Podcasts about Robin Williams

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American actor and comedian

  • 3,533PODCASTS
  • 4,601EPISODES
  • 1h 1mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST
Robin Williams

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Best podcasts about Robin Williams

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Latest podcast episodes about Robin Williams

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast
GGACP Classic: Bob Saget

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 102:35


Gilbert, Frank and the GGACP team remember our friend Bob Saget with this classic episode from 2020, featuring a spirited discussion about celebrity roasts, the perseverance of Rodney Dangerfield, the brilliance of Cloris Leachman, the understated genius of Martin Mull and his popular podcast, “Bob Saget's Here For You.” Also, Norm Macdonald reads a joke book, Jack Warden plays it old school, Gilbert jams with Robin Williams and Bob sneaks into a taping of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” PLUS: Lionel Atwill! Don Rickles meets Denzel Washington! Johnny Carson babysits! The cinema of Larry Cohen! The return of “Dummy in the Window”! And Cesar Romero makes a play for Bob's mom! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WhatCulture Gaming
10 Celebrities You Didn't Realise Were Hidden In Video Games - Snoop Dogg! Robin Williams! Phil Collins! Steve Carrell In Outlaw Golf?!

WhatCulture Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 8:06


For those times when you could swear someone sounds familiar. Scott Tailford presents 10 Celebrities You Didn't Realise Were Hidden In Video Games... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over The Moon, pt 2 (ep 179

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:34


How'd it go for the first BBC announcer with an accent?  How much work can you get if you "make it" in voiceover?  How much did the woman behind Siri make?  And what's a pencil got to do with any of this?  All this and more in part 2! Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. 00:25 RP and Wilfred Pickles (voiced by Simon Jackson) 04:26 The cast of Futurama work a lot! 08:17 Voiceover is easy! (right?) 11:30 #moxiemillion 12:30 Trying to find a job 13:55 Props and accessories 15:55 AI (even worse than the movie) 18:24 Bev Standing vs TikTok 20:50 sponsors: Sly Fox Trivia, Sambucol 23:06 Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri 27:53 It's in the game Music: Kevin MacLeod, Track Tribe . Links to all the research resources are on the website.   Back when the BBC was first launched in 1922, the first General Manager of the corporation, Sir John Reith, insisted the BBC be as formal and quintessentially British as possible, and he created a number of rules towards this end.  One thing he stressed in particular was that the newscasters spoke the “King's English.“  He felt it was “a style or quality of English that would not be laughed at in any part of the country”.  He also assumed RP would be easier for people across the empire to understand versus a regional accent, of which the tiny land mass of the UK has dozens.  Reish wanted things to be ‘just so,' even ordering that any newscaster reading the news after 8PM had to wear a dinner jacket while on air, on the radio, where no one could see them.    The BBC didn't create Received Pronunciation, though.  We can trace the origins of RP back to the secondary schools and universities of nineteenth-century Britain, making it the accent of a certain social class, the one with money.  Their speech patterns - based loosely on the local accent of the south-east Midlands, roughly London, Oxford and Cambridge, soon came to be associated with ‘The Establishment.'   although one of Reith's goals in using RP was to appeal to the widest audience possible, many listeners still felt alienated by the broadcasts being beamed into their homes because of this “upper class” accent being used. Despite this, newscasters were required to use Received Pronunciation right up until World War 2.   Why change it during the war?  Didn't they have bigger things to worry about?  Well, the Ministry of Information was worried about the Nazis hijacking the radio waves.  During World War 2, Nazi Germany invested a lot of time and money to train spies and propagandists to speak using perfect Received Pronunciation so that they could pass as British.  If they pulled it off, the Nazis could potentially issue orders over the radio in a thoroughly convincing and official-sounding newscaster voice.  Therefor, the BBC hired several newscasters possessed of broad regional accents that would be more difficult for Nazis to perfectly copy, and as a bonus might also appeal to the “common man”.   The first person to read the news on the BBC with a regional accent was one Wilfred Pickles in 1941.  [sfx clip]  The public trusted that he was in fact British, but they didn't trust, or couldn't ignore his accent to pay attention to, a word he said.  Far from being popular, his mild Yorkshire accent offended many listeners so much that they wrote letters to the BBC, blasting them for having the audacity to sully the news that way.  Nonetheless, after the end of World War 2, the BBC continued to loosen its guidelines and began to hire more people who spoke with the respective accent of the region they were being broadcast.  That said, the BBC does continue to select newscasters with the most mild accents for international broadcasts.   You can't please everyone, but if you can get in good in the voicework industry, you can do a staggering number of roles.  How many?  Here are some examples, pulling only from the cast of one of my favorite shows, Futurama.  You might say my husband and I are fans; we had a Hypnotoad wedding cake.  Billy West, the voice of Fry, Prof. Farnsworth, and Zoidberg, as well as both Ren and Stimpy, has 266 acting credits on his IMDB page.  Maurice LaMarche, who did Calculon, Morbo and Kiff and is the go-to guy for Orson Welles impressions like Brain from Animaniacs, has 390 roles listed.  Tress MacNeille, who did basically every female who wasn't Amy or Leela, as well as Dot on Animaniacs and Agnes Skinner on The Simpsons has 398 roles to her name.  Bender's voice actor, John DiMaggio, without whom the Gears of War video games wouldn't be the same, has worked on some 424 projects.  The man who made Hermes Conrad Jamaican, and gave us Samurai Jack, Phil LaMarr, is the most prolific voice actor on that cast, with a whopping 495 credits to his name.  Still, he falls short of the resume of Rob Paulsen, who did the voices of Yakko and Pinky on Animaniacs, and other examples too numerous to list here, because his IMDB pages lists 541 voice acting credits.  And did I mention they're bringing Animaniacs back? [cheer]  Paulsen is trailing behind Tara Strong, though.  The actress who voiced Bubbles on Powerpuff Girls, Raven on Teen Titans, and Timmy on Fairly Oddparents has 609 roles in her 35 year career, or an average of 17 a year.  That may not sound impressive, but have you've ever tried getting *one acting job?  Strong can't hold a candle to a man whose voice I can identify from two rooms away, a man who will always be Spike Spiegel from Cowboy Bebop no matter who he's playing, Steve Blum, who has racked up 798 voice roles.  And those are just a sampling of voice actors I can name off the top of my head.  So when career day rolls around, maybe skip doctor and firefighter and suggest your kid become a voice actor.  Not everyone who does voice work has a face for radio, so I put pictures of all the actors up on the Vodacast app so you can se what Fry, Yakko, and Raven really look like ..   “Sure,” you say, “that sounds like a sweet gig.  Walk in, say a few things, and cash the check.”  Oh my sweet summer child.  If it was that easy, everyone would do it.  For starters, there is no “got it in one take” in voice acting.  Be prepared to do your lines over and over again, with different emphasis, different inflection, different pacing, or sometimes simply saying it over and over again until, even though each take sounds the same to you, the director gets the subtle difference they're looking for.  Bonus fact: the feeling you get when you say a word or phrase so many times that it stops sounding like a word and becomes a meaningless noise is called semantic satiation.   You may be standing in a little booth all day, but that doesn't mean it won't be physically taxing.  Actors dubbing anime in particular are required to do a lot of screaming.  Chris Sabat, who voices Vegeta in the Dragonball series, says that even with his background in opera and the vocal control that taught him, “I will literally be sick the next day. I will have flu-like symptoms. Because you have to use so much energy, and use up so much of your voice to put power into those scenes, that it will make you sick. That's not an exaggeration; I will be bedridden sometimes after screaming for too long.”   That is, if you can get a gig.  Remember how I rattled off actors who've had hundreds of roles each?  That's because, in rough figures, 5% of the actors get 95% of the work. So unless you're a Tara Strong or Phil LaMarr, noteworthy roles will be hard to come by.  One plus side is you get paid by the word, as well as by the tag.  A tag is part of a recording that can be swapped out, like recording a commercial, and recording the phrases “coming soon,” “opening this Monday,” and “open now.”  The clients gets three distinct commercials from one recording sessions, so you get more money.  Assuming the client actually orders the session.  You may find yourself on stand-by or “avail,” as it's called in the industry.  You may be asked to set aside a few hours or even consecutive days for a recording session.  The problem is, the client isn't actually obligated to use you during that time and no one else can book you during that time until they release you from it.    But it's a job you can do in your pj's, and I often do, and that's always a plus.  Even though no one can see the actors, voice work still uses props and accessories.  While computers can be used to speed up or slow down dialogue (which is more of a concern in dubbing Japanese animation, where the visuals are already done), certain vocal changes can easily be achieved using random items in the studio. “If the character is in a hollowed-out tree, I might stick my head in a wastebasket,” veteran voice actor Corey Burton told Mental Floss. “If it doesn't sound quite right, I can throw some wadded-up Kleenex in there for better acoustics.”  Burton, like Mel Blanc, prefers to eat real food when the moment calls for it. “They want you to sometimes just go, ‘Nom, nom, nom.' No! I want a carrot, a cookie. I don't want to make a dry slurping noise when I could be sipping a drink.”   Pencils also play an important role, not for making notes on the script or creating any sort of convincing sound effect.  The plague of these performers is plosives.  You've probably heard them on podcasts; they've definitely been on mine.  A plosive is the noise you get when a consonant that is produced by stopping the airflow using the lips, teeth, or palate, followed by a sudden release of air.  It's also called popping your p's, since that's the worst culprit.  A round mesh screen in front of the mic helps, but the old-school trick to stop plosives actually uses a pencil.  If they're getting p-pops on the recording, voice actors will hold a pencil or similar linear object upright against the lips.  This disrupts the air enough to avoid the giant, sharp spike in the soundwave.  Now if only there were some cheap and easy trick to get rid of mouth noises and lip smacks.  You may hear a few on this podcast, but for everyone you hear, I cut twenty out.   The most sure-fire way to avoid mouth noises and breathing when ordering a recording is to use a computer-generated or AI voice.  Now this is a sticky wicket in the VO community, a real burr under a lot of saddles.  Whenever it comes up in message groups, a third of people turn into South Park characters [sfx they took our jobs].  I won't get too Insider Baseball here, but here's the scoop.  AI voices are cheap, fast, and they're getting really good.  Have you ever gotten a robodialer call where it took you a moment to realize it was not a live person?  There are companies offering entire audiobooks in AI voices.  There is even an AI voice that can cry!  So why am I not bothered?  The way I see it, the people who will buy the cheapest possible option, in this case an AI voice, weren't going to pay even my Fiverr rate, and invariably, the cheaper a client is, the more working with them makes you regret ever starting this business in the first place.  It's an irony a lot of freelancers and business owners are familiar with -- the $5k client pays you the day you submit the invoice; the $50 client makes you hound them for six weeks and then they say they want you to do it over or come down on the price.  So I'm fine with letting those gigs go.  The other reason is that while AI applications and devices such as smart speakers and digital assistants like Siri are powered by computer-generated voices, those voices actually originate from real actors!  In fact, I just wrapped an AI-generation job this week.    In most cases, even computerized voices need a human voice as a foundation for the development of the vocal database. Nevertheless, AI is creating new work for a wide range of voice actors. Are these actors putting themselves out of a job in future?  Maybe. Maybe not.  It's definitely something I had to wrestle with before accepting the job.  But I figured, AI is coming whether we like it or not, so it's best to be involved to help steer the ship rather than be capsized by its wake.   When I took the AI-generation job, there were two questions I had for the client: what control do I have over how my voice is used, and what happens if you sell the company?  I asked these two questions for two good reasons, Bev Standing and Susan Bennett.  Bev Standing, a VO and coach from Canada, was surprised to hear her own voice being used on peoples' videos when friends and colleagues told her to log onto Tiktok.  For one, people could use her voice to say whatever they liked, no matter how vile, and she'd never worked with, been paid by, or given permission for use of her voice to TikTok.   According to Standing, who I've taken classes with and is a really nice lady, the audio in question was recorded as a job for the Chinese Institute of Acoustics four years ago, ostensibly for translations.  “The only people I've worked with are the people I was hired by, which was for translations... My agreement is not what it's being used for, and it's not with the company that's using my voice,” Standing said in an interview.   Standing files a lawsuit against TikTok's parent company ByteDance on the grounds of intellectual property theft.  She hasn't consented to her performance being used by TikTok, and had very real concerns that the content created using her audio would hurt her ability to get work in the future.  Imagine if Jan 6 insurrectionists and other such hateful wackaloons used your voice on their videos.  Good luck getting hired after that.  TikTok and ByteDance stayed pretty mum, both publicly and to Standing and her lawyer, also a VO, but they did change the AI voice, which certainly looks like they done wrong.  The lawsuit was settled a few months ago, but it's all sealed up in NDAs, so I can't tell you the details, but I'm calling it a win.   The other name I dropped was Susan Bennett, but that's not the name you'd recognize her as.  Though she was training to be a teacher, it soon became clear to Susan Bennet that her voice was destined for more than saying “eyes on your own paper.”  She acted in the theater, was a member of a jazz band, an a cappella group, and she was a backup singer for Burt Bacharac and Roy Orbison.  That background helped her land gigs doing VO and singing jingles for the likes of Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Macy's, Goodyear, Papa John's, IBM, and more.  In 1974, she became the voice of First National Bank of Atlanta's Tillie the All-Time Teller, one of the first bank ATMs.  Her voice made the new technology more user-friendly for a computer-unfamiliar public.     Bonus fact: one of the earliest ATMs in NYC printed the security picture of the user on their receipts.  According to the man who sold them to the bank, “The only people using the machines were prostitutes and gamblers who didn't want to deal with tellers face to face.”  Or it could be the hours they keep.  I can neither confirm nor deny this, but I like to think that sex workers are the underappreciated early-adopters that helped the rest of us to be able to hit the cash machine on the way out of town (or the Mac machine, as my mom called it well into the 90's).  Bennet also became the voice of Delta Airlines announcements, GPS's, and phone systems.   But even with all that, that's not where you know her voice from.  “Hey, Siri, how big is the Serengeti?” [sfx if Google was]  Susan Bennet was the original voice of Siri on the iphone, but she never actually worked for Apple.  In 2005, she recorded a wealth of words and wordy-sounding non-words for a company called ScanSoft or Nuance, I've been seeing either listed.   For four hours a day, every day, in July 2005, Bennett holed up in her home recording booth, saying thousands of phrases and sentences of mostly-to-completely nonsense, which the “ubergeeks” as she called them, could use for generating AI speech.  According to Bennet, “I was reading sentences like 'cow hoist in the tub hut today.' 'Militia oy hallucinate buckra okra ooze.' Then I would read these really tedious things that were the same word, but changing out the vowel. 'Say the shrayding again, say the shreeding again, say the shriding again, say the shredding again, say the shrudding again.' “  These snippets were then synthesized in a process called concatenation that builds words, sentences, paragraphs. And that is how voices like hers find their way into GPS and telephone systems.   The job was done, the check cleared, and life went on, then 2011 rolled around and Siri was unveiled as an integrated feature of the Apple iPhone 4S.  The actors who'd worked for Nuance had no idea until well after it happened.  Bennett found out that her voice is actually Siri after a friend emailed: ”Hey, we've been playing around with this new Apple phone. Isn't this you?'  Apple had bought SoftScan/Nuance and all of its assets.  “Apple bought our voices from Nuance without our knowing it.”  As a voiceactor, this turn of events was problematic for a few reasons.  Typecasting and stereotyping, for one.  The downside of being successful in a role can be that that's all people want you for after that, like Sean Bean and a character who dies.  So Bennett kept her identity close to her vest until 2013, when Apple switched voices.  “My voice was just the original voice on the 4s and the 5. But now it no longer sounds like Apple because [Siri] sounds like everyone else. The original Siri voice had a lot of character; she had a lot of attitude.   Bennet has never said how much she made from Nuance, but we know how much she's made from Apple.  In round figures, give or take for inflation, [sfx calculator] she made $0.  Her voice was on something like 17 million phones.  Even a penny per phone would have been a handsome payday, but no, no penny for you.  “We were paid for the amount of time we spent recording but not at all for usage. The only way I've been able to get any payment for it, really, is through my speaking events, but I'm very grateful to have been the voice of Siri. She's very iconic; it's led to a whole new career for me.”   Another widespread voice that didn't get commensurate royalties is known for a single phrase, barely a full sentence. [sfx clip]  From FIFA and Madden to UFC and NBA, Andrew Anthony's voice has opened EA Sports video games for 30 years now and let us all have a collective shiver of mortality at that fact.  Anthony had a friend who ran a small ad sales company, who had taken on the not-yet-industry-cornerstone Electronic Arts as a client.  "My friend then called me up in Toronto and said 'Hey will you do this thing... for free?' I said 'yeah, of course, I will! I don't even know what this is but I get a free trip down to see you, so for sure'.  So Anthony went to visit his friend, read the line, which was originally “If it's in the game, it's in the game,” and assumed he would never, ever hear anything about it again.  Call that an underestimation.  EA is valued at $37B, with the Sports being a big chunk of that.  And Anthony has seen exactly none of that money, and he's pretty okay with that.  Over the years, Anthony has met plenty of other gaming fans and happily agreed to do his EA Sports voice impression on camera.    Not every screen actor's able to do voice work successfully; we've all heard flat, lackluster performances from big name stars in animated features.  Looking at you, Sarah Michelle Gellar from the recent HeMan cartoon.  Not so with the person who arguably kicked off the trends of booking big names stars for voice work, Robin Williams in his role as Genie.  Williams recorded 30 hours of dialogue, most of it improvised, for the 90 minute movie.  He took the role for *9% of the fee he normally commanded with the condition that the recordings not be used to merchandise products.  He wanted to “leave something wonderful behind for this kids.”  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  So a wife overheard her boss saying he wanted a voice to notify people when they received email and volunteered her husband. “I recorded it on a cassette deck in my living room,” Edwards told the New York Post on November 7.  “Most people think I'm retired and own an island.”  Instead, he works at WKYC-TV from 3:30 a.m. to noon, and drives an Uber from noon to 6 p.m.  In 2014, Edwards told CNBC that he pranks people by standing behind their computers and booming, “You've got mail!”  Explained the voice-over actor, “I have fun with it!”  He's not bothered by not getting royalties, so I guess we shouldn't be either. 

Achilles' Heel with Alex Hooper
Grieving Comedians with Drennon Davis

Achilles' Heel with Alex Hooper

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 92:26


Laughter is healing. When a comedian dies, immediate ripples are felt throughout the world. Drennon Davis (Conan, NBC) sits down with me to discuss why the loss of a clown is so impactful. We honor Bob Saget, Robin Williams, Betty White, and so many more while trying to stay true to our silly ass selves. Don't worry, this episode is anything but depressing. What will your impact be when you go? Drennon is a comedian, musician, puppeteer, and all around goofball. He can be seen all over your TV, social media, or running amok at insane festivals. Follow Drennon: @drennondavis drennondavis.org

Comedy Gold Minds with Kevin Hart
In Memory of Bob Saget

Comedy Gold Minds with Kevin Hart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 58:51


We're remembering the comedic legend Bob Saget this week on Comedy Gold Minds with Kevin Hart. In their discussion from May of 2021, the two sit down to talk about coming up in Philly, how Bob went from America's dad on the screen in Full House back to his raunchy comedy on the stage, and how he remembers comic legends we've lost like Bernie Mac and Robin Williams.Like Comedy Gold Minds? SiriusXM subscribers get it a day early, plus Kevin Hart's Laugh Out Loud Radio, his 24/7 comedy channel, with great talk shows and stand-up. Learn more / check it out for 3 months at siriusxm.com/comedygoldminds.

Opie Radio
Ep 477: Bob Saget - Last time I talked to him

Opie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 50:33


So funny, so kind and so humble.  Bob Saget is gonna be horribly missed.  I talked to Bob for the last time right around the beginning of the Coronavirus.  Original title for this episode was, Bob Saget "Get a Corkscrew and Slam it in a Drawer" Checking in with my old friend Bob Saget to see how he's during these tough times.  We discuss his brand new podcast, Here For You.  Also, the tragic loss of Robin Williams, Mario Cuomo killing the Coronavirus with a mallet, Bill Burr is a dick, people shocked by his dirty stand up, vasectomy home kit, rat problem, he got Full House by replacing someone else, Two Girls One Cup and much more! Opie livestreams most days on his www.youtube.com/opieradio and www.facebook.com/opieradiofans  Join the Private Facebook Group by clicking "subscribe" on www.facebook.com/opieradiofans March - www.opieradio.com   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blast Zone
Episode 47 - Death to Smoochy

Blast Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 63:32


A star-studded cast comes together for an R-rated cynical look at the children's television industry in DEATH TO SMOOCHY DEATH TO SMOOCHY RELEASED: February 28, 2002 DIRECTED BY: Danny Devito BUDGET: $50M BOX OFFICE: $8M ESTIMATED LOSS: Total STARRING: Ed Norton, Robin Williams, Catherine Keener, Jon Stewart, Danny Devito, Michael RispoliNEXT WEEK: We're heading down under for 1995's swing-and-a-miss TANK GIRL 

Mazan Movie Club
"The Fisher King" MMC

Mazan Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 66:50


Comedian Mike Pace joins Host and Corporate Comedian Steve Mazan to discuss Terry Gilliam's NY fable "The FIsher King" Is this Terry Gilliam's most mainstream? Does Robin Williams give too much Robin? How does it hold up two decades later? Were Jeter and Plummer unappreciated? Was it too happy of an ending? All these questions and more get answered on this week's Mazan Movie Club film.  "The FIsher King" on IMDB Mike Pace on Facebook Home of the Mazan Movie Club Steve Mazan on Instagram Home of Corporate Comedian Steve Mazan      

Dear Family,
Dr. Raghu Appasani- Psychiatrist and Neuroscientist Bridging the Gap Between Western and Eastern Health Practices Including Microdosing and Nutrition

Dear Family,

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 45:32


Dr. Raghu Kiran Appasani is an Integrative Psychiatrist, Neuroscientist, and Social Entrepreneur focused on bridging the gap between western and eastern practices to create a wholesome society by taking a proactive approach to health. He was born and raised in the Boston area, living in rural India with his grandparents for two formative years when he was young. His father, a biochemist at Harvard Medical School, opened up his labs for him to do research before going to Wesleyan to study neuroscience. He graduated from The University of Massachusetts with his Medical Doctorate in 2018, where he received the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.  He is currently the Chief Resident of Integrated Care Services at LA County + USC Medical Center and in private practice taking a holistic integrative approach to care. Dr. Appasani is the Chief Medical Officer at PYM Health, which stands for Prepare Your Mind. Partnering with Robin Williams' son, Zak Williams, PYM is the first neurotransmitter company focused on nutritional psychiatry through mood chews that target the body's neurotransmitter and amino acid levels to decrease anxiety and stress.   Dr. Appasani is CEO of The MINDS Foundation, a mental health nonprofit he founded that has been globally recognized. Through his extensive scientific research, he's published over 35 peer-reviewed articles, edited five books, and is a sought-after speaker and writer on mental health, entrepreneurship, global health, and consciousness. Throughout his medical career, he's focused on the impact of mental health in physicians, developing initiatives at medical institutions to combat suicide and build resilience, working extensively with Graduate Medical Education leadership.    Clinically, Dr. Appasani is trained in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy, Cognitive Processing Therapy for Trauma, Motivational Interviewing, Group Therapy, and Exposure Response Prevention. He's currently a Health Equity Scholar in the MAPS MDMA Psychotherapy Program. His clinical interests lie in mood disorders (depression, bipolar), addiction, anxiety disorders, OCD spectrum, eating disorders, trauma, and personality spectrum conditions.    His passion lies at the intersection of mental health literacy, consciousness, global psychiatry, mindfulness, digital health, personalized medicine, psychedelics, wellness, and social entrepreneurship. Dr. Appasani believes that we all have mental health and therefore believes that healing occurs through the integration of psychotherapy, medication management, supplementation with natural sources, nutrition, and physical fitness. Above all else, he believes building community is very important in his own and everyone's healing journey.   SHOW NOTE LINKS: MINDS Foundation  PYM- Mood Chews Dr. Raghu Appasani on Instagram Dr. Raghu Appasani on Facebook CONNECT WITH US! *Dear Family, Podcast Page *Write Now Rachel Website *Rachel's Blog @Medium *Rachel's Twitter *Facebook *Instagram   PLEASE JOIN: *Dear Family Members, the Private Facebook Group     WAYS TO HELP THE PODCAST: *PLEASE Leave a 5-Star Review and Subscribe! Thank you! Your support means the world to me. Wishing you love, happiness, and good mental health always.      

The FeedBak Podcast
237 - I Know I'm Funny with Jon Stringer (Throwbak)

The FeedBak Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 84:32


with Comedian https://www.jonstringer.com/ (Jon Stringer) - Being funny. Starting late in comedy. Working with Chingo Bling. Meeting Jackie Martling, Gallagher, Rob Schneider, Theo Von, Raymond Orta. Pre-approving the funny and being confident. Telling party stories. His idols Jim Carrey and Bill Burr. Paying for comedy vs paying for entertainment. Handling hecklers. Comedians are truth-tellers. Comedy legends like Robin Williams. Follow The FeedBak: IG: https://instagram.com/thefeedbak (https://instagram.com/thefeedbak) Facebook: https://facebook.com/thefeedbak (https://facebook.com/thefeedbak) Twitter: https://twitter.com/thefeedbak (https://twitter.com/thefeedbak) All episodes and show notes available at http://thefeedbak.com/ (thefeedbak.com) The FeedBak Podcast is also available on http://thefeedbak.com/spotify (Spotify), http://thefeedbak.com/stitcher (Stitcher), http://thefeedbak.com/googleplay (Google Play) and wherever you listen to podcasts.

The Decision Reel
TDR-Ep.52-Jack

The Decision Reel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 127:39


Vinny is back for the first episode of the year, and this week he picked a movie that I am pretty sure everyone has forgot about with Jack! Man what a movie, it makes you go through the emotions. Listen in to hear what all we have to say about Robin Williams performance of a 10 year old boy.........with Bill Cosby, what!?

The Charles Mizrahi Show
The Value of Emotional Thinking — Leonard Mlodinow

The Charles Mizrahi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 58:22


As the saying goes: “Think with your head, not your heart.” Emotion is widely considered as something that clouds judgment. Theoretical physicist and author Leonard Mlodinow turned that idea on its head in his new book, Emotional: How Feelings Shape Our Thinking. In this episode, Mlodinow and host Charles Mizrahi discuss how emotions can enhance our thought processes and improve decision-making. Topics Discussed: An Introduction to Leonard Mlodinow (00:00:00) The Value of Emotional Thinking (00:04:47)                       Life or Death Situations (00:12:25) Unconscious Mental Processing (00:17:49) Defining Emotion (00:19:34) Animal Versus Human Thinking (00:24:31) KAL Disaster and WWIII (00:28:52) Unconscious Decision-Making (00:37:33) Biased Decision-Making (00:45:54) Managing Emotions (00:51:00) Guest Bio: Leonard Mlodinow, Ph.D., is a theoretical physicist and New York Times best-selling author. He is recognized for making groundbreaking discoveries in his field. Mlodinow has written for TV shows, such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, designed games with Steven Spielberg and Robin Williams and taught at the California Institute of Technology and the Max Planck Institute in Munich. In addition, Mlodinow has co-authored bestselling books with Stephen Hawking and Deepak Chopra. And his books The Drunkard's Walk and Subliminal won the Robert P. Balles Prize for Critical Thinking and the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award, respectively. Resources Mentioned: ·      https://www.amazon.com/Dogs-World-Imagining-without-Humans/dp/0691196184 (A Dog's World: Imagining the Lives of Dogs in a World without Humans) ·      https://www.amazon.com/Unleashing-Your-Dog-Companion-Possible/dp/160868542X (Unleashing Your Dog: A Field Guide to Giving Your Canine Companion the Best Life Possible) ·      https://www.amazon.com/Drunkards-Walk-Randomness-Rules-Lives/dp/0307275175/ref=sr_1_1?gclid=Cj0KCQiA2sqOBhCGARIsAPuPK0iM6HpHwjq-eLeJv-m3Nso2kld9fja69IkLtOGw3g6kGJzJ6CdyhpoaAlMKEALw_wcB&hvadid=194584452395&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9007894&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=8665552786230998824&hvtargid=kwd-299555210350&hydadcr=22538_9636740&keywords=the+drunkard%27s+walk&qid=1641221942&sr=8-1 (The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives) ·      https://www.amazon.com/Subliminal-Your-Unconscious-Rules-Behavior/dp/0307472256 (Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior) Transcript: https://charlesmizrahi.com/podcast/   Don't Forget To... • Subscribe to my podcast! • Download this episode to save for later • Liked this episode? Leave a kind review!   Subscribe to Charles' Alpha Investor newsletter today: https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1729783 (https://pro.banyanhill.com/m/1729783)

Watch This With Rick Ramos
#362 - Terry Gilliam's The Adventures of Baron Munchausen - WatchThis W/RickRamos

Watch This With Rick Ramos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 76:27


Hot Air & Fantasy: Terry Gilliam's The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988) Here's a movie that makes it exciting to be a movie lover . . . in the mid-1980's, filmmaker Terry Gilliam - after having won an unbeatable media and artistic war with Universal Pictures over the release of his bleak and dystopian picture, Brazil (1985) - would tackle a film that would nearly prove the end of him and almost everyone involved with it. Based on an 19th Century German storyteller, Terry Gilliam's film had been filmed a number of times before, but never with the vision, excitement, budget, and production problems that would plague this film. Through problems with language (English-speaking director and cast, Italian-speaking crew, shooting in Spain), production overruns, cast changes, a line producer seemingly more interested in the bravado of his role, shutdowns, and - finally - being dumped by ColumbiaPictures without any kind of advertising, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen continues to amaze, intrigue, and baffle audiences. It is truly one of the most visionary and daring productions ever committed to film; from a director that was vilified (continuing to suffer from the films reputation some thirty plus years later) and, only much later, recognized as one of the great fantasy films. The Adventures of Baron Munchausen is a beautiful film gifted to anyone who wants to believe in, "sausage trees, oceans of wine," and the insanity of traveling to the moon on "hot air and fantasy". Featuring an incredible cast including: Eric Idle, Sarah Polley (all of nine years old), Valentina Cortese, Uma Thurman, Oliver Reed, Winston Dennis, Jack Purvis, Johnathan Pryce, Allison Steadman, co-screenwriter Charles McKeowen, Bill Paterson, Peter Jeffrey, Robin Williams (in a cameo as Ray D. Tutto - The King of the Moon), and a lead - an incredible lead - in John Neville as The Baron. This is a beautiful and inspiring film that we are thrilled to be talking about. We hope you enjoy the conversation, and that the conversation makes you seek out the movie. Thanks for the continued love and support. Questions, Comments, Complaints, & Suggestions can be directed to gondoramos@yahoo.com. Many Thanks.

Rumicast
Good Morning Vietnam

Rumicast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 48:14


Haaaaaaaaaaapy New Year FMBuffs. If you find yourselves alone this festive season allow the FMB to keep you company by desperately trying to keep a conversation going about Robin Williams and his iconic starring role in Barry Levinson's Good Morning Vietnam. (Hint: If you time the podcast with your NYE countdown at 36:00 you will welcome the New Year with our rendition of James Caan's racist impression of a Chinese person from El Dorado ;) ) 

Wake Up with KC
A horrific experience and a inspiration with the 3 Stooges with Marc Sheffler and how they inspired him

Wake Up with KC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 63:16


THE HOTTEST UP & COMING COMIC IN LOS ANGELES TODAYIS A 71 YEAR OLD JEWISH MAN!eL YID, NEW CHARACTER CREATED AND PERFORMED BY NOTEDTV WRITER/PRODUCER AND ACTOR MARC SHEFFLER,IS POISED TO TAKE THE LA COMEDY SCENE BY STORMBelieve it or not, the hottest and fastest rising new comic on the LA ComedyScene today is “el Yid,” a 69 year old Jewish man whose long white beard and blackand white garb would immediately lead anyone to assume that he was a Chasidic Rabbifrom Brooklyn. In actuality, el Yid is a new comedic character conceived and performedby noted TV writer/producer and actor Marc Sheffler.A former comedian and member of the Comedy Store's legendary “Class of1977,” Marc has also been involved with countless television series and specials duringthe course of his long entertainment industry career, including "Sister, Sister," "Harryand the Hendersons," "Who's the Boss," “Sanford & Son,” "Charles in Charge,” “TheHappy Days Reunion Show," "The Best of the Hollywood Palace" and the Warner Bros.cartoon “How Bugs Bunny Won The West,” among many others.The character of el Yid was born in late 2015, after a horrific automobile accidentalmost cost Marc his life. After having been hit by a car while walking down the streetnear his home by an 85-year old man texting on his phone while driving, Marc spentmany months recovering from his broken limbs and shattered spirit. Once finally healed,however, Marc looked in the mirror and realized that not only had he been transformedinto an entirely new person, but he had a brainstorm! He'd also just given birth to anentirely new character. The experience re-ignited his passion to once again performstand-up comedy live, after a 35 year absence from the stage.el Yid has been making LA audiences howl with laughter ever since. He appearsregularly at Robin Hood Pub on Burbank & Woodman in Sherman Oaks on Wed-nesdays, and at Upstairs @ Palermo on Vermont by Franklin on Thursdays. Check out:https://www.facebook.com/elyidthecomedian/About Marc Sheffler:A native of Pittsburgh, PA, Marc Sheffler was given a truly unique gift by hisfather for his 8th birthday: The Three Stooges! The famous slapstick trio performed athis birthday party during a local appearance there in 1957. The Stooges brought Marcon stage with a “Nyuck, Nyuck, Nyuck,” and the infamous phrase “I oughtta moider ya.”Moe Howard dubbed little Marc “The Fourth Stooge.” “It was on that stage, at the age of8, when I first realized it was my destiny to become a comedian,” Marc says today.In 1969, Marc dropped out of college to head off to New York State's CatskillMountains, the center of the stand-up comedy universe at the time. There, he began hisprofessional career, with his first job as the Stage Manager of the 1500-seat nightclub atthe Raleigh Hotel. During his fourteen months there, Marc watched every comedian onthat circuit – one of whom was London Lee, the scion of a wealthy Long Island family.Marc worked for Lee for about a year and a half, at first running errands for him, andeventually writing some of his jokes. Marc even became an onstage part of his actduring more than 200 club dates. One lucky night, Lee told his audience that Marc wasan aspiring stand-up comedian, and without any advance notice, thrust him into thespotlight. Marc performed ten minutes, managing to generate enough laughs to earnhimself a spot onstage with Lee for an upcoming, two week engagement at thelegendary Copacabana nightclub in Manhattan.After striking out on his own in late 1971, Marc walked into his manager's office in NewYork City (Lloyd Greenfield Management, whose clients at the time also includedEngelbert Humperdinck), where he was told a movie audition awaited him. As a result ofthat audition, Sean Cunningham and Wes Craven cast Marc as one of their film's fourleads, “a teenage heroin junkie named Junior Stillo” in the movie “The Last House onthe Left” (1972). The film became Wes Craven's first, and is considered today to be thegranddaddy of the modern day slasher/crime genre. In early1972, Marc's life and careerchanged forever when Roger Ebert published a 4 1⁄2 star review of the film with this leadsentence: "'Last House on the Left' is a tough, bitter little sleeper of a movie that's aboutfour times as good as you'd expect.” Marc made dozens of personal appearancesacross the country to help promote the film, meeting thousands of fans, and basking inthe newfound glow of his first taste of fame.After his initial blast of exposure with “Last House,” Marc shifted gears back to hisoriginal passion: a career in stand-up comedy. He also began to pursue writing andproducing projects for television. In late 1975, he developed a movie-of-the-week ideaalong with award winning commercial director N. Lee Lacy (the man who'd directed theinfamous “Mean Joe Green/Coke” commercial.) In early 1976, Lacy's agents at WilliamMorris sold the pitch to NBC – as a result, Marc moved to LA, arriving in town with awriting credit and William Morris as his talent agency.During his earliest days in LA, Marc spent countless nights at the legendary ComedyStore, watching such legends as Richard Pryor, Paul Mooney, Jimmy Walker, GeorgeMiller, Tim Thomerson, and Steve Bluestein. The William Morris Agency had set him upwith his first Monday night gig at the club just a few weeks after he'd relocated to la-la-land. After his fourth Monday night, he walked up to legendary founder Mitzi Shore'stable, and asked her if he had what it took. She looked up and said, “Okay Marc, call infor spots.” Marc quickly thanked her and got out of her sight, before she had time toconclude she'd just made a huge mistake. Over the course of the next several Mondaynights, Marc honed his material, quickly perfecting his set, generating big laughs, andquickly made a place for himself as an Original Comedy Store Regular. Based on hissuccess, Marc became a lifetime member of the Comedy Store's infamous “Class of'77.” He even got his name inscribed on the Comedy Store's exterior “Wall of Fame,”alongside his peers at the time - Jay Leno, Robin Williams, David Letterman, MarcSummers, and other now well-recognized performers.Segueing into writing and producing for television, Marc's career path next ledhim to participate on such hit TV series as "Sister, Sister," "Harry and the Hendersons,""Who's the Boss," “Sanford and Son,” and "Charles in Charge." He also becameinvolved with numerous TV pilots, made for TV movies, and television specials,including "The Little Shop of Horrors" pilot, "The Happy Days Reunion Show" and "TheBest of the Hollywood Palace" specials. His first real studio gig was at Warner Bros.with Mel Blanc, the voice of the classic Warner Bros. cartoons, as the writer of the TVshort “How Bugs Bunny Won The West” in 1978. During this era, Marc worked closelywith a number of notable Executive Producers, including Norman Lear, (“Sanford andSon,”) George Schlatter (“If She Dies, She Dies,”) Don Mischer (“The People's ChoiceAwards,”) Steven Spielberg (“Harry And The Hendersons,) and Garry Marshall (“TheHappy Days Reunion Special”), among them.In 2002, Marc returned to the horror film genre, and produced David DeFalco'scontroversial movie “Chaos.” In 2006, he co-wrote and produced another horror film,“Girls Gone Dead.” And in 2010, Marc supervised the writing of the first two episodes ofa new TV series called “Oh Telon” - a half-hour situation comedy - at EICTV, in SanAntonio de los Baños, Cuba. The show was greenlit for production, and in fall of thatyear, Marc made television history by becoming the first person ever to ExecutiveProduce a sitcom in Cuba!The Birth of el Yid:From 2011 to 2015, Marc was on the faculty of Loyola Marymount University'sSchool of Film and Television, where he taught classes in Situation Comedy,Screenwriting, and Re-Writing. During his time there, he noticed an interestinginteraction between himself and his students (18 to mid-20's). Realizing he could makehis students laugh at will, he went back to the Comedy Store (after a nearly four decadehiatus) to watch the latest comedians, and to listen to the audiences so he could learnwhat they thought was funny. He'd begun to plot a course back to the stand-up comedystage.After a long Thanksgiving (2015) holiday trip to New York and Boston, Marc and his wife(a social worker), returned to LA exhausted and jet-lagged from the trip. A few morningslater, Marc's wife headed out the door to work. Prior to her leaving, Marc told her hewas going to walk up to Trader Joe's, to pick up a few things. A little after 1:00 PM, ashe started the stroll back home carrying his Trader Joe's grocery bag, Marc was struckfrom behind by a Porsche doing about 40 mph, driven by an 85 year old man who wastalking on a handheld cell phone. The driver, who'd gotten distracted by that call, driftedinto the parking/walking lane, forcefully hitting Marc and hurling him through the air.Marc's injuries were extensive: fractured cervical spine bones, fractured ribs, afractured wrist, a shredded meniscus in his knee, multiple scalp lacerations, headtrauma, a concussion, multiple contusions and abrasions, and oral trauma among them.His doctors told him he was quite lucky to be alive, and had escaped life as a paraplegicby just a few millimeters. Describing his pain as “literally indescribable,” Marc's onlyrelief wasn't from the drugs administered, but from where their effects sent him – hementally “time-tripped” back to 1977, to the Comedy Store, and to his beloved stand-upcomedy days. What replaced his full body agony was the full body pleasure he got from“reliving” those moments when he was on stage at the legendary nightclub, getting biglaughs, all those years ago.Marc spent the next three months in bed, nearly immobile – he didn't drive againfor six months. During his recovery, he received a call from a friend about appearing ona radio talk show dedicated to comedy and comedians, along with two other guests –comic Johnny Beehner, and Budd Friedman's former partner at the Improv, MarkLonow. The show went well. One of its hosts asked Marc if he was thinking aboutmaking a return to the stand-up comedy stage. And on air, Marc said yes.One afternoon shortly thereafter, Marc got out of the shower, and took a longlook in the mirror at his body, hair, and long white beard, all dripping wet. He looked athimself, pointed a finger, and ordered himself “not to go away.” Dashing into hisbedroom, Marc put on a white, buttoned-down dress shirt, a black tie, and a black suit,then placed a wide-brimmed, black Fedora on his head. After brushing out his beardand putting on some wire rimmed glasses, Marc then saw in the mirror an amalgam ofhis maternal grandfather, and the Orthodox Rabbi of his Temple's congregation.What is the name of this new character?” he asked himself. This isn't MarcSheffler. Who is this guy? He shall be el Yid, The Jew!Since then, el Yid has been performing before a wide spectrum of LA audiences,generating big laughs wherever he goes. Two, post-performance experiences – onewith an admitted anti-Semite, and another with an attractive single woman - have beenparticularly encouraging. As Marc explains, “By my metrics, if el Yid can get a lifelonganti-Semite to approach him and say he was going to reevaluate his prejudice, and acute, single woman to admit she felt regret because el Yid was married, clearly this newcharacter seems to be resonating with his audiences! Total strangers are starting tobelieve that el Yid is a real person. Now that I've given birth to this comedic new voice,it's time for el Yid to start making a really big noise!”# # #Media Contact:Dan HararyThe Asbury PR Agency310/859-1831dan@asburypr.com

Direct To Video
Episode 58 -Aladdin and the King of Thieves

Direct To Video

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 92:07


All right, one last time before the end of the year, let's finish a series. Important questions: Could they have more blatantly gotten Robin Williams back? How racist are the forty thieves? In what myriad of ways does Cassim suck? Keep an ear out for Andy referring to Cassim as a “daddy” and Tony refusing to acknowledge it. Thanks to Lee Rosevere for

Release Date Rewind

Filmmaker, podcaster, and entertainment scholar Jeff Frumess returns to the show to fly with Mark to Neverland and discuss the movie Hook for its 30th anniversary this month. From their love of the Lost Boys and their colorful frosting feast, to how Dustin Hoffman chews the scenery as the perfectly villainous Captain Hook, to Julia Roberts' Tinkerbell awkwardly falling in love with Peter Pan, they break down the beloved fantasy adventure and wonder why Steven Spielberg doesn't love it like they do.

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast
BSP 159: From The Purge to This is the Night with James DeMonaco

Bulletproof Screenplay® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 79:32


The Purge franchise is one of the most iconic dystopian action horror series of all time and the man behind it, James DeMonaco is not stopping anytime soon.James is our guest today and even though we talk a great deal about the various Purge films he's either written or directed, which are all fan favorites, we start off with his most recently released film, This Is The Night, that was digitally released on September 21, 2021, after a prior theater release on Sep 17, 2021.This Is The Night, drama stars Frank Grillo, Lucius Hoyos, Jonah Hauer-King, Bobby Cannavale, and Naomi Watts. It is set in the summer of 1982 Staten Island with the release of Rocky III as its backdrop.The story tells of an average teen who embarks on a quest in his Rocky Balboa-obsessed town that swirls in his family members. Watts and Grillo will play with his parents. His family must confront its greatest challenges and the family realizes that the only way to live is like there's no tomorrow.I have tons of questions for James in this interview, which I am sure you, my tribe will appreciate. I have been a fan of some of his work but clueless he had written other top-ranked films on my list, it came as an exciting shock to discover more that James has written, directed, or produced.Besides screenwriting, directing, and producing projects like the Purge movies,  he's also written for TV and gets credit for writing The Negotiator, Staten Island, Jack, and Assault on Precinct 13.  As a child of 5 years old, he would beg his more for a pass to watch the 4:30 ABC network movies and would visit the cinema often. At seven years old, he went to see, Apocalypse at the cinema and that changed everything for him. Leaving that theater with the desire to be part of that experience of whatever happened on the screen. Through screenwriting, he landed his first production gig with director Francis Coppola, for the 1996 movie, Jack, starring Robin Williams. The inspiration for The Purge was birthed during James's time living in Paris and Canada. It came mainly, from his relationship against guns even though he had grown up around cops.The experience in Europe and Canada, in general, were the complete opposites he had observed. This was around the time mass shootings in America were on the rise in the early 2000s. Combined with an aftermath dark thought from a road rage incident curious about what it would be like if we all had a day pass, turned into a masterpiece original screenplay. But dressed in a science fiction dystopian world. The Purge: Anarchy - A couple is driving home when their car breaks down just as the Purge commences. Meanwhile, a police sergeant goes out into the streets to get revenge on the man who killed his son, and a mother and daughter run from their home after assailants destroy it. The five people meet up as they attempt to survive the night in Los Angeles. It was challenging to find someone willing to finance a ‘nihilistic' and ‘un-American movie life The Purge. James and his partners got about fifty rejections because of how dark the script seemed.   Until finally with help from Jason Blum who said it was a great fit for his low-budget horror model on his deal with Universal Studios, to be produced by Blumhouse Productions and Platinum Dunes.The studio took a shot at it and the first Purge movie in 2013 albeit on a $3 million budget, grossed $89.3 million. The film starred Ethan Hawke, Lena Headey, Adelaide Kane, and Max Burkholder as members of a wealthy family who find themselves endangered by a gang of murderers during the annual Purge, a night during which all crime, including murder, is temporarily legal.The franchise includes The Purge: Anarchy( 2014), The Purge: Election Year (2016), a prequel, The First Purge (2018), The Purge TV series (2018 to 2019), and The Forever Purge (2021).There is a sixth Purge movie in the works. And the franchise has grossed overall over $450 million against a combined production budget of $53 million.We go deep in the weeds on these projects and James's writing process.Enjoy my conversation with James DeMonaco.

Fularsız Entellik
Hayatımın En Saçma Anı (Efsane Noel Hikayeleri 2)

Fularsız Entellik

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 20:15


Bugün Robin Williams'dan Enrique Iglesias'a, Meksika'daki mercan kayalıklarından Miami varoşlarına, köpek yetiştiriciliğinden gayrımenkul fırsatlarına uzanan hızlı bir ilişkinin hikayesi var.***Bu podcast, TAKK hakkında reklam içerir.TAKK, size sade ve sürdürülebilir bir kişisel bakım dünyası vaad ediyor. İçerikler vegan. Hayvan deneyi yok. Takk.com.tr'ye girin, sadece ihtiyacınız olan kaliteli ürünler kapınıza gelsin, sadeleşmeye başlayın.***Bölümler:(00:05) Mary Anne(03:45) Robin Williams(05:45) Maya Rivierası(09:10) Ranger Dede(13:50) Hayatımın en saçma anı(14:50) Gerçeklerin iyi bir hikayeyi engellemesine izin vermeyin(16:57) New Orleans'daki aşırı lüks gerginlik(19:30) Patreon TeşekkürleriSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Movies That Made Us Gay
131. Hook wth special guest Joshua Clement

Movies That Made Us Gay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 107:46


"So, Peter, you've become a pirate." We watched Hook (1991) with MTMUG Superstar Joshua Clement and we've lost our marbles. Steve Spielberg's 1991 continuation of Peter Pan gave us iconic performances and a couple of arguably draggy character pieces.  Dame Maggie Smith in Granny Wendy Drag and Dustin Hoffman in Captain Hook High Drag are at the top of the list but Robin Williams and Dante Basco are giving them a run for the money.  Robin's 30-something Peter Banning (Pan) goes from executive realness to cosplay queen while Dante as Rufio is serving Mother of the House of Lost Boys in full Road Warrior couture, complete with red Capezio dance shoes.  Don't worry - we get to the one and only Julia Roberts giving us ginger Tinkerbell realness. Say it and mean it... "I believe in fairies!" Thanks for listening and don't forget to subscribe, rate and review us on Apple Podcasts! www.patreon.com/moviesthatmadeusgay Facebook/Instagram: @moviesthatmadeusgay Twitter: @MTMUGPod Scott Youngbauer: Twitter @oscarscott / Instagram @scottyoungballer Peter Lozano: Twitter/Instagram @peterlasagna

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Wajahat Ali and Comedian David Feldman Episode 503

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 87:34


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more All this month and next I will be promoting GiveWell.org and I hope you will consider sending them a donation. They will match new donors up to $250! Please go to GiveWell.org/StandUp Get your holiday gifts from one of the sponsors of the show! GetQuip.com/STANDUP Indeed.com/STANDUP and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup   Wajahat Ali is a columnist at The Daily Beast and a Senior Fellow at The Western States Center and Auburn Seminary. He has previously been a New York Times contributing op-ed writer, CNN commentator, host for Huff Post, and co-host of Al Jazeera America's The Stream. He is also a recovering attorney and playwright. He is currently working on his first book, "Go Back To Where You Came From: And, Other Helpful Recommendations on How to Become American" scheduled for Spring 2022 publication. He makes Pakistani food and Lego sets "for his kids" during his free time. You can send him hate mail at wajahatmali@protonmail.com   Award winning Comedian and Writer and Host of the The David Feldman Show, David Feldman David Feldman is an American comedy writer, standup comedian and podcaster/radio host. He writes for Triumph The Insult Comic Dog's series on Hulu and Maya and Marty on NBC. Feldman has won three Prime Time Emmys for comedy writing, as well as four Writers Guild Awards and a CableACE award. In the past several years he's written on Comedy Central's Roasts, Jeff Ross's The Burn and Joy Behar's Say Anything on Current TV. He also hosts a radio show with Ralph Nader for Pacifica. He has also written on ABC's Roseanne, HBO's Dennis Miller Live, HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, Comedy Central's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and Fox's Talk Show With Spike Feresten. Feldman has also written for The Academy Awards, The Emmys, Triumph The Insult Dog Comic and countless roasts on Comedy Central. Over the past few years he has written with and for Steve Martin, Martin Short, Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, Robert Smigel and Bette Midler. As a comedian, Feldman has appeared frequently on Late Night with Conan O'Brien, The Tonight Show and The Late Late Show, as well as his own special for Comedy Central. Feldman has also done commentary for Salon magazine. In 2009, Feldman launched the listener supported 'David Feldman Show' (formerly known as the 'David Feldman Comedy Podcast'), which includes a diverse mixture of live and prerecorded content which can be downloaded from the iTunes Store for free. In November 2013, he released a special digital download only compilation album called 'The Very Best of the David Feldman Show, Vol. 1'. Feldman began as a standup comic in San Francisco and currently resides in New York City. He has about 6 kids and several ex-wives. Feldman spoke at Pitzer College's 2009 Commencement Ceremony and released an album in the same year called 'Left Without Paying'. He is a Democrat who has written jokes pro bono for candidates he supports. Feldman is a graduate of Columbia University in NYC and Dwight Morrow High School in Englewood, New Jersey. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Cinematic Sound Radio - Soundtracks, Film, TV and Video Game Music

In today program, it's our 2021 Christmas Special. Before we begin I just want to again personally offer my thanks to the great team here at the CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST.  It's been another tough year for everyone not just here on the network but all over the world. And it's not getting any better. We truly do hope that you are staying safe during these tough times and hopefully the programming here on the CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST has injected a bit of hope and joined into your life during the past 12 months. So a big thanks to, Jason Drury, Eric Silver, Robert Daniels, Randy Andrew, in house composer David Coscina, and Ley Bricknell. And we can't forget about the newest member of the team, J. Blake Fichera, who I've admired for a very long time. I love his SCORED TO DEATH series of books and I'm so proud to have him on the network producing his fantastic horror music-themed program, SCORED TO DEATH RADIO. Last but not least, a big thank you to our long time voice of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO, Tim Burden. And of course, I cannot forget you... the listener! Thank you very much for spending some time with us today! On today's program, six CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST hosts join me again to celebrate the holiday season by playing Christmas themed music from a wide variety of film, TV and video game scores.    Join Robert Daniels from OBSCURE SCORES, Jason Drury from THE ARCHIVE & TALKING SOUNDTRACKS, Ley Bricknell from FILMIC, J. Blake Fichera from SCORED TO DEATH RADIO, Randy Andrew's from THE ANIME SPECTACULAR & SOUNDTRACK ALLEY, the voice of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO, Tim Burden and me, Erik Woods, for our annual Yuletide spectacular. On the show today, you are going to hear a wide variety of Christmas / Holiday / Winter themed music includingA BOY CALLED CHRISTMAS (Marianelli), MIRACLE OF 34th STREET (Broughton), 8-BIT CHRISTMAS (Trapanese), TOKYO GODFATHERS (Suzuki / Moonriders) THE CHRISTMAS MIRACLE OF JONATHAN TOOMEY (Farley), A VISIT FROM SAINT NICHOLAS ("'TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS") (Moore / vocal: Robin Williams) and 3615 CODE PÈRE NOËL (Lalanne). Enjoy! Special thanks to our Patreon supporters: Matt DeWater, David Ballantyne, Mindtrickzz, Joe Wiles, Rich Alves, Maxime, William Welch, Tim Burden, Alan Rogers, Dave Williams, Max Hamulyák, Jeffrey Graebner, Douglas Lacey, Don Mase, Victor Field, Jochen Stolz, Emily Mason, Eric Skroch, Alexander Schiebel, Alphonse Brown, John Link, Andreas Wennmyr, Matt Berretta, Eldaly Morningstar, Elizabeth, Glenn McDorman, Chris Malone, Steve Karpicz & Deniz Çağlar. —— Cinematic Sound Radio is fully licensed to play music by SOCAN. Support us on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/cinematicsoundradio Check out our NEW Cinematic Sound Radio TeePublic Store! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/cinematic-sound-radio Cinematic Sound Radio Web: http://www.cinematicsound.net Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cinsoundradio Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cinematicsound Cinematic Sound Radio Fanfare and Theme by David Coscina https://soundcloud.com/user-970634922 Bumper voice artist: Tim Burden http://www.timburden.com

Tourette's Podcast
Special Episode - The Old Guard - Talking with the Late Steve Bachner

Tourette's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 72:21


The Tourette community lost a hero Dec. 15, someone I named on the very first episode (Season 1, Episode 0) of Tourette's Podcast. Steve Bachner was my first frame of reference for TS. Seeing him on an episode of 20/20 in the late 1980s was my first time seeing someone else with the disorder, and there he was, Steve, being followed by John Stossel and cameras, in a shopping mall, Steve ticcing to the fullest. I remember being a little kid guffawing at people's reactions to Steve, with a least one citizen observer telling the show he assumed he was probably high on drugs. The observer wouldn't have guessed Steve was living with a disorder that throws involuntary sounds and movements. I knew all about it. I met Steve not long after at a national Tourette Association of America (then called the Tourette Syndrome Association) conference and confirmed his heroism to me. Steve was kind, funny, witty, and willing to be talk to me like a human being. I never forgot it. We reconnected after I started Tourette's Podcast in 2018 and always talked about doing an interview. Sadly, Steve's health was declining; scheduling would be hit or miss, with very wide latitude granted to all the rest and recuperation time he needed. But we eventually, in May 2020, found the chance to record. It wasn't our dream interview; it would have been but the phone line was noisy and made listening a challenge. But, after some audio cleanup, and now in Steve's memory, it's here and it covers a lot of amazing ground. This is old-school Tourette Syndrome, with critical cracks at sensational coverage from Stossel, Geraldo, Springer and others who orbited Steve's disorder. They got to know his Tourette (or maybe a thin dimension of it) but did they ever get to know him as a person? (His friend Robin Williams did; Steve describes him here as a "soulmate.") I'm so lucky to have counted him a hero and saddened at his absence now. So this one is dedicated to the loving memory of Steve Bachner.

I Survived Theatre School
Fresh and Fancy

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 70:07


Intro: Amtrak, you can't afford to live anywhere, where am I trying to go?, being of service, Legacy, Fresh and FancyLet Me Run This By You: We get feedback from Dave, talk about Jeff Garlin, NO ONE IS HIDING ANYTHINGCOMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):You didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (31s):Hello survivors. It is Gina. Just wanted to let you know that today, boss and I are guest lists. We are without a guest and we instead had a conversation, just the two of us, chickens about a ton of things, including the fact that nothing is a secret. Even the things that we think are and talking about legacy. This is a topic that boss has been really interested in recently. And I guess I'm starting to get interested in it too. At some point in one's life, one starts to think, Hmm, did it matter that I was here? What did I do? What, what proof or evidence of is there? What I did, or maybe you don't think that way, maybe your legacy is just that you lived a contented and happy life and, and it doesn't matter if it is written in the stars in any way, either way.1 (1m 22s):It's fine with me. Just interesting to learn about what people's philosophies or the thoughts are about legacy. And as we come to this end of the year and we're reflecting on, wow, we're reflecting on, I guess these last two crazy years, hopefully everybody is entering this time of reflection with a lot more clarity. Maybe I think the pandemic has been clarifying among many other things. And so hopefully you're feeling, I don't know, clear, and hopefully you are enjoying this podcast.1 (2m 4s):And if you are enjoying it, you are hopefully subscribed. And if you're subscribed, hopefully you have left us a review. Honestly, I don't even care what the review says. I think just having reviews is the thing that helps us with the king algorithm. And that's important only because we want to be able to keep doing this podcast. We enjoy doing it. We, we get a lot out of it. And we've heard from people that people are getting a lot out of it in return. So it's a mutually great thing that we'll be able to continue. If you are able to put your love for our podcast, not just in your heart, but in the world, tell the public, shout it from the rooftops.1 (2m 47s):I'm not going to stop you from shouting it from the rooftops. I'll tell you that much right now. Anyway, that's all for that. Please enjoy.3 (3m 10s):I'm going to take it to all those places. Cause those are like some of my favorite places in Southern California. And I didn't know that. So I'm learning a lot. And so I took it to San Francisco to Oakland and my cousin picked me up. But what is fantastic and sad about Amtrak for people that don't know? Like nobody knows shit about Amtrak, but Amtrak is a government funded. So rail is government funded. It was supposed to be like the thing of the future. It was supposed to be just rail. We weren't like flying and, and, and, and train travel was supposed to be comparable like it was going to be, but it just like, it has a lot to do. Someone was telling me like w who I met on the Amtrak.3 (3m 51s):Cause you eat in community eating. So these two amazing women that I met told me that like something with world war two and trains, the trains all had to be used for, for like ammunition, like the war Fs. And so then it became less of a, a passenger situation. And then when flying really anyway. So, but it's gorgeous. So w and what you can do is, so I bought a coach ticket, which is literally like, you know, I don't know, 50 bucks, a hundred bucks round trip from, but then you can bid to upgrade your seat because Amtrak has no money.3 (4m 32s):So what you can do is say, okay, well, like I'm willing to pay. They give you a range I'm willing to pay. And I did the lowest $20 more to go to business class, which is like super much nicer. Right. So I bid, and then they said, of course they accepted my bid because it's not a full train. Nobody trained travels by train. And so business classes dope. And it is like, you get two seats. It, they reclined almost all the way. There's, it's just, it's quiet. Like coaches, coaches, loud as hell, where people are eating, like, you know, Funyuns and like Takis chips the whole time. And like, you know, a lot of people like down on their luck and stuff like that.3 (5m 15s):Okay. So, you know, I did business class on the way there and lovely. I mean, there's wifi. I mean, it's like dope. And the bathrooms were relative are clean. I don't in business class anyway. All right. So it literally goes up the coast. And so you, you, you're on the ocean. It's the weirdest thing you're like, this is I'm, I'm traveling right next to the ocean. It's a long time. The whole time. Almost long as hell though. Okay. So like, you know, the flight is 45 minutes from Burbank to, to, to San Francisco. And the train ride is 10 hours. Like, that's just how it is. Like, that's, if you are in a hurry, you do not take the Amtrak.3 (5m 57s):You know what I mean? So there is like, I do have some shame, like, people think I'm ridiculous a little bit. They're like, I'm like, where am I going? I, it's not like I have pressing meetings. I am not. Yeah.1 (6m 9s):And for, for the life, so many of us are living right now, which is working from home or working remotely or making your own schedule. Why shouldn't you it's much better for the environment to take the train. Yeah.3 (6m 23s):It is it, you take the airplane. Yes. So, so it was amazing. And then I had a wonderful, wonderful time in San Francisco. Like I never really liked San Francisco. I don't know what my problem was. Like, I never really got into San Francisco even though like people cause1 (6m 41s):Your mom left you a spree for, oh3 (6m 43s):My God. Yeah. If you listen to this podcast, you know that like, you know, my mom was having an affair and, and, and we went to San Francisco and she literally left my sister and I at the esprit outlet, which thank God, had a restaurant in the outlet for like what felt like forever. But it, it was a work day. It was a full work day at a spree. It was like eight hours. So I just really, in the last couple years have really grown to love the shit out of the bay area. Like I know the tech bros have taken over. I know that you can't afford to live there. Okay. All those things are true. I still, because maybe I'm not from there.3 (7m 23s):I know I'm not so butt hurt about that. Like I, you know, and my aunt and uncle this beautiful, beautiful condo in north beach and my cousin lives in the inner inner Richmond, I don't know. Anyway. So she's on Clement street and it's gorgeous. And I walked everywhere and we went hiking in Moran and we drove to Marin. So I would live there. I would live. I mean, I, you know, who can afford to live there, but here's the thing that I think a lot of us too are, are, are really looking at. Most of us in my circle are like, we, we really literally can't afford to live anywhere. Like the, the world is becoming unaffordable on a, so many ways. And so many levels that the thing of like, oh, it's so expensive in blank.3 (8m 6s):City becomes less sort of exciting or like less sensational because it's like, look around what, what are you talking about? You can't live anywhere. It's all, it's all terrible. So, so all this to say, like, it was, it was a great trip. And then on the way back, I got smart and I was like, okay, well, let me see if I can upgrade to a room. You can bid on rooms on the train, right. Cause it's 10 hours or whatever. And I was like, okay, let me, and they took my bid of, you know, $40 or something to upgrade to a room. And that has all the amazing meals included. So two meals, which lunches, if you just paid for it is 25.3 (8m 49s):Dinner is 45. So I got lunch and dinner free. And I just tipped to the, and it was delicious salmon. I mean like this, and I got my own room and I wrote, and I, I like lived, lived my best life on the train1 (9m 5s):Girl. I need to do this, but I don't live in California. I mean, maybe I'll just pick a, maybe I'll pick it east coast version of that.3 (9m 16s):It doesn't matter. Like you could, you can also take it like they have specials. Like there's apparently a really beautiful ride between DC and New York. So1 (9m 29s):Yeah, no. So I also love or have loved the idea of train travel. And I always really wanted to take, there's a, there's a train that goes somehow through the Rockies. That's the one I really want to go on. But the first time I treated myself to a train trip. Oh, that's right. The worst possible3 (9m 53s):You were pregnant. Right.1 (9m 55s):I was the worst possible route to, we went from Chicago to Texas. So there's nothing to look at. The train was disgusting. It was so dirty and I was pregnant. So my, you know, my sense of smell, which is already very heightened was even, was just off the chain. And as a result of being on that train, I developed3 (10m 24s):Vertigo. I'm like, God, I mean,1 (10m 26s):It was coincidental. I never, we never did figure out what the deal was. But I developed a kind of vertigo when I was pregnant, where I had to crawl on the floor because I couldn't, you know, cause I couldn't walk and thankfully knock on wood that has not returned to me. And it also didn't return to my next two pregnancies, but yet it soured me and us on trains. But I think it's just the route we picked. We need to pick3 (10m 57s):It's the route and yeah, definitely don't have, don't be pregnant, but that's not going to happen for you again. So you don't have to worry about that. But like I'm all done with that. And so I had a great trip and I actually had like these huge realizations while I was there about, about working about money, about the entertainment industry, it was really, it was I, and I went with the intention of really looking at what is it that I'm going for in life? I mean, that's such a huge question, but like what, where am I trying to go? And, and the idea of service, right? So I always thought being of service was about other people, but really what it is for me is being of service in the way that I want to be of service is actually for me, like I didn't realize that I feel is good for my mental, physical, and emotional health when I'm being of service in a way that feels not to pleading, but all, but like really energizing and also like a, like thinking about legacy, I've also been thinking about legacy, like what is my, what is going to be my legacy?3 (12m 12s):And it tied into like, I was really, you know, I spend because the holidays are coming up way too much. It will not wait too much, but a lot of money on my nieces and nephew for Christmas gifts, right? Like thousands of dollars, right. Dish, I love giving gifts. It's my jam. But then I realized that like, and you probably, you know, I'd be so interested to hear what you have to say, but having children, but like a lot of this stuff, I got them, they outgrow, they don't care about very soon is cheaply made and is garbagey. And it has a very, very little lasting effect on their lives. And that's just the truth and I'm not judging it.3 (12m 52s):I'm just saying that seemed, that was the data I was picking up. And I'm like, that's literally like just throwing money away after a while year after year. So there's a, let me get smart about this. So we started a trust for each kid where we put that and I said to that shutter dude, I wish someone had done that for my ass. So I said to them, you can choose, we can keep going the way we're doing with gifts for Christmas and blah, blah, blah. Or you can, we can put donate every year and you could literally get very, very, very few gifts. But your huge gift is that each year we put a certain amount of money. And then basically by the time you're 30, you'll be millionaires.3 (13m 36s):I mean, just because of the way money grows, not even because we're putting that much in. And they were like, what? And so miles really educated me and them on the power of, of the investing money in a way that is with the interest and all that shit. And so that's what we're doing. And I, I got to say like, it tied into this idea of legacy and like, I would watch rather have those kiddos like be able to use it. And it's not like one of these things where they have to use it for college because fuck it, man, not everyone goes to goddamn college right away or ever, but they can't touch it until they're a certain age or they can choose to keep it in there and roll it over to another kind of account or whatever.3 (14m 17s):So, but I'm thinking about this shit differently in terms of legacy based on like, what do I want to leave this earth? Like, do I want to, you know, have, have my legacy be that I gave my, my niece to like a fake Dior ring that turned her finger green or right, right. It's fine. But it's so that's how we started it this Christmas. Cause I was like enough, enough, enough. Yeah. Yeah. Well, what you've just given us here in this conversation is like the center of a1 (14m 51s):Bicycle wheel by the goal wheel. And we have a, there's a bunch of spokes there. There's like talking about what's your purpose in life and where are you going? And there's talking about your legacy and then there's talking about consumption. And then there's talking about instant gratification that we give to kids in the form of gifts. And there's talking about that a lot, the pressures that we put on ourselves on Christmas, I mean just suffice it to say, I have been on the sometimes what feels like the circular journey of, you know, from, I mean, you know, when, when I first had kids, when we first had kids, it was really exciting to give the gifts.1 (15m 33s):It was exciting to create a Christmas that I remember from my childhood, the excitement of coming downstairs3 (15m 40s):And magic magic1 (15m 43s):1000%. And, and that sustained me for the period of time that the kids are literally happy to get whatever the minute it turned. And it turned when the oldest one was not that old. Yeah. I'm going to say like seven. Yeah. Yeah. And he, they had a bunch of presents and they opened everything up. And then he said, is that it? Yeah. And I went, oh damn, we're doing this wrong. We're doing it completely wrong. And so we've had a few Christmases and this is one of them where we're not doing gifts, which is to say, there will be stockings, you know, and maybe one little thing, but we're not doing the multiple presents under the trees.1 (16m 31s):We didn't do multiple Eddy presents for Hanukkah because of exactly what you said, toys is five to 15 minutes of joy for a lifetime, literally a lifetime of trash that I then, then it becomes my job to get rid of organized, find a space for a blood body block. And now the kids are pretty much almost all of them at an age where they don't want any of those things anymore. They want money, they want electronics. They want, so we have the way that we save money for them is not in the, for like Christmas, but that's actually a really good idea.1 (17m 12s):And something going to bring up with my husband and says,3 (17m 15s):Yeah, I mean, for those of us, I think it's a great idea. And also it's so much easier, not easy. Well, I don't know for miles and I don't have kids, so it's not in our face all the time. And we moved away from them. It's a different story when you're in under the same roof with being with children, with beings, small beings that, you know, are you so I, I am very aware that we have like the we're the aunt and uncle to different, it's a different deal. But like we just thought, wait a minute.1 (17m 44s):Yeah. And the thing that you're really after when you give a gift or at least I think is the joy that it brings to the person and, and that's great, but like you're saying most of the time, it's a, it's a very fleeting. And also like you don't want to teach kids that this is the way to direct your joy, right? Like from getting things, right. I'm not saying that that's, that's what you're definitely doing. If you give Christmas present, I'm not saying that. But you know, we just live in this very like consumer oriented culture,3 (18m 17s):The kid's fault. It's nobody's fault. It's a system, it's a systemic situation, but it hit me last. When I really, when I really was like, okay, I want to do this differently. It was last Christmas. My youngest niece wanted and got it is not knocking anyone involved, but it was very clear to me that we, it was really stark about what was going on. She wanted a claw machine, a mini Kalama machine from an arcade that literally just had candy in it, candy bars. And you made this loudest noise you've ever heard, took 10 batteries, 10 big ass batteries.3 (19m 7s):And literally there's candy in it. That's killing us all the sugar and look, you know, whatever. That was the least of my worries. But I was like, this is wait, what?1 (19m 16s):That's interesting. That has me3 (19m 20s):Wait. And it was a, probably a really expensive machine. It's not cheap, but that's what she wanted. My sister got it. And look, I'm not knocking anyone involved, but for me, I was like, it was so, so striking about what was going on. Cause it was so loud and obnoxious.1 (19m 39s):Let me ask you this. What do you remember getting for Christmas? Okay.3 (19m 42s):My favorite thing I ever got, this is so crazy in my life when I was a kid kid was okay. Two things I can tell the first gift that I like went Gaga, Google over was something, it was a makeup kit called fresh and fancy. And it had, it had perfumes. It had, and it was probably, you know, 9 99, 99 at Kmart. But like my sister and I each got one and it, what, what it was, was super fun, super adult, super smelled. So good. And I, there is a picture of me opening it up and in, in my I'm saying fresh and fancy.3 (20m 27s):And then I take the picture.1 (20m 30s):Do you have that picture accessible?3 (20m 33s):Yeah, I think so. I can send it, send it, send1 (20m 36s):It. Yeah.3 (20m 38s):I will send that and to fresh and fancy. Okay. That was number one. And then the second gift I remember as an adult getting that was really moving to was my mother who traveled all the time and who I really sort of labeled as a selfish, kind of a human at times gave my sister and I each a ticket, a plane ticket to go anywhere in the world because she had so many miles. But like the fact that she, she thought about us and the fact that her travel, which as a child brought so much grief to me because she was gone all the time that she was then turning it around and giving my sister and I each a plane ticket to anywhere was really moving to me and also was really abundant and felt like that's awesome.3 (21m 25s):You know, is that when you went to Columbia, that's when I went to Prague by myself for a week and a half, which was insane or two weeks, it was crazy, but1 (21m 34s):Oh yeah,3 (21m 37s):It was in, when I lived in LA, it was a long time ago. So, and I, I, I, it just, so I wish I had gone with somebody else. It was the most lonely, it was beautiful and Prague is crazy and, and fun, but I went alone, but that's like really just indicative of where I was at in my LA life. So it doesn't, that's not shocking to me. What about you? Like, what do you remember being like, oh my God,1 (22m 0s):I got to speak and spell. I, I really, I really coveted speak and spell. And for those of you who don't know a speak and spell is just, would be an app now. And it wouldn't be nearly as fun. This was a self-contained. It was like a really thick version, like a three inch thick version, maybe note or two of an iPad. And it was orange and it had a handle built into the top and it would say a word in a computerized voice, like structure, and then you'd have to spell it. And if you got it right, this is the, so this tells you a lot about my psychology, the high, I got that little sound telling me I spelled something, right.1 (22m 43s):I just felt like I could, I was vanquishing Rome. It was, I felt so powerful that I got a bike one year. That was amazing. And I kind of lip gloss that smelled like root beer.3 (22m 57s):Oh, I know that those1 (22m 59s):Are the things that just like off the top of my head. I remember just falling in love with, and, and being, you know, unequivocally joyful, happy with moments. And that's the thing that you're always after, like for yourself or the people that you love, you want to impart this joy. That's what I was going to get you. Like, you want to impart this joy and then there's this tacit thing about like, you better feel joy from this. At least that's what I find myself, you know, evaluate whether or not this person is feeling joy from it, because that's what I want. I want to give them joy of this present. And then I feel sad if it doesn't work out.3 (23m 38s):Yeah. And, and, and, and, and it, it usually doesn't work out like that only because people aren't mind readers people don't, everyone's different. And Joy's so, so personal. And so, so specific to that person. And it's like, it's just such a setup, but it's also, we keep trying and I'm going to still, I still love giving presents, but I now am like, oh, okay. Can't be for me, like the mass quantity of just, yeah. Crap. Like, it really hit me too. Like I bought one year, my niece was really into Shopkins.3 (24m 19s):Remember, oh yeah. I bought like $200 worth of Shopkins for her.1 (24m 23s): lasted for that year. And then she makes, never picked up shots.3 (24m 29s):Not even the whole year, maybe a month.1 (24m 32s):That's the thing, man. They get, and they get, and I, I, I was going to say, this is especially true for girls, but I'm, I'm going to re revise that because the boys did it too. When they love that thing, it's all they care about. It's their whole world. You know, my daughter said to me all, I, the only thing I want you to get me is just tons and tons of puppets. What's a3 (24m 58s):Pocket.1 (24m 59s):A pocket is a PLA silicone flat toy that has these half hemisphere, a half a hemisphere that you put, like you, it's a satisfying sensation to push it in. And then you flip it over and push it the other way. Shit.3 (25m 24s):What's in that what's in the pocket, like a little creatures,1 (25m 28s):Zero, nothing. It's in the shape of whatever you want it to be in the shape of it's a fidget choice. Essentially. I3 (25m 36s):Understand. It's like an ASMR founding,1 (25m 39s):Totally tile. It doesn't make a sound. It's all about it being tactile. Yeah. And, and, you know, go to the stores and they're everywhere. Puppets. You'll see if you start looking for now, you'll see that they're everywhere. And so that's what she wants. And a half of me completely wants to indulge that wish. And the other half of me says, I'll be throwing these all away in six months. And then I'll feel like an asshole because I spent a bunch of money on something that I knew was a fool's errand.3 (26m 10s):Yeah, I'm right. It's like so hard because they believe they really want it.1 (26m 18s):They really, it's3 (26m 18s):Not, it's not a joke. It's not a, it's not a joke. Like that's their jam.1 (26m 24s):Yeah. So this year we're going skiing for Christmas. That's3 (26m 27s):Our part of New Hampshire.1 (26m 29s):We're going to Vermont. And I think I've told everybody on the podcast I do. That's right.3 (26m 35s):You'd like the ski lodge into, right?1 (26m 38s):Yes ma'am. So I go and I get everybody off in the morning to their little activities and it's as, you know, a huge amount of work, then the gear and the schlepping. So I help everybody get to that. And I get back to my little cozy spot and read and write and just hang out that sound. So I'm really looking forward to it. Yeah. And honestly, that's the thing that people I I'm banking on. Cause this will be the third time we've done a trip instead of presence. And, and these are trips that we still talk about. So I think it is a good investment experiences are a better investment than3 (27m 14s):I absolutely agree. And I feel like that's the trust starting for these kids. It's like, we're gifting them with the experience of maybe like a down payment on a fricking home, a car to get them from here to there a education, like a real thing, like a thing that you need to like live your life versus a fricking fake Cuban Linx chain. I didn't even know what Cuban links were. I didn't know what was happening.1 (27m 42s):I don't know what that3 (27m 42s):Is. What is Cuban links? I oh, those1 (27m 45s):Big, Easy.3 (27m 51s):And it's just ugly. And it's also $6,006,000. What did Jackie about? Oh anyway,1 (27m 59s):I, you, you just did yourself, such a favor. I mean, you did them mostly a favor, but you did yourself such a favor because also the other thing is, you know, I have experienced, I go out shopping and I'm immediately overwhelmed and I'm trying, okay, now this one, I got this,3 (28m 14s):I asked who gets one and did, is it equal? And like,1 (28m 18s):Oh my God, it's just, it's like a, it's a hell3 (28m 33s):I thought we might start out with, I got some feedback on the, okay. So my, on the podcast from, so my, my parents' best friends, Nancy and Dave, they like helped raise me and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And they've really become like second parents. And, you know, they, they hadn't heard the podcast. So they were like, send us an episode. And I said, okay. And you know, it's always tricky because they really know me. They really know my parents. They really know my life in some ways in my childhood. So I was like, well, so I sent them an episode. I sent them the does small ocean Hooga knocker episode because Dave is a therapist and he works with people with addictions.3 (29m 13s):And I thought, oh, that might be interesting. And so the feedback is so interesting. The feedback I got was I'll read it on air because it's good. It's a podcast. Podcasts was good. Felt like a reunion. Sounds like David was deep into self-destruction before he recovered a talented guy was hoping to hear more from you. But that's for selfish reasons. I like how you identified the macro themes in your Roundup at the end. And then I wrote, thank you so much. We're we Gina and I are always aware that like, like, you know, we don't want it just to be us and we don't want to just to be guests.3 (29m 54s):So we're trying to find a mix. So his feedback it's so funny. He liked, he likes to give feedback. You know, if you and Gina are willing to talk about what life experiences brought you to embrace the arts and try and make a decent living, I liked the way you have reconstructed your family life so that you don't have to be an emotional casualty. There's a lot to talk about how you both learn to think from, from psychodynamic and systems orientation. I don't even know what that means. I'm not smart enough. The best stories are the stuff of good soap operas, good screenwriting can teach people how to better understand and navigate within their interpersonal worlds.3 (30m 36s):I'd like to hear another one, if you don't mind the feedback. So Loves our inter you know, he's, he's a therapist, obviously. So he loves that. But it was interesting. I mean, I seriously don't know what half of that means, but like,1 (30m 54s):No, he just means no, he just means like the thing, I mean here, here's this big secret that we've never told anybody, this podcast is not really about theaters. Right. And so what you saying is the, the, the psychodynamic for, you know, background that we have influences and informs our conversation so that we, we think about things dynamic and that's it. And that would be interesting to a therapist. Therapist thinks about things dynamically too. And yeah, I mean, honestly, it there's so much it's, so there's always so much to talk about. There's so much to talk about. Like, and I, well, the thing I, this ties into the thing that I kind of wanted to talk to you about, which is that when we first started recording a podcast, it was not, I survived theater school.1 (31m 44s):We were calling undeniable, right.3 (31m 46s):That's right.1 (31m 47s):And we had about eight, you know, hour long conversations that were about this concept of being undeniable. So I kind of wanted to clarify for people who may not know why is our company called undeniable? Why is not the website? Because when you told the great story about it, we didn't never air that till we did. So, no, because it was, it was for,3 (32m 20s):We never found and they tried to send to you and then it got1 (32m 23s):No, no, no, no, no. I'm just saying like, we recorded those and then we changed our mind about what the3 (32m 29s):Right. Yes. Okay. Yes. That makes sense. Oh, should we tell the story? Yeah. So it's so funny because I wonder if he ever heard this, if he would even remember, you know, it's so funny, like who remembers telling people what? All right. So the story is this. So I, well, first to say that, like you and I were talking about like, what, what is the thing of life? Like, what is again, where I'm at now, which is what are we going after, right. Like, what is the quality of life that I'm going after that you're going after that we're going after as a team. Okay. So it reminded me of this story of I did a solo show and it was called why not me love cancer and Jack White and the woman who was, and it was a solo show basically about cancer and about working for Nick cage and all kinds of things.3 (33m 19s):Just like I surprised theater school is not about theater. School is not really about Jack White, my show, you know, it's whatever. So, okay. So I'm doing this show. And my, the director of my show is this woman named Alison lion. And she happens to be good friends with the comedian and storyteller and actor, Jeff Garlin who I, I didn't know from Adam, like I wasn't a curb, your enthusiasm fan. So I didn't know, but I knew he of him. And I knew he's like a famous guy. Right. So she said, you know, how would you feel about Jeff? Garlin coming to see a dress rehearsal and giving notes. And I was like, oh, sure. Literally being like, oh, a famous person wants to come see my show.3 (34m 0s):That's cool. You know, not like, what can I glean from this artist? You know, just cause that's, that's where my mind went. I would've have been the same. I mean, I just am not mature enough for whatever, so, okay. So I do the, it was, it, it was real nerve and it was an empty house, but him, he and Alison were sitting up there at stage 7 73 on Belmont in Chicago. And so I did the show and whatever, and it was an okay show. I mean, I look, I don't know, but afterwards, if such an interesting story afterwards, he was giving notes to Alison, but not me. And I thought, well, that's weird, but he was really there for her.3 (34m 42s):That was her mentor kind of, you know, her comedy mentor. But then I came out of the house into the house and met and met Jeff and he was lovely. And he said, well, do you want notes? Or somehow it came up like, do I want actor notes? And I was like, of course, which is shocking to me because I never want notes. Right. And I always say, I would love feedback. And by feedback, I mean, compliments, like, that's my . I did say of course, because that's what you say when a fancy person wants to give you notes. And he gave me some great notes, which was stopped swearing so much. And he compared me to Robin Williams, which was amazing.3 (35m 22s):He said, because I could tell he called him by his first name. I do believe he was like, when Robin would swear a lot, I would know that he was, he was, was dying on stage, was off. Yeah. And I was like, that's fascinating or pushing, like I push when I'm swearing. Okay. Great note. I've I've kept that note and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. All right. So then, then I have to tell us, because it's so interesting because I would have done the same thing. So then after he gave notes, which I kind of blacked out some of them, cause it was a lot, but then he, Alison, we're going to go out to eat at clerks on Belmont, but they didn't invite me. Right. And I was like, oh, and then I was in the bathroom and Alison called and she's like, I'm an idiot.3 (36m 5s):I didn't invite you. Do you want to come? And I was like, oh, of course. Yeah. She, and I think what happens is when you're around famous people, you forget, you1 (36m 13s):Lose your census. It's3 (36m 15s):Very weird. It's a weird thing. I think that's what happened for, so we went to Clark's on Belmont and he, we taught he's so what is he? He's he's a generous. No, he's, he's a big personality. So he takes over rooms. Right? So at clerks, he's the center of the show and it is not anything he's doing. It's just, that's how some people are like,1 (36m 42s):He's not trying to lay low. Right. He's3 (36m 45s):Not trying to lay low. And he also loves people I think, and loves human interaction. I mean, from what I know, as we got into this conversation and somehow, and he said, and he said to me, we were talking about acting and we were talking and he said, I'm going to make a movie and you're going to be in it one day. And I said, that's fantastic. I love that. That's great. That sounds great. And then we talked about other stuff and then he said, you know what you are? And I said, what? And he said, you are undeniable. And I was like, what is even happening? And I was like, okay, thanks. Great. He's like, no, no, no. You're undeniable. Like that show is undeniable.3 (37m 26s):And I was like, what does that mean? And he said, well, it just means that like eat exists in its truest form unapologetically. And I'm totally paraphrasing here, of course. But it was like, it exists in its truest form. It's just is you don't have to like it. You don't have to like, you, you don't have to like what you're saying, but there is a quality that cannot be taken away about the show. It's more than unique. It's more than that. It's undeniable. You don't have to like it. You don't have to dislike it, but it, it exists on its own. And it cannot be basically cannot be fucked with in, in, in that way, you know? And I was like, whoa, that is awesome. And that I feel like is what I'm going for in my life.1 (38m 10s):Yeah. And, and when you told the story before you also said that, that he said, you know, be undeniable continue to be undeniable because that, that is ultimately the only thing that lasts in terms of, you know, the industry or whatever. And as long as you're holding true to, you know, your own undeniable truth or whatever, you can, you know, you can't go wrong. It may not mean that you, whatever, get fame and fortune, but, but you'll be doing, you'll be on the right track.3 (38m 40s):You won't be led astray by your undeniable city. Like you, you won't be, it won't be, you won't go in the wrong direction for too long. If you use an deniability as your north star kind of a thing. And it really, and he, he later told Alison, you know, she's, you know, he kept reiterating like she's undeniable, she's undeniable. And he, and Alison had told me, and I, of course, because, you know, I just figure people say that about everybody analysis and no, he does not do that. And also he stands by his word. So you will one day be in a movie with Jeff Garlin and I was like, cool, great. That's fine. But I it's interesting looking back on the story, it's like, I wish everyone is so scared.3 (39m 24s):Like I wish that I would have used those quotes in my press, but Alison didn't want to use them because she felt she was already asking too. We're all, we always feel like we're asking too much. So she felt that she, she was asking too much just having him come to the show and having him give notes was enough and having him. And I remember at the time I had a musician as part of the show, you know, his name is Philip Michael scales. He's amazing. And he was like, we should totally use Garland's quotes to get more people to come to the show and both Alison and I, it's interesting, both Alex and I were like, oh no, no, no, no, like he's done enough.3 (40m 4s):You know, it's just so1 (40m 5s):Like, yeah. Like, and all I'll do to Alison I would've made probably the same choice, but you know, it's like, what are we so afraid of? What skin is it off of his nose? If you say that he said something that he said, you know what I mean? It's not like his reputation is living or dying on your show. It's just,3 (40m 25s):I mean, yeah. I would have done the same thing too. And I1 (40m 30s):That's the mentality that we've talked about so much on here, and it's definitely true for Hollywood entertainment, whatever, but it may also just be true for life that we kind of inherently have this idea that there's a finite pie. Sure. And you know, it's kind of like the people who think that only whatever 7,000 people are going to heaven, you know, what kind of cockamamie thing is that like you believe in heaven, you believe that all of this is God's plan and that people have been alive for millions of years and yet only 7,000 feet. Right. That to me is like a perfect evidence of the way in which we make ourselves and our, and the possibility so much smaller than they need to be.1 (41m 15s):Yes. So you think there's a finite amount of pie and you say, well, I can't take my one, one thousandths of a sliver, you know, that's Jeff Garlin because then there won't be any Jeff Garlin left. Like that's just simply not how it works. It's just simply, you know, anyway, the reason I said generous is because, I mean, you know, whatever, he has a friendship with her, but, but offering the feedback to you and then offering this truth about identifying your and deniability, which I'm guessing was one is one of the things that you carry with you. Okay.3 (41m 53s):Yeah. I mean, I do think, I do think that he's, that that was very generous of him. Like, and, and I do think that he and I do carry it with me and, and it obviously had an effect on me because I tell the story and because, you know, we, that you and I started a whole company around the idea of being undeniable, but like, and yeah, it, it really was like an affirmation, right. To just fucking pick a side already, like, like take a stand, like do something like th th th the gold boldly in one direction, because this sort of, this sort of, wishy-washy trying to please everybody, it, it, it not only does it not, it's not, it's a totally unpleasant, it actually doesn't work for the thing that you think you want.3 (42m 45s):Like, if you want notoriety power, fame, fortune, you have to pick a side at some point. Okay. But if you also want to feel good and be led, like we're saying by your north star, you could, you could use your, and deniability as a north star to eventually mean that sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly to get to a place where you really feel like you're doing right by yourself. If you follow your undeniable, whatever that means to you. So, yeah, he changed my life. Like that changed my life. I mean, the show did the sh you know, looking back on the show, I spent so much money. I would say, like, to be, if I'm completely honest, it was like a $25,000 investment I made over from 2012 to 2015 or whatever.3 (43m 31s):And, and I didn't bring in one dime, you know, I didn't make, make a dime, but it was, I would've done things differently, but I still I'm glad I did it. And, and that's one of the reasons stories. And one of the reasons I'm glad I did it was because I learned that lesson about being undeniable from Jeff Garlin. And yeah,1 (43m 55s):I don't think he went to theater school, but he needs to come on the podcast, you know, tell him that and, and, and hear more about his, his thoughts about, and deniability. So, so that you have shared that story with me, which really even moved me. I mean, it's, it's affected me. And then we linked it to this crooked, let's say path that we made, where we were pursuing this creative, creative career. And then we couldn't pursue it because we needed to make money. And we thought it would be okay to do else. And ultimately wasn't. And so the creative urge or whatever is undeniable in us.1 (44m 39s):And we're basically having to listen to it instead of, you know, pushing it away. And, and we also have a belief that many, many, many people are in that exact same position at this age in life, they were pursuing something. It wasn't financially viable. They had to do something else. And that when, what we're talking to a lot of people about these days is I think a lot of people who come on the podcast are reckoning with that question. Whether it be when we ask them to come on or while we're having the conversation or in the time after.1 (45m 21s):And we hear a variety of things from, from, you know, genuine like bridge equipment is a good example of somebody who went and did something else. And I think she found her thing. Yeah. I feel like therapy. She found the right thing for her. Yeah.3 (45m 37s):And she's now taking classes again, though. Acting classes, remember? Cause she wrote us.1 (45m 43s):Oh, that's right. Okay. Well, all right. So maybe, so maybe so maybe everybody, but what, we also talked to, a lot of people who I feel are trying to convince themselves, us, that they have moved on and you know, what, if that's true for you, I don't want to take that away from anybody, but it's hard for me to believe that's true for as many people as say it is true because if you, right, if you just, if you have, if you're born with this desire to express, and then you don't exp and you don't do it, it doesn't go away. And,3 (46m 19s):And here's the kicker too, is like the secret Willie, we can let everybody in a secret that you and I, because of our childhoods. And then on top of the childhood, the training that we received as actors, and then on top of that, the training we received as clinicians, we are able, here's the secret. We can see things in you that you may not be able to see in yourself or that you think you're hiding. Like that is just the secret.1 (46m 45s):And, and I'll say as a person who is fully does this all the time, nobody's hiding anything. I'm sorry to inform you. Nobody, you whoever's walking around. They're saying nobody knows that I, blah, blah, blah. Right? Yes, they do. I mean, they may not say it to you. They may not even have that thought in the front of their mind to everybody does truly know everything. And you're only kidding yourself, right? To, to hide behind, you know, dishonesty,3 (47m 20s):You're kidding yourself that you were hiding it and you're kidding yourself that other people can't see it. And you're kidding yourself that it's working for to hide it. But it's easier said than done to not hide it. I'm not saying coming out, coming clean about your truth is easy at all. But I just want to say like, cause people always ask like, and I, I run up against this a lot in Hollywood of like, how could you tell that? Like, so-and-so really, didn't like this script. I'm like, dude, body language. Blahbity blah, blah. And they're like, I didn't get that.3 (48m 0s):I'm like, dude, you just have to like, I have training. But also you just have to really, I always say this, but like you have to be sort of a neglected child that then decided that people pleasing was the way to freedom. Then learn that that is actually not true. But then use those skills to actually be like an emotional detective for other people. It's a whole process, but you could do it if you spent enough time, but I can tell like I can, I even at coworking, like I'm going to soundproof booth. So no one could hear me. But like I, I spent five minutes with somebody and I'm like, oh my God, they hate themselves. They hate themselves a passion they're pretending not to, but they hate themselves.3 (48m 42s):And that is unfortunate because I know they have redeeming qualities. I haven't talked to them for more than five minutes. So I don't know what that is. And I don't want to talk to them for more than five minutes because I'm not their therapist or friend, but I get it. I get it. It is a super power that I think people who really have trauma and then have chosen to work through the trauma. It's a super power that we have that we can, and it's also can be a burden, like any superpower to really see what the fuck is going on with people and call it out if need be. But we don't always call it out because it's not our job.3 (49m 23s):And you know, that is something we run into on this podcast too. It's like, there are times on the podcast where I want to be like, you know, this is just full transparency where I want to be like, you're full of shit. You're full of shit. Totally terrible. You, you, you hate blahbity blah, but you don't want to tell us you hate blabbity, blah. And I understand that because I've been in the same boat and I still am in the same boat, but just know that if you come on this podcast that it kind of behooves you to just tell the truth because what? Yeah. We all see it anyway. Right, right. We just do. We all see it anyway. Yeah. In your voice, we don't even have to look at your face.3 (50m 3s):Here's the other thing about human experience? So people think, I think because it's a podcast and it's not, we don't air the video that like, they can also hide shit. Well, your voice and the, and the PA I mean, I'm giving away all the secrets here, but there are no real secrets. Like the pauses in between watching the next person we have come on is gonna be like, okay, anyway. So I feel really bad about everything in my life. And I put the pauses, the pauses in between questions and answers. It's all part of the deal. And so I just encourage people. Like, I want you to come on this podcast and feel like you can, that you you're able to be undeniable and FYI on deniability does not mean everything is great about you.3 (50m 48s):Right? Like it doesn't mean, it just means that you're telling the truth about who you are. Good, bad, ugly, weird.1 (50m 56s):Yeah. You, you could be an undeniable asshole. There's no, it's a, it doesn't have a necessarily positive connotation, but you know, if you are an asshole and you're, well, that's not a good example. If you are, if you hate yourself, let's say that's a good example. If you hate yourself, you know, you're never going to get to a place where you don't hate yourself by pretending that you don't hate yourself. You have to start with the idea that, okay, here's what I'm up against right now. Hearn's out. I really hate myself. And you know, and I'm going to have to get real about that before I can, because how could you begin to interrogate a problem that you haven't named at all? That's like, that's like, you know, getting, I don't know that to the end of a math problem without having like what the3 (51m 43s):She's learning a new language without studying one minute of the language in your life. It doesn't, it's not possible. I mean, you might get one word. Right. But by luck. But1 (51m 55s):Yeah. And my thing, and I think this is your thing too in life is just encouraging people and the reason, and I understand why people want to lie to themselves about it because it's painful or because you don't want to be a person who hates yourself. You don't want to be a person who feels unfulfilled by career traces. I get that. But, but it's like that, that you are unfulfilled or you are that you just haven't done the work of accepting.3 (52m 23s):Right. And I, and I, I definitely feel like for me, the turning point, literally in my life had to, had to do with, when I had a physical problem with my heart, where I was like, oh, this is what is happening. I haven't taken care of my body for whatever reason. Not because I'm a bad person, but because I've always shit going on and all these issues and hereditary, but I haven't done the work to, to look at this. And so now it's coming, it's now it's, it's, it's a problem. And, and, and when you're laying in the hospitals hooked up to machines and you and people are telling you, it's a problem that are trained specifically in this problem.3 (53m 7s):And you finally are faced with, oh, either I'm going to believe this or not, and acknowledge it or not. And I just was like, okay, I acknowledge it. I need to lose weight. I need to move my body and I need to eat less shitty foods and okay. That's it. It's in my face. It's in my face. It's in my face. I'm the1 (53m 25s):Hospital. Yeah. My, my wish for it to be something other than it isn't has, it helped me to have it be something other than it isn't. But my, my courage, if, if you can summon the courage to face it, then it might actually be different. So the other thing that you were talking about before was legacy, and that is, that has been a theme in my life recently too, because, you know, I realized after my sister died, like it's all over for her. I, you know how a lot of times when people die, then people will go on their Facebook account and like, write these messages to them.1 (54m 16s):You know, I miss you, blah, blah, blah. No, nobody did that on my sister's Facebook page. Nobody and no, nobody and her kids, you know, who are too young, really to use Facebook there that's because it's an old person's thing, but they have Facebook accounts and they had each written something about their mom when she died. And periodically, I checked back in to see like, what the comments are at for first of all, I don't know, 95% of the people who were making the comments, cause I haven't been in their lives, but it really ended like a few, you know, a few days after she died, it ended.1 (54m 58s):And I just thought, wow, man, there's just no trace of this first. God, I don't like that. There's yeah. It's it's really unsettling. And so recently we came in to possession of unpublished manuscript that Aaron's grandfather wrote on which sirens grandfather, his dad's dad. Okay. Aaron's grandfather was a, you know, hardcore Chicago in, he was a tool and die maker. He worked in one of these factories where whenever there was factories in Chicago and he retired when he was 70, 70 or 75 and went back and went to college and he was the oldest graduate from Roosevelt university where I teach by the way weird.1 (55m 58s):Yeah. And he was a writer and a poet and he wrote a book. Now, dear listeners, I regret to inform you. It's not a great book. You know, he could have used an editor. I'm sure. And, but it doesn't matter. The point is we receive this cream and a half of paper that's wrapped up in like a grocery bag and bound with string and it hasn't been touched3 (56m 34s):How'd you get it? How'd you get it?1 (56m 37s):His mom had it. And she sent him a bunch of stuff in that, and that was in there. So we opened it up and, and I thought to myself, okay, this is fascinating because one of the things that I think compels people to write is a desire to leave some kind of an imprint. And I'm curious how other people think or don't think or feel, or don't feel about their legacy. I mean, I guess people do it in other ways you get really rich and you name a building after yourself or by the way, they took the Sackler name off the mat. Finally they took the Sackler name off the met. Yes. And oh God.1 (57m 18s):Yes. That's a whole other thing. Watch dope. Sick with John who can aprons really good. Yeah. Anyway, people do use philanthropy. I mean, it kind of seems like, unless you're in the arts or rich, how do you have a legacy? What's your, what is,3 (57m 33s):This is a great freaking question. Like this is the question that I really been thinking about in my brain. And I, I think I have the answer for me, but I'm not exactly sure. So, all right. So I love to teach, but I love to teach a very specific population. It's a population that is underrepresented in colleges. So I I'm trying to narrow down like what I want to do with my life basically. And I think I want, I know I want to be a writer, but I was like, okay. But my realtor says I have to make 80 to a hundred thousand dollars if I want a house in California.3 (58m 17s):Okay. And I'm tired of sitting around, waiting for Hollywood to discover me. Okay. Fine. And us. So what do I do? Okay, fine. So then I've been teaching right at Roosevelt and other places and I love it. I love the 1819 year olds. Okay. Fine. I love teaching acting. I don't know. I feel like I don't really know shit about acting, but I know I do when it's mixed with psychology. Does that make sense? Okay.1 (58m 44s):A hundred percent then the other3 (58m 45s):Day I was like, and then I was like, okay, but I don't want to teach at a fancy conservatory. Like I don't, that's just, I just don't. So I was like, all right. All right. All right. So then someone sent me a listing to teach a community college, making a $90,000 a year. Community colleges paid better than a lot of colleges. And so I'm applying to teach first year actors at a community college in Glendale. And I don't know, and I don't know, and I actually think it's going to make my writing. And I think it's going to make me hustle in a different way. I don't know if I'll get the job, but I gotta say my legacy might be, cause I thought, okay.3 (59m 30s):At first I thought my legacy was going to be, and we could track it with the podcast. Right. Like I thought my legacy was going to be famous actor even though like, I don't know if that's, that is a legacy like Brando and you know, that's a legacy. That's what I thought. I thought, oh, that'll be my legacy. I'll be fancy, famous lady. Okay, fine. That did not happen. Then I thought, okay, my legacy is going to be that I'm a very sort of famous PR prolific addictions counselor, like at a social service agency. Yeah. That's going to be my legacy, but that's what I thought, like, that's my mark. That's where I'm going to leave my mark. That did not happen. Then I thought, okay, I'm going to be again, a famous actor, but maybe a solo artist. Right.3 (1h 0m 10s):And, and then, and then a screenwriter and I'll get really famous as a television writer, which still could happen. But I was like, I'm not sure that is the flavor of legacy that we're talking. I'm talking about here in terms of service, right. Service. What I want is to teach, I could teach 18, 19 year olds tangible skills that they can use then and move on in their lives and then teach their kids. Like, like that seems more in alignment with what I'm talking about in terms of legacy than just fancy screenwriter.3 (1h 0m 50s):That makes a lot of money. So, yeah.1 (1h 0m 53s):Yeah, because actually I was just having this thought yesterday, if I was ever given an award that was related in any way to theater, the first person I would think is my junior high acting teacher and teachers truly do leave some of the biggest, like good and bad. Some of the biggest legacies. I remember every single teacher I've ever had. Yeah. And w I mean, I mostly remember the ones who were really good or really bad, but they, I can think of five people off the top of my head who should be canonized as saints, because really Mrs. McDaniels, you were a prima ballerina who ended up teaching math in junior high.1 (1h 1m 37s):And you know what she did, she knew that I had just a, I was having a really hard time in junior high. And she invited me to eat lunch in her classroom every day, because I think she was at a Mexican, she didn't eat. And so she could go over the math with me cause I was having a hard time getting it. And I was just having a hard time. Sure. In general, this is seventh grade. And she provided all under the guise of teaching me math. Of course she gave me mentorship. She gave me attention. She showed me love.1 (1h 2m 19s):Right. Like what's3 (1h 2m 20s):What more could you ask for legacy I'm looking for? I'm not, I decided like, especially during COVID times, I've really been thinking, I think a lot of us have about like, what is obviously important, but also what is lasting and what is, and I thought, yeah. Okay. So, so I don't have a desire to like go into the classroom and teach, you know, I don't wanna teach psychology. I don't want to teach, but I was like maybe. And the thing that like the community colleges in California in Southern California, like I believe Pasadena city college and Glendale community college are two of the best community colleges in the country. So I'm like, okay.3 (1h 3m 0s):And it's cheap to go there. And it's a bunch of different kinds of learners and it's not just white kids that are like, I'm fucking going to be the next, I don't know whoever it's like kids that actually want to learn. And I, I mean, look, there's going to be some real assholes in there. I know it. But like I thought, oh, okay. Like also I really, really need a house with a yard. And I don't know how, I don't want to do it by, by getting an office job that I'm gonna die at. And I, and I, and then try to write on top of that.3 (1h 3m 45s):So like, I really need more space. And we were looking at houses and this all really was, was sparked by talking to a realtor, a really great realtor who also was like a very therapeutic and his approach. And he was like, listen, do you want a house in California? Yes. Okay. Do you want a two bedroom, two bath? Yes. This is how much money you each need to bring in a year. And this is how much your down payment is going to be act accordingly. He just told me that like, it's not,1 (1h 4m 16s):It's not a mystery. It's not an unknowable path. It's just like, no, no, no.3 (1h 4m 22s):It's very clear. And he was very loving, but he was also like, you, you piecemealing the piecemealing, your salary together is not going to work for this. And I was like, and I, I needed him to say that too, to know that like, it's time for me to bring in a decent amount of money. Now, if it comes, if it, if, if, if somehow it comes from your mind getting a television show or our documentary taking off. Great. But like, in the meantime, I need to feel like I am, I am not just piecemealing my shit together.1 (1h 5m 8s):Right. Because in addition to all the other things we've mentioned, you have a lot other needs that are undeniable and it is much your responsibility to meet those needs your, your need to have, you know, your own space. You need to have address, you know, that's as important to listen to as anything else.3 (1h 5m 27s):I had no idea. Like I just thought it's interesting. I, I thought that I did not have those needs. Like I thought, who cares where you live literally. I mean, I've moved 15 times. So it's like, who cares if you live in a one bedroom with two people and a dog, I care. I care a lot now I really care. And it's really, really important to me to be out. So having an outside space,1 (1h 5m 55s):And what I hear in this for you is a shift from what does it look like to other people to, what does it feel like inside of me? And it was always more important,3 (1h 6m 8s):More important. And it's also super interesting. And I think we run up against this all the time. People think that they're like, oh, you're not going to be an actor anymore. Like you're not going to audition anymore. And I'm like, I don't think so. It's not like it's like I had the other night. I had the experience. So I get off the train right at eight o'clock the day before I got an audition from my agent for self-tape for a show in Chicago, that's a procedural show, you know, and that everyone auditions for in Chicago. And I got a self-tape quick turnaround. I had to get off and I chose to, I got off the train, dropped my stuff, picked up.3 (1h 6m 50s):My friend came to coworking and was up til midnight filming this scene. It's not a good scene. I'm not good. I'm not good in the scene because I don't, I'm, I'm not, I was having trouble memorizing because it's late at night. And then, and then I turned to my friend and I just said, you know, and, and I'm not paid, obviously we're not paid for the audition. If I book it, I have to go to Chicago on my own dime, stay in a hotel on my own, or place my own plane fare. I hate to fly to do this thing. That's going to terrorize me on set for a day to make $900.3 (1h 7m 32s):What the fuck am I doing? So I turned to my friend and I just said, who was nice enough to stay up with me till midnight, taping this in the fucking coworking space. I turned to her and I said, I don't want to do this anymore. And she said, okay. And she said, okay. I mean, she doesn't give a shit. She's a writer. She's not an actor. She doesn't, but she's like, okay. And I was like, yeah, this is no, no, no, it's not. That is not my legacy.1 (1h 8m 0s):Right.3 (1h 8m 1s):So it's very clear. So now I'm going to, I'm just, I'm not, I'm having calling my agents1 (1h 8m 8s):And you can't know until, you know, I mean, like that reality couldn't hit you until it did. I'm like, no, so yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, good for you. I mean, part of life is figuring out what it's not, and as much as it is figuring out what it is. Yeah. So4 (1h 8m 34s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable in production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina Culichi for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you. 

The Black Wine Guy Experience
Who's That Girl? Brooke Sabel… International Woman of Mystery.

The Black Wine Guy Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 89:01


MJ's guest is a cellar's worth of degrees and experiences in wine, and service, and is currently the wine director of Gary's Wine and Marketplace, please welcome Brooke Sabel. Brooke has been featured in Real Simple Magazine, Travel + Leisure Magazine, Forbes Magazine, CondeNast Traveler Magazine, SOMM Journal and More! Along with the James Beard Foundation, Brooke has participated in Star Chefs Somm Slam, New Jersey Wine & Food Festival and is one of sommelier luminaries for Nantucket Wine & Food Festival. Brooke was Assistant Wine Director for Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa where she developed wine lists for culinary masters Bobby Flay, Wolfgang Puck, and Michael Mina. Brooke also developed a wine program for Sir Richard Branson and New Jersey developer Bob Wojtowicz to develop the wine program at Natirar and its award-winning restaurant Ninety Acres, where she held the position of opening Wine Director. It was her focus on sustainable, organic, biodynamic and small-production wines that garnered high accolades amongst her peers and the press.On this episode, MJ and Brooke pull back the curtain on what's nothing less than an amazing career that started in college! Brooke dishes on her initial foray into wine during a wine class; leaving a potentially lucrative job with the PGA Tour to drink and eat her way through Spain with her class; being recruited to Borgata after just 3 months with 56 Degrees Wine where she worked as the top Sommelier working alongside Bobby Flay (and one particular special night, where he never let her out of his sight again!). Phone call, after phone call, changed Brooke's career path again and again, and each time, for the better. From Sir Richard Branson to Robin Williams and Billy Crystal - Life doesn't get much sweeter than this, Kid. Grab a long stem and a cabernet sauvignon, and get ready for a good time. A huge thank you to Brooke Sabel! Follow her on IG at @brookesabelFollow Gary's Wine and Marketplace @garys_wineGet more of Gary's Wine at garyswine.com This episode's in studio wine:1989 Corison Cabernet Sauvignon______________________________________________________________Until next time, cheers to the mavericks, philosophers, deep thinkers, and wine drinkers! Don't forget to subscribe and be sure to give The Black Wine Guy Experience a five-star review on whichever platform you listen to.For insider info from MJ and exclusive content from the show sign up at Blackwineguy.comFollow MJ @blackwineguy Thank you to our sponsor: Paso Robles Wine Country. Paso Robles is a region with so many diverse microclimates that allows for a stunning array of grapes to thrive in. It's made up of over 200 family-owned wineries, making a beautiful variety of wines. Learn more at https://pasowine.com/Tune in to their podcast Where the Wine Takes You - which explores the people, places and wines of Paso Robles Wine Country! https://pasowine.com/where-wine-takes-you/ Love this podcast? Love the cool content? Get a producer like mine by reaching out to the badass team at Necessary Media. www.necessarymediaproductions.com@necessary_media_ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Radio Flyer
Show 34: Jeff Garcia

Radio Flyer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 60:15


Comedian and actor Jeff Garcia, born and braised in La Puente has been doing comedy since he was 15 years old! Early ambitions and natural talent emanated into a resume which includes voice acting in Happy Feet, Rio, Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius and to this day performs and tours live doing standup all over the world. On this episode, he wastes no time getting into his experience working with comedy legend Robin Williams and why he, to this day, holds Robin in high regard and can further attest to his legendary legacy. Oh, and how his ex wife got a piece of Robin too. I'll let Jeff explain... He's made the city of La Puente proud. He's made audiences laugh all over the world. And now, he's here in Rancho Cucamonga, to hang with us. Jeff Garcia is tonight's main course. And yes, he has all the sizzle and plenty of bite.

First Class Fatherhood
#570 Brad Williams

First Class Fatherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 38:27


Episode 570 Brad Williams is a First Class Father and Stand-up Comedian. Brad has become one of the funniest, most in-demand comedians working today. He has appeared on numerous TV shows including the Tonight Show & Jimmy Kimmel Live. His one hour comedy special “Fun Size” was the highest rated comedy special on Showtime in the year 2015. A year later, he followed it up with a 2nd special called “Daddy Issues,” its airing prompted the New York Times to write “no one is doing it more hilariously than Brad Williams.” Brad's show is high energy. Robin Williams called him “Prozac with a head.” Brad's ability to make humorous observations on disability, relationships, sex, and race are winning over audiences and proving anyone can overcome their shortcomings. In this Episode, Brad shares his Fatherhood journey which includes a 23-month old daughter. He discusses the cancel-culture facing comedians today and how he approaches it. He describes some of his parenting fears as a Little Person Dad. He talks about some of the challenges growing up as a Little Person and why his daughter will be well equipped to handle herself. He tells us about his plans for 2022. He offers some great advice for new or about to be Dads and more! Brad Williams - https://www.bradwilliamscomedy.com Subscribe to First Class Fatherhood and watch on YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCD6cjYptutjJWYlM0Kk6cQ?sub_confirmation=1 SPONSORS: SeatGeek - https://seatgeek.com Promo Code: FirstClass Save: $20 off tickets MY PILLOW - https://www.mypillow.com Promo Code: Fatherhood Save Up To 66% Off 1-800-875-0219 More Ways To Listen - https://linktr.ee/alec_lace Follow me on instagram - https://instagram.com/alec_lace?igshid=ebfecg0yvbap For information about becoming a Sponsor of First Class Fatherhood please hit me with an email: FirstClassFatherhood@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alec-lace/support

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast
TPM Episode 257: Zach Crist, Pro Skier

The Powell Movement Action Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 67:09


Zach Crist may have the most complete ski career of any athlete  I've had on the podcast--other than his older brother Reggie. Coming up in Sun Valley, Zach achieved his goal of making the US Team, but it wasn't all the glory that it sounded like and after a second knee injury and retirement, Zach started collecting X-Games medals.  From there he became a guide, went to AK to film, invested in some ski related real estate and we talk about the high's the lows, and the tragedies and triumphs on the podcast. Zach Crist Show Notes: 3:30:  Busy life, kids, and DuPont 9:00:  Moving to Sun Valley at 6, skiing every day, mountain town problems, and his ski crew 13:30:  Skiing gets serious, the path to greatness, being small, making the US Ski Team, not partying, and always being late 21:00:  Stanley:  Get 30% off site wide with the code drinkfast Peter Glenn Ski and Sports:  Over 60 years of getting you out there 10 Barrel Brewery:  Buy their beers, they support action sports more than anyone 23:30:  Breaking down the race world, his race results, the disappointment of being a racer, and getting along with his brother as a racer 28:30:  His worst crash, leaving a loser every week, and chemicals on the course 33:00:  Rahlves, being elite, why ski racing athletes are unique, losing Bret Samus in a ski accident and Retiring from the US Ski Team,   41:00:  Dragon:  Get new goggles and really see the mountain use the code Powell15 to save 15% Alpine Vans:  Upgrade your adventure, Upgrade your life Elan Skis:  Over 75 years of innovation that makes you better 43 :00:  An unfair advantage in Skier Cross, X Games medals, and why the sport disappears in the US 47:00:  Money, The Ski Tour, skiing with Jann Winter and Robin Williams, and buying Smiley Creek Lodge 55:00:  Inappropriate Questions with Daron Rahlves

Alison Rosen Is Your New Best Friend

Comic, writer, and activist Lizz Winstead (host of Feminist Buzzkills, co-creator of The Daily Show) returns to the show to talk about Abortion Access Front, fake clinics, growing up in a religious conservative house, what's happening with Roe and why the recent Mississipi ruling is important, incels, working as a clinic escort, why this cause is so important to her, creating the Daily Show, her new pup, living with Dana Gould, Robin Williams and more. We also took your questions and did a round of Just Me Or Everyone. Products I Use/Recommend/Love: http://amazon.com/shop/alisonrosen Check us out on Patreon: http://patreon.com/alisonrosen Buy Alison's Book: Tropical Attire Encouraged (and Other Phrases That Scare Me)  https://amzn.to/2JuOqcd You probably need to buy the HGFY ringtone! https://www.alisonrosen.com/store/

Buzzin' Biographies
Robin Williams

Buzzin' Biographies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 61:51


Paz and Slavo travel go through the incredible life of Robin Williams. Listen in for Robin's life story, and be prepared for meandering conversation. Enjoy!

Soundtrack Alley
134: Hook

Soundtrack Alley

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 136:57


Let it be known that as having a guest on my show, Jenn from the Shake the Sheets podcast is guesting on my show today as we discuss Hook from 1991. We discuss some great tidbits on the film itself with background on the cast like the late Robin Williams, Dustin Hoffman and the late Bob Hoskins. We also discuss some on the special effects and makeup in the film. The prime reason is for the score by John Williams. This is an episode that should not be missed. Listen and enjoy!

A F*ckup's Guide To Self-Help
Robin Williams, Ram Dass, and God

A F*ckup's Guide To Self-Help

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 89:06


SUCH A GOOD EPISODE. Will also help walk you back from panic attacks!   Sitaram Dass spent several years serving his beloved teacher Ram Dass on Maui, where he was shown the path of Bhakti, the yoga of service and devotion to God. He is the director of the Sacred Community Project and a member of the kirtan group Kripa, where he works to lower the barriers of access to contemplative and devotional practices through affordable, free, and donation-based offerings, one-on-one spiritual support, and prison outreach. His new book, From and for God, is an intimate and contemplative collection of writings on the spiritual path. Learn more about Sitaram Dass at: sitaramdass.com   Sacred Community Project: https://sacredcommunityproject.org Sitaram Dass: https://sitaramdass.com

OTwithOliver
Scott Edwards- Author-20 Questions Answered About Being a Stand-up Comic/ Let's talk about owning comedy stores in the early '80s

OTwithOliver

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 62:18


Scott Edwards, what did we learn:Opened 12th EVER USA Comedy Store in 1980.Best Tom Hanks Bosom Buddies story I've heard.Behind the scenes with Seinfeld, Robin Williams, Jay Leno, Dana Carvey and more.He's got a book if you want to be a comedian.

Music Is Funny
David Lee Roth, Doug Stanhope, and Driving Greg Giraldo w/Mark Riccadonna- episode #41

Music Is Funny

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 67:38


Impersonating David Lee Roth while in diapers, booking a NYC comedy club at 19, watching a pre-famous Bill Burr and Marc Maron, witnessing Robin Williams, Jerry Seinfeld and Chris Rock working out material, talking to George Carlin on the phone, touring with Greg Giraldo, writing for Weekend Update on SNL, creating scripts, directing plays, doing TV pilots, finding a Johnny Cash photo album in the trash, and oh so much more! Check out our chat with the hilarious Mark Riccadonna. •Mark Riccadonna•https://markriccadonna.comInstagram: @markriccadonnaTwitter: @markriccadonnaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/markriccadonna#markriccadonna #musicisfunnypodcastSubscribe and Like here, too: ✨

Roll The Credits
Robin Williams

Roll The Credits

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 63:42


Ryan and Tina talk about getting ready for the holiday's and get to discuss one of the greatest people this world has gotten the pleasure to see, Robin Williams. Both Ryan and Tina watched classic movies that they somehow both missed growing up. They talk most impactful teachers growing up, how smart they think they are and if their friends would agree, weird rodent stories and more! A great episode you don't want to miss. And the Holiday special episode releases next week! Ryan: 3, Tina:1

The Wedding Biz - Behind the Scenes of the Wedding Business
Episode 392 MEG SMITH: Photography As A Life's Work

The Wedding Biz - Behind the Scenes of the Wedding Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 33:45


Meg Smith of Meg Smith Photography joins Andy in this episode to talk about her photography! Meg has done photography for celebrity weddings such as those of Anne Hathaway, Jimmy Kimmel, Governor of California Gavin Newsom, LeAnn Rimes, and the late Robin Williams. She has also photographed engagements for Christina Aguilera and Nicole Richie. Meg is a frequent contributor to Martha Stewart Weddings, Town & Country, and InStyle Magazine, and her photographs have also been featured in many other publications such as The New York Times, Vogue, and Glamour. Her images have also graced covers and been featured in books including, but not limited to, InStyle Weddings and Vera Wang on Weddings! Meg dives into so many interesting topics such as how, early in her career, she photographed riots and protests such as the Gulf War riots and Take Back the Night. She discusses how she really wanted to be a part of history in those ways and how they are examples of photography being found rather than created, as she is interested in authenticity and integrity. She also talks about framing and lighting, what the most difficult part of her job is, how she handles nerves, the importance of knowing who you are and finding contentment, and so much more! Andy had such a fun time talking to Meg about all things her photography and appreciates her willingness to be so open and vulnerable in this interview. He really hopes that you also enjoy your time listening to the conversation and encourages you to check Meg out on her website and on her Instagram page! Until the next episode of The Wedding Biz, please share this interview with at least three good friends and/or colleagues who might also benefit from and/or enjoy it, and leave a review of the podcast wherever you listen! Have you heard about the brand new show on The Wedding Biz Network, Stop and Smell the Roses with Preston Bailey? Listen as Preston shares the secrets, tools, and technologies behind his extraordinary ability to create a theatrical environment out of any space. Also, don't forget about Sean Low's podcast The Business of Being Creative, where Sean discusses the power of being niched, pricing strategies, metrics of success, and so much more. You can find both shows on The Wedding Biz Network.   SUPPORTING THE WEDDING BIZ Become a patron and support Andy and the show! If you are so inspired, contribute!   Time Stamps [0:51] – This episode's guest is revealed to be Meg Smith of Meg Smith Photography. [2:10] – Meg talks about how photographers in her family influenced her. [5:31] – Meg reflects on a darkroom that her father built for her when she was younger. [6:28] – Meg discusses the relationships that she had with mentors. [8:32] – We learn about photographable moments that are found rather than created. [10:52] – Meg talks about her tendency to alternate between film and digital. [13:03] – We discover what Meg thinks about photography elements such as framing and lighting. [14:28] – Meg discusses her typical process with her clients. [17:38] – Andy shifts the conversation toward celebrity clientele. [20:26] – Meg shares insight about different locations where she has shot photos. [21:35] – Meg gives examples of challenges that she has had to overcome. [24:33] – Meg acknowledges nerves and how they are to be expected. [26:55] – Meg encourages people who want to go into similar fields as hers to be true to themselves [29:08] – Meg discusses contentment and how she feels finding it. [30:55] – We learn what type of photography equipment Meg uses now. [32:54] – Andy reveals where we can find Meg online.   RESOURCES Ryan Holiday – The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph Find Meg: Meg's WebsiteMeg's Instagram Page Follow The Wedding Biz on Social: The Wedding Biz The Wedding Biz on Instagram: @theweddingbiz The Wedding Biz on Facebook: @theweddingbiz The Wedding Biz Network The Music Makers   Support The Wedding Biz by clicking here.   Title Sponsor: This episode is sponsored by Kushner Entertainment & PartySlate.

Ready 2 Retro
Episode 80 with Actor and Filmmaker Thomas Tulak ("Too Small" from Hook)

Ready 2 Retro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 83:40


On the day this episode drops is the 30th Anniversary of Steven Spielberg's "HOOK" (1991)! There is no better way to celebrate this momentous event than by having Thomas Tulak on Ready 2 Retro for Episode 80! Thomas is a filmmaker and actor and played "Too Small" on the movie "Hook". He joins Ready 2 Retro to share about his career, his time on the set of Hook, his relationship with Robin Williams and so much more! If you're a fan of Robin Williams, Steven Spielberg, Hook or 90s in general, you do NOT want to miss this episode! Get connected with Thomas Tulak's Projects: Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/thomastulak The Making of "The Day the Laughter Died": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7zMGT0XbFs Follow Ready 2 Reto on Instagram & Twitter: @ready2retro Ready 2 Retro Merch Store: etsy.com/shop/Ready2RetroPodcast

Canned Air: A Tribute to Comics and Pop Culture
Canned Air #419 A Conversation with Bill Bryan (Stay Puft Marshmallow Man from Ghostbusters)

Canned Air: A Tribute to Comics and Pop Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 66:37


If you watch movies then you've seen his work. This week we welcome Mr. Stay Puft himself, actor, puppeteer, costume and special effects master Bill Bryan to the show. We talk with Bill about how he got into the business, his work on Child's Play & Spider-Man 2, his experiences working with Robin Williams, and of coarse how he designed and brought to life The Stay Puft Marshmallow Man! Don't miss this one! @bill.staypuft CannedAirPodcast.com @CannedAirPod @Canned_Air If you'd like to show your support, you can either visit our Patreon page at Patreon.com/CannedAirPod or you can leave us a review on iTunes! Thanks for listening! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Thirty Twenty Ten
Tom Cruise Battles Heights, Charlize Theron is an Awful Adult and Robin Williams Goes Full Pan

Thirty Twenty Ten

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 125:08


Dec. 10-16: Bruce Willis is the last boy scout, a very Dinosaurs Xmas, Steve Martin plays another bad dentist, Not Another Teen Movie is…or isn't?, Alvin gets chipwrecked, not your daddy's Sherlock Holmes, Luck runs out, and Hook steals the kids and the movie. All that and more this week on Thirty Twenty Ten, your weekly look back on the week that was 30, 20, and 10 years ago.

True Fiction Podcast
True Fiction Talks to Actor/Screenwriter/Comedian Marc Sheffler

True Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 49:18


Marc Sheffler will tell you he lived a charmed life, but I will tell you that none of the amazing things he has done and is still doing in his life would have happened if he wasn't such an amazing talent. We discuss his first role in the ground-breaking Wes Craven's film Last House on the Left, as well as the beginning of his comedy career with likes of Richard Lewis, Jerry Seinfeld, and Robin Williams. We also discussed his screenwriting for shows like Charles in Charge and Harry and the Henderson. He also has some great tips on writing and working in the entertainment industry. You don't want to miss this one!Buy Me a Copy option

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts
Kelly Clarkson‘s Cautionary Christmas Special - Full Christmas Concert

UNPLUGGED Live Concerts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 38:42


Directed by: Hamish Hamilton & Liz Plonka Written by: Glenn Clements Special Features: Jai Rodriguez, Reba McEntire, Trisha Yearwood, Blake Shelton, Robin Williams, Jay Leno, William Shatner, Ken Jeong, Whoopi Goldberg, Heidi Klum & more. Team UNPLUGGED.

Soundstage Access
EP 50 | Ve Neill, Makeup Effects Designer ('Pirates of the Caribbean', 'Mrs. Doubtfire')

Soundstage Access

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 66:19


It was so much fun to welcome on the show Ve Neill, a 3-time Oscar winner and Makeup Effects Designer whose credits include EDWARD SCISSORHANDS, BEETLEJUICE, and the PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN among many other iconic films. In today's conversation, Ve and I discuss her early love for the Universal Monsters, and how the appreciation for makeup history fueled her desire to open her very first makeup school, Legends Makeup Academy; the challenges of breaking into the union as a woman in the 1970s, as well as her creative relationships with Tim Burton / Johnny Depp, and the process behind creating Robin Williams' makeup for MRS. DOUBTFIRE. All of this… and much more! If you want to learn more about Ve's program, please visit LEGENDS MAKEUP ACADEMY at legendsmakeup.com. Make sure you subscribe to Soundstage Access on your favorite podcast platform so you can share your favorite episodes with your friends. INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/soundstageaccess/ FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/soundstageaccess/ TWITTER: twitter.com/SoundstageAC

Choose Film: A Reel Retrospective
053 JUMANJI (Dir.Joe Johnston) with CRAIG ANDREW MOONEY

Choose Film: A Reel Retrospective

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 61:43


It's time to unearth a classic board game, roll some dice and pray for a 5 or an 8 as we discuss 1995 Jumanji. Gary and Rebecca are joined by Actor and fellow Podcaster Craig Andrew Mooney to discuss this Robin Williams, comedy adventure. SynopsisA magical board game unleashes a world of adventure on siblings Peter (Bradley Pierce) and Judy Shepherd (Kirsten Dunst). While exploring an old mansion, the youngsters find a curious, jungle-themed game called Jumanji in the attic. When they start playing, they free Alan Parrish (Robin Williams), who's been stuck in the game's inner world for decades. If they win Jumanji, the kids can free Alan for good -- but that means braving giant bugs, ill-mannered monkeys and even stampeding rhinos!Links In Conversation. Twitter - @CraigAMooneyTwitter - @100FilmReviewsInsta - @CraigAMooneyInsta - @100filmreviewsCreative Recommendationspositive stories for negative timesWonder Fools in association with the Traverse Theatre.https://positivestories.scot/SHORT FILM - BEST MAN https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7y326_OIgWgSCARE - Sarah Granthttps://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=234581304450911CRAIG'S BIOCraig Andrew Mooney is a Scottish actor and writer. Craig trained to become a Physical Education teacher before deciding to pursue his career in the TV and Film industry. He has recently completed two feature films, 'Mortem' and 'The Difference Between Us', the latter as both an actor and script editor. His new panel show 'the 100' recently filmed its first season and has a corresponding podcast 'the 100: Film Review Talk Show'. Both aim to help promote Scottish talent and underrepresented voices in the industry.

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
Sweet Home Cannabama 12-6-21

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 46:19


Jennifer Boozer, owner of CannaBama: The CBD Store - Mobile, Alabama hosts this weekly show about the CBD industry, interviews Jason Gann of Wilfred Cannabis, CBD and Hemp, named after the pot-smoking dog that was also the series namesake starring himself, Elijah Woods, and Robin Williams, about CBD and Delta 8 products

Live Your True Life Perspectives with Ashley Berges
Helping Children Understand and Process Memory Loss in their Elders. [Ep.698]

Live Your True Life Perspectives with Ashley Berges

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 40:50


Join Awilda Prignano and I today on Live Your True Life Perspectives. Awilda is an acclaimed children's author with her book: Loving Lulu. Awilda's book is based on her real life experience of being her mother's primary caregiver, after she was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia (the form of dementia that the late Robin Williams had, before he tragically committed suicide). Her book is written to help children understand and process memory changes and memory loss of a loved one. In the story Lulu and her Grandmother spend time together and over time her Abuelita/grandmother begins to develop memory loss, and Lulu realizes she can help her Grandmother feel loved and special. Listen today around the country on AM radio or on our Youtube channel @ashley berges

Joe and Raanan Talk Movies
Episode 46- Even More Fan Questions

Joe and Raanan Talk Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 66:35


Joe and Raanan are back, taking Fan Questions! It's a grand old time. We talk Robin Williams, movies with Twist Endings, adaptations of foreign films, and more!  Follow us on social media @joelistcomedy and @raanancomedy Subscribe to our Patreon for exclusive, bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/joeandraanantalkmovies1 Reserve tix to Joe's Special Taping at The Comedy Cellar on Dec. 7 at 10 pm: https://www.comedycellar.com/reservation/?showid=1640142000 Reserve tix to Raanan's Special Taping at The Comedy Cellar on Dec. 21st at 8 and 10 pm:  https://www.comedycellar.com/reservation/?showid=1640142000  

KYO Conversations
BTQ: How can you be more kind, to yourself?

KYO Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 2:56


We are who we are because of the questions we ask or the questions we do not ask. You are always one question away from a completely different life. To be guided by the questions and mental fitness practices from the best in the world, people like Kobe Bryant, Maya Angelou, Robin Williams, Stephen Hawking, Ryan Holiday, James Clear, Jane Austin, and more, check out my debut book: Personal Socrates - Questions That Will Upgrade Your Life From Legends and World-Class Performers*Let's Connect!

Mazan Movie Club
"Awakenings" MMC

Mazan Movie Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 64:51


Deniro. Williams. Penny Marshall behind the camera. It's "Awakenings" from 1990. A bittersweet classic with an up and coming all time great screenwriter Steve Zaillian. Comedian Ryan Maher and Host Steve Mazan discuss it all.  Who is making a bigger turn here, Deniro or Robin? Is Penny Marshall underrated? How much is real? What happened after the events in the film? All these questions and more get answered on this week's Mazan Movie Club.   

Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory
RE: Defining Weird & Social Anxiety w/ Skylar Astin

Pen Pals with Daniel & Rory

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 54:12


Dear Pennies & Pallers,Today we are joined by our incredibly talented friend, Skylar Astin! In our first letter, a Pen Pal asks about the fluid definition of “weird.”This week's second letter discusses the struggle of making friends when you have social anxiety.We also discuss: Skylar's new film “Zoey's Extraordinary Christmas,” finding your passion early, getting weird, dad jokes, and a great Robin Williams story. We wish you well, sincerely,Your Pen Pals Daniel Van Kirk & Rory Scovel