Podcasts about groovin

1967 single by The Rascals

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Latest podcast episodes about groovin

The Mindful Coping Podcast
Groovin' On A Sunday Evening With Seth Leaf Pruzansky

The Mindful Coping Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 75:57


Cash That
New York Groovin'

Cash That

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 19:49


Joe is on his own this week, but Producer Cory has a message for all of the Eagles fans out there. Football aside, the Cowboys are terrible, and Joe brings you some of the best plays for the upcoming NBA slate. Listen up, listen good and Cash That!

Sense of Soul Podcast
Recovery and Wellness

Sense of Soul Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 40:21


Today on Sense of Soul Podcast we have Michelle Hillier, she is a Recovery Coach, Transformational Breathwork Coach, Ted X speaker, Dance/Movement Specialist, Yoga instructor, Certified Meditation /Social Emotional Learning/Wellness Teacher and the founder of Breath+Fire, a wellness program that helps people identify gaps in their lives that are holding them back from becoming who they truly want to be. The COVID-19 pandemic pushed Michelle to her breaking point. All of a sudden, all of her work—which had been her escape—was cancelled. The isolation spotlighted the cracks in her marriage while at the same time Michelle's mother was diagnosed with dementia, and she looked for ways to numb the feelings.  Today, Michelle is in recovery, she and she uses her personal story to help people see it's possible to lead a great life. Thousands of people have gone through the online wellness course that uses personal reflection, evidence-based mindfulness, and intentional body movement to overcome addiction, relationship issues, transition in their careers, and more. Before starting Breathe+Fire, she ran the Groovin' Kids program, which created movement courses for schools that reached more than 1M students in 800 schools, community centers, and camps across North America. Visit Michelle's Website: www.breathandfire.com Visit Sense of Soul at www.mysenseofsoul.com Do you want Ad Free episodes? Join our Sense of Soul Patreon, our community of seekers and lightworkers. Also recieve 50% off of Shanna's Soul Immersion experience as a Patreon member, monthly Sacred circles, Shanna mini series, Sense of Soul merch and more. https://www.patreon.com/senseofsoul Thank you to our Sponsor  KACHAVA, Use this link for 10% off! www.kachava.com/senseofsoul  

A Breath of Fresh Air
The Rascals' FELIX CAVALIERE on life, gurus and music

A Breath of Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 52:00


THE RASCALS were the pinnacle of '60s blue-eyed soul. It's been said that they were the first rock band in the world. Led by FELIX CAVALIERE, the band drew much of its inspiration from British Invasion bands, psychedelic rock, gospel, and even a bit of jazz and Latin music. They were at their best on classic singles like "Good Lovin'," "How Can I Be Sure," "Groovin'," and "People Got to Be Free." This week my special guest is keyboardist/singer Felix Cavaliere who shares tales of his musical journey. Felix talks about starting out with Joey Dee and the Starlighters, how the Beatles opened the door for musicians to write their own songs and about his and George Harrison's involvement with gurus who kept them grounded. It's a fascinating story that highlights the fact that while others in his profession became synonymous with sex, drugs and anything goes, Felix Cavaliere reached the highest peaks on a message of peace, love and understanding. This songwriter could have been made for A Breath of Fresh Air … he promises to make you feel great. To learn more about Felix and his Rascals head for https://www.felixcavalieremusic.com/ To contact me with feedback or suggestions for who you'd like to hear interviewed, send me a message through my website https://abreathoffreshair.com.au/

Stoned N' Social
Stoned N' Social - Groovin' On The 70s + Spicy Rap Snacks

Stoned N' Social

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 55:22


Join Nat, and Bee of Wavy Flower Company, this week to ring in the New Year but also reminiscence on times past, specifically the 1970s. Do you only associate tie-dye and peace signs with the cultural wave of 'The Me Decade'? Then you're in for a groovy treat as we discuss fashion, music, and pop culture of the 70s era. If you like tangents, plus thoughtful ramblings, the coveted title of 'Munchie of The Week' (MoTW) and of course, a lot of laughs, then listen here. --- Wavy Flower Company's Instagram - @wavy.flower.company

DJ BANDIT Official Podcast
Dance Club Mix #047 (Jan 2023) | Tiesto, Ownboss, Maniak, Felguk | Movin' & Groovin' Podcast

DJ BANDIT Official Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 69:57


⚡️DJ BANDIT Pres: Movin' & Groovin' 047 [Radio Show] 2023 ⚡️ 😎
The best Remixes & Dance tracks, 1 Hour of the best music from the artists like: Tiesto, Ownboss, Maniak, Felguk and much more. 📳 DJ BANDIT on the web, follow me: ➤ Official site → taplink.cc/djbandit ➤ Instagram → www.instagram.com/djbandit/ ➤ Facebook → www.facebook.com/DJBanditOffi... ➤ Mixcloud → www.mixcloud.com/bandit_odessa ➤ Telegram → bit.ly/385ifik ➤ iTunes Podcast → apple.co/2ydufi9

WAGRadio
GROOVIN' BLUE SHOW 22 - 12

WAGRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 79:37


Groovin' Blue 22 - 12 is dedicated to Dr. Li Wenliang Hello World.  Groovin' Blue is on the air! 1.  (3:36)  WAGRadio 2212 Intro - Produced by WAGRadio Vinyl Librarian William "Fats Is Back" Reiter 2.  (3:41)  "Power (Remember Who You Are)" - SPINALL, SUMMER WALKER, DJ SNAKE, AYANNA [Interscope] 3.  (1:23)  WAGRadio 22-06 Open Segment 4.  (1:49)  "Late Night (Beats Instrumental)" - MIKEY MIKRO [not released] 5.  (  :23)  WAGRadio Pull Down Id 6.  (3:19)  "Tbt3 (DJZigZag EdiT of the Osunlade Remix)" - ROCCO RODAMAAL [Memories] 7.  (5:05)  "Family Funk (DJZigZag EdiT)" - DAVIDE MIGLIARDI [KluBasic] 8.  (4:08)  "Treat Her Like A Lady (James Godfrey Remix)" - THE TEMPTATIONS [soundcloud] 9.  (2:36)  "Papa True Love" - MIGHTY SAM [Amy Promo 45rpm No. 11,044] 1968  10.(  :40)  WAGRadio 16 and One Half Id 11.(6:06)  "Keep Bouncin' (DJZigZag Flo' Wit' Da Go EdiT)" - GRIZ [GRiZ LLC/All Good Records] 12.(5:22)  "How Long (DJZigZag 2022 Short Hodge Twins EdiT)" - MARKUS POLEY ft. MAX'C [Enormous Chills 12" No. ETC 229] 2020 13.(  :12)  WAGRadio Control Yo' Mind Id 14.(5:17)  "Wepaaa (DJZigZag Beat-Up Time EdiT)" - DAVID MORALES [Diridim] 15.(3:28)  "Cry Baby" - CEE LO GREEN [Elektra Cd No. 2-526448 "The Lady Killer"] 2010 Prod. Fraser T. Smith 16.(  :58)  WAGRadio 2206 Final Open 17.(3:39)  "If You Want (Luke Solomons Body Remix) vs. Your Mind [DJZigZag MashEdiT]" - BENNY MUSSA, ANOTR, ABEL BALDER [Edible] / [No Art] 18.(  :34)  WAGRadio 2206 Final Open Pt. 2 19.(3:25)  "Old Fashioned" - CEE LO GREEN [Elektra Cd No. 2-526448 "The Lady Killer"] 2010 Prod. Alan Nglish & Salaam Remi 20.(3:17)  "Twenty-Five Miles" - EDWIN STARR [Gordy Promo 45rpm No. G-7083] 1969 Prod. Bristol-Fuqua 21.(  :33)  WAGRadio 2206 Final Open Pt. 3 22.(2:55)  "Last Last (Benja Styles Remix)" - BURNA BOY [Atlantic] 23.(5:28)  "Everyone On The Floor (Clubmix)" - BLOCK & CROWN [Dope Demand] 24.(4:31)  "Make It Back" - RICHARD GREY [G High] 25.(  :17)  WAGRadio Up Feet Id 26.(4:12)  "Night Train" - CEE LO GREEN with The GOODIE MOB [Merlot Music Group Mp3 - "Cee-Lo Stray Bullets (The Mixtape Made Of Gold)"] 2010 * Cee Lo's full name Thomas DeCarlo Callaway-Burton 27.(3:21)  "Track ID2 (DJZigZag Out 'Ya Mind EdiT Pt.1)" - MR ID, YOUNEZ AKHRAZ [Kaoz Theory] 28.(  :06)  GB End 79:37  

PuroJazz
Puro Jazz 29 Diciembre

PuroJazz

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 59:12


KEITH JARRETT STANDARDS TRIO “WHISPER NOT” – Palais des Congres, Paris, July 5, 1999 Bouncing with Bud, Groovin’ high, Chelsea bridge Keith Jarrett (p) Gary Peacock (b) Jack DeJohnette (d)             PETER WENIGER “KEY OF THE MOMENT”   – New York, February, 1993 Do your thing, Flatbush (1), Peter Weniger […]

Dirty Glove Bastard: Off The Porch
Groovin Gorilla DGB Off The Porch Interview

Dirty Glove Bastard: Off The Porch

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 25:25


Interview by Mikala Horne https://www.instagram.com/_mikalatv_/ We recently sat down with viral sensation Groovin Gorilla for an exclusive “Off The Porch” interview! During our conversation he discussed living in Germany when he was younger, being inspired by the movie “You Got Served”, being overweight when he was younger, weighing 200lbs at 15, getting denied by his High School crush sparked his weight loss, running miles everyday to lose weight, being insecure at times about his size, sticking to 6 meals a day, his dancing career starting by his brother motivating him, recording his first video from a car, starting his first public video in the gym, finding his female dance partner via Instagram, recording his first dance video at Northpark Center in the mall, crazy dance stories, feeling happy when he dances, dancing being therapeutic for him, wanting to start studying choreography, how his recording process goes when it comes to dancing in establishments, catching backlash with his name, practicing living his best life, spreading positivity through out what he does, his signature dance move, and more! 

The Roger Ashby Oldies Show
Behind The Hits - Groovin' by The Young Rascals

The Roger Ashby Oldies Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 2:21


Roger Ashby goes behind the hits of your favourite songs from the 50s, 60s and 70s.  Listen to The Roger Ashby Oldies Show anytime on the iHeartRadio app.

La Voix des Bulles
Canailles BD 12 : Elles

La Voix des Bulles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 12:48


L'adolescence est une période de transformation, surtout quand on change de lycée … et que de nombreuses personnalités se disputent notre corps !Kid Toussaint et Aveline Stokart nous entraine dans une aventure pleine de mystères, dans laquelle Elles ont sans doutes plus de secrets qu'il n'y parait.Bonne écoute !Télécharger l'émission (19 Mo) – Regarder sur YoutubeS'abonner à Canailles BDElles n°1 Kid Toussaint Aveline StokartGénérique et jingles : Groovin' (Texasradiofish)

WAGRadio
GROOVIN' BLUE SHOW 22 - 11

WAGRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 79:37


Groovin' Blue is dedicated to Dr. Li WenLiang 1.  (2:26)  WAGRadio Intro - Urban DJ Tools Cut-In Recording No. 2211 - Produced by WAGRadio Vinyl Librarian William "Fats Is Back" Reiter 2.  (6:00)  "If It Ain't Funky" - CHUCK BROWN AND THE SOUL SEARCHERS [Source Records Inc. Lp No. SOR - 3076 "Bustin' Loose"] 1979 3.  (  :11)  WAGRadio Mic Selek Id 4.  (4:07)  "Wham Dance (DJZigZag 45rpm 2022 EdiT)" - CUPID ft. DJRO & MYSTIKAL[] 5.  (  :16)  WAGRadio Who Dat DJ ? Id 6.  (4:03)  "Gonna Have Funk Tonite (DJZigZag Good Shirts Safari EdiT)" - INFRADISCO [Tropical Disco Records] 7.  (2:46)  "Can I Get A Witness" - MARVIN GAYE [Tamla 45rpm No. 54087] 1963 8.  (  :29)  WAGRadio Hot Chikken Id 9.  (3:03)  "Problemz" - JUNGLE [Caiola Records] 10.(5:00)  "Philly Dubbs (DJZigZag Help A Riot EdiT)" - ADRI BLOCK, PAUL PARSONS [Funk Supreme] 11.(3:32)  "Monalisa (Mr. I Like That Remix)" - LOJAY, SARZ, CHRIS BROWN [Metallic Music/1789] Prod. Sarz 12.(3:47)  "Garden Party" - JID, MASEGO, BIG BOI [Universal] 13.(  :03)  Girl Laff 14.(4:26)  "Dale vs. Bored Ape Rave Club vs. Justified The Funk (DJZigZag MashEdiT Pt. One)" - DJ KONE, MARC PALACIOS, BASSJACKERS, JACK MATTER [Hot Leaf Records] / [Smash The House] / [Tall House Digital] 15.(5:40)  "Never Gonna Give You Up" - CHUCK BROWN & THE SOUL SEARCHERS [Source Records Inc. Lp No. SOR-3076 "Bustin' Loose"] 1979 16.(  :10)  DJZigZag Id 17.(4:58)  "Dub-O-Logy (DJZigZag Hunt Cuddy Bunt EdiT)" - C. Da AFRO [Tropical Disco] 18.(  :13)  WAGRadio Uno, Dos, Three Id 19.(4:17)  "Move On Up" - Ken @ Work [Hive] 20.(  :16)  WAGRadio Push/Stop Id 21.(4:24)  "Oh Baby vs. I've Got Jazz (DJZigZag MashEdiT)" - DjMANUEL, GLEDD, HOTMOOD [Disco Machine] / [Super Spicy] 22.(5:55)  "Te Queiro vs. Your Love (DJZigZag MashEdiT)" - PETER MAC, HELIOTYPE [Azucar Disctribution] / [Armada] 23.(3:11)  "Berro e Sombaro" - CHUCK BROWN & THE SOUL SEARCHERS [Source Records Inc. Lp No. SOR-3076 "Bustin' Loose"] 1979 24.(3:05)  "Jack Sax The City" - JOHNNY BEECHER And His Buckingham Road Quintet feat. Bert Kendricks At The Organ [Warner Bros. 45rpm No. 5341] * J. Beecher is sax phenom Plas Johnson 25.(8:48)  "We Are One" - MAZE Featuring FRANKIE BEVERLY [Capitol Lp No. SKBK12155 "Live In New Orleans"] Prod. Frankie Beverly 26.(  :06)  GB End 79:37

fred and walk in the house music
BEVERAGE SOUL & FRESH MUSIC VOL.11

fred and walk in the house music

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 62:45


DJ 'S' - Groovin' Loletta Holloway - short end of the stick - Reflex Edit South Funk blvd - Be together Kenny Thomas - crazy world - Opolopo remix Count Basic - Jazz in the House Petalpusher Miguel Migs - breakin' it down - Downtown original Sweet Mixture - House of Fun and Love Young Pulse - tell me - retouch Gavin Mintus - it's a new day T.C.O.J - the Bitch - alternative version DJ 'S' - Sweet Love Dennis Taylor - in the Mood - Nigel Lowis Philly mix

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley

WTOP Entertainment Reporter Jason Fraley chats with Rascals founder Felix Cavaliere to mark the 55th anniversary of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame band's last single as The Young Rascals before changing its name to The Rascals. They spoke when Cavaliere and co-founder Gene Cornish played The Birchmere in Alexandria, Virginia in 2018, breaking down hits like "Good Lovin'," "Groovin'" and "A Beautiful Morning." (Theme Music: Scott Buckley's "Clarion")

The Inspiring Conversations Podcast
Groovin' On A Sunday Evening With Seth Leaf Pruzansky

The Inspiring Conversations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 75:57


PAST 10s: A Top 10 Time Machine
What Were You Groovin To in '78?

PAST 10s: A Top 10 Time Machine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 105:06


Milt and Dave get in the time machine and Get Off in 1978.

Late and Live
S05E35 - Most Played Mix (4th November 2022)

Late and Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 134:36


Late and Live kicks off its final full month of shows celebrating the history of "The Sound of Friday Night" as ResidentSD plays you the most played tracks from the show's past. Tracklisting: - Ollie King - The Concept of Love (The Concept of Passion Mix) - Streets of Rage - Keep the Groovin' (ROUND 4) - OutRun Europa (C64 version) - English Channel - Sonic the Hedgehog 3 - Hydrocity Zone Act 2 - Metropolis Street Racer - Passion - Phantasy Star Online Episode I & II - The Frenzy Wilds (Arrange ver.) - Initial D Arcade Stage - SPACE BOY - Sonic Adventure - General Offensive - Juan Medrano - Super Hang-On "Burn, Baby, Burn!" OC ReMix - Rexy - Labyrinth of the Mind - The 8-Bit Big Band feat. Grace Kelly - Hydrocity Zone (from Sonic the Hedgehog 3) - Turbo OutRun (C64 version) - Title - Balouga Boys - Sonic 3D - House Mix - MC's Nick & Steve - Do Me A Favour (SEGA MasterMix '90) - Jet Set Radio Future - Aisle 10 (Hello Allison) - Metropolis Street Racer - Heartland - Sonic Adventure 2 - Live & Learn ...Main Theme of "SONIC ADVENTURE 2" - PlanetSkill - Sonic the Hedgehog 2 "Oil Ocean (WT-40 Mix)" OC ReMix - Metropolis Street Racer - Am I Only Dreaming - SEGA SMASH PACK Volume 1 - Back in Time - OutRun 2 - NIGHT FLIGHT - Shadow the Hedgehog - I Am...All of Me - Jet Set Radio - Everybody Jump Around - Metropolis Street Racer - Let's Get It On Tonight - Columns III: Revenge of Columns - Column Dive

CMT 4 Me
CMTA's Groovin' Jonah Berger shares the Magic of Camp Footprint and much more

CMT 4 Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 48:52


An old soul with a big heart, Jonah Berger brings wisdom and youthful energy to every moment of every day. In this episode of CMT 4 Me, Jonah gets personal about his upbringing, family life, the Pickle Witch (yes, the Pickle Witch!), the CMTA's future leaders, and Camp Footprint – camp for kids with CMT. Explaining the success of Camp Footprint, Jonah points out, "This one-week sleepaway camp for kids with CMT is truly unique. Every camper fits in, feels free to let their guard down, and is given space to be vulnerable, real, and relaxed without the fear of being judged or perceived as different. There is no doubt in my mind – Camp changes lives." Jonah's spirit and uplifting energy are not only contagious but also motivating. His talent for storytelling and insightful personality will inspire you to move mountains.  Bio: Jonah has CMT 1X and joined the CMTA staff full-time in early 2020 as the National Youth Programs Manager and is thrilled to be serving the CMTA community by working to celebrate and engage the youth. Jonah has written two books: He Walks like a Cowboy: One Man's Journey Through Life With a Disability and The Strangest of Places, both available on Amazon for purchase. Jonah also has a website where you can find his He Walk Like a Cowboy podcast as well as his blog:  HeWalksLikeACowboy.comFor more information about CMT and to support the CMTA, please visit www.cmtausa.org

The Debbie Nigro Show
Rascal Felix Cavaliere Is Still Groovin'

The Debbie Nigro Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 14:58


That Rascal Felix Cavaliere is Still ‘Groovin'.  The Legendary singer songwriter, has been making people feel good with his music for over 50 years. So why stop now? He's not! The Rascals are on the move! He and fellow Rascal Gene Cornish are hitting the road to share some more ‘Good Lovin' on 'The Rascals Time Peace Tour 2022'. Gene fell ill during past concert and has since had a pacemaker put in, but he's good to go.  Felix Cavaliere calls Nashville home now, but people in my ‘hood' near Pelham, NY have always loved to claim him as their hometown rock n' roll hero. In fact, he just wrote a book about it all. “Felix Cavaliere Memoir of a Rascal From Pelham, NY To The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame”. Do people recognize him? Felix says sometimes, but because the Rascals were around before MTV they didn't have the kind of visual exposure that helped promote so many other groups to make them recognizable beyod their music. Speaking of being recognized or not, Felix chuckles while telling the story about his dear friend Billy Joel who he was with at his concert in Nashville. When Billy Joel looked up at himself on the giant TV monitors on the wall, he turned to Felix and said, "Whos That?" "My Father?" Felix laughs when he shares that story as he make the point, "Sometimes I too don't recognize myself".   I asked Felix if the songs we know so well and still enjoy today are kinda like his children? Yes he said, they are.  Songs like Good Lovin', Groovin', It's A Beautiul Morning, I've Been Lonely Too Long, How Can I Be Sure, A Girl Like You, and People Got To Be Free. The Rascals are considered the best 'blue-eyed soul' group to come out of the 60's, as well as one of the groups with the most record sales. Their message has always been to stand for Peace, Love and Happiness. Felix says, as a musician, when people hear your music and it brings them joy, that joy translates back to you. Especially live on stage. The Rascals Featuring Felix Cavaliere & Gene Cornish Time Peace Tour.  November 11 | St. George Theatre | Staten Island, N.Y.  November 12 | College Street Music Hall | New Haven, Conn.  November 13 | NYCB Theatre at Westbury | Westbury, N.Y.  November 16 | Mayo Performing Arts Center | Morristown, N.J.  November 18 | Ovation Hall at Ocean Casino | Atlantic City, N.J.  More dates being announced soon.                 

Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino
Kansas City Jazz Guitarist Brian Baggett on the 2022 CD Groovin'' and Swingin'

Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022


Welcome to a new edition of the Neon Jazz interview series with Kansas City Jazz Guitarist Brian Baggett  on the 2022 CD Groovin'' and Swingin' .. The album is presented by Jazz Daddy Records and Green Lady Radio with a CD Release Show at Green Lady Lounge slated for Monday, November 7, 2022 .. As the legend of Kansas City jazz continues to grow and evolve, and Green Lady Lounge has become a key venue for continuing the city's rich history of great guitar players.  In 2020, Brian Baggett Trio began a Monday night residency at Green Lady Lounge.  Brian had been appearing at the club since 2013 playing several nights a week as a member of Ken Lovern's OJT and Guitar Elation with legendary guitarist Danny Embrey.  We get into his history at the Green Lady and the road ahead .. that is getting brighter and brighter .. Dig .. Click here to listen.Thanks for listening and tuning into yet another Neon Jazz interview .. where we give you a bit of insight into the finest players and minds around the world giving fans all that jazz ..  If you want to hear more interviews, go to Famous Interviews with Joe Dimino on the iTunes store, visit the YouTube Neon Jazz  Channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/neonjazzkc, go The Home of Neon Jazz at  http://theneonjazz.blogspot.com/ and for everything Joe Dimino related go to www.joedimino.com When you are there, you can donate to the Neon Jazz cause via PayPal https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=ERA4C4TTVKLR4 or through Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/neonjazzkc - Until next time .. enjoy the music my friends ..

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 156: “I Was Made to Love Her” by Stevie Wonder

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “I Was Made to Love Her", the early career of Stevie Wonder, and the Detroit riots of 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "Groovin'" by the Young Rascals. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, I've put together a Mixcloud playlist of all the recordings excerpted in this episode. The best value way to get all of Stevie Wonder's early singles is this MP3 collection, which has the original mono single mixes of fifty-five tracks for a very reasonable price. For those who prefer physical media, this is a decent single-CD collection of his early work at a very low price indeed. As well as the general Motown information listed below, I've also referred to Signed, Sealed, and Delivered: The Soulful Journey of Stevie Wonder by Mark Ribowsky, which rather astonishingly is the only full-length biography of Wonder, to Higher Ground: Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, and the Rise and Fall of American Soul by Craig Werner, and to Detroit 67: The Year That Changed Soul by Stuart Cosgrove. For Motown-related information in this and other Motown episodes, I've used the following resources: Where Did Our Love Go? The Rise and Fall of the Motown Sound by Nelson George is an excellent popular history of the various companies that became Motown. To Be Loved by Berry Gordy is Gordy's own, understandably one-sided, but relatively well-written, autobiography. Women of Motown: An Oral History by Susan Whitall is a collection of interviews with women involved in Motown. I Hear a Symphony: Motown and Crossover R&B by J. Andrew Flory is an academic look at Motown. The Motown Encyclopaedia by Graham Betts is an exhaustive look at the people and records involved in Motown's thirty-year history. How Sweet It Is by Lamont Dozier and Scott B. Bomar is Dozier's autobiography, while Come and Get These Memories by Brian and Eddie Holland and Dave Thompson is the Holland brothers'. Standing in the Shadows of Motown: The Life and Music of Legendary Bassist James Jamerson by "Dr Licks" is a mixture of a short biography of the great bass player, and tablature of his most impressive bass parts. And Motown Junkies is an infrequently-updated blog looking at (so far) the first 694 tracks released on Motown singles. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I begin -- this episode deals with disability and racism, and also deals from the very beginning with sex work and domestic violence. It also has some discussion of police violence and sexual assault. As always I will try to deal with those subjects as non-judgementally and sensitively as possible, but if you worry that anything about those subjects might disturb you, please check the transcript. Calvin Judkins was not a good man. Lula Mae Hardaway thought at first he might be, when he took her in, with her infant son whose father had left before the boy was born. He was someone who seemed, when he played the piano, to be deeply sensitive and emotional, and he even did the decent thing and married her when he got her pregnant. She thought she could save him, even though he was a street hustler and not even very good at it, and thirty years older than her -- she was only nineteen, he was nearly fifty. But she soon discovered that he wasn't interested in being saved, and instead he was interested in hurting her. He became physically and financially abusive, and started pimping her out. Lula would eventually realise that Calvin Judkins was no good, but not until she got pregnant again, shortly after the birth of her second son. Her third son was born premature -- different sources give different numbers for how premature, with some saying four months and others six weeks -- and while he apparently went by Stevland Judkins throughout his early childhood, the name on his birth certificate was apparently Stevland Morris, Lula having decided not to give another child the surname of her abuser, though nobody has ever properly explained where she got the surname "Morris" from. Little Stevland was put in an incubator with an oxygen mask, which saved the tiny child's life but destroyed his sight, giving him a condition called retinopathy of prematurity -- a condition which nowadays can be prevented and cured, but in 1951 was just an unavoidable consequence for some portion of premature babies. Shortly after the family moved from Saginaw to Detroit, Lula kicked Calvin out, and he would remain only a peripheral figure in his children's lives, but one thing he did do was notice young Stevland's interest in music, and on his increasingly infrequent visits to his wife and kids -- visits that usually ended with violence -- he would bring along toy instruments for the young child to play, like a harmonica and a set of bongos. Stevie was a real prodigy, and by the time he was nine he had a collection of real musical instruments, because everyone could see that the kid was something special. A neighbour who owned a piano gave it to Stevie when she moved out and couldn't take it with her. A local Lions Club gave him a drum kit at a party they organised for local blind children, and a barber gave him a chromatic harmonica after seeing him play his toy one. Stevie gave his first professional performance when he was eight. His mother had taken him to a picnic in the park, and there was a band playing, and the little boy got as close to the stage as he could and started dancing wildly. The MC of the show asked the child who he was, and he said "My name is Stevie, and I can sing and play drums", so of course they got the cute kid up on stage behind the drum kit while the band played Johnny Ace's "Pledging My Love": [Excerpt: Johnny Ace, "Pledging My Love"] He did well enough that they paid him seventy-five cents -- an enormous amount for a small child at that time -- though he was disappointed afterwards that they hadn't played something faster that would really allow him to show off his drumming skills. After that he would perform semi-regularly at small events, and always ask to be paid in quarters rather than paper money, because he liked the sound of the coins -- one of his party tricks was to be able to tell one coin from another by the sound of them hitting a table. Soon he formed a duo with a neighbourhood friend, John Glover, who was a couple of years older and could play guitar while Stevie sang and played harmonica and bongos. The two were friends, and both accomplished musicians for their age, but that wasn't the only reason Stevie latched on to Glover. Even as young as he was, he knew that Motown was soon going to be the place to be in Detroit if you were a musician, and Glover had an in -- his cousin was Ronnie White of the Miracles. Stevie and John performed as a duo everywhere they could and honed their act, performing particularly at the talent shows which were such an incubator of Black musical talent at the time, and they also at this point seem to have got the attention of Clarence Paul, but it was White who brought the duo to Motown. Stevie and John first played for White and Bobby Rodgers, another of the Miracles, then when they were impressed they took them through the several layers of Motown people who would have to sign off on signing a new act. First they were taken to see Brian Holland, who was a rising star within Motown as "Please Mr. Postman" was just entering the charts. They impressed him with a performance of the Miracles song "Bad Girl": [Excerpt: The Miracles, "Bad Girl"] After that, Stevie and John went to see Mickey Stevenson, who was at first sceptical, thinking that a kid so young -- Stevie was only eleven at the time -- must be some kind of novelty act rather than a serious musician. He said later "It was like, what's next, the singing mouse?" But Stevenson was won over by the child's talent. Normally, Stevenson had the power to sign whoever he liked to the label, but given the extra legal complications involved in signing someone under-age, he had to get Berry Gordy's permission. Gordy didn't even like signing teenagers because of all the extra paperwork that would be involved, and he certainly wasn't interested in signing pre-teens. But he came down to the studio to see what Stevie could do, and was amazed, not by his singing -- Gordy didn't think much of that -- but by his instrumental ability. First Stevie played harmonica and bongos as proficiently as an adult professional, and then he made his way around the studio playing on every other instrument in the place -- often only a few notes, but competent on them all. Gordy decided to sign the duo -- and the initial contract was for an act named "Steve and John" -- but it was soon decided to separate them. Glover would be allowed to hang around Motown while he was finishing school, and there would be a place for him when he finished -- he later became a staff songwriter, working on tracks for the Four Tops and the Miracles among others, and he would even later write a number one hit, "You Don't Have to be a Star (to be in My Show)" for Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr -- but they were going to make Stevie a star right now. The man put in charge of that was Clarence Paul. Paul, under his birth name of Clarence Pauling, had started his career in the "5" Royales, a vocal group he formed with his brother Lowman Pauling that had been signed to Apollo Records by Ralph Bass, and later to King Records. Paul seems to have been on at least some of the earliest recordings by the group, so is likely on their first single, "Give Me One More Chance": [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Give Me One More Chance"] But Paul was drafted to go and fight in the Korean War, and so wasn't part of the group's string of hit singles, mostly written by his brother Lowman, like "Think", which later became better known in James Brown's cover version, or "Dedicated to the One I Love", later covered by the Shirelles, but in its original version dominated by Lowman's stinging guitar playing: [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Dedicated to the One I Love"] After being discharged, Clarence had shortened his name to Clarence Paul, and had started recording for all the usual R&B labels like Roulette and Federal, with little success: [Excerpt: Clarence Paul, "I'm Gonna Love You, Love You Til I Die"] He'd also co-written "I Need Your Lovin'", which had been an R&B hit for Roy Hamilton: [Excerpt: Roy Hamilton, "I Need Your Lovin'"] Paul had recently come to work for Motown – one of the things Berry Gordy did to try to make his label more attractive was to hire the relatives of R&B stars on other labels, in the hopes of getting them to switch to Motown – and he was the new man on the team, not given any of the important work to do. He was working with acts like Henry Lumpkin and the Valladiers, and had also been the producer of "Mind Over Matter", the single the Temptations had released as The Pirates in a desperate attempt to get a hit: [Excerpt: The Pirates, "Mind Over Matter"] Paul was the person you turned to when no-one else was interested, and who would come up with bizarre ideas. A year or so after the time period we're talking about, it was him who produced an album of country music for the Supremes, before they'd had a hit, and came up with "The Man With the Rock and Roll Banjo Band" for them: [Excerpt: The Supremes, "The Man With The Rock and Roll Banjo Band"] So, Paul was the perfect person to give a child -- by this time twelve years old -- who had the triple novelties of being a multi-instrumentalist, a child, and blind. Stevie started spending all his time around the Motown studios, partly because he was eager to learn everything about making records and partly because his home life wasn't particularly great and he wanted to be somewhere else. He earned the affection and irritation, in equal measure, of people at Motown both for his habit of wandering into the middle of sessions because he couldn't see the light that showed that the studio was in use, and for his practical joking. He was a great mimic, and would do things like phoning one of the engineers and imitating Berry Gordy's voice, telling the engineer that Stevie would be coming down, and to give him studio equipment to take home. He'd also astonish women by complimenting them, in detail, on their dresses, having been told in advance what they looked like by an accomplice. But other "jokes" were less welcome -- he would regularly sexually assault women working at Motown, grabbing their breasts or buttocks and then claiming it was an accident because he couldn't see what he was doing. Most of the women he molested still speak of him fondly, and say everybody loved him, and this may even be the case -- and certainly I don't think any of us should be judged too harshly for what we did when we were twelve -- but this kind of thing led to a certain amount of pressure to make Stevie's career worth the extra effort he was causing everyone at Motown. Because Berry Gordy was not impressed with Stevie's vocals, the decision was made to promote him as a jazz instrumentalist, and so Clarence Paul insisted that his first release be an album, rather than doing what everyone would normally do and only put out an album after a hit single. Paul reasoned that there was no way on Earth they were going to be able to get a hit single with a jazz instrumental by a twelve-year-old kid, and eventually persuaded Gordy of the wisdom of this idea. So they started work on The Jazz Soul of Little Stevie, released under his new stagename of Little Stevie Wonder, supposedly a name given to him after Berry Gordy said "That kid's a wonder!", though Mickey Stevenson always said that the name came from a brainstorming session between him and Clarence Paul. The album featured Stevie on harmonica, piano, and organ on different tracks, but on the opening track, "Fingertips", he's playing the bongos that give the track its name: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (studio version)"] The composition of that track is credited to Paul and the arranger Hank Cosby, but Beans Bowles, who played flute on the track, always claimed that he came up with the melody, and it seems quite likely to me that most of the tracks on the album were created more or less as jam sessions -- though Wonder's contributions were all overdubbed later. The album sat in the can for several months -- Berry Gordy was not at all sure of its commercial potential. Instead, he told Paul to go in another direction -- focusing on Wonder's blindness, he decided that what they needed to do was create an association in listeners' minds with Ray Charles, who at this point was at the peak of his commercial power. So back into the studio went Wonder and Paul, to record an album made up almost entirely of Ray Charles covers, titled Tribute to Uncle Ray. (Some sources have the Ray Charles tribute album recorded first -- and given Motown's lax record-keeping at this time it may be impossible to know for sure -- but this is the way round that Mark Ribowsky's biography of Wonder has it). But at Motown's regular quality control meeting it was decided that there wasn't a single on the album, and you didn't release an album like that without having a hit single first. By this point, Clarence Paul was convinced that Berry Gordy was just looking for excuses not to do anything with Wonder -- and there may have been a grain of truth to that. There's some evidence that Gordy was worried that the kid wouldn't be able to sing once his voice broke, and was scared of having another Frankie Lymon on his hands. But the decision was made that rather than put out either of those albums, they would put out a single. The A-side was a song called "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1", which very much played on Wonder's image as a loveable naive kid: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1"] The B-side, meanwhile, was part two -- a slowed-down, near instrumental, version of the song, reframed as an actual blues, and as a showcase for Wonder's harmonica playing rather than his vocals. The single wasn't a hit, but it made number 101 on the Billboard charts, just missing the Hot One Hundred, which for the debut single of a new artist wasn't too bad, especially for Motown at this point in time, when most of its releases were flopping. That was good enough that Gordy authorised the release of the two albums that they had in the can. The next single, "Little Water Boy", was a rather baffling duet with Clarence Paul, which did nothing at all on the charts. [Excerpt: Clarence Paul and Little Stevie Wonder, "Little Water Boy"] After this came another flop single, written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Janie Bradford, before the record that finally broke Little Stevie Wonder out into the mainstream in a big way. While Wonder hadn't had a hit yet, he was sent out on the first Motortown Revue tour, along with almost every other act on the label. Because he hadn't had a hit, he was supposed to only play one song per show, but nobody had told him how long that song should be. He had quickly become a great live performer, and the audiences were excited to watch him, so when he went into extended harmonica solos rather than quickly finishing the song, the audience would be with him. Clarence Paul, who came along on the tour, would have to motion to the onstage bandleader to stop the music, but the bandleader would know that the audiences were with Stevie, and so would just keep the song going as long as Stevie was playing. Often Paul would have to go on to the stage and shout in Wonder's ear to stop playing -- and often Wonder would ignore him, and have to be physically dragged off stage by Paul, still playing, causing the audience to boo Paul for stopping him from playing. Wonder would complain off-stage that the audience had been enjoying it, and didn't seem to get it into his head that he wasn't the star of the show, that the audiences *were* enjoying him, but were *there* to see the Miracles and Mary Wells and the Marvelettes and Marvin Gaye. This made all the acts who had to go on after him, and who were running late as a result, furious at him -- especially since one aspect of Wonder's blindness was that his circadian rhythms weren't regulated by sunlight in the same way that the sighted members of the tour's were. He would often wake up the entire tour bus by playing his harmonica at two or three in the morning, while they were all trying to sleep. Soon Berry Gordy insisted that Clarence Paul be on stage with Wonder throughout his performance, ready to drag him off stage, so that he wouldn't have to come out onto the stage to do it. But one of the first times he had done this had been on one of the very first Motortown Revue shows, before any of his records had come out. There he'd done a performance of "Fingertips", playing the flute part on harmonica rather than only playing bongos throughout as he had on the studio version -- leaving the percussion to Marvin Gaye, who was playing drums for Wonder's set: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] But he'd extended the song with a little bit of call-and-response vocalising: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] After the long performance ended, Clarence Paul dragged Wonder off-stage and the MC asked the audience to give him a round of applause -- but then Stevie came running back on and carried on playing: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] By this point, though, the musicians had started to change over -- Mary Wells, who was on after Wonder, was using different musicians from his, and some of her players were already on stage. You can hear Joe Swift, who was playing bass for Wells, asking what key he was meant to be playing in: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] Eventually, after six and a half minutes, they got Wonder off stage, but that performance became the two sides of Wonder's next single, with "Fingertips Part 2", the part with the ad lib singing and the false ending, rather than the instrumental part one, being labelled as the side the DJs should play. When it was released, the song started a slow climb up the charts, and by August 1963, three months after it came out, it was at number one -- only the second ever Motown number one, and the first ever live single to get there. Not only that, but Motown released a live album -- Recorded Live, the Twelve-Year-Old Genius (though as many people point out he was thirteen when it was released -- he was twelve when it was recorded though) and that made number one on the albums chart, becoming the first Motown album ever to do so. They followed up "Fingertips" with a similar sounding track, "Workout, Stevie, Workout", which made number thirty-three. After that, his albums -- though not yet his singles -- started to be released as by "Stevie Wonder" with no "Little" -- he'd had a bit of a growth spurt and his voice was breaking, and so marketing him as a child prodigy was not going to work much longer and they needed to transition him into a star with adult potential. In the Motown of 1963 that meant cutting an album of standards, because the belief at the time in Motown was that the future for their entertainers was doing show tunes at the Copacabana. But for some reason the audience who had wanted an R&B harmonica instrumental with call-and-response improvised gospel-influenced yelling was not in the mood for a thirteen year old singing "Put on a Happy Face" and "When You Wish Upon a Star", and especially not when the instrumental tracks were recorded in a key that suited him at age twelve but not thirteen, so he was clearly straining. "Fingertips" being a massive hit also meant Stevie was now near the top of the bill on the Motortown Revue when it went on its second tour. But this actually put him in a precarious position. When he had been down at the bottom of the bill and unknown, nobody expected anything from him, and he was following other minor acts, so when he was surprisingly good the audiences went wild. Now, near the top of the bill, he had to go on after Marvin Gaye, and he was not nearly so impressive in that context. The audiences were polite enough, but not in the raptures he was used to. Although Stevie could still beat Gaye in some circumstances. At Motown staff parties, Berry Gordy would always have a contest where he'd pit two artists against each other to see who could win the crowd over, something he thought instilled a fun and useful competitive spirit in his artists. They'd alternate songs, two songs each, and Gordy would decide on the winner based on audience response. For the 1963 Motown Christmas party, it was Stevie versus Marvin. Wonder went first, with "Workout, Stevie, Workout", and was apparently impressive, but then Gaye topped him with a version of "Hitch-Hike". So Stevie had to top that, and apparently did, with a hugely extended version of "I Call it Pretty Music", reworked in the Ray Charles style he'd used for "Fingertips". So Marvin Gaye had to top that with the final song of the contest, and he did, performing "Stubborn Kind of Fellow": [Excerpt: Marvin Gaye, "Stubborn Kind of Fellow"] And he was great. So great, it turned the crowd against him. They started booing, and someone in the audience shouted "Marvin, you should be ashamed of yourself, taking advantage of a little blind kid!" The crowd got so hostile Berry Gordy had to stop the performance and end the party early. He never had another contest like that again. There were other problems, as well. Wonder had been assigned a tutor, a young man named Ted Hull, who began to take serious control over his life. Hull was legally blind, so could teach Wonder using Braille, but unlike Wonder had some sight -- enough that he was even able to get a drivers' license and a co-pilot license for planes. Hull was put in loco parentis on most of Stevie's tours, and soon became basically inseparable from him, but this caused a lot of problems, not least because Hull was a conservative white man, while almost everyone else at Motown was Black, and Stevie was socially liberal and on the side of the civil rights and anti-Vietnam movements. Hull started to collaborate on songwriting with Wonder, which most people at Motown were OK with but which now seems like a serious conflict of interest, and he also started calling himself Stevie's "manager" -- which did *not* impress the people at Motown, who had their own conflict of interest because with Stevie, like with all their artists, they were his management company and agents as well as his record label and publishers. Motown grudgingly tolerated Hull, though, mostly because he was someone they could pass Lula Mae Hardaway to to deal with her complaints. Stevie's mother was not very impressed with the way that Motown were handling her son, and would make her opinion known to anyone who would listen. Hull and Hardaway did not get on at all, but he could be relied on to save the Gordy family members from having to deal with her. Wonder was sent over to Europe for Christmas 1963, to perform shows at the Paris Olympia and do some British media appearances. But both his mother and Hull had come along, and their clear dislike for each other was making him stressed. He started to get pains in his throat whenever he sang -- pains which everyone assumed were a stress reaction to the unhealthy atmosphere that happened whenever Hull and his mother were in the same room together, but which later turned out to be throat nodules that required surgery. Because of this, his singing was generally not up to standard, which meant he was moved to a less prominent place on the bill, which in turn led to his mother accusing the Gordy family of being against him and trying to stop him becoming a star. Wonder started to take her side and believe that Motown were conspiring against him, and at one point he even "accidentally" dropped a bottle of wine on Ted Hull's foot, breaking one of his toes, because he saw Hull as part of the enemy that was Motown. Before leaving for those shows, he had recorded the album he later considered the worst of his career. While he was now just plain Stevie on albums, he wasn't for his single releases, or in his first film appearance, where he was still Little Stevie Wonder. Berry Gordy was already trying to get a foot in the door in Hollywood -- by the end of the decade Motown would be moving from Detroit to LA -- and his first real connections there were with American International Pictures, the low-budget film-makers who have come up a lot in connection with the LA scene. AIP were the producers of the successful low-budget series of beach party films, which combined appearances by teen heartthrobs Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello in swimsuits with cameo appearances by old film stars fallen on hard times, and with musical performances by bands like the Bobby Fuller Four. There would be a couple of Motown connections to these films -- most notably, the Supremes would do the theme tune for Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine -- but Muscle Beach Party was to be the first. Most of the music for Muscle Beach Party was written by Brian Wilson, Roger Christian, and Gary Usher, as one might expect for a film about surfing, and was performed by Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, the film's major musical guests, with Annette, Frankie, and Donna Loren [pron Lorren] adding vocals, on songs like "Muscle Bustle": [Excerpt: Donna Loren with Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, "Muscle Bustle"] The film followed the formula in every way -- it also had a cameo appearance by Peter Lorre, his last film appearance before his death, and it featured Little Stevie Wonder playing one of the few songs not written by the surf and car writers, a piece of nothing called "Happy Street". Stevie also featured in the follow-up, Bikini Beach, which came out a little under four months later, again doing a single number, "Happy Feelin'". To cash in on his appearances in these films, and having tried releasing albums of Little Stevie as jazz multi-instrumentalist, Ray Charles tribute act, live soulman and Andy Williams-style crooner, they now decided to see if they could sell him as a surf singer. Or at least, as Motown's idea of a surf singer, which meant a lot of songs about the beach and the sea -- mostly old standards like "Red Sails in the Sunset" and "Ebb Tide" -- backed by rather schlocky Wrecking Crew arrangements. And this is as good a place as any to take on one of the bits of disinformation that goes around about Motown. I've addressed this before, but it's worth repeating here in slightly more detail. Carol Kaye, one of the go-to Wrecking Crew bass players, is a known credit thief, and claims to have played on hundreds of records she didn't -- claims which too many people take seriously because she is a genuine pioneer and was for a long time undercredited on many records she *did* play on. In particular, she claims to have played on almost all the classic Motown hits that James Jamerson of the Funk Brothers played on, like the title track for this episode, and she claims this despite evidence including notarised statements from everyone involved in the records, the release of session recordings that show producers talking to the Funk Brothers, and most importantly the evidence of the recordings themselves, which have all the characteristics of the Detroit studio and sound like the Funk Brothers playing, and have absolutely nothing in common, sonically, with the records the Wrecking Crew played on at Gold Star, Western, and other LA studios. The Wrecking Crew *did* play on a lot of Motown records, but with a handful of exceptions, mostly by Brenda Holloway, the records they played on were quickie knock-off album tracks and potboiler albums made to tie in with film or TV work -- soundtracks to TV specials the acts did, and that kind of thing. And in this case, the Wrecking Crew played on the entire Stevie at the Beach album, including the last single to be released as by "Little Stevie Wonder", "Castles in the Sand", which was arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Castles in the Sand"] Apparently the idea of surfin' Stevie didn't catch on any more than that of swingin' Stevie had earlier. Indeed, throughout 1964 and 65 Motown seem to have had less than no idea what they were doing with Stevie Wonder, and he himself refers to all his recordings from this period as an embarrassment, saving particular scorn for the second single from Stevie at the Beach, "Hey Harmonica Man", possibly because that, unlike most of his other singles around this point, was a minor hit, reaching number twenty-nine on the charts. Motown were still pushing Wonder hard -- he even got an appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in May 1964, only the second Motown act to appear on it after the Marvelettes -- but Wonder was getting more and more unhappy with the decisions they were making. He loathed the Stevie at the Beach album -- the records he'd made earlier, while patchy and not things he'd chosen, were at least in some way related to his musical interests. He *did* love jazz, and he *did* love Ray Charles, and he *did* love old standards, and the records were made by his friend Clarence Paul and with the studio musicians he'd grown to know in Detroit. But Stevie at the Beach was something that was imposed on Clarence Paul from above, it was cut with unfamiliar musicians, Stevie thought the films he was appearing in were embarrassing, and he wasn't even having much commercial success, which was the whole point of these compromises. He started to get more rebellious against Paul in the studio, though many of these decisions weren't made by Paul, and he would complain to anyone who would listen that if he was just allowed to do the music he wanted to sing, the way he wanted to sing it, he would have more hits. But for nine months he did basically no singing other than that Ed Sullivan Show appearance -- he had to recover from the operation to remove the throat nodules. When he did return to the studio, the first single he cut remained unreleased, and while some stuff from the archives was released between the start of 1964 and March 1965, the first single he recorded and released after the throat nodules, "Kiss Me Baby", which came out in March, was a complete flop. That single was released to coincide with the first Motown tour of Europe, which we looked at in the episode on "Stop! In the Name of Love", and which was mostly set up to promote the Supremes, but which also featured Martha and the Vandellas, the Miracles, and the Temptations. Even though Stevie had not had a major hit in eighteen months by this point, he was still brought along on the tour, the only solo artist to be included -- at this point Gordy thought that solo artists looked outdated compared to vocal groups, in a world dominated by bands, and so other solo artists like Marvin Gaye weren't invited. This was a sign that Gordy was happier with Stevie than his recent lack of chart success might suggest. One of the main reasons that Gordy had been in two minds about him was that he'd had no idea if Wonder would still be able to sing well after his voice broke. But now, as he was about to turn fifteen, his adult voice had more or less stabilised, and Gordy knew that he was capable of having a long career, if they just gave him the proper material. But for now his job on the tour was to do his couple of hits, smile, and be on the lower rungs of the ladder. But even that was still a prominent place to be given the scaled-down nature of this bill compared to the Motortown Revues. While the tour was in England, for example, Dusty Springfield presented a TV special focusing on all the acts on the tour, and while the Supremes were the main stars, Stevie got to do two songs, and also took part in the finale, a version of "Mickey's Monkey" led by Smokey Robinson but with all the performers joining in, with Wonder getting a harmonica solo: [Excerpt: Smokey Robinson and the Motown acts, "Mickey's Monkey"] Sadly, there was one aspect of the trip to the UK that was extremely upsetting for Wonder. Almost all the media attention he got -- which was relatively little, as he wasn't a Supreme -- was about his blindness, and one reporter in particular convinced him that there was an operation he could have to restore his sight, but that Motown were preventing him from finding out about it in order to keep his gimmick going. He was devastated about this, and then further devastated when Ted Hull finally convinced him that it wasn't true, and that he'd been lied to. Meanwhile other newspapers were reporting that he *could* see, and that he was just feigning blindness to boost his record sales. After the tour, a live recording of Wonder singing the blues standard "High Heeled Sneakers" was released as a single, and barely made the R&B top thirty, and didn't hit the top forty on the pop charts. Stevie's initial contract with Motown was going to expire in the middle of 1966, so there was a year to get him back to a point where he was having the kind of hits that other Motown acts were regularly getting at this point. Otherwise, it looked like his career might end by the time he was sixteen. The B-side to "High Heeled Sneakers" was another duet with Clarence Paul, who dominates the vocal sound for much of it -- a version of Willie Nelson's country classic "Funny How Time Slips Away": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Funny How Time Slips Away"] There are a few of these duet records scattered through Wonder's early career -- we'll hear another one a little later -- and they're mostly dismissed as Paul trying to muscle his way into a revival of his own recording career as an artist, and there may be some truth in that. But they're also a natural extension of the way the two of them worked in the studio. Motown didn't have the facilities to give Wonder Braille lyric sheets, and Paul didn't trust him to be able to remember the lyrics, so often when they made a record, Paul would be just off-mic, reciting the lyrics to Wonder fractionally ahead of him singing them. So it was more or less natural that this dynamic would leak out onto records, but not everyone saw it that way. But at the same time, there has been some suggestion that Paul was among those manoeuvring to get rid of Wonder from Motown as soon as his contract was finished -- despite the fact that Wonder was the only act Paul had worked on any big hits for. Either way, Paul and Wonder were starting to chafe at working with each other in the studio, and while Paul remained his on-stage musical director, the opportunity to work on Wonder's singles for what would surely be his last few months at Motown was given to Hank Cosby and Sylvia Moy. Cosby was a saxophone player and staff songwriter who had been working with Wonder and Paul for years -- he'd co-written "Fingertips" and several other tracks -- while Moy was a staff songwriter who was working as an apprentice to Cosby. Basically, at this point, nobody else wanted the job of writing for Wonder, and as Moy was having no luck getting songs cut by any other artists and her career was looking about as dead as Wonder's, they started working together. Wonder was, at this point, full of musical ideas but with absolutely no discipline. He's said in interviews that at this point he was writing a hundred and fifty songs a month, but these were often not full songs -- they were fragments, hooks, or a single verse, or a few lines, which he would pass on to Moy, who would turn his ideas into structured songs that fit the Motown hit template, usually with the assistance of Cosby. Then Cosby would come up with an arrangement, and would co-produce with Mickey Stevenson. The first song they came up with in this manner was a sign of how Wonder was looking outside the world of Motown to the rock music that was starting to dominate the US charts -- but which was itself inspired by Motown music. We heard in the last episode on the Rolling Stones how "Nowhere to Run" by the Vandellas: [Excerpt: Martha and the Vandellas, "Nowhere to Run"] had inspired the Stones' "Satisfaction": [Excerpt: The Rolling Stones, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction"] And Wonder in turn was inspired by "Satisfaction" to come up with his own song -- though again, much of the work making it into an actual finished song was done by Sylvia Moy. They took the four-on-the-floor beat and basic melody of "Satisfaction" and brought it back to Motown, where those things had originated -- though they hadn't originated with Stevie, and this was his first record to sound like a Motown record in the way we think of those things. As a sign of how, despite the way these stories are usually told, the histories of rock and soul were completely and complexly intertwined, that four-on-the-floor beat itself was a conscious attempt by Holland, Dozier, and Holland to appeal to white listeners -- on the grounds that while Black people generally clapped on the backbeat, white people didn't, and so having a four-on-the-floor beat wouldn't throw them off. So Cosby, Moy, and Wonder, in trying to come up with a "Satisfaction" soundalike were Black Motown writers trying to copy a white rock band trying to copy Black Motown writers trying to appeal to a white rock audience. Wonder came up with the basic chorus hook, which was based around a lot of current slang terms he was fond of: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] Then Moy, with some assistance from Cosby, filled it out into a full song. Lyrically, it was as close to social comment as Motown had come at this point -- Wonder was, like many of his peers in soul music, interested in the power of popular music to make political statements, and he would become a much more political artist in the next few years, but at this point it's still couched in the acceptable boy-meets-girl romantic love song that Motown specialised in. But in 1965 a story about a boy from the wrong side of the tracks dating a rich girl inevitably raised the idea that the boy and girl might be of different races -- a subject that was very, very, controversial in the mid-sixties. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] "Uptight" made number three on the pop charts and number one on the R&B charts, and saved Stevie Wonder's career. And this is where, for all that I've criticised Motown in this episode, their strategy paid off. Mickey Stevenson talked a lot about how in the early sixties Motown didn't give up on artists -- if someone had potential but was not yet having hits or finding the right approach, they would keep putting out singles in a holding pattern, trying different things and seeing what would work, rather than toss them aside. It had already worked for the Temptations and the Supremes, and now it had worked for Stevie Wonder. He would be the last beneficiary of this policy -- soon things would change, and Motown would become increasingly focused on trying to get the maximum returns out of a small number of stars, rather than building careers for a range of artists -- but it paid off brilliantly for Wonder. "Uptight" was such a reinvention of Wonder's career, sound, and image that many of his fans consider it the real start of his career -- everything before it only counting as prologue. The follow-up, "Nothing's Too Good For My Baby", was an "Uptight" soundalike, and as with Motown soundalike follow-ups in general, it didn't do quite as well, but it still made the top twenty on the pop chart and got to number four on the R&B chart. Stevie Wonder was now safe at Motown, and so he was going to do something no other Motown act had ever done before -- he was going to record a protest song and release it as a single. For about a year he'd been ending his shows with a version of Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind", sung as a duet with Clarence Paul, who was still his on stage bandleader even though the two weren't working together in the studio as much. Wonder brought that into the studio, and recorded it with Paul back as the producer, and as his duet partner. Berry Gordy wasn't happy with the choice of single, but Wonder pushed, and Gordy knew that Wonder was on a winning streak and gave in, and so "Blowin' in the Wind" became Stevie Wonder's next single: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Blowin' in the Wind"] "Blowin' in the Wind" made the top ten, and number one on the R&B charts, and convinced Gordy that there was some commercial potential in going after the socially aware market, and over the next few years Motown would start putting out more and more political records. Because Motown convention was to have the producer of a hit record produce the next hit for that artist, and keep doing so until they had a flop, Paul was given the opportunity to produce the next single. "A Place in the Sun" was another ambiguously socially-aware song, co-written by the only white writer on Motown staff, Ron Miller, who happened to live in the same building as Stevie's tutor-cum-manager Ted Hull. "A Place in the Sun" was a pleasant enough song, inspired by "A Change is Gonna Come", but with a more watered-down, generic, message of hope, but the record was lifted by Stevie's voice, and again made the top ten. This meant that Paul and Miller, and Miller's writing partner Bryan Mills, got to work on his next  two singles -- his 1966 Christmas song "Someday at Christmas", which made number twenty-four, and the ballad "Travellin' Man" which made thirty-two. The downward trajectory with Paul meant that Wonder was soon working with other producers again. Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol cut another Miller and Mills song with him, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday"] But that was left in the can, as not good enough to release, and Stevie was soon back working with Cosby. The two of them had come up with an instrumental together in late 1966, but had not been able to come up with any words for it, so they played it for Smokey Robinson, who said their instrumental sounded like circus music, and wrote lyrics about a clown: [Excerpt: The Miracles, "The Tears of a Clown"] The Miracles cut that as album filler, but it was released three years later as a single and became the Miracles' only number one hit with Smokey Robinson as lead singer. So Wonder and Cosby definitely still had their commercial touch, even if their renewed collaboration with Moy, who they started working with again, took a while to find a hit. To start with, Wonder returned to the idea of taking inspiration from a hit by a white British group, as he had with "Uptight". This time it was the Beatles, and the track "Michelle", from the Rubber Soul album: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Michelle"] Wonder took the idea of a song with some French lyrics, and a melody with some similarities to the Beatles song, and came up with "My Cherie Amour", which Cosby and Moy finished off. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "My Cherie Amour"] Gordy wouldn't allow that to be released, saying it was too close to "Michelle" and people would think it was a rip-off, and it stayed in the vaults for several years. Cosby also produced a version of a song Ron Miller had written with Orlando Murden, "For Once in My Life", which pretty much every other Motown act was recording versions of -- the Four Tops, the Temptations, Billy Eckstine, Martha and the Vandellas and Barbra McNair all cut versions of it in 1967, and Gordy wouldn't let Wonder's version be put out either. So they had to return to the drawing board. But in truth, Stevie Wonder was not the biggest thing worrying Berry Gordy at this point. He was dealing with problems in the Supremes, which we'll look at in a future episode -- they were about to get rid of Florence Ballard, and thus possibly destroy one of the biggest acts in the world, but Gordy thought that if they *didn't* get rid of her they would be destroying themselves even more certainly. Not only that, but Gordy was in the midst of a secret affair with Diana Ross, Holland, Dozier, and Holland were getting restless about their contracts, and his producers kept bringing him unlistenable garbage that would never be a hit. Like Norman Whitfield, insisting that this track he'd cut with Marvin Gaye, "I Heard it Through the Grapevine", should be a single. Gordy had put his foot down about that one too, just like he had about "My Cherie Amour", and wouldn't allow it to be released. Meanwhile, many of the smaller acts on the label were starting to feel like they were being ignored by Gordy, and had formed what amounted to a union, having regular meetings at Clarence Paul's house to discuss how they could pressure the label to put the same effort into their careers as into those of the big stars. And the Funk Brothers, the musicians who played on all of Motown's hits, were also getting restless -- they contributed to the arrangements, and they did more for the sound of the records than half the credited producers; why weren't they getting production credits and royalties? Harvey Fuqua had divorced Gordy's sister Gwen, and so became persona non grata at the label and was in the process of leaving Motown, and so was Mickey Stevenson, Gordy's second in command, because Gordy wouldn't give him any stock in the company. And Detroit itself was on edge. The crime rate in the city had started to go up, but even worse, the *perception* of crime was going up. The Detroit News had been running a campaign to whip up fear, which it called its Secret Witness campaign, and running constant headlines about rapes, murders, and muggings. These in turn had led to increased calls for more funds for the police, calls which inevitably contained a strong racial element and at least implicitly linked the perceived rise in crime to the ongoing Civil Rights movement. At this point the police in Detroit were ninety-three percent white, even though Detroit's population was over thirty percent Black. The Mayor and Police Commissioner were trying to bring in some modest reforms, but they weren't going anywhere near fast enough for the Black population who felt harassed and attacked by the police, but were still going too fast for the white people who were being whipped up into a state of terror about supposedly soft-on-crime policies, and for the police who felt under siege and betrayed by the politicians. And this wasn't the only problem affecting the city, and especially affecting Black people. Redlining and underfunded housing projects meant that the large Black population was being crammed into smaller and smaller spaces with fewer local amenities. A few Black people who were lucky enough to become rich -- many of them associated with Motown -- were able to move into majority-white areas, but that was just leading to white flight, and to an increase in racial tensions. The police were on edge after the murder of George Overman Jr, the son of a policeman, and though they arrested the killers that was just another sign that they weren't being shown enough respect. They started organising "blu flu"s -- the police weren't allowed to strike, so they'd claim en masse that they were off sick, as a protest against the supposed soft-on-crime administration. Meanwhile John Sinclair was organising "love-ins", gatherings of hippies at which new bands like the MC5 played, which were being invaded by gangs of bikers who were there to beat up the hippies. And the Detroit auto industry was on its knees -- working conditions had got bad enough that the mostly Black workforce organised a series of wildcat strikes. All in all, Detroit was looking less and less like somewhere that Berry Gordy wanted to stay, and the small LA subsidiary of Motown was rapidly becoming, in his head if nowhere else, the more important part of the company, and its future. He was starting to think that maybe he should leave all these ungrateful people behind in their dangerous city, and move the parts of the operation that actually mattered out to Hollywood. Stevie Wonder was, of course, one of the parts that mattered, but the pressure was on in 1967 to come up with a hit as big as his records from 1965 and early 66, before he'd been sidetracked down the ballad route. The song that was eventually released was one on which Stevie's mother, Lula Mae Hardaway, had a co-writing credit: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] "I Was Made to Love Her" was inspired by Wonder's first love, a girl from the same housing projects as him, and he talked about the song being special to him because it was true, saying it "kind of speaks of my first love to a girl named Angie, who was a very beautiful woman... Actually, she was my third girlfriend but my first love. I used to call Angie up and, like, we would talk and say, 'I love you, I love you,' and we'd talk and we'd both go to sleep on the phone. And this was like from Detroit to California, right? You know, mother said, 'Boy, what you doing - get off the phone!' Boy, I tell you, it was ridiculous." But while it was inspired by her, like with many of the songs from this period, much of the lyric came from Moy -- her mother grew up in Arkansas, and that's why the lyric started "I was born in Little Rock", as *her* inspiration came from stories told by her parents. But truth be told, the lyrics weren't particularly detailed or impressive, just a standard story of young love. Rather what mattered in the record was the music. The song was structured differently from many Motown records, including most of Wonder's earlier ones. Most Motown records had a huge amount of dynamic variation, and a clear demarcation between verse and chorus. Even a record like "Dancing in the Street", which took most of its power from the tension and release caused by spending most of the track on one chord, had the release that came with the line "All we need is music", and could be clearly subdivided into different sections. "I Was Made to Love Her" wasn't like that. There was a tiny section which functioned as a middle eight -- and which cover versions like the one by the Beach Boys later that year tend to cut out, because it disrupts the song's flow: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] But other than that, the song has no verse or chorus, no distinct sections, it's just a series of lyrical couplets over the same four chords, repeating over and over, an incessant groove that could really go on indefinitely: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This is as close as Motown had come at this point to the new genre of funk, of records that were just staying with one groove throughout. It wasn't a funk record, not yet -- it was still a pop-soul record, But what made it extraordinary was the bass line, and this is why I had to emphasise earlier that this was a record by the Funk Brothers, not the Wrecking Crew, no matter how much some Crew members may claim otherwise. As on most of Cosby's sessions, James Jamerson was given free reign to come up with his own part with little guidance, and what he came up with is extraordinary. This was at a time when rock and pop basslines were becoming a little more mobile, thanks to the influence of Jamerson in Detroit, Brian Wilson in LA, and Paul McCartney in London.  But for the most part, even those bass parts had been fairly straightforward technically -- often inventive, but usually just crotchets and quavers, still keeping rhythm along with the drums rather than in dialogue with them, roaming free rhythmically. Jamerson had started to change his approach, inspired by the change in studio equipment. Motown had upgraded to eight-track recording in 1965, and once he'd become aware of the possibilities, and of the greater prominence that his bass parts could have if they were recorded on their own track, Jamerson had become a much busier player. Jamerson was a jazz musician by inclination, and so would have been very aware of John Coltrane's legendary "sheets of sound", in which Coltrane would play fast arpeggios and scales, in clusters of five and seven notes, usually in semiquaver runs (though sometimes in even smaller fractions -- his solo in Miles Davis' "Straight, No Chaser" is mostly semiquavers but has a short passage in hemidemisemiquavers): [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Straight, No Chaser"] Jamerson started to adapt the "sheets of sound" style to bass playing, treating the bass almost as a jazz solo instrument -- though unlike Coltrane he was also very, very concerned with creating something that people could tap their feet to. Much like James Brown, Jamerson was taking jazz techniques and repurposing them for dance music. The most notable example of that up to this point had been in the Four Tops' "Bernadette", where there are a few scuffling semiquaver runs thrown in, and which is a much more fluid part than most of his playing previously: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "Bernadette"] But on "Bernadette", Jamerson had been limited by Holland, Dozier, and Holland, who liked him to improvise but around a framework they created. Cosby, on the other hand, because he had been a Funk Brother himself, was much more aware of the musicians' improvisational abilities, and would largely give them a free hand. This led to a truly remarkable bass part on "I Was Made to Love Her", which is somewhat buried in the single mix, but Marcus Miller did an isolated recreation of the part for the accompanying CD to a book on Jamerson, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, and listening to that you can hear just how inventive it is: [Excerpt: Marcus Miller, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This was exciting stuff -- though much less so for the touring musicians who went on the road with the Motown revues while Jamerson largely stayed in Detroit recording. Jamerson's family would later talk about him coming home grumbling because complaints from the touring musicians had been brought to him, and he'd been asked to play less difficult parts so they'd find it easier to replicate them on stage. "I Was Made to Love Her" wouldn't exist without Stevie Wonder, Hank Cosby, Sylvia Moy, or Lula Mae Hardaway, but it's James Jamerson's record through and through: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] It went to number two on the charts, sat between "Light My Fire" at number one, and "All You Need is Love" at number three, with the Beatles song soon to overtake it and make number one itself. But within a few weeks of "I Was Made to Love Her" reaching its chart peak, things in Detroit would change irrevocably. On the 23rd of July, the police busted an illegal drinking den. They thought they were only going to get about twenty-five people there, but there turned out to be a big party on. They tried to arrest seventy-four people, but their wagon wouldn't fit them all in so they had to call reinforcements and make the arrestees wait around til more wagons arrived. A crowd of hundreds gathered while they were waiting. Someone threw a brick at a squad car window, a rumour went round that the police had bayonetted someone, and soon the city was in flames. Riots lasted for days, with people burning down and looting businesses, but what really made the situation bad was the police's overreaction. They basically started shooting at young Black men, using them as target practice, and later claiming they were snipers, arsonists, and looters -- but there were cases like the Algiers Motel incident, where the police raided a motel where several Black men, including the members of the soul group The Dramatics, were hiding out along with a few white women. The police sexually assaulted the women, and then killed three of the men for associating with white women, in what was described as a "lynching with bullets". The policemen in question were later acquitted of all charges. The National Guard were called in, as were Federal troops -- the 82nd Airborne Division, and the 101st Airborne from Clarksville, the division in which Jimi Hendrix had recently served. After four days of rioting, one of the bloodiest riots in US history was at an end, with forty-three people dead (of whom thirty-three were Black and only one was a policeman). Official counts had 1,189 people injured, and over 7,200 arrests, almost all of them of Black people. A lot of the histories written later say that Black-owned businesses were spared during the riots, but that wasn't really the case. For example, Joe's Record Shop, owned by Joe Von Battle, who had put out the first records by C.L. Franklin and his daughter Aretha, was burned down, destroying not only the stock of records for sale but the master tapes of hundreds of recordings of Black artists, many of them unreleased and so now lost forever. John Lee Hooker, one of the artists whose music Von Battle had released, soon put out a song, "The Motor City is Burning", about the events: [Excerpt: John Lee Hooker, "The Motor City is Burning"] But one business that did remain unburned was Motown, with the Hitsville studio going untouched by flames and unlooted. Motown legend has this being down to the rioters showing respect for the studio that had done so much for Detroit, but it seems likely to have just been luck. Although Motown wasn't completely unscathed -- a National Guard tank fired a shell through the building, leaving a gigantic hole, which Berry Gordy saw as soon as he got back from a business trip he'd been on during the rioting. That was what made Berry Gordy decide once and for all that things needed to change. Motown owned a whole row of houses near the studio, which they used as additional office space and for everything other than the core business of making records. Gordy immediately started to sell them, and move the admin work into temporary rented space. He hadn't announced it yet, and it would be a few years before the move was complete, but from that moment on, the die was cast. Motown was going to leave Detroit and move to Hollywood.

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festivalPass Stories
Ep. 72 Groovin' with Joe Hertler and The Rainbow Seekers

festivalPass Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 37:52


Welcome back festival friends! On this episode our host, Pat Tully talks with Joe Hertler to get the story behind the Michigan music scene and his band, The Rainbow Seekers.   Joe was making his own music in college, then began collaborating with his good friend Ryan Hoger and The Rainbow Seekers were born. Micah Bracken, Aaron Stinson and Ryan McMahon would complete the ensemble.   The band says they will “make a sprightly young groove doctor out of anyone” and their infectious energy delivers on that promise.   Joe takes time out from putting the finishing touches on the band's 5th album to sit with Pat and let the fans in backstage to hear about the band's experience at Bonnaroo, Electric Forrest, Summer Camp and more.   Joe also talks about what it was like to get discovered and signed to a major music label and the challenges that entails.   Hear more about these stories on this episode of FestivalPass Stories.   To find out more about Joe Hertler, The Rainbow Seekers and their music go to their website: https://joehertler.com/  Follow them on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joehertler/  Connect on Twitter: https://twitter.com/joehertler    Connect with Festival Pass!  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/getfestivalpass/  Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/getfestivalpass/  Twitter - https://twitter.com/getfestivalpass  Website - https://festivalpass.com 

You'll Hear It - Daily Jazz Advice
Groovin' Inclusively

You'll Hear It - Daily Jazz Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 14:55


Adam and Peter take a Speakpipe question on how playing different genres and instruments can effect one's playing. You can find a link to the YT channel here.  Have a question for us? Leave us a SpeakPipe Checkout courses from Adam, Peter and more at Open Studio Let us know what you think by leaving a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ review, or head over to our YouTube channel.Follow us on Twitter | Instagram

DJ Rhythm Dee's Black Magic Sounds
Episode 100: BMS Special: The Very First Show (Episode 1)

DJ Rhythm Dee's Black Magic Sounds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 63:32


In celebration of our 10th anniversary, I thought it would be fun to go back to episode 1. The very first episode was posted on October 12th, 2012. I had no idea what podcasting exactly was at the time but I had a strong urge to explore this new medium. Well needless to say I never thought that I would still be doing this for these many years. Ten years later and over 3000 songs played, I am still loving sharing the gift of music.  A special thanks to all the BMS Listeners all over the world that have supported me with your time and kind words. Hoping we will never forget when music was Music! DJ Rhythm Dee  Playlist  1.  GROOVIN' (THAT'S WHAT WE'RE DOING/S.O.S. BAND 2.  YOU ARE MY MELODY/CHANGE 3.  I'VE FOUND LOVIN'/FATBACK BAND 4.  KEEPIN' MY LOVER SATISFIED/MELBA MOORE 5.  NEVER TOO MUCH/LUTHER VANDROSS 6.  HEAVY ON MY MIND/CLUB NOVEAU 7.  MY FORBIDDEN LOVER/CHIC 8.  WARM/ CHANGE 9.  GET DOWN IT'S SATURDAY NIGHT/OLIVER CHEATHAM 10. JOY & PAIN/FRANKIE BEVERLY & MAZE 11. BLESSED/EMOTIONS 

JahPrince
JahRiffe TruVersation

JahPrince

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 10:51


JahRiffe stops by the show to discuss the release of new music, We're Groovin'. Overall he is an energetic performer and when he is done, the audience feels rejuvenated. Make sure you search for his consistent conscious releases on all streaming platforms.

Sunsplash Mix with Jah Prince & Selecta Princess
Episode 627: JahRiffe TruVersation

Sunsplash Mix with Jah Prince & Selecta Princess

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 10:52


JahRiffe stops by the show to discuss the release of new music, We're Groovin'. Overall he is an energetic performer and when he is done, the audience feels rejuvenated. Make sure you search for his consistent conscious releases on all streaming platforms.

All Points Podcast
Movin and Groovin

All Points Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 73:56


Due to a hiccup in the system, Tuesday's show comes out today! Enjoy. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Media Path Podcast
Peace, Love & Rascals featuring Felix Cavaliere

Media Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 67:50


Blue-eyed soul pioneer, Felix Cavaliere soared to chart topping heights with The Rascals and their smash hits, Good Lovin', Groovin', It's a Beautiful Morning, and People Got to Be Free, all designed to elevate your spirits and positively change the world.Rock and Roll, Songwriter, Musician, Vocal Group, and Grammy Hall of Famer Felix is adding best selling author to his list of accomplishments with the new biorgraphy, Felix Cavaliere: Memoir of a Rascal.Felix writes his heart into his words and his music and he joins Fritz and Weezy, who, this week, are recommending Mike on Hulu and the podcasts Fever Dreams and The Orange Wave.Path Points of Interest:Felix CavaliereFelix Cavaliere: Memoir of a RascalThe Rascals and Tom Jones The Orange Wave: A History of the Religious Right Since 1960 PodcastStraight White American Jesus PodcastFever Dreams PodcastMike on HuluGift of Democracy

MHD Off the Record
MHD OTR South LA Resources

MHD Off the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 10:36


This is an episode of MHD Off the Record South L.A. Community Resources, where Chavonne Taylor shares what services, programs, and events we have available in our city and community. Here you can check for information and resources regarding housing, wellness, and employment but also art programs, music festivals and so much more. Resources discussed in episode: WELLNESS 1. Aqusize Class Walk-in rates: Adults (18-49) $5.00 Adults (50+) $4.00 Series (10 classes) Adults (18-49) $45.00 Adults (50+) $35.00 When: Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:00pm-6:45pm Where: Van Ness Pool 5720 2nd Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90043 Contact: vanness.pool@lacity.org More Info: www.instagram.com/vanness.pool 2. Moovin' & Groovin' All-Abilities Dance Workout for Adults 55+ When: Wednesdays at 11am Where: Hyde Park Miriam Matthews Branch Library 2205 W. Florence Avenue. Los Angeles, CA 90043 Contact: 323-750-7241 More Info: www.lapl.org/branches/hyde-park 3. Beginner's Yoga When: Thursdays at 6:30pm Where: Hyde Park Miriam Matthews Branch Library 2205 W. Florence Avenue. Los Angeles, CA 90043 Contact: 323-750-7241 More Info: www.lapl.org/branches/hyde-park 4. Tree Yoga Cooperative Grand Opening Celebration When: September 10th at 8:30am Where: The Beehive 918 E. 60th St. Los Angeles, CA 90001 More info and RSVP: www.TreeYogaCoop.com TRANSPORTATION 5. Metro GoPass Fareless Pass Program The GoPass Program is available to students at participating K-12 schools and community colleges, with a focus on helping students ride transit without the worry of paying fare. With a registered GoPass TAP card, students attending participating schools can ride Metro and other participating systems to and from school, and for trips after school and on weekends. More info: www.Metro.com/GoPass YOUTH PROGRAMS 6. Metro Youth Council Metro is also selecting 27 youth to represent on their youth council. Information Sessions via Zoom: Thursday, September 8th at 6pm Tuesday, September 13 at 6pm Saturday September 24th at 10am More info and to RSVP: www.metro.net/about/youth-council HOUSING 7. Low-Income Purchase Assistance (First-time Home Buyers) Contact: (213) 808-8800 More Info: www.housing.lacity.org/housing/housing-programs/first-time-homebuyers EMPLOYMENT 8. Trans & Non-Binary Career Resource Clinic When: September 7th at 10am Where: Via Zoom More info and to RSVP: bit.ly/LATransCareerClinic 7. Trans & Non-Binary Job Fair When: September 14th at 10am Where: Via Zoom More info and to RSVP: bit.ly/LATransJobs MUSIC, ARTS, AND RECREATION 8. Barbara Morrison Jazz & Blues Music Festival and Barbara Morrison Square Intersection Naming When: September 10th 10am to 7pm Where: Barbara Morrison Performing Arts Center 4305 Degnan Blvd #101, Los Angeles, CA 90008 More info: www.culturela.org/event/barbara-morrison-jazz-blues-music-festival-and-barbara-morrison-square-intersection-naming 9. Harvard Park Community Block Party When: September 17th 10am to 2pm Where: Jackie Tatum Harvard Park 1535 W 62nd Street

What the Riff?!?
1968 - March: The Electric Flag “Long Time Comin'”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 32:07


The Electric Flag was the brainchild of guitarist Mike Bloomfield, and Long Time Comin' was their debut studio album.  The core of the band was formed by Mike Bloomfield on guitar, Barry Goldberg on keyboards, and Buddy Miles (soon to be with Jimmy Hendrix's Band of Gypsies) on drums.  Additionally, Nick Gravenites would sing lead on several tracks.With "Long Time Comin'" Bloomfield wanted to create a sound that would feature what he called "American music."  He would draw inspiration from many sources including traditional country, gospel, and R&B, and the result would be a fusion of rock, jazz, R&B, and an early use of a horn section.  The sound would be described as an "eclectic approach toward American musical."  Critics would complement the group's sound on this album, though it would be somewhat of a failure commercially on the charts.The Electric Flag would put out two albums in 1968, but would break up shortly before their second album was released.  Drug use affected the group's ability to perform, and Bloomfield would later admit that heroin caused his playing to fall apart.Wayne brings us this classic of southern rock. WineThe full name for this song is actually "Drinking Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee," and is a traditional boogie-woogie blues song about a famous and not very good wine called Thunderbird ("the word is Thunderbird").  It was a creation of E & J Gallo Winery, made cheap with a high alcohol content.Texas Buddy Miles sings lead on this blues track.  This sound would find traction with later groups like ZZ Top and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Bloomfield's playing was inspired by groups he heard in Chicago, and he would become known as one of the premier guitarists in rock music.  "I Wouldn't be an American, If it wasn't for Texas."Killing Floor This is an updated take on the Howlin' Wolf blues classic.  It has a blues feel but with an upbeat tempo.  The Electric Flag would cover this long before Led Zeppelin would make it the basis for "The Lemon Song."  Jimmy Hendrix would play this at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival.Groovin' Is Easy This is the "hit single" from the album.  The sound is different from the other blues-based tracks, and is a bit more time stamped for the age.  "Groovin's so easy, baby, if you know how.  You don't have to keep yourself forever slavin' - go out an chase whatever you're cravin'." ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:main theme from the animated series “Speed Racer”While it would become a staple of after school and Saturday morning cartoons in the United States, this animated series was crossing the finish line of its run in Japan in this month.   STAFF PICKS:Summertime Blues by Blue CheerRob starts off our staff picks with a cover of Eddie Cochran's song from 1958.  Blue Cheer was a psychedelic band out of San Francisco, and considered a precursor to the heavy metal band.  Many consider this song to be the first heavy metal song to chart in the U.S.  They were considered the loudest group in concert at the time.I Thank You by Sam & Dave Bruce takes a soulful turn with the final Sam & Dave release on Stax records, as Stax ended a distribution deal with Atlantic Records (from which Sam & Dave were on loan).  It hit number 3 on the Billboard Pop Singles chart.  ZZ Top would cover this song later on, and it would be their second top 40 hit after "Tush."(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay  by Otis Redding Brian's staff pick is another song from Stax records, and the last single from Otis Redding.  Redding died in a plane crash 3 days after recording this song.  It was Redding's biggest hit, and the first posthumous release in the U.S.  It hit number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.Are You Gonna Be There (At the Love In) by The Chocolate WatchbandWayne closes out the staff picks in fine hippie style with  this band out of Los Altos, California.  The Chocolate Watchband started in 1965 and would break up by 1970.  Supposedly Jerry Garcia plays guitar on this track. The story is that when the band's guitarist was too high to play, Garcia was in another studio in the same building, and sat in. INSTRUMENTAL TRACK:(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay by King Curtis & the Kingmakers"Dock of the Bay" was so popular that it featured both Redding and this instrumental version on the charts.

Dave & Mahoney
Movin' Groovin' Ice Cream Truck

Dave & Mahoney

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 87:51


Why Should I Give A Damn?
Episode 112 "Movin' & Groovin'" feat. Christopher Gilbert

Why Should I Give A Damn?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 94:51


What actors & actresses played a role so well you never looked at them the same? Fellas could you flip a another woman with your wife? Who are the worse people to take advice from?

The Briefing
What they found in the drugs: Canberra's pill testing trial

The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 19:40


Back on July 19th, Australia's first fixed pill testing site opened in Canberra's city centre. The pilot program is running two nights a week for six months. Pill testing was one of the recommendations made by a coronial inquest into festival deaths. The team behind this latest site, called Harm Reduction Australia, has run a couple of trials of pill testing before at the Groovin the Moo festivals in Canberra. We're joined by Professor Malcolm McLeod, a chemist from the ANU and chemistry lead for CanTEST and Pill Testing Australia to find out how the testing went. In today's Briefing, we find out what was in the drugs, and how people reacted when the drugs they bought were not what they thought they were. Today's Headlines: - NASA rocket delayed- CSIRO releases pandemic report- Albo doesn't rule out high income tax cuts- Grace Tame says abuser still harassing her- Chris Dawson verdict to be handed down Follow The Briefing: Instagram: @thebriefingpodcast Facebook: TheBriefingNewsAUTwitter: @TheBriefingAU See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On Target
Episode 380: Keep On Groovin'

On Target

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 61:08


on-target-podcast.onpodium.comPrepare yourself for an effusive overflow of powerful vibes. This show is poppin' with boombastic beats and essential sounds. -----------------------------------------------The Playlist Is:"If You Don't Get It Yourself"Gloria Lynne- Canyon"Charlotte (Yes I'm Gonna Miss You)"Otis Leavill- Smash"If This Is Love"The Precisions- Stone"Where Is The Party"Johnny & The Expressions- Josie"Dance Little Girl"The Cavaliers- RCA-Victor"Direct Me"Otis Redding- Atco"I Just Wanna Make Love To You"The Rolling Stones- London"Girls, Girls, Girls"Gates Of Edan- Jubilee"Fool Killer"The Brian Auger Trinity - Columbia"Club A-Go-Go"Barbara Lynn- Tribe"Hold My Hand"Vernon & Jewell - Kent"Love Me One More Time"Jimmy Holiday- Diplomacy"Do You Feel It"Archie Bell & The Drells- I Just Can't Stop Dancing LP"Get Down"Harvey Scales & The Seven Sounds- Magic Touch"Keep On Groovin'"C. Smalls & Co. - A&M"Went Home Today"Merriday Park- Columbia"I Stole The Goodyear Blimp"The Book Of Changes- Capitol"Blackberry Lane"The Move- Regal Zonophone"Soul Bossa Nova"Quincy Jones- Mercury"Mas Que Nada"Sergio Mendes & Brazil '66- A&M"Samba Saravah"Pierre Barouh- United Artisits

Icon Fetch
399 - Felix Cavaliere - Book: Memoir of a Rascal

Icon Fetch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 25:12


They were the first white group signed to Atlantic Records, the Rascals blazed a trail with what became known as “blue-eyed soul,” with legendary hits like “Good Lovin,” “Groovin,” and “How Can I Be Sure,” but also created songs like “People Gotta Be Free,” which are still socially relevant more than 50 years after they were written. At the heart of the band was singer and organist Felix Cavaliere, who has just written a book - Memoir of a Rascal: From Pelham, NY to the Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame. He talks about his early days in Joey Dee & the Starlighters, how the Rascals got signed to Atlantic Records, and how they found "Mustang Sally" before Wilson Pickett.

The Inspiring Conversations Podcast
Groovin' On A Monday Evening With Jazz Musician Dean Demerritt

The Inspiring Conversations Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 33:56


Dirt Tracks & Rib Racks
Episode 55 - Groovin' at One Eleven Public House - LIVE in Knoxville for the Nationals

Dirt Tracks & Rib Racks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 54:05


We met up with the Cross boys (Across the Groove) for a podcast in Knoxville, IA at One Eleven Public House. We discuss how our week is going so far and what we have enjoyed here while in town. One Eleven is a great place in Knoxville for food and drinks, stop by if you're in town. And check out Across The Groove podcast. They are on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Spotify.

The Mindful Coping Podcast
Groovin' With Seth Leaf Pruzansky

The Mindful Coping Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 67:36


Great Hang with Myka and Tim
Movin' and Groovin'

Great Hang with Myka and Tim

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 46:13


Myka and Tim moved to a new apartment 

Another Day Another Slice
Movin' and Groovin'

Another Day Another Slice

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 33:31


Welcome to episode 2, Movin' and Groovin' where we hear about the new adventures of Maggie moving out with our special guest, Maggie's boyfriend, Joey! Listen in to see how their relationship has evolved over the years, the new motions of finding a routine outside of gender stereotypes, and how they're tackling this new adventure of their lives. Be sure to stay up to date and follow our Instagram @AnotherDayAnotherSlice! Produced by: @Ob1fooo

THE MISTERman's Take
#Harvey Mason groovin you

THE MISTERman's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 4:11


#Harvey Mason groovin you # one of the most talented and well rounded musicians ever# very distinctive drummer, songwriter and producer # song composed and produced by Harvey mason # respect --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mr-maxxx/support

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner
Bandana Blues #954 - It's Getting Too Hot

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 93:20


Show #954 It's Getting Too Hot 01. Slim Harpo - The Music's Hot [1970] (2:37) (Tip On In, Ace Records, 1996) 02. Liz Mandeville - Too Hot For Love (3:03) (The Stars Motel, Blue kitty Music, 2016) 03. Jimmy Burns - Red Hot Mama (3:54) (Back To The Delta, Delmark Records, 2003) 04. Sean Chambers - Red Hot Mama (3:45) (Welcome To My Blues, American Showplace, 2018) 05. Julie C Myers - Hot Rod Heart (4:06) (Rock On - Fearless Journey, self-release, 2015) 06. StratCat Willie & the Strays - Hot Tin Roof (2:36) (On A Hot Tin Roof, self-release, 2022) 07. RB Stone - She's Too Hot To Handle (2:45) (Loosen Up!, Middle Mountain Music, 2013) 08. James Cotton - Hot 'n Cold (3:04) (High Energy, Buddah Records, 1975) 09. Dave Weld - Red Hot Tabasco (3:03) (Nightwalk, Delmark Records, 2022) 10. Ms Zeno - Hot Sauce (4:02) (Back In Love, Blue Lotus Records, 2018) 11. Coco Montoya - Coming In Hot (3:25) (Coming In Hot, Alligator Records, 2019) 12. Bob Margolin And Bob Corritore - Red Hot Kisses (3:14) (So Far, VizzTone Records, 2022) 13. Jon Cleary - Too Damn Hot (5:11) (Jon Cleary & The Absolute Monster Gentlemen, Basin Street Records, 2002) 14. Trickbag - Hot And Heavy (2:49) (With Friends Vol. 1, Magic Records, 2013) 15. Jon Spear Band - Hot Sauce (4:56) (Hot Sauce, self-release, 2017) 16. Dee Miller Band - Hot And Sweaty (3:20) (Leopard Print Dress, self-release, 2018) 17. Richie Arndt & the Bluenatics - Too Hot To Handle (2:49) (Voodoo, Pepper Cake, 2001) 18. Miss Lily Moe & the Gamblers - Hot Man (2:49) (Wine Is Fine, Rhythm Bomb Records, 2018) 19. Rick Estrin & The Nightcats - Hot In Here (2:38) (Groovin' In Greaseland, Alligator Records, 2017) 20. Randy Kaplan - They're Red Hot (2:21) (Mr. Diddie Wah Diddie, Hip-O Records, 2012) 21. Dennis Jones Band - Hot Sauce (4:04) (WE3 Live, Blue Rock Records, 2018) 22. B.B. & The Blues Shacks - Hot Pants (3:04) (Dirty Thirty, Rhythm Bomb Records, 2019) 23. Malaya Blue - Hot Love (3:48) (Still, Blue Heart Records, 2020) 24. Sonny Boy Williamson II - Red Hot Kisses [1953] (2:36) (Down And Out Blues, Not Now Music, 2010) 25. Ed Maly - Hot Love (2:16) (Turn It Up, self-release, 2015) 26. Grace Potter & The Nocturnals - Hot Summer Night (3:22) (Grace Potter & The Nocturnals, Hollywood Records, 2010) 27. Son Seals - Hot Sauce (3:01) (Live And Burning, Alligator Records, 1978) Bandana Blues is and will always be a labor of love. Please help Spinner deal with the costs of hosting & bandwidth. Visit www.bandanablues.com and hit the tipjar. Any amount is much appreciated, no matter how small. Thank you.

XXE Worldwide
DJ Screwface: Old School R&B Joints 90s and 2k

XXE Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 59:25


Groovin'...  This is the closest you'll get to 2-stepping with Screw... YaDig??? 

T-Roc Beatz
Herbie Groovin

T-Roc Beatz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 3:00


LilTecca/LilYachty Type Beat

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner
Bandana Blues #950 - Just 50 Away From A Grand

Bandana Blues, founded by Beardo, hosted by Spinner

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 96:56


Show #950 Just 50 Away From A Grand 01. Mighty Mike Schermer - Tired Of Travellin' (4:33) (Just Gettin' Good, Little Village Foundation, 2022) 02. Jonas Scott Cowan - Gasoline (3:33) (Been There, Melrose Hill Records, 2019) 03. Phantom Blues Band - That's What Love Will Make You Do (4:05) (Blues For Breakfast, Little Village Foundation, 2022) 04. Lara & the Bluz Dawgz - Out Here In The Blue (6:00) (Out Here In The Blue, Lock Alley Music, 2017) 05. Emanuel Casablanca - Blood Money (2:33) (Blood On My Hands, Kings County Blues, 2022) 06. Dudley Taft - Goin' Away Baby (4:25) (Cosmic Radio, American Blues Artist Group, 2020) 07. The Groove Krewe - Run To Daylight (3:59) (Run To Daylight, Sound Business Services, 2022) 08. Jeff Finlin - Wondering What Went Wrong (4:26) (Soul On The Line, Bentwheel Records, 2022) 09. Marcia Ball - They Don't Make 'Em Like That (4:18) (Shine Bright, Alligator Records, 2018) 10. Kim Wilson - Fine Little Woman (3:31) (Take Me Back!, MC Records, 2020) 11. Cary Morin & Ghost Dog - Goin' Down South (3:39) (Single, Maple Street Music, 2022) 12. The Routes - Showroom Dummies (3:38) (Twang Machine, Topsy Turvy Records, 2022) 13. Duke Robillard - Lotus Blossom (3:18) (Duke Robillard & His Dames Of Rhythm, MC Records, 2017) 14. Dayna Kurtz - Sweet Lotus Blossom (4:51) (Secret Canon Vol. 1, Kismet Records, 2012) 15. Julia Lee - Lotus Blossom [1947] (3:10) (Of Lions And Lambs, Charly Records, 1988) 16. Rick Estrin & the Nightcats - The Blues Ain't Going Nowhere (5:08) (Groovin' In Greaseland, Alligator, 2017) 17. Eric's Blues Band - Is This The Prize I Have To Pay (5:08) (Rolling Avenue, self-release, 2022) 18. Markey Blue Ric Latina Project - You Got The Blues (4:39) (Jumpin' The Broom, SoulOSound Records, 2022) 19. Crystal Shawanda - Evil Memory (5:56) (Church House Blues, True North Records, 2020) 20. Rock House All Stars - Gimme Shelter (4:29) (Let It Bleed Revisited, Qualified Records, 2022) 21. The DogTown Blues Band - County Line (5:00) (Everyday, RVL Music, 2016) Bandana Blues is and will always be a labor of love. Please help Spinner deal with the costs of hosting & bandwidth. Visit www.bandanablues.com and hit the tipjar. Any amount is much appreciated, no matter how small. Thank you.

People and Places along the Heritage Trail
Episode 42: Well Crafted cocktails, outdoor summer concerts and incredible views of the city

People and Places along the Heritage Trail

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 32:32


We're nearly halfway through Season 2 of the People & Places along the Heritage Trail podcast! In this episode you'll hear from Jeanne Kern, owner of The Vine in downtown Elkhart. Jeanne shares some details about their food and drink menu, plus how she got started at The Vine. Then Eric Garton, executive director of Wellfield Botanic Gardens, shares the details of the 2022 Groovin' in the Gardens series. We wrap up the episode chatting with Denita Henry, sales director at Hotel Elkhart. Denita gives more information about the newly-opened hotel and the great spaces it features. Learn more about The Vine and see the menu at TheVineOnMain.com See a full list of events happening at Wellfield Botanic Gardens including the performances during Groovin' in the Gardens series at WellfieldGardens.org Find out more details for Relish Cafe and The Corner Bar plus book your overnight stay at Hotel Elkhart online at HotelElkhart.com

Chus & Ceballos presents Stereo Productions Podcast
CHUS | LIVE FROM BARCELONA | Stereo Productions Podcast 457

Chus & Ceballos presents Stereo Productions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 60:01


CHUS is back to his House Music Roots with a frenetic live show recorded recently at La Terrrazza in Barcelona for Jackie's Party!  Jacking, Movin' & Groovin' with DJ CHUS. Showtime, Play it loud and Enjoy it! 01. MOOJO, GABSY - VAMONOS 02. MENDO - GOTTA HELP (CHUS VOCAL EDIT) 03. MAW - WORK 04. TILL WEST, DJ DELICIOUS - SAME MAN 05. MOUSSE T. - JOIN (BUTCH REMIX) 06. NINA SIMONE - SEE-LINE WOMAN 07. HONEY DIJON - WORK 08. LEGO - EL RITMO DE VERDAD 09. ELIANA PITTMAN - QUEM VAI QUERER (EDNNER SOARES MIX) 10. HUXLEY, JAVI BORA - YOU'RE EVERYTHING (DJ CHUS REMIX) 11. JEREMIAH ASIAMAH - BRING IT 12. FINGERS INC - MY HOUSE 13. TODD TERRY - WEEKEND (MARCO LYS REMIX) 14. DISCIPLES - THEY DONT KNOW (DOSEM REMIX) 15. SOUL DIVIDE - HANKY PANKY 16. HARRY ROMERO - TANIA

Don't Be A Dick with Gretchen Clark

It's moving week!!! (finally). G talks about chopping Michael Vicks penis off, why Hollywood is fake, why she feels like she's not doing enough, how you shouldn't have one question in your brain about marrying someone, and how to watch your language. And speaks like this, in a run on sentence. Next episode in the new house! Happy holidays fam!!  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gbclark/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/980677579011644/?ref=share Website: https://www.gbclark.co/