBE and Hit the Bell to never miss an ep! Share this podcast with someone who wouldn't think twice to kill you if it came down to a squid game. NSTAGRAMS YND Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/yourenotdownpod/ Luis' Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/luis.d.castillo/ Mike's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/halftime_ynd/

Broken Boxes Podcast
Bonus episode: Ku'e - Who I am/ What I stand for - CCA series launch for Radio Coyote

Broken Boxes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


This is a special Bonus Episode, presented as a poem stitched together with music and memory, story and reflection. I am a sound artist and this is how I feel most comfortable to share a bit of my own story, who I am on this planet, how I maintain community, connection to land and assert ally-ship to the various communities who I love and who love me. This episode was the first broadcast to open a series of 18 episodes presented by Broken Boxes for Radio Coyote and aired March, 2021. You can hear the full series archive at Radiocoyote.org. Ku`e loosely translates from Hawaiian language to mean, “To Oppose, Resist: Stand Different”. My life I have always been different, it used to feel like a point of trauma, not belonging, but now as I grow older, I feel like this understanding of relationship to self and land is what makes me so strong. I am proud of who I am and where I come from. This broadcast is the memory of home. The land I was born in/with/for and the people and locations and songs that informed my being on the planet. In the middle of the pacific ocean, the water and the land of Hana on the island of Maui, Hawai'i. This broadcast is my memory of that place, it is a vulnerable love story. Kumu Kama, a teacher of mine from my youth used to say “You have to honor the land, songs and dance of where you are from in order to honor the that of others you may want to support and be in community with.” Thank you to my family and friends for sharing your memories of home transmitted here in a mixtape format to set up this series. Music featured in this episode: Artist: Olomana  Song: Ku'u Home O Kahalu'u  Artist: Hapa Song: Lei Pikake Artist: Paula Fuga Song: Loloiwi Audio recording from the late Kanaka Maoli activist Haunani Kay Trask. This excerpt is from a speech Trask gave On the 100th anniversary of the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, in 1993, where Trask famously spoke in front of Iolani Palace. Artist: Composed by Hinaleimoana Wong Song: Kū Haʻaheo E Kuʻu Hawaiʻi Thank you to my dad, my hanai sister Pamakani Pico and my dear friends Christy Werner and Angelica Belmont who contributed to this episode by sharing stories from home!

All Things Travel
Best Things to Do in Maui

All Things Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:55


Some of the world's most beautiful beaches, farm-to-table cuisine, Activities galore on both land and water. Today we're headed to the Hawaiian island of Maui.The Best Things to Do in MauiOverview of the island of Maui (characteristics, regions, etc.)Getting there (airport, transportation, inter-island travel tips)Activities specific to MauiWhere to stay?Tips for visiting MauiStories from your visits to MauiTom Srsich's Contact InformationTravel With Too Tall TomFacebook.com/TSrsichQuestion: What are the best things to do in Maui? **Let us know on Facebook and Instagram.** For Current Promotions and complete show notes, go to Shayne.FUN/att75. Grab your free download: Top Items to Buy Before Your Theme Park Vacation to Save You Money and Stress!Ready to plan your vacation?  Ryan and Shayne are both Travel Advisors with Creating Magic Vacations and will make YOU the travel-planning superhero.Contact Ryan at DisneyTravelDad.Com.Contact Shayne at Shayne.fun.Never miss an episode and help us take you to the top with us be subscribing and leaving a 5-Star review on your favorite podcasting app:Apple PodcastsStitcherAmazon MusicSpotifyiHeartRadioGoogle Podcasts

SuperFeast Podcast
#137 Love, Sex and Psychedelics with Dr. Molly Maloof

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 73:52


We have one of our favourite returning guests on the podcast today, entrepreneur and practicing MD Molly Maloof, who is back this time going straight to the heart of health and happiness; Love, sex, relationships, and the harmonious intersection of medicine and love. One of the many reasons we love the work of Dr. Molly is she's all about maximising potential and better function within the human body. Evolving in her practice and true to form with her ever-innovative mind, Dr. Molly's work has recently taken a more focused move into the space of relationships and how the quality of our close relationships significantly determines our long-term health. Healthy relationships help us cope better and defuse the external stresses of life; So why not focus on improving relationships? Inspired by years of experience and research in psychedelics, the neurobiology of love, and drug-assisted therapy, Dr. Molly is developing a company that aims to improve relationships and strengthen bonds through drug-assisted therapy. A complete paradigm shift in the way we view modern medicine and an upgrade to the human condition and relationships. As always with Mason and Dr. Molly, this episode is energised and thought-provoking. They explore the topics of psychedelic-assisted therapies, sexual dysfunction and the root causes of relationship problems, the history of MDMA and couples therapy, where modern medicine is falling short, and so much more. Tune in for good convo and sovereign health.   "I think technology is where we see these bonds decay. We're seeing people give up their marriages, we're seeing people walk away from long-term relationships, and we're seeing families and children affected. One of the most adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is a divorce. Why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, honourable, that's scientifically sound, and will leave people better than we found them".   - Dr. Molly Maloof     Mason and Molly discuss:   Natural Aphrodisiacs. Entactogens (empathogens) The psychedelic movement. Psychedelic assisted therapy. Combatting stress through love. Relationships, community, and happiness. How relationships affect long-term health. Exploring root trauma and healing sexuality. Technology and the decay of relationships. Sexual dysfunction and relationship problems. Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Oxytocin, and Serotonin.   Who is Molly Maloof? Dr. Molly Maloof's goal is to maximise human potential by dramatically extending the human healthspan through medical technology, scientific wellness, and educational media. Her fascination with innovation has transformed her private medical practice, focused on providing health optimisation and personalised medicine to San Francisco & Silicon Valley investors, executives, and entrepreneurs. Molly's iterative programs take the quantified self to the extreme through comprehensive testing of clinical chemistry, metabolomics, microbiome, biometrics, and genomic markers.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Cordyceps Deer Antler Molly's Twitter   Molly's Linkedin  Molly's Website Molly's Facebook Molly's Instagram  Psychedelic News Hour with Dr Molly Maloof Maximising Your Human Potential with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#47) Spiritual Awakening and Biohacking with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#108)   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:03) Molly, how are you?   Molly Maloof: (00:05) I'm alive and well in the middle of a chaotic world. And somehow I feel like one of the more sane people in the room these days.   Mason: (00:14) You're the sane person. It's great because I like the fact that the sane person and one of the sane people on Instagram. I love your Instagram endlessly.   Molly Maloof: (00:23) Thanks.   Mason: (00:23) And I love you're the doctor whose drugs I want to take.   Molly Maloof: (00:28) Yeah, right. Like I kept on asking myself, "What if we made drugs that people wanted to take? What if we made drugs that actually improve the human condition?" What if we made drugs that actually improved resilience and improved our relationships? How come that's not medicine?   Mason: (00:46) Now, let me start with this little light question.   Molly Maloof: (00:48) Yeah.   Mason: (00:49) Where does the intersection of medicine and love begin and integrate?   Molly Maloof: (00:56) Yeah, right? Okay. Here's what occurred to me. And I haven't really even announced my company because I've been stalled, but I can talk about the big picture because I think it's really important. I spent my entire life trying to figure out how and ever since I was a child, and I was like, wanting to become a doctor at a young age, and then hit puberty in all sorts of hormonal disarray. And I was just like, "What is this happening to my body?" I remember thinking, someday I'm going to figure out my whole body, and I'm just going to understand all this weird shit that's happening to me. And so I spent a lot of my life trying and testing out things to see what would they would do. I would take supplements when I was in ninth grade. I was just constantly doing weird stuff to see what I could do to make my body function better.   Molly Maloof: (01:41) And then, left my residency, started my own medical practise, and really was like, "Fuck, I want to make a practise around optimising health, instead of just fixing sickness." So I want to understand health from first principles. So I spent all this time studying and practising . And fortunately, I had patients who would pay me a lot of money to like, be my lab rats. And they were willing, they were coming to me with experiments that they're like, "I want to do this, will you be help me?" And I'm like, "Sure." So I was one of those doctors that was just like, helping executives find greater performance. And then I had a bit of a come to Jesus moment.   Molly Maloof: (02:18) And I was just like, I did not go into medicine to be doctor just to rich people. That's not cool. And this is like been an interesting experiment. But I should probably be doing more with my life than just helping rich people stay healthy. So it really was that. That was really going through my head. I was at Esalen Institute, and I was just like, "Yeah. I'm pretty sure that there should be more to life than this."   Mason: (02:39) It's an elephant a lot of the time in the health sector.   Molly Maloof: (02:42) Yeah. But at the same time, I'm super grateful that I actually was able to do what I did because A, I could show I actually was part of like a massive trend movement, which was like, precision medicine for individuals was like, not a thing until, a few years after I started practising . So I've always been a bit ahead of the curve. But I've always also been one of those people who's just like, I can't settle for like surface level anything. So I have to get under the surface. So I got asked to teach at Stanford, a course. And she was like, "You seem to be this healthspan expert. So why don't you teach about it?" And I was like, well, of course, I got really insecure. And I was like, "Well, I know a lot. But I can't know enough to teach a second best school in the country." So I went and I started researching even deeper and started studying even more and started like coming up with this framework of what health was about.   Molly Maloof: (03:28) And in my process of studying everything, I was creating electron relationships. And I started figuring, I saw a couple TED Talks, and I started looking into the research of these two psychologists and this researcher from Stanford. And basically, the conclusion was that long term health and happiness is literally dependent on your relationships, like the number one factor in whether you're going to live long and healthy or not is your relationships. And why do you think that is? Well, usually they're the biggest source of stress or stress relief. And we know that stress is a huge source of disease, and yet everybody talks about stress, but nobody talks about what to do about it. Even like some of the best most famous doctors in America.   Molly Maloof: (04:11) Well, even doctors are on stress, like sit around talking about how they don't know what to do with stress. So I was like, "I wonder if we could actually create medicine, that improved relationships." And so I started figuring out through the psychedelic movement, that a lot of what entactogens do is they fundamentally reproduce the neurobiology of love. And so I started digging into the neurobiology of love and I was like, oh, so dopamine, norepinephrine, oxytocin, and serotonin are essentially like some of the bigger molecules involved with love and connection as well as hormones. So to me, it was like kind of a lightbulb moment happened when I was like, "Whoa, what if we actually were to create medicine that can reproduce the love that you had early in your relationship when you first got married, when you first started dating?" What would happen if you could actually reintroduce that feeling again, in your relationship, when you've been together for 10 years, and you're already annoyed by each other constantly. And there's all this resentment built up?   Molly Maloof: (05:17) And what if you could work on that resentment, work on your attachment issues, work on your relationship and your bond and strengthen that bond, through drug assisted therapy? And so that's kind of what I came up with as an idea. And so I'm in this process of investigating the possible ways to do this. But really, it's like a complete paradigm shift in modern medicine because A, it's not about individuals taking drugs, it's about two people taking a drug together. And B, it's not about doctors just handing people drugs, but it's drugs plus therapy. Drugs plus a therapeutic journey that you take, in order to achieve a certain outcome. So not only does medicine have to change in a few different ways, like A, we have to like see if the FDA will even let us give two people drugs. But B like, the payment system of medicine is about you go to a therapist, you go to a doctor, you get a drug, and the doctor is paid for that visit. And that psychologist is just paid for that visit.   Molly Maloof: (06:14) So I have friends that are in payments systems, and they're developing like bundled payment programmes because essentially you need to like create an entire outcome based experience that is paid for in a lump sum. And so there's a lot of things that need to change about in medicine. But I think that fundamentally the human bonds that we create, like are the hugest source of survival that we have. And a lot of people have overlooked this in this pandemic. We know now from isolation, that there's nothing healthy about people being by themselves in their homes, especially the elderly. Come on, and young people and children with families in one house, like we're meant to be in community, we're meant to be touching other people, we're meant to be around other people. And I think it's really a shame that we have ignored this factor for so long, and we're continuing to ignore it while people are killing themselves with alcohol and drugs and other substances.   Molly Maloof: (07:07) And it's just like, and even food, right? Like kids are gaining weight at record rates, people are gaining weight at record rates. And it's all because we're not supposed to be alone. We're not supposed to be indoors by ourselves isolated, like it's not productive, and it's the antithesis of health. So that's my shtick in my soapbox description. And I'm just going to say this, this is a really ambitious endeavour, there is a very good chance that it will not work because the government will stop me. That doesn't mean that people shouldn't be doing stuff like this because we actually need to change the way that people think about medicine. We actually need to change how medicine is delivered.   Mason: (07:42) You know what, like what brings up, I've been reading a lot of like management books because I'm at that stage by my business where I was like Peter Pan and I'm back in the real world a little bit where am I growing up and becoming a little bit adulty.   Molly Maloof: (07:56) We're both becoming adults, dude.   Mason: (07:57) We're both adulting the shit out of life right now.   Molly Maloof: (08:01) We're adulting the shit out of life.   Mason: (08:04) The one Tani got like the whole management team to raid was like a Patrick Lencioni one. I don't think that's how you pronounce his name, but he's got business fables, and it's the Five Dysfunctions of a Team and one of the dysfunctions, I can't remember if it's an exact dysfunction or just something I took out of the fable, but it's like you get an executive team and you go through all the different departments like what's our goalposts? Like what are we all agreeing on that we're looking at as like what we're all trying to get? Is it like customer acquisition? Is it customer happiness ratings? Is it revenue? It doesn't matter what the hell it is, we just focus on that and we go for it and then that unifies you. I think most people and including people that get into health and are entrepreneurs in the health same doctors what the thing that happens is they still they can't get over the hangover of getting dumped.   Mason: (08:53) The goalposts been put on you by a pretty old medical system that just like, just keep people alive. Just improve the condition somewhat. And I think why when you speak and when people listening, I know people like loving my team like listening to your last podcast in the community really excited is because the boldness that you have and it's screaming me, you're like, "No, I'm creating my own goalpost, not taking on that one, and I can see the bridge, and I'm going..." Like you actually can bridge it. It's not just, I'm defying you. It's like, "No," I'm just like, I can work with in that and I can see what you're focused on. And I'm very clear about what I'm focusing on. It's like relationship and then measure the markers to see that your relationships have improved and we know it because we have these markers. And that focus is really inspiring. It's really intimidating for people that have just allowed themselves to be handed what the goalpost is. So cheers you, I raise my hot chocolate to you.   Molly Maloof: (10:00) It's like I ask myself, "Okay, I've got this personal brand. If I like go and be Dr. Molly brand, Dr. Molly, how is that going to like..." Okay. So let's say there's Andrew Weil, there's Dr. Oz, there's all these, like leaders in the space. I could do that. And I can always fall back on that if this thing doesn't work, like I'll only be 40 by the time I fail at this, right? So I think I'm going to give myself like solid three years before I give up. Look, it's really hard to do this thing, but I'm going to give myself some significant time and commitment, like five to 10 years, then we'll see what happens. If I can get through past three years, I'll be fucking stoked. So point is, is like I can always fall back on like the Dr. Molly brand because it's like, that's cool. But that's just an evolution, right? That's just like, me becoming branded doctor 2.0. But the thing about this other thing is like, if we actually were to accomplish this, this just fundamentally changes medicine, and also could transform human relationships, which are falling apart.   Molly Maloof: (11:02) People are getting divorced after eight years, and kids are getting damaged by these relationships. Kids are missing their relationships with their parents, parents are not bonding, kids are feeling neglected. We've got to save the family unit and I think it starts with the primary relationship. And to me, this is something that is interesting to me that, I just don't think a lot of people work on their relationships, like I don't think it's something that a lot of people consider to be a thing that they should be doing every day. But it's actually so fundamental to survival, right? And yet, it's like when things are getting really bad, that's when they get to work. So we are looking at different indications. But fundamentally, the big picture, what I'm trying to do, it's kind of like bring what people have been doing underground above ground.   Molly Maloof: (11:49) The history of MDMA was like couples therapy, right? And Shulgin was giving it to psychologists to improve couples relationships. And it turns out, like underneath a lot of dysfunction, a lot of sexual dysfunction in men and women is relationship problems. So if you just keep on getting to the root cause of anything, it's like, "Oh, why don't we just like deal with the root cause? And go with that?" So it's pretty-   Mason: (12:15) I've definitely experienced with underground MDMA.   Molly Maloof: (12:17) Yeah.   Mason: (12:19) Therapy?   Molly Maloof: (12:19) Sure. Exactly.   Mason: (12:22) Yeah. With my wife. Can you just enlighten people about how you'd use it in like a clinical setting and why in particular it has been used there?   Molly Maloof: (12:37) So MDMA, we're not technically using MDMA, unless we can't use the substance we're going to work on toward developing which there's a lot of reasons why, like drug developments hard, right? But MDMA would be a good backup solution because of its history. MDMA is essentially an entactogen. So what it does is it means to touch with that it means to generate, it's also known as enpathogen. So it creates a deep sense of empathy and human connection. And that empathy reminds you of like, "Oh, there's this person next to me." And I can actually feel how they feel right now.I can actually, more noticeably understand their emotional experience. And I can be a part of that experience, rather than feeling so separate from someone else. And fundamentally, it also works on the neurobiology of love. So it's a love drug. So it creates a similar experience to what I call post coital bliss, which is kind of like right after you had sex, and you're feeling like really comfortable and really blissed out, it's like, that's kind of the MDMA experience.   Molly Maloof: (13:42) And the interesting thing is that through different types of combinations of different chemicals, we're going to be able to modulate consciousness in ways that we never thought we could do and it's fascinating, just this whole field of psychedelic medicine because it's just beginning like this whole revolution is just beginning. And it's like happening from a place of like deep interested in science and understanding the brain, but also from like a deep reference to the past. So like MDMA, for example, in the past was used in couples therapy. So two couples would come in and take the medicine with the therapist. And the therapist will help them work through their issues whether it be like attachment trauma, or deep seated resentment that's been carried or anger or betrayal or just trust issues. And therapist would use this medicine to help people come together again.   Molly Maloof: (14:32) And one of the rules interestingly, for couples therapy with when Ann Shulgin was doing it and was giving it to other therapists was no sex. So it's funny because I actually think that psychedelics go great with sex. And I think that like, you have to know what you're doing, you have to know the dose, but I do think that there will be a role in the future for psychedelic assisted therapy, and there should also be a role for psychedelic aphrodisiacs.   Mason: (15:00) Speak more about that.   Molly Maloof: (15:02) Well, okay, so I'm giving a talk at delic on this is actually quite kind of interesting. I'll give you a little preview of my talk. So it turns out that psychedelic aphrodisiacs have probably been used since like the beginning of human history.   Mason: (15:17) Cool thing. The two best things.   Molly Maloof: (15:21) Right? So people are fascinating, right? So turns out that there's like a whole bunch of categories of psychedelic aphrodisiacs. And they're so interesting. So there's the Acacia DMT, harmelin combo, there's an Alaska DMT harmelin combo, there's also the combination, that combo the drug. There's also MDMA, and MDA, which is the entactogen class of synthetic love drugs. There's LSD and psilocybin, which are the tryptamines. There's actually like a salamander that in Romania, they put into a vodka, and they use it as aphrodisiacs. There's also toads that people use as aphrodisiacs. There's Morning Glory, which is an LSD derivative, there's Hawaiian woodrose, there's all sorts of cool plants and animals that have been used since primitive times that are psychedelic, and that can turn you on.   Molly Maloof: (16:25) And there's also dangerous ones things like scopolamine, which is not technically a psychedelic, but it's a deliriant. And you don't really want to take like the tour up. But people in Brazil apparently, occasionally accidentally get dosed by like prostitutes, who are trying to take advantage of them. So there's actually a pretty good Vice episode on that. But turns out that it's not exactly a psychedelic, but you can't have psychosis and hallucinations. So I was like, "Wow, these are really interesting. There's all sorts of different mushrooms and fungi that people use, there's also like, what is it called? There's a type of fungus. Actually, let me look it up. I've got my computer right here. So why don't I come out and give you a little bit more detail on this because it's kind of getting good.   Molly Maloof: (17:14) So there's like this substance, there's actually a fruit in Southeast Asia called my Marula bean. And it has all sorts of weird ingredients in it, that can make you trippy. And then interestingly, alcohol has the effect of creating beta-carboline in the body, which I didn't know. So it's actually technically slightly psychedelic, which I never knew this. And then absinthe has wormwood which has thujone in it, which is mildly psychedelic as well. So it's essentially there's different doses of different ingredients that are kind of used for different reasons, right? And so there's basically like the medicinal dose, they said, which is the lowest dose, like the sort of the micro dose of medicine. And that's kind of like people taking things just for overall improvement of their health, mental health. And then there's the sort of aphrodisiac dose, which is a little bit higher than that. So it's enough to get you to start noticing a shift in your perception, but not so much to make the trip really hard.   Molly Maloof: (18:12) And then there's the shamanic dose, which is like what's being used in a lot of clinical studies, which is like people try to get to the root of really deep trauma. And oftentimes, getting to the root of trauma is actually what a woman or man needs to do in order to actually heal their sexuality. So I got particularly interested in this space because MDMA kind of accidentally helped heal my sexual dysfunction that I had in my 20s because of some trauma that I had in college, that I didn't even realise was causing sexual dysfunction because I didn't know I had sexual dysfunction. I just knew that I wasn't aroused. I was in pain every time I had sex, and it wasn't orgasming. And then I met a guy, we were using MDMA together and all these problems went away. And I was like, "What just happened"? And I had my first orgasm with a guy. I had orgasmed on my own, but never with a man before because of unfortunately, my history of sex was not positive.   Molly Maloof: (19:07) So I basically been trying to figure this out, "Wow, it seems like there's an opportunity for healing sexual dysfunction." Because a lot of the root causes of sexual dysfunction are relationship problems and trauma. And so then I started uncovering the whole trauma, Pandora's box, and I started discovering natural numbers on sexual trauma. And it became this whole holy shit moment, like fuck the world is so fucked up when it comes to sex. Talk about like, this Me Too movements, just the tip of the iceberg. Underneath all of it is like, clearly dysfunctional sexual upbringing that most people have because of our completely outdated religious culture, right? Basically really religiosity in a lot of ways really ruins sexuality for people because it makes it into this forbidden fruit and then in that you start wanting all sorts of things that are wrong because you're like, "Oh, I can't have it. So I want all these things that I can't have."   Mason: (20:05) Forbidden fruit. And the guys our snake tells us you want the fruit.   Molly Maloof: (20:09) Oh yeah, and women want it too, by the way. I was like, when I discovered masturbation was a sin in like fifth grade. I was like, "Oh, dear god, I've been masturbating my entire life." So funny, right? And there was just this moment I had growing up being like, really feeling like I went from like a really good Christian girl to like, a very bad child because I masturbated. And that's just not okay. So then I get into the history of psychedelics. And this talk and essentially, before Christianity, psychedelics were being used by medicine women and priestesses, and medicine men, and they were given to people as a tool for enhancing their virility and their fertility and their sexual function. And it was like, part of nature, sex was something beautiful, it was something acceptable, it is something that was part of life, right? It was celebrated. And then Christianity basically turned polytheism into this monotheistic culture, and basically started burning witches, and saying that these love potions are evil, and that anything related to sex was wrong.   Molly Maloof: (21:09) And now sex is the thing that you have to have in the bounds of marriage, which the church of course has to govern. And if you do anything outside of that, or let alone, you're homosexual, you're now a deeply evil person, and you deserve to be harmed. And you really think about this history. It's kind of epically fucked how much, no offence to men, but like patriarchy, took over religion, and basically made it all about men being in charge of the religious experience. Even though women were actually very much part of like polytheistic religious culture, and sexuality was part of that culture. And so it's like all this stuff is really went downhill from there.   Molly Maloof: (21:50) And now we live in this modern time where like, the Catholic Church has unending problems with brutalising children sexually. And we have not woken up to this reality that sex is not evil. It's part of life. It's a beautiful part of life. It's a part of life that is one of those magical mystical, if not psychedelic experiences. And it shouldn't be demonised, but I do think we need to return it back into a place of wholesomeness and respect and love and really treating people the way we would want to be treated and I don't think any woman or man wants to be raped.   Molly Maloof: (22:29) I don't think any woman or man wants to be assaulted, and I don't think if any child grows up thinking that, that's normal. And I don't know what changes in culture that makes it okay for kids and adults to like mistreat each other, but I really think that like part of my mission in life is actually to create a better culture around sex and love and really this company that I started called the Adamo Bioscience is basically a company that's dedicated to studying the science of love because I think that if we understood it better, we might be able to create more of it, and through multiple pathways and products and services. And yes, I have a commercial interest, but mostly because like it seems totally a better thing to be spending my life making money off of than anything else right now, which is like why not try to create more love in the world? I think there should be like 15 to 20 companies trying to do this.   Mason: (23:22) I think there will be once you show them the way. That's the that's the beautiful thing about being someone who's charging and leading the way. Something as a couple, I was just like thank you, epic download by the way and I saw... And I think it's nice openly talking about religion this way, we can see that it's gone far away from the natural and the original intentions. And I saw you like, I can just see you reshare the meme the other day. It tickled me the most of it was just like white Jesus cuddling someone going, "I'm sorry I made you a drug addict. Let me a book before I send you to hell." It just popped me in school I was like doing things that potentially was going down the way of being like condemned and told by teachers, "Well, your stepfather is going to go to hell because he believes in evolution."   Molly Maloof: (24:16) Oh my god, I remember being in sixth grade being like, "I think evolution is real and my school thinks I'm..." But they don't believe in it. Like, holy shit, that was our lives.   Mason: (24:28) Oh man, I got a few pop moments. I was like, "Hang on. So I'm going down this route. Where I'm sinning because I'm trying to think critically here and so now I'm going to go to hell, but you created me in your image and I'm doing? You set me off. You know all, you know I'm going to end up here. And then you're going to send me to hell?" I'm like, "You asshole. You sadist." Anyway, that was my pop.   Molly Maloof: (24:54) What got me to like what really challenged my beliefs when I was 18 was talking to a guy who went to Harvard and messenger, you're in messageboard you're talking to people smarter and older than you. And I remember talking to this guy and he asked me this question. He's like, "How can God be omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent and how can there be a hell? If he's everywhere all the time all at once? How can it be ever a separation from God because hell is a separation from God?" And I was like, brain explode like oh that's impossible logical, total it felt like this doesn't work, right? Like does that work does not compute. And my brain just exploded I went into the bathroom and cried and cried in front of the mirror. I was like, "Oh my god, it means I'm all alone." I actually still believe in God now, but like my belief in God is much different than the patriarchal God that I grew up.   Molly Maloof: (25:50) I still pray to Jesus because I'm used to it's like a pattern, but I don't think Jesus is the only God. I think there's plenty of Gods you can pray to. But realistically I think that God is like infinite intelligence and beauty underneath everything that whether, and it's totally no gender or God can't have a gender.   Mason: (26:09) I'm going to send you my podcast with George Kavassilas. It's another mind blowing one. It's talking about the God matrix and the universe, the natural, the synthetic it's like really, really clear.   Molly Maloof: (26:25) Oh, cool.   Mason: (26:25) I'll send you because it's a very good one. And you know what, you were saying things that don't work and you know what I like that does work is aphrodisiac. So this is like telling before we move on from that point it's something that really jumped out at me that I really love and I might go a little bit of a tangent because I just wrote about it this kind of topic, this nuance. Yesterday we sent out a newsletter around lion's mane and I'm like I really love Lion's Mane because it's a bridge herb and for so often people are looking at, "I want a nootropic and so they go into a narrow," which is nice sometimes. It's nice to go reductionist. And you go, "I want something that's going to increase output and give me something now and I'm going to use this nootropic in order to get something. And then they eventually fall to Lion's Mane as like a nootropic and the word sits there very medical and very [inaudible 00:27:20], which is nice as well I use it.   Mason: (27:24) But then Lion's Mane is one if you get like a complete non grown on grain, you get one grown on wood, it's got elements of wild to it, all of a sudden you look past the textbook written black and white, in the tropic and you got the same intention here and then you look up at nature and you see, "Wow, my brain is so much more than what I thought it was and the output of my brain and the way the way that it operates in conjunction with my organs in my blood and my outlook in my life, it's connected to where I'm going to be. What I do now is connected to how I'm going to be when I'm 90 years old."   Molly Maloof: (27:59) Totally.   Mason: (28:00) it's not just take something get some output, it's like this pattern you can see the brain function connecting to the constant pattern of like, like the waves in never ending. Internally there are things that are like constantly happening that I can cultivate and work with and look at and ease into that are going to have my brain on the sea of marrow is the Daoists.   Molly Maloof: (28:21) I love that. The sea of marrow.   Mason: (28:26) And the aphrodisiacs are the same like that. And it's a fun one because people go, "Oh, aphrodisiacs great, it'll get your horny." And what you're talking about it's like a carrot that leads like you go and that's what I see. Like how I see Daoist aphrodisiacs as well, like deer antler in your pants.   Molly Maloof: (28:46) Yeah.   Mason: (28:48) Horny goat weed, like epimedium. These herbs cordycep, Eucommia, schisandra. People say the word aphrodisiac, and you go, "Great, okay, cool. I'm going to engage because I want to be horny." And you think there's more substance too, behind it. And then you get onto these aphrodisiacs and you start engaging with your sexuality, and all of a sudden it's an opportunity to connect to yourself and the word aphrodisiac falls away, and you start connecting to the sexuality. And I just heard it, then you're saying we're using aphrodisiacs to go and connect to the sexual trauma so we can connect to ourselves and our partner. And I think it's beautiful. I love it.   Molly Maloof: (29:32) Well, it's actually that the sexual trauma can damage your relationship to sex. So because it actually programmes your brain. There's this thing called the Garcia effect, and it's like when you eat something that makes you sick, you don't want it anymore because your brain associates that with feeling sick. Now not all women or men who have trauma end up with having sexual dysfunction, but a large percentage of women do that. In fact, like somewhere between 60 to 80% of women who had sexual trauma have some form of sexual dysfunction. And like in America, the numbers, which I think are underreported, are like one in five women are raped, one in four women are abused as children, one and three are assaulted in her lifetime. And so there's quite a lot of women who have sexual dysfunction because of the fact that their sexual experience was not pleasant. And it was, in fact, potentially scary and dangerous.   Molly Maloof: (30:26) So now their brain says, "Oh, that experience that's not good. I don't like that. And that's scary." And so it's kind of programmed as a traumatic memory. Now, only 30% of women with sexual trauma end up with PTSD, which is interesting. So there's actually more women with sexual dysfunction, than PTSD from sexual trauma, which is fascinating. So the theory is, is that with MDMA assisted therapy, that the medicine can actually help you revisit the trauma from a place of feeling safe and feeling okay and loved with a partner, preferably with a partner, if you're with someone that you feel safe with. And you can revisit that trauma, and then it gets reprogrammed in your brain, reconsolidated as, "Oh, this is not the worst thing in the world anymore." This is not something I need to like, fear or be afraid of anymore. That was just an event that happened. And in fact I think the real magic will come from when women can experience pleasure, again, through psychedelic medicine. As I did.   Mason: (31:32) How ironic that there's an aphrodisiac involved in that process.   Molly Maloof: (31:36) Well, you think, right? You think that like, that would make sense. It's just funny. I think we're just beginning to understand space. But I don't know if people even though this, but there's actually like three phases of neurobiology of love. The first is like the intense sex drive, which is like, our body is designed to get us to fuck a lot of people when you're young. Actually, the sex drive is like oestrogen and testosterone. And then like, you're horny, and you're young, and you want to have sex, and not everybody does. A lot of young people aren't these days, but the point is, is that it's designed to get you to be turned on and attracted to a lot of people. And then when you meet someone and you have sex with them, what happens is, is that you start activating other hormones. So dopamine starts getting released, oxytocin gets released after orgasm, and that can actually increase the attachment to this person.   Molly Maloof: (32:29) So especially in women particular. So then we start moving on to romantic love, which is actually an attachment device that's designed like we really evolved it in order to basically bond ourselves to someone, become obsessed and addicted to someone, so that we're more likely to have a baby with that person. And then keep that baby alive long enough that they will not die, right? And so the romantic love starts to switch over to pair bonding. And pair bonding is actually designed to keep that baby alive and family unit strong. Because pair bonding hormones are very similar to familial bonds. Like they think it's all mostly oxytocin vasopressin. So like, you actually look at the neurobiology of all this. It's highly adaptive, and it's a huge survival advantage to have love in your life, huge survival advantage to find someone to care about them. You're more likely to reproduce, you're more likely to make a child and a family and you're more likely to have a healthy family if there's healthy bonds.   Molly Maloof: (33:26) And so I think that we should be really looking at these things from the lens of science because a lot of what's happening in society today because I think technology is seeing these bonds decay, we're seeing people give up their marriages. We're seeing people walk away from long term relationships, and we're seeing families affected and children affected. And one of the main adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is divorce. So I'm just like, "Fuck, why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, and that's honourable and that's scientifically sound and that will actually leave people better off and we found them. But again, this is like very much new territory. I don't think anybody has tried to do this or thought about doing this. And I'm actually giving you a lot of information that I like is going to keep kind of quiet but whatever you like might as well announce it to like your community first.   Mason: (34:20) Yeah. I think we're worth the drop. It's interesting, it's such a return to the natural. And I've been using that a lot because I feel like I'm saying for the matrix. I'm like nailing all over the bloody place at the moment like people.   Molly Maloof: (34:36) All the time.   Mason: (34:39) And it's so confronting for people which and I agree, as a system we haven't... What you're doing is going like, "Screw it, go to the core and think, multiple generations around leading to the core. Like, let's look at the divorce rates, let's look at the unhappiness and the lack of love in relationships and how that impacts ourselves and children." And I think about it a lot. And it gives me that raw, even talking about it now, there is tingling and there's a rawness and a raw excitement, when you know you're actually in the right place. But it's very confronting, looking at just how much healing there is to be done.   Molly Maloof: (35:18) Yeah. Well, someone told me when I was like, everyone was like, "No one's going to invest in this, and no one's going to do this. And this is crazy." I know, actually, I have a lead investor. So if investors are listening, I'm about to fundraise. So you should probably email me because it's going to be really good. It's going to be a really exciting time in the next few months because I'm actually going to be-   Mason: (35:37) I think I have like, probably $400 liquid at the moment.   Molly Maloof: (35:45) I'm not going to take your last $400. But maybe we could do something with-   Mason: (35:47) But that's not the last 400. We're being responsible in other areas.   Molly Maloof: (35:50) ... Lion's Mane. Yeah. No, but it's interesting. So like, I have a lot of people from biotech say, "This is absolutely never going to happen. It's impossible. Don't even try." And then I had a lot of people who are starting biotech companies say, "Fuck, if this problem is as big as you describe it is, then I'm pretty sure we should be throwing like a billion dollars at this." And I was like, "Fuck. Yeah, dude. Totally."   Mason: (36:16) Absolutely. Is there a market for this? If the people who would poohing it are probably the ones that just can't look in the mirror and be like, "I am the market." It's like, it's in your backyard. It's everywhere. Every time you go to a family reunion, every time you go to bed.   Molly Maloof: (36:40) I shouldn't say this out loud, but family members of mine-   Mason: (36:43) Just say it in a monologue.   Molly Maloof: (36:44) Yeah. I know my family story pretty well. I like deconstructed all of our problems at this point. I've plugged my computer in. And having deconstructed a lot of these problems, and really examined the people in my family who struggle with different problems. In my extended family, in particular, like my aunt and my grandmother, and just people I know. There's a lot to be said about early relationships, and about how important families are to the long term health of children. And when things go wrong in families, it can really, really hurt people long term. And I just looked at like, my great, great grandparents and their relationship with my grandmother. And I looked at my grandmother's relationship with her daughters, and I just looked at all this, and I was like, "Wow there's so many things that we don't realise that if we just fix that one thing, right, then it would have transformed the entire rest of a person's life."   Molly Maloof: (37:59) But there's a lot of things, we don't have solutions for. A lot of things we don't have pathways for, and a big one of those is healing trauma. And I recently did about 21 hours of deep, deep neuro somatic trauma healing from a friend of mine who's like a super gifted healer. And I can't explain in scientific terms what he did with me, but I do know one thing, and that's that we do not do a good job in our society, helping people who have trauma, heal, and express it immediately right over this happened. In fact, the medical system typically, when a girl has raped, she'll basically get a rape kit, and maybe sent to a psychologist. And if she's lucky, she'll get in, in a few months. And it's like, we don't actually have pathways for healing and caring for kids who've had major... I saw this, by the way, in health care system. I saw kids who were abused by their parents. And they go to social workers, and they kind of handed around the foster care system.   Molly Maloof: (39:00) And it's really crazy how much people experienced trauma in society. And there's really not a lot of good solutions besides talk therapy. And if talk therapy worked so well, we probably not be seeing so many problems. Like if talk therapy was like a really effective solution for all of our problems, we'd probably be seeing a lot of problems solved. Now I'm not saying talk therapy doesn't work.   Mason: (39:23) It doesn't pop the champagne. I think that's where I'm with you on that. I'm at the point in my journey where I'm like talk therapy with someone who's got a Jungian background is like perfect for me because I went so hard on psychedelics. And so I'm loving just the groundedness of it. But to get it going-   Molly Maloof: (39:36) Totally. I'm not saying it doesn't work. I think talk therapy is very much like working on your consciousness, right? Your conscious brain. Everyone actually need to talk therapy in order to fundamentally create sense, sense making around their life experience. Like that's the best thing it does. Is it creates a framework of understanding of like, "This happened to me, this happened to me, this happened to me and I understand why, and I understand how I dealt with it." And I'm trying to do a better job at it, right? But I think what's really more interesting about like, what's happening in psychedelic medicine is what's on a subconscious and the unconscious level, right? Like hypnotherapy does a pretty decent job at getting into the subconscious level.   Molly Maloof: (40:27) But what's fascinating is like all this stuff that's buried in the unconscious, right? That comes out in your dreams, that comes out in your... A lot of people have nightterors. That is most definitely a bunch of unconscious process trauma, like unprocessed trauma that needs to be like addressed. And I don't think people see it that way. They're just like, "Oh, it's a nightmare disorder." It's like, "No, you probably have like a major unresolved trauma from your childhood that you really should look at." And oftentimes, I know, multiple people who've taken psychedelics, and it just comes up to them. They're like, "Oh, my God, I was raped in high school by a few guys." And it just like comes up. Or they're like, "Oh, my God, I was sexually assaulted as a child." And this stuff comes up underneath because it's lifted out of the subconscious and unconscious.   Molly Maloof: (41:21) And that's what we don't talk enough about in like modern medicine. And even like psychology, I think, is this like, "Oh, wow," like everybody has deep trauma. But if you do have deep trauma, and it's like running in the background, it's like malware, it's just draining your energy. It's draining CPUs, it's actually playing a huge role in your behaviours and your triggers and how you interact with people. And if it's not looked at or addressed, and especially if they're things like internal family systems, like there's a lot of good forms of talk therapy that can really do a good job of bringing you back to your childhood or bringing you back these moments. And I don't even think drugs are completely necessary to get to these places. Meditation is also a phenomenal tool that a lot of people don't take advantage of. And there's a bunch of different types of meditation that are fairly obscure that can do a great job at helping people get underneath the surface of their pain.   Molly Maloof: (42:11) But a lot of this stuff is isn't mainstream. And it's a shame because a lot of people are still just like, "Where do I go to deal with all this stuff?" Most of the stuff that's worked really well for me has been very obscure stuff that I have had to find through word of mouth. And it's like not highly advertised experiences and therapies and meditation schools and it's like a lot more on the realm of like woo, but it works these things have worked. And it's like strange to me that they're not more well studied and in the mainstream.   Mason: (42:46) Yeah. We've got such a wide array of people with such a wide array of histories at different stages in their processes. And there's naturally going to be different therapies and different angles that are going to pierce the veil to whatever is sitting there behind the curtain in the subconscious and I definitely, like for me it was like personal development back in the day going like you know landmark forum was like one of the things to kind of like a bang. And I could see behind it and then okay that lost its relevance at some point. And then psychedelics became very relevant, got me probably went a little bit too hard into identifying with that community and the mannerisms around taking medicine and like that feeling like I finally belonged rather than doing the work. And then getting beautiful lessons and now it's like getting to the point where talk therapy for me 10 years ago just would have been like I think just sort of lapping up against a great wall.   Mason: (43:48) Whereas now I know how to scale that concrete wall, and I know what it looks like when I do connect to the subconscious. And I understand my processing bringing it out and what my process is, thanks to the work I did with psychedelics. I know how I'm going to bring that into awareness in my everyday and that's when personal practise comes in. That's where I know to the extent of like, with my exercise regime, I know keeping me strong enough and healthy enough to be able to handle staying in that space, where I can constantly acknowledge that part of me that wants to hide behind that veil and run everything. And I know someone like Tani she's like, there was a point where psychedelics were like, incredible. She goes, "I know I need that." And then she's like, "I don't need that anymore." And my meditation practise is exactly where I need to be and that's where I'm going to get the biggest bang.   Mason: (44:39) Not that it's about a bang, but she's going to get the rubber hitting the road. So I think that's like that integration because you see a lot of people in the psychedelic world, kind of pooh poohing therapy going like modern therapies like this domesticated little dog and psychedelics are this big dog in terms of what it can do. And it's like, true in one context, and in another context, if it's just integrated, you have an array of ways of approaching as you're talking about them. Then all of a sudden, the approach becomes multicoloured and multifaceted. And hopefully, it becomes more effective.   Molly Maloof: (45:16) I really think that we just maybe just need to marry them more. Even like MDMA assisted therapy today, is largely like, hands off. It's largely don't talk to the patient, let them do, they have their own experience, and let them do whatever they need to do to heal, it's not really guided at all. It's mostly kind of like, it's guided, but it's not really like lead. It's like, you're there. You're like going through this process, and you're having these experiences, but they're not actually trying to get you to go anywhere on your trip, they're trying to let you have your experience. Whereas like, I think that, in particular, it may be possible that like, we can give people medicine that gives them have the... I think that the idea is that you have the preparation. And then you have the creating the right set and setting. And then you take the medicine, and then you have this like deep integration experience. And that's typically what the experiences for psychedelic assisted therapy today. The question is, will the FDA let us give people drugs that turn them on unsupervised?   Molly Maloof: (46:26) Because you kind of need to be a little bit... You don't really want anyone watching you while you are with your partner. So I got a lot of questions, I need to figure out to make this thing, an actual proper model. But I think that it'll be really interesting to see how this thing evolves because I'm at the very beginning of this journey. I have an idea of what I think that this business model could look like. I have no idea what I think this therapy could be. But a lot of it is I'm like figuring it out, right? I'm like in this total creative mode of what will the future of medicine look like, if you could create it from scratch? And I've already done this once, and it turned out really great for me. And I could easily have just gone and scaled personalised medicine clinics for wealthy people. But now I'm like, "Let's see if we can create a democratised version of this medicine that actually is like it's going to start out expensive, but let's figure out how we can make this something that's eventually affordable for people." That's the goal.   Mason: (47:28) I think the other thing, that's why it feels like a safe bets. And interesting way to put it, but it makes sense, and has substance is because I think a lot of people approach this, and what we've always been taught how to do, lecture people on how they should be, and I'm going to create a product based on how I think you should act. Whereas what you're talking about, is going there's, let's say we're looking at, like morality around let's stay in our marriage, so that we don't destroy this family unit. There's a way that, that's been happened, we've been told what to do by the media. And therefore the part of us goes, if someone goes you have to stay on your marriage because it's the morally right thing to do. You're bad if you do that, there's no attraction there because it's an external like judgement , and we want to revolt against being told what to do, especially by society.   Mason: (48:31) It's why we get your rage against the machine, etc. And then, if you just understand the patterns that emerge when people do connect back to themselves, and do deal with their trauma within a relationship, what's natural for people and seems to be the pattern is people do naturally resonate with maintaining the relationship that they've chosen or maybe in some instance. Like a very conscientious uncoupling in a way that you're very connected and aware to the way that children are going to be affected by it and minimising that impact. Either way, there's an emergence of morality an emergence of ethics, rather than being told what to do.   Molly Maloof: (49:19) Yeah. There's emergence of just like, knowing what's right and wrong. Like, "Oh, yeah. We're not meant to be together. But we're also not meant to destroy each other's lives as we get divorced." I think if we were to be able to help people stay together, that would be ideal. But if we're also able to help people consciously uncouple in a way that doesn't destroy their lives. And I've heard this from multiple people, like one of my friends did MDMA with his ex wife when they were getting divorced and it completely transformed the divorce process because they were actually able to love each other through the process, and they're now really good friends. They're like super good friends. They just didn't want to be married. And it's like, that's appropriate, right? Like, it's also appropriate not to hate people for years. Just the number of people I know that have deep seated resentment for their exes. And it's like, that's not healthy for your nervous system, that's not healthy for your long term health. That's not going to keep you well.   Mason: (50:20) So we've both dived into exploring what health is, especially in the context of, and in this what we're talking about in this context of like synthetic morality, versus what emerges as right. I've just started in the last few months really feeling icky about the way I've used the word health and the way it's been used because it's natural, if you talk about healthy, then naturally, there's an opposition of unhealthy there. And so much of what's implied is basing yourself on, "I'm healthy because I'm not that." And so there's this intrinsic opposition, that... An opposition and kicking back against something in order to form identity around health. And we need the word because healthy, it's just a fun word that everyone knows. But kind of similar and synonymous with what we're talking about, and the emergence of morality and the emergence of ethics coming just through whether it's psychedelic therapy or whatever, how are you relating to health now?   Mason: (51:28) Because I definitely am finding, the more I move away from being wrapped in and around that world of being healthy versus unhealthy, and the more I kind of sit in that middle and see. What's emerging through the patterns of myself doing, I don't know, finding harmony for myself, delving into my shit, coming out the other side. Doing things that are maybe I've seen is unhealthy in one way, in one ideological circle. So I want to talk about dropping that coming back to what emerges within me. It makes the space, I don't know, I feel very roared and identified in terms of, even though we're leaders in the health space, I feel very, unidentified with anything that revolves around that word healthy. I'm curious as to where you're at, in your relationship to what is healthy.   Molly Maloof: (52:25) I used to think it was what the WHO said, which was like the complete absence of disease or infirmary. And then I was like, "No, it's not realistic." Health is actually a dynamic function of life. And to me, I have a very unique perspective on how I think, and it all stemmed from this other definition, that was the ability to adapt and self managed in the face of adversity. But I started digging under the surface, and I really started understanding things like biology, and fundamental human anatomy, and microbiology and physiology and molecular and cellular biology. And I was really thinking about it from like a mechanistic perspective as well. And I think that if you actually just look at any system, you can ask how healthy a system is based on its capacity. And whether it's able to perform its functions properly, basically, whether it's able to maintain its integrity of its structure. And that's usually a function of how much energy and how much work capacity is available.   Molly Maloof: (53:31) So, for example, the healthcare system, deeply unhealthy in America. Demands outspent capacity and it just completely started crumbling, right? Like just did not work, was not resilient, was not flexible, it was actually really struggling and breaking a lot and a lot of people have been broken through the experience of going to the healthcare system. So capacity and demands, if there's more capacity than demands, you're usually in a really good healthy state because you have enough energy to maintain the structure to do work. Now, when your demands are really high, and your capacity is really low, shit starts to break down. And so this is like the mitochondrial theory of ageing, which is fundamentally that when we lose about 50% of our functional capacity of organs, they start to malfunction, they actually start producing the ability to do the work functions that they had. And then we start to break down.   Molly Maloof: (54:27) And largely this is driven by metabolic dysfunction and stress. And like lack of exercise is really a big huge driver of disease because it's the number one signal for making more energy. So basically, I look at how we... If you actually think about like the biology of like metabolism, when we breathe air, we drink water, we eat food, it goes into our cells, it gets turned into substrates, those get put into the mitochondria, which are like little engines that could of our cells, and they have this called the electron transport chain which pulls off electrons kind of like power line. Like electrons are running through this electron transport chain. And they're powering this hydrogen turbine that creates an electrochemical gradient. And that gradient creates a battery and a capacitor. So a battery is like a differential charge between two, it's like a charge polarity. And then the capacitor is like a differential charge between two late membranes.   Molly Maloof: (55:22) And then so capacitors can deploy energy quickly. Batteries store energy as potential energy. So when you really look at it, like most people have broken their metabolisms in modern society, there's so many people with diabetes, so many people with heart disease, somebody with cancer, so many people with dementia. And those are really symptoms of broken metabolism, broken mitochondrial function. And it's funny because like, we look at all these things as separate diseases, but actually, they have the same root causes and like half of cancers are made up of metabolic in nature. So everyone's been kind of obsessed with this like, DNA and genetics theory of ageing. I'm just so unconvinced because it's kind of like, okay, that's like the architectural plans of the body. But in order to actually express those plans, you need energy. You actually need to make energy to take the plants and turn into a structure, which is proteins, right?   Molly Maloof: (56:15) So my perspective is that, like life is this interplay between energy matter and information. And essentially, like life itself, is negative entropy. So we're just constantly trying to fight against entropy, and the best way we know how to do that is like, maintain our functional capacity and be able to repair ourselves. And so this lack of being able to repair ourselves is often a function of the fact that a lot of people are just like, the biggest complaint in medicine is, "I'm tired," right? Being tired all the time is actually a reflection of energetic inefficient, insufficient energy production.   Mason: (56:56) Is that in particular with like the battery storage as you work-   Molly Maloof: (56:59) Yeah, exactly.   Mason: (57:00) Which is funnily used when you talk about, like his Yin and Yang.   Molly Maloof: (57:05) Yes. There you go. Right? We need time off to store energy. The most interesting thing about the Yin and Yang, is that there's this clear relationship between this toggling of switching between different states in biology to flourish. So you actually have to go from intense work to relaxation or rest. You have to go for ideally if you actually just look at all the best [inaudible 00:57:30] stressors, it's like, hyperoxia hypoxia breathwork. What is that? It's breathwork. Right? If you look at cold and heat, that's sauna and coal plant right? What are these things work so damn well, for making us feel healthy and feel good? Well, they're literally boosting mitochondrial biogenesis. And in some cases, like eating fasting is my toffee G, right? It's throwing-   Mason: (57:53) Being awake, being asleep.   Molly Maloof: (57:56) Being outside being indoors, like we actually need to spend way more time outdoors than we're doing. And like being in buildings and having your feet grounded into the earth, like being alone being with people, like life is this constant interplay, right? Yeah, there you go.   Mason: (58:14) That was earthing that I just mumbled.   Molly Maloof: (58:16) Yeah. So like today I've been experimenting with like different ways of movement throughout my day because I'm kind of sick of being in front of the computer constantly. And it makes me feel really unhappy. And there's this great meme you posted, feel dead inside, go outside. Fucking love that meme. And it's like, everybody loved that meme. I got it posted so many times. And it was like, actually, I spent two hours today on phone calls outside. And like, people get annoyed when you're not on a Zoom call. But I'm like, "Look, if I can walk, I will walk." And I got two separate workouts and that were like about 10 minutes each in the gym that were like broken up throughout the day. And it's like, holy shit, did I feel better today than I did for like many other previous days where I was just in front of a computer the whole time? Like, we're not meant to be in front of screens all day long. It's not healthy.   Molly Maloof: (59:06) It's not a healthy period. So the more that we can try to align our lives as much as possible with something with how we're actually like primitively programmed because our genes have not evolved since primitive times. We're the same genetically, there's been a few changes, but fundamentally, we're basically the same people as we were in hunting and gathering times. So it's no question that we've lost a lot of our health in the process of becoming more modern because we basically hijacked all of these different pathways that are actually ancient pathways of survival that are now being used to take advantage of people. Like the salt, sugar and fat in foods, the convenience of cars, right? Like humans are designed to conserve energy and to find food.   Molly Maloof: (59:53) So the society is now designed to like make everything ultra convenient, and eat too much. And it's like, okay. We don't move our bodies enough, we drive everywhere, we know what that's done to society. And so it's kind of like the real process of becoming a truly modern human is to actually try to like life according to your genetics, while also existing in a modern culture. It's a huge challenge.   Mason: (01:00:19) Can be a great thing. This is like the Daoist and the Yogi's would need to go outside of society to go and live in a cave so their life could revolve a

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food
Invasive Species: Foundation for the Future? With Sunny Savage — WildFed Podcast #103

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 88:28


It's our pleasure to share a conversation with Sunny Savage of Maui, Hawaii — a modern-day wild food pioneer and incredible asset to our community of foragers. Sunny teaches wild food internships, created a foraging and cooking television series, ran a food truck featuring foraged ingredients, and has even created a foraging app. While most of us think of Hawaii as a kind of tropical paradise, there are — in some parts of the archipelago — darker forces at work there than just the endless golf courses. Villainous bioengineering companies test their toxic wares there, and invasive species — otherwise balanced into their own native ecology — wreak havoc on the native floral and faunal assemblages of the Hawaiian islands. While the typical response of conservation groups has been to reach for pesticides — very often from those same bioengineering companies we just mentioned —  Sunny has been presenting a different approach. Making them, when we can, into foods. Sunny shares some powerful insights in this interview that are very important to the ongoing conversation we've had here on this show about deleterious, non-native plants, and this is just a compliment to her otherwise wonderful wild food wisdom. So, enjoy this conversation with the one and only Sunny Savage! View full show notes, including links to resources from this episode here: https://www.wild-fed.com/podcast/103

The Touring Fan Live
Hitchhiker, Stories From The Road” Brad Laing

The Touring Fan Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 110:08


On October 10th we continue our series “Hitchhiker, Stories From The Road”.On this edition we pick up the fan we always notice at shows. Some reference him as the guy in the Hawaiian shirt and others as the nicest Pearl Jam fan.On October 10th at 9pm Est The Touring Fan Live sits down with Brad Laing, to hear all his stories from the road. Hear stories like:How Brad Feel in love with musicHow he met the Love of his life because of Pearl JamDigging through Vans for music& so much moreDont Forget to Like and Subscribeand places you get podcasts!

Wake Up Call
Not So Little Chris

Wake Up Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:25


Chris Little fills in for Jennifer Jones Lee for your Monday morning Wake Up Call. U.S. vaccinations have reached their highest weekly number since July. Huntington Beach is set to reopen its beaches today. And a 6.2 magnitude earthquake hit off the Hawaiian coast.

Subspace Transmissions: A Star Trek Podcast
"wej Duj" - Lower Decks (#368)

Subspace Transmissions: A Star Trek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021


Hosts Cam Smith and Tyler Orton, along with special guest Scott Hardy of SpyHards Podcast, get totally out of control while delving into Lower Decks' penultimate season 2 episode, wej Duj. From the daily realities of low-ranking Klingon and Vulcan crew members, to Ransom's Hawaiian backstory and Pakled intrigue, the trio discuss it all. Plus, they offer their non-spoilery thoughts on recent film releases No Time to Die, The Many Saints of Newark and Venom: Let There Be Carnage.Right-click to download.Read more »

HUB History - Our Favorite Stories from Boston History
Around the World on the Columbia (episode 233)

HUB History - Our Favorite Stories from Boston History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 62:17


Come with me on a voyage around the world with the officers and crew of the ship Columbia. Formally named the Columbia Rediviva and accompanied by the sloop Lady Washington, the ship was owned by a group of prominent Bostonians and charged with opening up trade between Boston and China. Almost by accident, the Columbia became the first American ship to visit the west coast of North America, the first American ship to land in the Hawaiian islands, and the first American ship to circumnavigate the globe. Over the course of five years and two expeditions, the crew completed two circumnavigations, brought the first native Hawaiian to visit Boston, and “discovered” the Columbia river (which would have been news to the dozens of villages and thousands of inhabitants on the river). The mighty river of the west had previously been thought to be a myth, and navigating up this river established US land claims in what would eventually become seven states. The Oregon Country was contested between Russia, Spain, and Britain, but the Columbia's expedition opened it to Boston merchants, and pretty soon all American traders on the west coast were known as the Boston men. Full show notes: http://HUBhistory.com/233/ Support us: http://patreon.com/HUBhistory/

Hawaii Real
The Best Vegan Cookbook Ever Written, How To Make Traditional Hawaiian Food Vegan, Lillian Cumic

Hawaii Real

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 61:58


Lillian Cumic is a vegan cook and author of the bestselling cookbook 'Hawaii, A Vegan Paradise' In this video, Lillian offers to share her expertise with us and how she likes to make her favorite dishes. She also shares some great tips on vegan cooking and what it means for the environment and for the future of humanity as we plan to travel into space. A vegan chef, Lillian Cumic has written her own cook book that focuses on Hawaiian food. To find a podcast about vegan cooking is no small task. It's a niche genre that, frankly, isn't very popular. But if you're vegan and living in Hawaii, your search is over! Brought to you by The NativeHawaiianChamberofCommerce.org YOU CAN ORDER HAWAIIAN SPRINGS WATER HERE! https://amzn.to/3C2H0rR Hawaii Real is a podcast interviewing locals in Hawaii and their day to day struggles and how they overcome them. You can find Hawaii Real on Amazon Podcast, Spotify, Apple Podcast, Pandora Podcast and many more. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hawaiireal/support

The Science Hour
Youngest rock samples from the moon

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 63:56


n December 2020, China's Chang'e-5 mission returned to earth carrying rock samples collected from the moon – the first lunar samples to be collected since the American Apollo and Luna missions to the moon in the 1970s. Laboratory analysis has revealed that these are the youngest samples of rocks to be collected from the moon. Lunar geologist Katherine Joy explains what this tells us about the moon's volcanic past. Also on the programme, a recent study reveals that the hepatitis B virus has been infecting humans for at least 10,000 years. Denise Kühnert from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History shares what the evolution of the virus tells us about human evolution, as well as the rise and fall of civilisations. In the wake of Cyclone Shaheen, we also speak to Princeton University's Ning Lin about how climate modelling can help us predict tropical storms in the Arabian Sea, and Fredi Otto joins us to discuss the 2021 Nobel Prizes for Science. Snails are a major enemy of gardeners around the world, invading vegetable patches and gobbling prize plants. CrowdScience listener Alexandre reckons he's removed thousands of them from his garden, which got him wondering: apart from eating his garden to the core, what's their wider role in nature? Would anyone or anything miss them if they suddenly disappeared? And for that matter, what about other creatures? We all know how complex biodiversity is, but it seems that some animals are more important than others in maintaining the balance of life on earth. Is there anything that could go extinct without having knock-on effects? CrowdScience heads to the Hawaiian mountains, a snail diversity hotspot, to discover the deep value of snails to native ecosystems there. Researchers and conservationists are working together to protect these highly endangered snails, and their natural habitats, from multiple threats. We hear why all snails – even the ones munching Alexandre's petunias – have their role to play in the natural world, and get to grips with cascading extinctions: how the loss of a single species can trigger unpredictable effects on a whole ecosystem. (Image: Getty Images)

CrowdScience
Does the planet need snails?

CrowdScience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 35:19


Snails are a major enemy of gardeners around the world, invading vegetable patches and gobbling prize plants. CrowdScience listener Alexandre reckons he's removed thousands of them from his garden, which got him wondering: apart from eating his garden to the core, what's their wider role in nature? Would anyone or anything miss them if they suddenly disappeared? And for that matter, what about other creatures? We all know how complex biodiversity is, but it seems that some animals are more important than others in maintaining the balance of life on earth. Is there anything that could go extinct without having knock-on effects? CrowdScience heads to the Hawaiian mountains, a snail diversity hotspot, to discover the deep value of snails to native ecosystems there. Researchers and conservationists are working together to protect these highly endangered snails, and their natural habitats, from multiple threats. We hear why all snails – even the ones munching Alexandre's petunias – have their role to play in the natural world, and get to grips with cascading extinctions: how the loss of a single species can trigger unpredictable effects on a whole ecosystem. With contributions from Imogen Cavadino, Dr Norine Yeung, Dr Kenneth Hayes, Dr David Sischo, Jan Kealoha, and Professor Ian Donohue. Presented by Marnie Chesterton Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service [Image credit: Getty Images]

I SHAKE MY HEAD
A No Win World?!

I SHAKE MY HEAD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 70:19


Lisa has finally realized she is living in a no win world when it comes to breakfast?! She confesses to being in a breakfast choice spiral! However, croissants and chocolate bars are sustaining her but this has Sam questioning why she still has a muffin top if that is all she eats! Welcome to Lisa's no win world! Lisa is concerned about her new sleeping habits and Sam is concerned about her gal Wendy! Big news on the McRib front has Lisa preplanning for its first day back in Canada. Sam is elated that finally someone takes her side about bikes and it's even better that it's Mike! The discussion keeps going with talk of Mike cranking the heat, smoke and Mother Nature, Lisa's Hawaiian trek, sweet moonchild, trademarking the word shaket, butter tarts, discussing Thanksgiving, FB Tuesday, the Jays, Mick Jagger and the dive bar, Vanilla Ice, Tom Brady, a side of toast, useless information, Lisa's question corner, winter pants, Denny's waiter, mini mini bite bites, William Shatner and things Lisa oughta know! The I shake my heads are ugly and revealing! It's just a bit of ridiculous chatter but it might just make you laugh! If you love what you hear you can support the podcast by following the links below! Podbean: https://patron.podbean.com/ismhead Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/join/ishakemyhead You can also find us on: Twitter www.twitter.com/i_shakemyhead  Instagram www.instagram.com/ishakemyhead Facebook I shake my head with Lisa and Sam Tik Tok i_shakemyhead Buy our merchandise at www.ishakemyhead.threadless.com We are proud to be a part of www.podfixnetwork.com 

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
Gaea Star Crystal Radio Hour with Mariam Massaro

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:51


Today on Gaea Star Crystal Radio Hour #462 the Gaea Star Band is joined by a favorite guest, New York blues and jazz singer Ptah Brown for an hour of improvised music and songs featuring Mariam Massaro on vocals, Native flute, acoustic guitar, celtic harp, ukulele and harmonica, Bob Sherwood on piano, Craig Harris on congas and Native drums and Ptah contributing her powerful voice.  Recorded live at Singing Brook Studio in Worthington, Massachusetts in September of 2021, today's show begins with the dramatic “Green Dancing Trees”, a driving gypsy autumn song from Mariam with powerful backing from the band and fine countervocals from the singular Ptah.  “Rialiya” from Mariam's “Release” album is given a powerful reading with driving percussion from Craig and powerful vocals from Mariam and Ptah before the band eases into the classic “Tracks Of My Tears” to support a powerful, affecting vocal from Ptah.  Mariam begins the next exploration with a plaintive, extended fanfare on Native flute as Bob sets up a compelling fusion framework for what slowly collects into the lush, mystical “Luna”, a swirling, majestic piece that features fine work from each member of the ensemble.  Mariam's classic “I'm The Full Moon” from her 2012 album “Gaea Star Goddesses” is expressed with power and precision before the band slides into Mariam's beautiful, tropical song “Islands”, a funky Hawaiian groove featuring Mariam's 8-string ukulele.  Blues is the game for the last segment of today's show with Ptah cutting loose on two powerful, improvised blues vamps as Bob digs deep into the 20th century to bring a powerful authenticity to Ptah's vocal adventures. Learn more about Mariam here: http://www.mariammassaro.com

Saltwater High by Wave Tribe
E42. Laurelove: Inspiring Kids to Follow Their Entrepreneurial Urges

Saltwater High by Wave Tribe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 53:05


Laurelove - otherwise known, in Hawaiian, as Lahela, has been known to be called a health coach, yogini, farmer, inspirator, water woman, nutrition coach, cleansing specialist, and kid and animal Evangelista. She has created Cleansing Retreats on Maui, teen and youth farm clubs, and built and ran yoga studios in a few countries. Laurelove started out as a pro windsurfer in 1980 with her 1st business in life called Malibu Windsurfing. She then joined her mates who created the 1st U.S. Windsurfing team. Today she's halfway to 70 and spry as a chicken with endless curiosity to learn and to make things better in the world. It's the youth and kids that she's all about now, (and the soils they stand on) so the future can be bright for them and their future generations. Hence a trade school to dive into an aspect of one of 3 things in life: food, yoga, sound. If a kid has a curiosity to learn more about any of these subjects they start learning something that within weeks or months will be a start of their own business. They can be 6 years old or 16. We invite you to renew yourselves and those you love. Come join Laurelove and the 3 sisters in celebrating and awakening to our New Earth Renewal. Social Media Profiles: Website: https://www.thrivingwithlaurel.com/ and https://laurelove.com/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/mauilaurel/ FB: https://web.facebook.com/laurelwhiteMAUI YT: https://www.youtube.com/user/laurelannie Topics Discussed: Tell me a little about your background? Thyroid, thyroid dysfunction, power of seaweed Tell me about the New Earth Trade School and food, yoga, and music? Let's talk about how you selected the virtues and why you chose them? Kuleana: responsibility Aloha: Love first, not $$ Lokahi: Harmony in all things Laulima: Group work approach Akahi: Modesty ‘Olu ‘Olu: Pleasantness Ha ‘Aha ‘A: Humility Ahonui: Patience I read Thriving is Abundance, tell me a little about that phrase. What was your first surfboard? What was your best wave? If you could go back and give your younger self advice, what would it be? Any departing comments? Location: Maui, Hawaii - - - - - This podcast is produced by Derek Dodds, founder of Wave Tribe and lover of the sea. For more info, email support@wavetribe.com https://www.wavetribe.com/ https://www.instagram.com/wavetribe/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wavetribe/message

Inside Julia's Kitchen
Meet Sheldon Simeon

Inside Julia's Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 46:52


This week on Inside Julia's Kitchen, host Todd Schulkin welcomes chef, restaurateur and cookbook author Sheldon Simeon. Todd and Sheldon discuss the difference between Hawai'ian food and Hawai'i food, his new cookbook Cook Real Hawai'i and what we need to know about dishes like poke and saimin. As always, Sheldon shares his Julia Moment. Photo Courtesy of Sheldon SimeonHeritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Inside Julia's Kitchen by becoming a member!Inside Julia's Kitchen is Powered by Simplecast. 

My Voice, Our Story Talks with Cielo
How to Handle Criticism with Rep. Adrian Tam

My Voice, Our Story Talks with Cielo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 32:34


In this episode, Rep. Adrian Tam shares with us how to handle criticism so you do not let it get the best of you. He also tell us about his fascinating political career and what he has learned from it so far.   Background: Representative Adrian Tam was born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii. He is the proud graduate of Kalani High School, and received his bachelor's degree from Pennsylvania State University. Upon graduating, Tam became a licensed real estate agent. In 2016, he worked as a temporary hire at the Hawaii State House of Representatives before moving to the Hawaii State Senate to work for Senator Stanley Chang from 2017- 2020. In 2020, Tam launched a successful campaign for the Hawaii State House of Representatives. He became a household name after defeating conservative proud's boy leader in Hawaiian elections to become the only openly gay member of the Hawaii State Legislature. Tam is currently the representative for Hawaii State House, District 22 serving Waikiki and Ala Moana. He serves as Vice-Chair of the House Committee on Health, Human Services, and Homelessness, and Vice-Chair of the House Committee on Culture, Arts, and International Affairs, and as a member of the House Committee Finance. This episode also covers: Adrian's unique family history and upbringing The journey to becoming a politician.  Why Authenticity matters  Definition of Success Resources: Connect with Adrian on IG: instagram.com/adrianktam/ Connect with Cielo on IG: instagram.com/seaandsky45/ Adrian's Twitter: twitter.com/adrianktam Official Website of Rep. Adrian Tam: adrianforhawaii.com Services: Are you ready to take your brand to the next level? Want to increase your digital presence online so you can skyrocket your number of clients & sales? We can help you!  Visit BLENDtw Media to learn more about our digital marketing services and send us an email to outreach@blendtw.com to BOOK a F-R-E-E consultation TODAY.  For more resources to help you live your BEST life, join our community on: Facebook  Instagram Find more inspiring stories & higher wisdom at myvoiceourstory.com  

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 191: Education and Empire in Hawaii w/ Dr. Michelle Morgan

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 151:38


In 1893, an American backed coup d'état overthrew the royal government of Hawai'i, setting the stage for the archipelago's annexation by the United States five years later. On 7th July 1898, President McKinley signed the Newlands Resolution annexing the islands and creating a new US territory in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.  This example of naked imperial aggression set the stage for the economic and political transformation of Hawai'i. The American naval presence was greatly expanded as too was the plantation-based economy. However, Americanization was also felt in the cultural sphere, through the transformation of the education system. How did American rule change the Hawaiian education system? What were the objectives of this transformation? And how did this affect the people of the islands? Dr. Michelle Morgan Michelle Morgan is an associate professor and coordinator of the BSED-history program at Missouri State University.  She completed her PhD in American History with a minor in Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her teaching and research focus on the history of American education, the American West, and American empire. Her work explores the roles schools have played in competing definitions of “American” in newly acquired territories, emphasizing the participation of teachers as cultural agents and the ways in which gender and identity shape teachers' roles in classrooms and communities.    Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron only programing, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents?   Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, (specially YouTube!)   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast   Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   The Dispatch on Zero Books (video essay series): https://youtu.be/nSTpCvIoRgw   Medium: https://jasonmyles.medium.com/i-was-a-teenage-anarchist...   Pascal Robert's Black Agenda Report: https://www.blackagendareport.com/author/PascalRobert   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com   Get the music from the show here: https://bitterlakeoakland.bandcamp.com/.../coronavirus...

Business Breakdowns
Salesforce: The Cloud & SaaS Pioneer [Business Breakdowns, EP. 29]

Business Breakdowns

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 49:33


Today, we are breaking down the cloud and SaaS trailblazer, Salesforce. Founded by Marc Benioff in 1999, Salesforce has grown rapidly to become the global leader in the $100 billion CRM market. The business has 150,000 customers, including 90% of the Fortune 500, and is currently valued north of $270 billion. To break down Salesforce, Patrick O'Shaughnessy is joined by Matt Garratt, general partner at VC firm CRV and former head of Salesforce Ventures, where he led investments in companies like Snowflake, Twilio, and Zoom. In our conversation, we discuss the attributes that make Marc Benioff special, how he pushed against convention to usher in a new era of cloud-based businesses, and ways in which he has built a world around Salesforce's product lines. We also cover decision-making in the company, why its culture derives from the beaches of Hawaii, and how it's transitioning from builder to buyer. Please enjoy this breakdown of Salesforce. For the full show notes, transcript, and links to the best content to learn more, check out the episode page here.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Quartr. With Quartr, you can access conference calls, investor presentations, transcripts, and earnings reports – straight from your pocket. Quartr is 100% free and includes companies from 12 markets including the US, the UK, Canada, India, and all the Scandanavian countries. Quartr is available for both iOS and Android, so check out the app today.   -----   This episode is brought to you by Brex. Brex began as the first corporate card for startups and now offers a full financial stack built for scale. Get 10-20x higher credit limits, uncapped rewards, easy deposits and payments, and expense management all in one. Grow your business faster with Brex.   -----   Business Breakdowns is a property of Colossus, Inc. For more episodes of Business Breakdowns, visit joincolossus.com/episodes.   Stay up to date on all our podcasts by signing up to Colossus Weekly, our quick dive every Sunday highlighting the top business and investing concepts from our podcasts and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here.   Follow us on Twitter: @JoinColossus | @patrick_oshag | @jspujji | @zbfuss   Show Notes [00:03:14] - [First question] - What Salesforce is and what it does [00:04:55] - The scale and revenue scope of the business today [00:06:13] - Driving variables of revenue growth and their current model [00:09:10] - The unique founding story and becoming the first SaaS company [00:11:06] - What about Marc Benioff made him so compelling and successful [00:14:20] - An experience in his time at Salesforce that changed and moved him [00:15:16] - The first buyer and what they were served as a product [00:17:07] - Overview of Salesforce as a software platform [00:19:58] - The core database that powers their infrastructure and user experience [00:21:26] - Transitioning from being mostly a builder to largely a buyer and acquirer [00:23:46] - Why building trust early on is so crucial when doing something new [00:25:45] - What is Dreamforce, and how it's evolved over time [00:27:24] - The connection between Hawaiian culture and Salesforce [00:29:14] - How they continue to market and acquire customers and spend so much on marketing [00:30:44] - Their current addressable market and plans to expand into those areas [00:35:05] - How priorities are set, picked, and followed through on  [00:35:58] - What is V2MOM and the role it plays with the executive team  [00:38:08] - The philosophy behind Salesforce Ventures and the function it serves [00:40:27] - Potential risks the business faces going forward [00:44:24] - Key characteristics that separate Salesforce from other businesses out there [00:46:47] - Lessons for investors and builders when studying Salesforce's story

The Heat Factory
Mini-sode #1: What would you pay for EVERYTHING?

The Heat Factory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 16:55


Follow us on Twitter to check when new episodes drop: @HeatFactoryPod Twitter user and Hawaiian shirt man, @BrettStratton4 asks the competitive Pokémon player base; what would you pay for a totally unlocked account? We answer that poll, twice; because we lost the audio on the first podcast. Another solo cast without audio engineer Rob, Owen discusses what caused everyone to pick the 'WRONG' answer.

Indianz.Com
William J. Ailã, Jr. / Hawaiian Homes Commission

Indianz.Com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 8:35


Legislative: Remote SCIP Legislative Hearing – October 5, 2021 Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States Date: Tuesday, October 5, 2021 Time: 12:00 PM Presiding: The Honorable Teresa Leger Fernández, Chair On Tuesday, October 5, 2021 at 12:00 p.m. EDT, the Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) will host a virtual, fully remote legislative hearing on the following tribal-related legislation: H.J.Res.55 (Rep. Kahele), To consent to the amendments to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, 1920, made by Act 080 of the Session Laws of Hawaii, 2017. Prince Jonah Khiuo Kalaniana‘ole Protecting Family Legacies Act. H.R. 441 (Rep. Don Young), To provide for the conveyance of certain property to the Tanana Tribal Council located in Tanana, Alaska, and for other purposes. H.R. 2402 (Rep. Fortenberry), To transfer administrative jurisdiction of certain Federal lands from the Army Corps of Engineers to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, to take such lands into trust for the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, and for other purposes. Winnebago Land Transfer Act of 2021. H.R. 4881 (Rep. Raúl Grijalva), To direct the Secretary of the Interior to take into trust for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona certain land in Pima County, Arizona, and for other purposes. Old Pascua Community Land Acquisition Act. H.R. 5221 (Rep. Raúl Grijalva), To amend the Indian Health Care Improvement Act to establish an urban Indian organization confer policy for the Department of Health and Human Services. Urban Indian Health Confer Act. Panel I Representative Raúl Grijalva Arizona, 3rd District Representative Don Young Alaska, At-Large Representative Kaiali'i Kahele Hawaii, 2nd District Representative Jeff Fortenberry Nebraska, 1st District Panel II Mr. P. Benjamin Smith (H.R.441, H.R.5221) Deputy Director for Intergovernmental Affairs, Indian Health Service U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Rockville, MD Mr. Darryl LaCounte (H.J.Res.55, H.R.2402, H.R.4881) Director, Bureau of Indian Affairs U.S. Department of the Interior Washington, DC Panel III The Honorable Peter Yucupicio (H.R.4881) Chairman Pascua Yaqui Tribe Tucson, Arizona The Honorable William J. Ailã, Jr. (H.J.Res.55) Chairman Hawaiian Homes Commission Department of Hawaiian Home Lands Kapolei, HI The Honorable Julie Roberts-Hyslop (H.R.441) Second Chief Tanana Tribal Council Native Village of Tanana Tanana, Alaska The Honorable Victoria Kitcheyan (H.R. 2402) Chairwoman Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska Winnebago, NE Mr. Walter Murillo (H.R.5221) President National Council of Urban Indian Health Washington, DC This hearing will take place via Cisco WebEx and will be streamed on YouTube. For additional hearing materials and schedules, please visit the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee Repository at http://docs.house.gov/.

Heaving Bosoms: A Romance Novel Podcast
Ep. 208 - Love's Serenade by Sheryl Lister

Heaving Bosoms: A Romance Novel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 95:59


Hey everyone! This week we've got a super sweet novella called Love's Serenade by Sheryl Lister. It wasn't a home run for us, but we loved being thoroughly steeped in 1920's Harlem as we watched Leigh and Miles find each other again. Plus, there were a ton of super impactful historical easter eggs throughout! And hot sex! It's part of the "Decades: A Journey of African American Romance" series.  Bonus Content: bedside chocolate, squirrels carrying another squirrel in it's mouth, we're famous, alcoholic mango chunks, Mel's drunk, rent parties, Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, Art Sculptures of the rural 1920s, "catch my farts," and so much more.  Lady Loves:  Mel: Bedside chocolate. What a lovely surprise! And using frozen mango chunks as ice cubes in cocktails. Yum! Erin: The Scream franchise! They're 1/3 slasher film, 1/3 satire, and 1/3 straight up comedy.  Subscribe! Rate! Review! Tell all your friends :) Get more content on PATREON!! Sign up for our Newsletter!  MERCH! Teepublic, Chicaloo Kate, Redbubble Make your life better and hire Natalie to assist you!!! And follow our socials:  Instagram: @heavingbosoms Twitter: @heaving_bosoms Patreon Shout Out:  Susan R you are descended from Kanaloa, a Hawaiian god known for being the spiritual leader of the underworld, a mysterious healer, and teacher of magic, who would most often take the form of an octopus, or he'e. Growing up, Kanaloa was my third favorite Hawaiian god behind Pele and Hi'iaka. And he might be the origin of my love for octopodes. In myths he is powerful, yet flexible, and can get out of any scrape he finds himself in. He's the deity Hawaiians called on when wayfinding because he's the navigator. He's the subtle compliment to Hawaii's chief god Kane. Don't believe the haoles who say that Kanaloa is evil, or Hawaii's devil. That's some judeo-christian projection that happened after missionaries colonized the islands and started bastardizing their culture. He's flexible, intelligent, and multifaceted, just like you.

The Rumcast
37: All About the Kō: Making Hawaiian Rum with Single Sugarcane Varietals (with Kyle Reutner of Kō Hana Distillers)

The Rumcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 76:46


In this episode, we talk to Kyle Reutner of Kō Hana Distillers about the Hawaii distillery's approach to making fresh sugarcane juice rum from heirloom Hawaiian sugarcane varietals. We go deep into:How sugarcane's journey to and role in Hawaii differs from other places around the worldWhy Kō Hana is focusing exclusively on single cane varietals in their rumThe distillery's production process (and how it's designed to isolate the sugarcane as the key variable outside of time and location)The differences between heirloom sugarcane varietals and sugarcane that was used for modern sugar refining before the decline of Hawaii's sugar industryThe challenges of creating aged rums that highlight the sugarcane rather than obscuring itWhat the future of Hawaiian rum as a category looks likeKō Hana's place in the larger category of sugarcane juice rums around the worldAnd more!Links to Explore After Listening:Check out Kō Hana's website here Book Recommendation: Kō: An Ethnobotanical Guide to Hawaiian Sugarcane Cultivars by Dr. Noa Kekuewa LincolnBook Recommendation: From King Cane to the Last Sugar Mill: Agricultural Technology and the Making of Hawaii's Premier Crop by C. Allan Jones and Robert V. Osgood

cocktailnation
Spyvibe -Hawaiian Eye

cocktailnation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 60:30


  Jason Whiton joins me this week from Spyvibe.com for some more essential viewing and listening when it comes to the world of Spy jazz….good to see things are opening up so an entry for the World Of Swank Gig guide ….all the latest from Lounge Life Magazine   www.cocktailnation.net   Richard Cheese- Baby Got Back Project Pimento - Peter Gunn Warren Barker Deep Night Warren Barker -Lopaka's Beat Tiki Delights- Cosmopolitan James Spencer- Tender Is The Night Linda Lawson- Like Young Dave Bruebeck That Old Black Magic Out Of Abingdon- What Kind Of Life Martini Kings- Caravan Ellington Hawk- Beatnik Pascal Schumacher- Decoy John Eric Booth- More Francis Lai- Plus Fort Que Nous. Lee Morgan- That's All Henry Mancini- Night Side

Marine Mammal Science
MMS 107: Hawaiian Cetacean Studies

Marine Mammal Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 29:59


On this week's episode,  Jordan Lerma from Cascadia Research Collective talks to Dr. Ashley Scarlett about his work with drones and sampling the breath of cetaceans, as well as research on the behavior of false killer whales.

They Call Us Bruce
135: They Call Us Doogie Kameāloha, M.D.

They Call Us Bruce

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:48


Jeff and Phil welcome actress Peyton Elizabeth Lee, star of the Disney+ series Doogie Kameāloha, M.D., series creator and showrunner Kourtney Kang, and executive producer Melvin Mar. They talk about crafting a unique contemporary Hawaiian take on the beloved 90s teen doctor series.

Bon Appétit Foodcast
What does it mean to be a Hawaiian chef?

Bon Appétit Foodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 35:09


Thanks to both outside influences and native resources, Hawaiian cuisine is incredibly diverse for such a small geographic space. But when you're Hawai'i's most well-known chef, everyone expects you to define it. Since beginning his career at a plate lunch restaurant, Sheldon Simeon has been an acclaimed restaurateur, a Top Chef contestant, and (most recently) a cookbook writer. He lives, breathes, and cooks Hawai'i, and this week on the show he's here to talk about what it means to be a Hawaiian chef. He and Amanda talk about growing up on the islands, his run on Top Chef, and the crossroads he found himself at when it was over. And to spark your travel appetite, he recommends his top food spots on Maui, where he lives now. Restaurants editor Elyse Inamine—who profiled Simeon for our website—pops in along the way to rep for an often-misunderstood Hawaiian ingredient: Spam. Stuff we talk about in this episode: - Sheldon Simeon's Guide to Maui - Elyse Inamine's Profile on Sheldon Simeon - Cook Real Hawai'i: A Cookbook by Sheldon Simeon with Garrett Snyder - Oki's Seafood Corner Instagram  - Papa'aina Maui Restaurant Website - Ululani's Hawaiian Shave Ice Website  - MonkeyPod Kitchen Website  - Star Noodle Website - Noreetuh Website  - Elyse Inamine on How to Make Spam Musubi - Spam musubi press  - Tin Roof Website  - Lineage Website *(When you buy something through our links, we earn an affiliate commission.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Confessions of a Native Son
Confessions of A Hawaiian Navy SEAL

Confessions of a Native Son

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 94:29


I sit down with my Navy Boxing Teammate Antone Aku, to discuss his childhood, his time in the SEAL Teams, and his future as an entrepreneur.Leave a comment on today's show on my Substack at https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE Follow me on Twitter here: https://bit.ly/38CkyZfIf you like this type of dialogue and are interested in booking me to speak at your organization, just shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.com or visit my website www.ConfessionsofANativeSon.com