Podcasts about Little Richard

American pianist, singer and songwriter

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Little Richard

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Latest podcast episodes about Little Richard

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
Tiffany and her new album Shadows

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 6:44


ABOUT TIFFANY AND SHADOWSTiffany is back with the announcement of her first new record since 2018's Piece Of Me. Shadows, due November 25, 2022 via Deko Entertainment, is described as a cathartic comeback LP on which Tiffany bares her soul and invites listeners to walk with her into the light. Today, she shares the record's newest single, "I Like The Rain," of which she says: "'I Like The Rain' is about owning your own dysfunction and the people who benefit from it."Speaking on her forthcoming LP, she continued: "Shadows is about the light and dark of my life, the heartbreak that nobody knows about, when you're trying to be fabulous onstage. My life has never been perfect. But maybe all those things are meant to be. And what helps me more than anything is writing songs."Shadows includes 11 brand new songs, including the new single "I Like The Rain," as well as stand out tracks "My Everything," "Bed of Nails," and a rocking cover of the Rival Sons track "Keep On Swinging." It will be released in multiple formats, including Digital, CD, and Limited-Edition Pink and Black vinyl, with pop-up album artwork created by multidisciplinary British artist Stuart Semple. This is limited to 250 copies and comes with multiple Tiffany photo inserts, making this a one-of-a-kind collectible piece.Stuart states, "It's been really exciting to be able to make some new art with Tiffany. Her music was a big part of my childhood. The new record is amazing and I'm so glad to have been able to come up with a visual way to bring it to life. It feels like the whole project is an artwork in it's own right."The most fascinating artists have both darkness and light. No one understands that duality better than Tiffany. She's the former teen icon with the scars of a lifer. A multi-million-selling phenomenon whose outward success story belies bad romances and bum deals. A genre-blind singer/songwriter who writes starkly personal lyrics that make entire stadiums sing along.As such, when it came to naming her new studio album, one title called out. "Shadows is about the light and dark of my life," says Tiffany. "The heartbreak that nobody knows about, when you're trying to be fabulous onstage. My life has never been perfect. But maybe all those things are meant to be. And what helps me more than anything is writing songs."Tiffany's life can be measured in songs. Anyone with even a casual eye on pop culture will remember her breakout in the late-'80s, sparked by the transatlantic #1 smash, "I Think We're Alone Now."But the fans who have made the journey with her since know that the best stuff came later, as the singer fought her way to the music she burned to record, from 1993's restorative Dreams Never Die, through the pulsing electro bangers of 2005's Dust Off And Dance, right up to 2018's highly acclaimed Pieces Of Me. "It's an album highlighting an artist at the top of their game," wrote Get Ready To Rock of the latter, "producing music from the heart.""It's been a long journey to get back," reflects the singer. "There can be a lot of discouragement, naysayers, and obstacles. But you've got to keep on swinging. You've got to have a lion heart. For Shadows, I found the right people and that made me bold."The songs that Tiffany brought to the Shadows sessions at Rockfield Studios - some rowdy and brittle, others tender and feather-soft - are a candid snapshot of her life as she steps into her fifth decade. But listen a little harder and you'll hear everything that has led her here, for better and worse.Born in Norwalk, California, on October 2nd, 1971 - and carrying a tune from the age of two - Tiffany barely remembers her life before the stage. She was a pageant girl, then a dancer, before, aged nine, she sang at a friend's birthday party and the clocks stopped. "There I was, nine years old, and I sounded like a 30-year-old woman," she recalls. "Not being in the music industry, my parents had no idea how to begin, but we just started there."Even in the Golden State, Tiffany's home life came with storm clouds. "My parents were lovely people, but there were issues with alcohol, a turmoil there," she says. "You'd hear the crying at night, the screaming, the rows, and wonder if you're even going to have a place to stay the next day."Through the chaos, music was her lifeline. In the early-'80s, all over San Diego, from the fairgrounds of Del Mar to the country music circuit, Tiffany was a livewire presence, singing out her heart and soaking up the wisdom of the greats whose orbit she now moved in. "From artists like Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard and George Jones, I learnt to live out loud," she reflects. "They woke up and that's who they were. They lived their life through music."All the while, Tiffany was feeding the insatiable muse that is evident on Shadows. "I had an older cousin who was listening to AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, Heart," she reflects. "I'd ask my best friend to buy my records at the music store when I was too embarrassed, because I had Barbra Streisand, Ozzy Osbourne, and James Taylor. I love Joni Mitchell. Joan Baez. Huge Bob Dylan fan. And with artists like Stevie Nicks and Deborah Harry, it wasn't just the music that inspired me, it was their strength. These are women who have made it through the good, the bad and the ugly."The passing decades would see Tiffany suffering her own body blows, from the painful court case in which she fought her parents for control of her career to the relationships that rose and fell in the public eye. "Sometimes," she laughs darkly, "my girlfriends will make a joke and say, 'You just date the same person over and over again...'"But while a lesser artist might retreat to lick their wounds, Tiffany always used her hard-won experience as rocket fuel. Driven by that unmistakable grit-and-honey voice, Shadows feels wrenched from the depths, from the defiant primal-scream rocker "Cried For The Last Time" to the bruised electro ballad "I'll Meet You Anywhere." "On this album, there's a pop base with rock edge," she considers. "There's a definite retro sound on songs like 'Shadows' and 'Lost Inside. 'They have that punky, '80s, Go-Gos, Blondie, Pat Benatar kinda feel with a more modern rock attitude. I want people to sing along."Producer Mark Alberici and the first-call studio band ensured that Shadows roars from the speakers. But perhaps the record's greatest power comes from Tiffany's unflinching lyrics. "'I Like The Rain' is saying that I almost choose the chaos in my life," she says of the riff-driven groove, "while 'You're My Everything' was about having a big row with my boyfriend, but instead of the end of our relationship being ugly, I wanted it to be beautiful." Elsewhere, smoky torch song "Bed Of Nails" was so heartfelt that Tiffany caught the vocal in a single late-night take. "It's quite a dark song and I just purged myself. I walked up to the mic and it was literally one pass, which is what you hear on the record. I'm writing about a relationship where two people aren't getting what they want out of it, yet they've sacrificed a lot to be there. At the time, my boyfriend and I were both divorcing other people. With a lot of these songs, I'm sharing my vulnerability with you."All of our lives come with shadows. But with her latest studio album, Tiffany invites her fans to walk with her into the light. "These last few years, we've all been through a really hard time," she considers. "People have been through divorces, lost jobs, family members, friends. I know I have. You have to carry on, but there's a sadness and loneliness."That's where music comes in," she counters. "It bonds people. For me, it recharges my batteries, getting that validation, seeing those smiles, getting the fans to go on the next journey with me. Who knows where I'm going next? But I'm a lifer. There's no plan B. I think I'm doing my best material now. I know myself more - and I'm singing the best I ever have..."https://linktr.ee/TiffanyTuneshttps://tiffanytunes.com/news

Ongoing History of New Music

Rock'n'roll is built on the electric guitar...well, mostly...and not really in the beginning...in fact, the electric guitar as we know it, didn't have much to do with the birth of rock at all... The earliest rock evolved out of rhythm & blues combos...by the early 50s, many of them featured some kind of electric guitars...but the honk and rhythm came from saxophones and pianos which were slowly pounded into matchsticks... The piano contributed bits of jazz, boogie-woogie, barrelhouse, and juke-joint energy...and even through the 1950s, the construct known as the “guitar hero” was largely absent from the world of rock'n'roll—outside of chuck berry, of course...  Instead, the early pioneers were piano heroes...Little Richard...Jerry Lee Lewis...Fats Domino...Ray Charles...Huey “piano” Smith...  But when guitars got louder, started sounding dirtier, and began to wail more powerfully, the number of rock'n'roll piano heroes were outgunned and began to recede into the background...not entirely, though... Again, I'm talking just about pianos...none of this fancy synthesizer stuff... Elton John, Billy Joel, and Carole King have had massive careers based largely on piano songs...the Beatles—especially Paul McCartney—served the cause...Freddie Mercury of Queen wrote much of their greatest songs on piano... There are others...Leon Russell, Mike Garson (who played with Bowie for years), Chuck Liddell (a favourite of the Rolling Stones), Dr. John, Billy Preston, Stevie Wonder, Ray Manzarek of The Doors, Rick Wakeman of Yes, Keith Emerson of Emerson Lake and Palmer... But you notice what's missing from that list?...any piano heroes from the world of alt-rock...does even such a thing exist?...actually, yes...they're a bit hard to spot, but they're out there...here—let me show you... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sam Waldron
Episode 240, Little Richard

Sam Waldron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 58:04


Episode 240, Little Richard, explores the life and music of one of the true pioneers of rock and roll. Recordings include Good Golly Miss Molly, Tutti Fruiti, Ready Teddy, Taxi Blues, By the Light of... Read More The post Episode 240, Little Richard appeared first on Sam Waldron.

TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast
TCBCast 244: Elvis on The Dorsey Brothers Stage Show

TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 145:54


Six performances on television across nine weeks in early 1956. Not only did Elvis's life and career changed so dramatically between them, but the face of America's cultural landscape, as the establishment voices of popular and country music fought the tidal wave of rock and roll on all fronts, winning some small victories like Dot Records's attempt to obliterate Little Richard's original "Tutti Frutti" with Pat Boone's atrocity, but ultimately losing the war as Elvismania takes over the nation. When Elvis first steps on camera for Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey's TV program in January, 1956, he's a novelty that can only be compared to Johnnie Ray... by the time he leaves, he's on track to being on the big screeen. Bec, Gurdip and Justin sit down to review all six Stage Show appearances, twelve songs in total, and try to unpack their significance. For Song of the Week, Justin takes the lead first to draw attention to the last real new cut for Elvis penned by Mort Shuman, "You'll Think of Me," then Bec digs deep on the gospel classic "Lead Me, Guide Me" and its writer Doris Akers, and finally, Gurdip tries to reason out why a 1957 Elvis bothered with the moody Cole Porter ballad, "True Love," originally by Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly. Sadly, video of Elvis's Stage Show appearances are largely commercially unavailable. Some individual performances are available in documentaries like Elvis '56, This is Elvis (theatrical and extended cuts) or The Great Performances. Some fans have shared a handful of performances on YouTube and other video hosting sites sourced from old non-official products and VHS collections, but we must acknowledge that there simply is currently no one-stop shop for all of them. If you enjoy TCBCast, please consider supporting us with a donation at Patreon.com/TCBCast. If you are unable to support us via Patreon, but want to support us another way, please make sure to leave a positive review or mention our show to another like-minded music history and movie enthusiast.

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast
Episode 448 – Publicist Ramon Hervey, You Can’t Trust Social Networks, And We Dance More With VLFs

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 39:27


My guest this week is Ramon Hervey II, who's worked as a highly regarded entertainment manager, brand consultant, and public relations specialist with a diverse and impressive roster of entertainers that encompass a wide spectrum of contemporary music genres, ranging from pop/rock, rhythm & blues, hip-hop, jazz, and gospel.  The list includes Richard Pryor, Bette Midler, Little Richard Lenny Kravitz, Don Cornelius, Paul McCartney, Herb Alpert, Vanessa Williams, Kenny "Babyface" Edmonds, Peter Frampton, Andrae Crouch, Nick Nolte, and James Caan, and many more.  He has also served as an Executive Producer for several films, television and live events, including the Peabody Award-winning documentary, "Chisholm '72: Unbought & Unbossed," the anniversary album, "NBA AT 50," and was a Music Supervisor for the NAACP Award-winning film "Free Angela and All Political Prisoners. Ramon recently wrote about his experiences in a book entitled “The Fame Game: An Insider's Playbook For Earning Your 15 Minutes.” During the interview we spoke about promoting the great Motown acts, managing Little Richard, working with Mohammed Ali, what it takes to be successful in the entertainment business, dealing with celebrity egos, and much more. I spoke with Ramon from his office in New York via zoom. On the intro I'll take a look at why you can't rely on social media as your online presence, and dancing more when there's more very low frequencies. var podscribeEmbedVars = { epId: 84224726, backgroundColor: 'white', font: undefined, fontColor: undefined, speakerFontColor: undefined, height: '600px', showEditButton: false, showSpeakers: true, showTimestamps: true };

The Greatest Non Hits
Deep Purple: Deep Purple in Rock

The Greatest Non Hits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 72:11


Referred to as the "Third Leg" of the unholy trinity(the others being Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath), Deep Purple cemented itself as a founding father of metal with this 1970 studio album. As always, we had fun with sound clips derived from "This is Spinal Tap", a movie that seems to parody  Deep Purple more than most metal bands of the time. This particular album is Mark II, the second lineup that adds Ian Pace and Roger Glover to Ritchie Blackmore, Jon Lord and Ian Paice. Upon first listen, it is heavy, aggressive, and fast paced. After the 2nd or 3rd listen,  a range of less obvious influences from Little Richard to Jimmy Hendrix become more evident.Enjoy!Support the show

Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll Podcast
Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll_170

Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 71:45


R&SRNR_170 – “THE COMPLETE HIT SINGLES HISTORY OF THE BEACH BOYS, PART 2” This is the second of two episodes spotlighting the most enduring rock and roll band in American History. –  the Beach Boys. No matter what the season, it's always summer whenever and wherever their songs are playing. They've sold more than 100 million recordings around the world since 1961. We'll focus on their U.S.-charted hit singles – all of them – in a two-episode salute. We began this chronicle on show #169 – comprising the Beach Boys' successful 45s during the1960s. Now, this edition #170 – reviews the band's hit singles since 1970 – all together more than half a century of solid gold. This includes hit records with Little Richard, the Fat Boys, and four late 1990s country music stars, as well as former members of the Mamas & Papas and the Byrds. Plus, the Beach Boys connection with famed classical composer Johann Sebastian Bach. Our resident Rockologist, Ken Deutsch, will join Radio Dave  to co-anchor this episode, as together we present more of the greatest rock and roll stories on record. Hear it all here.

GENTE EN AMBIENTE
Programa "GENTE EN AMBIENTE" sábado, 12 (SEGUNDA PARTE) Disfruta y/o revive la SEGUNDA SEMANA DE NOVIEMBRE en diferentes décadas y años. DE COLECCION!

GENTE EN AMBIENTE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 55:59


De MARIAH CAREY, RUDY MARQUEZ y LITTLE RICHARD a CHAYANNE, LUCHO GATICA, ELTON JOHN,... De "CORAZON VALIENTE" a la EMPERATRIZ "SISSI" y "VERANO DEL 42" De PEREZ PRADO, ABBA y LOU BEGA a ROGER WILLIAMS, RUBEN BLADES, RAY BARRETO, FOUR SEASONS, BEE GEES,... Y MUCHO MAS!!!! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genteenambiente/support

Ranking The Beatles
#132 - Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey with musician Kyle Melancon (drummer, Imagination Movers, ex-Dash Rip Rock)

Ranking The Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 66:39


By the time of Beatles for Sale at the end of '64, the band were exhausted, overworked, and for good reason. They'd been working nonstop for YEARS with a schedule that most artists would shudder at. While their previous album had been their first of all originals, this time, the tank was a bit lower than before, and the band had to revert back to covers they'd been doing since the Cavern and Hamburg days. Even though they may have been tired, they pulled out a fiery cover of Little Richard's version of "Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey", which was in fact a medley of "Kansas City" and a song of his own. In 1959, at one point there were 5 different covers of "Kansas City" on the Billboard charts. The fabs manage to turn in one of the more energetic moments on Beatles For Sale here. Paul's Little Richard vocal tribute is always on point, Ringo gives a swinging backbeat. The gang vocals are 100% pure energy and fun, you can't not want to singalong. To me, this is a real highlight and a killer cover from the band. That said, I have a real sweet spot for Beatle covers. This isn't their best Little Richard cover though, and we won't get to that one for quite a while. Joining us this week is yet another member of the 5 timers club, our buddy and bandmate Kyle Melancon. Recorded on Toss Day 2020 (thanks, Ringo) we cast a wide net on Beatlechat, ranging from poorly-made Beatle albums, what makes their covers successful or unsuccessful), the long strange version of "Kansas City," that ol' N'awlins classic Jazzbolaya, and we introduce a new element to our show! What do you think? Too high? Too low? Just right? Let us know in the comments on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rankingthebeatles, Instagram @rankingthebeatles, or Twitter @rankingbeatles! Be sure to check out RTB's official website, www.rankingthebeatles.com and our brand new webstore!! RANK YOUR OWN BEATLES with our new RTB poster! Pick up a tshirt, coffee cup, tote bag, and more! Enjoying the show, and wanna show your support? Buy Us A Coffee! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rankingthebeatles/support

It's Always The Husband
Big Dick and Little Richard

It's Always The Husband

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 69:07


Show: The Perfect MurderEpisode: Heart ShotYear 1999Big Richard Illes was a huge dick.  He was married to Miriam, but she divorced him when she found out about all his affairs.  Richard was a heart surgeon and was away with their son Richie when Miriam was found dead in her kitchen. Miriam had been shot through her kitchen window.  The shooter stood in her yard and waited in the dark for the perfect shot. Clues were left all over the place, but none of the clues matched back to Richard.  So why then did the police feel that Richard was guilty? Check out our website: https://www.buzzsprout.com/837988Linktree: https://linktr.ee/itsalwaysthehusbandpodcastLike our Facebook page and join our group!!Instagram: @itsalwaysthehusbandpodcastTwitter: @alwaysthehubsEtsy Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ItsAlwaysTheHusband?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=776055218Theme song by Jamie "I'm Gonna Kill You, Bitch" NelsonSupport the show

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast
"Weird Al" Yankovic Encore

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 83:38


GGACP salutes the recently-released biopic "Weird: The Al Yankovic Story" and the upcoming release of the book "The Illustrated Al" with this ENCORE of a 2021 interview with comedian, musician and multiple Grammy winner "Weird Al" Yankovic. In this episode, Al talks about the influence of Mad magazine, the golden age of Top 40, the reclusiveness of Tom Lehrer, the cultural importance of "Word Crimes" and the mystifying longevity of "The Joe Franklin Show." Also, Little Richard buys a vowel, Al and Coolio bury the hatchet, Jerry Lewis tries to take over "Comic Relief" and Charles Nelson Reilly makes "sweet, sweet love" to a manatee. PLUS: Pat Boone! "The Rutles"! Remembering Frank Jacobs! The wit and wisdom of Shel Silverstein! And the rise and fall of Allan Sherman! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Produce Like A Pro
Songs That Changed Music: Little Richard - Tutti Fruitti

Produce Like A Pro

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 14:04


In the mid-fifties, rock ‘n roll was emerging onto the popular music landscape, as wider audiences began to discover the energy and vitality of rhythm and blues records. While many of the first rock ‘n roll performers (like Elvis Presley) performed covers of songs written by others, Little Richard was both a performer and a songwriter. One of his most important hits was the song “Tutti Frutti” which he co-wrote with Dororthy LeBostrie – a song that captured a defining moment for rock and roll history. Subscribe to the email list and get yourself some free goodies: https://producelikeapro.com  Want to create radio ready mixes from the comfort of your home? Go check out https://promixacademy.com/courses/  Check out all other services here: https://linktr.ee/producelikeapro

Soundside
'The Boy Who Kissed the Sky' explores Jimi Hendrix's childhood

Soundside

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 22:10


We know a lot about the man Hendrix became: the paratrooper who played in a band during his free time, the backup player for musicians like Sam Cooke, BB King, and Little Richard, and eventually, the world renowned rockstar. But there's a chapter of Hendrix's life that has gone largely unexplored: his childhood. A new production from playwright and Seattle Children's Theatre Creative Director Idris Goodwin is inspired by Hendrix's childhood growing up in Seattle's Central District. It's called “The Boy Who Kissed the Sky.”

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano
Ep.236: Music legend Jerry Lee Lewis dies age 87

SBS Italian - SBS in Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 4:44


Rock and roll master Jerry Lee Lewis has died, leaving behind a musical legacy as one of the last surviving members of an elite class of performers including Elvis Presley and Little Richard.

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
Huyền thoại âm nhạc Jerry Lee Lewis qua đời ở tuổi 87

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 2:24


Bậc thầy dòng nhạc rock and roll Jerry Lee Lewis vừa qua đời, là một trong những thành viên cuối cùng còn sót lại của lớp nghệ sĩ ưu tú gồm Elvis Presley và Little Richard. Nhạc sĩ Hoa Kỳ qua đời ở tuổi 87 và các nghệ sĩ khác bao gồm Elton John đã ca ngợi khả năng ca hát tuyệt vời của ông nhưng Lewis đã có một cuộc sống khó khăn liên quan đến việc sử dụng chất kích thích và ly hôn.

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan
Jeff Hanna

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 41:31 Very Popular


Jeff Hanna, founder member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, is a team player. He has played with Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Johnny Cash, Jackson Browne, John Prine, Levon Helm, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Rosanne Cash, Linda Ronstadt and Matraca Berg. Oh, and Roger McGuinn, Jason Isbell, Rodney Crowell, Jerry Douglas, Sam Bush, Larry Campbell and... Lee Marvin. Plus Mother Maybelle Carter (“my first guitar hero”), June Carter Cash, Earl Scruggs, Doc Watson, Roy Acuff and Vassar Clements.Whether labelled Americana, Country Rock, Bluegrass or Traditional Country, the NGDB have come a long way since their early days as a Southern Californian jug band. Their most recent album is Dirt Does Dylan. Jeff sums it up: “Dylan was our North Star. He was always in the conversation. We would analyse every morsel of that sandwich”. Bring your appetite: this is a particularly tasty episode.Jeff Hanna has hundreds of recording credits as a composer, vocalist, arranger, producer and acoustic, electric, steel, slide and twelve-string guitarist. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band recorded their first hit “Buy For Me The Rain” in 1967. An even bigger hit followed in 1970: a cover of Jerry Jeff Walker's “Mr. Bojangles,” with Jeff on vocals and guitar - it was eventually inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1971, the band and Jeff recorded Will The Circle Be Unbroken, one of the most influential albums of the era, introducing a generation of young musicians to the generation that came before. Two other Circle albums followed. In 2006, Hanna's composition “Bless The Broken Road” won a Grammy Award for Best Country Song. The NGDB celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2016 with a sold-out concert at the Ryman Auditorium and the live album “Circlin' Back”. “Dirt Does Dylan” was released in 2022.WebsiteTwitterTrailerEpisode playlist on AppleEpisode playlist on SpotifyListeners: please subscribe and/or leave a review and a rating.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: Jeff Hanna

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 41:31


Jeff Hanna, founder member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, is a team player. He has played with Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Johnny Cash, Jackson Browne, John Prine, Levon Helm, Emmylou Harris, Alison Krauss, Rosanne Cash, Linda Ronstadt and Matraca Berg. Oh, and Roger McGuinn, Jason Isbell, Rodney Crowell, Jerry Douglas, Sam Bush, Larry Campbell and... Lee Marvin. Plus Mother Maybelle Carter (“my first guitar hero”), June Carter Cash, Earl Scruggs, Doc Watson, Roy Acuff and Vassar Clements.Whether labelled Americana, Country Rock, Bluegrass or Traditional Country, the NGDB have come a long way since their early days as a Southern Californian jug band. Their most recent album is Dirt Does Dylan. Jeff sums it up: “Dylan was our North Star. He was always in the conversation. We would analyse every morsel of that sandwich”. Bring your appetite: this is a particularly tasty episode.Jeff Hanna has hundreds of recording credits as a composer, vocalist, arranger, producer and acoustic, electric, steel, slide and twelve-string guitarist. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band recorded their first hit “Buy For Me The Rain” in 1967. An even bigger hit followed in 1970: a cover of Jerry Jeff Walker's “Mr. Bojangles,” with Jeff on vocals and guitar - it was eventually inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1971, the band and Jeff recorded Will The Circle Be Unbroken, one of the most influential albums of the era, introducing a generation of young musicians to the generation that came before. Two other Circle albums followed. In 2006, Hanna's composition “Bless The Broken Road” won a Grammy Award for Best Country Song. The NGDB celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2016 with a sold-out concert at the Ryman Auditorium and the live album “Circlin' Back”. “Dirt Does Dylan” was released in 2022.WebsiteTwitterTrailerEpisode playlist on AppleEpisode playlist on SpotifyListeners: please subscribe and/or leave a review and a rating.

SBS World News Radio
Music legend Jerry Lee Lewis dies age 87

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 2:36


Rock and roll master Jerry Lee Lewis has died, leaving behind a musical legacy as one of the last surviving members of an elite class of performers including Elvis Presley and Little Richard.

Launch Left
RAIN PHOENIX launches The Steens

Launch Left

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 12:40


The Steens, Elijah and Isaiah, are two brothers from Orange County, CA, who formed their band in 2021. Growing up in the music and TV production industry, the brothers had a lot of influence from early on in their lives. Tune in to hear the brothers and Rain talk about growing up with music and how they used it to evolve into the duo they are now.  -----------------  LAUNCHLEFT OFFICIAL WEBSITEhttps://www.launchleft.com  LAUNCHLEFT PATREON https://www.patreon.com/LaunchLeft  TWITTER https://twitter.com/LaunchLeft  INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/launchleft/  FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/LaunchLeft  --------------------- LaunchLeft Podcast hosted by Rain Phoenix is an intentional space for Art and Activism where famed creatives launch new artists. LaunchLeft is an alliance of left-of-center artists, a curated ecosystem that includes a podcast, label and NFT gallery. --------------------- IN THIS EPISODE: [02:32] The Steens talk about their goals for the future of their duo.  [06:30] The brothers talk about their top favorite books and records.  [09:00] Advice the brothers would give to anyone in the teen demographic about working towards their goals. KEY TAKEAWAYS:  Things that happen in your life can shape your perspective.  Influences can be gathered starting at a young age.  Work with what you have and don't be afraid to be weird and go big. BIO: The Steens are two brothers from Orange County, CA. They formed their band in 2021 using their surname.  Naming the band was an easy decision with the duo's sound and vision being firmly planted in their roots. At an early age their father was actively working in the music industry as an A&R/ artist manager while their mother was pursuing a promising career as a stylist. This all changed when their dad was arrested and went on to serve a 10 year prison sentence. The Steen's “future rock n' roll” sound picks up where their fate dropped them off. Feeding back and buzzing like gleaming gold through a distorted lens, the brother's have woven a sound very much in tune with their childhood. Blown out 808s clip your speakers while fuzz injected guitars and vocals invite ancestors like Little Richard to perhaps take some more uppers. Someone suggested their band was like “the Black Strokes or something.” The Steens weren't offended by the comparison but later stated, “The Strokes are great, but they're a little polite, no? If we were gonna be the “black anything” and not “the Black Beatles” can't we at least be “the Black Iggy Pops.” RESOURCE LINKS The Steens on IG The Steen's on FB  The Steen's on Sound CloudSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What Ya Into?
Episode 88 To Catch a Predator, No Not the Show with Chris Hansen Part 1 of 2 with Cody Hucker and Paul Gonzalez

What Ya Into?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 101:34


Hey Listener, are you ready to go hunting with movie reviewer Paul Gonzalez and Cody Hucker from The Bastard Sermon? For the first time in WYI? History we have a multiple part episode as we fully break down the entire Predator collection. Part 1 is Predator (1987) and Predator 2 (1990) and Part 2 is AVP: Alien vs. Predator (2004), Aliens vs. Predator - Requiem (2007), Predators (2010), The Predator (2018), and Prey (2022). Topics this week include: Ric Flair. Pawl: Horror trivia host and awesome bartender. Yautja noises. We all love Schwarzenegger movies. DVD Easter Eggs. Your host will die on the hill of The Running Man. The cast of Predator. The Terminator is about to be the President?!?! Listening to Little Richard to get hyped to murder dudes. The Predator is worse than kicking a bird. Where can you get a minigun backpack? Having great one liners after you killed a man. When the hunters become the hunted. Will Arnold win this fight? Talking Danny Glover with Pawl again and Bill Paxton with Cody again. A side tangent about Ice T's Surviving the Game. In 1997 everyone has OP guns. Living in a pornless hellscape. Collecting Masters degrees. Killing a subway car of people.The  Predator proves he is a Pro Life Conservative. You have to suspend disbelief if you're going to watch Predator 2. Popping the trunk like Yelawolf. Gold Bond and hemorrhoids. Riding the Hellavator to the Predator's foggy spaceship.

1001 Album Complaints
#75 Elvis Presley - Elvis Presley

1001 Album Complaints

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 76:47


Elvis Presley was just 18 years old when he recorded his first hit record for Sun Records, and 18 short months later he was a national phenomenon. In the space between he finished the recordings for this self-titled debut album which purposely leaves off his hit singles. The boys discuss early slap back effects, bad guitar solos, and the pointlessness of trying to cover Little Richard. Listen to our episode companion playlist (compilation of the songs we referenced on this episode) here: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4mbuclGdRKInu9vZAfckpv?si=c04a0f0e48d14e59 (https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4mbuclGdRKInu9vZAfckpv?si=c04a0f0e48d14e59) Listen to Elvis Presley here: https://open.spotify.com/album/7GXP5OhYyPVLmcVfO9Iqin?si=xWNepWIVTv2ix19Q7EqDEQ (https://open.spotify.com/album/7GXP5OhYyPVLmcVfO9Iqin?si=xWNepWIVTv2ix19Q7EqDEQ) Email us your complaints (or questions / comments) at 1001AlbumComplaints@gmail.com Intro music courtesy of https://open.spotify.com/artist/6iUot3X4FwzuZVHMQ4xh4P?si=TOpyXme9QU-Hf71jjj7_DQ&dl_branch=1 (The Beverly Crushers) Outro music courtesy of https://open.spotify.com/artist/4ehOaXsBSc6eMO2fnveJU2?si=UrpyPkbrQh2AB9wQBLVbOg&dl_branch=1 (MEGA) Follow us on instagram https://www.instagram.com/thechopunlimited/ (@thechopunlimited) NEW: We have Merch!https://www.amazon.com/1001-Album-Complaints-Premium-T-Shirt/dp/B09J36918F/ref=sr_1_38?qid=1652737355&refinements=p_4%3AThe+Chop+Unlimited&s=apparel&sr=1-38 ( T-Shirt #1) |https://my.captivate.fm/3FT/ref=sr_1_40?qid=1653253944&refinements=p_4%3AThe+Chop+Unlimited&s=apparel&sr=1-40 ( T-Shirt #2) Next week's album: Michael Jackson - Thriller

Naked Lunch
Paul Reubens, The Artist Also Known As Pee Wee Herman

Naked Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 61:13


Phil invites his longtime friend and even longer-time hero Paul Reubens to Naked Lunch for a Big Adventure over lunch. This playful and ultimately revealing conversation over sandwiches from Monroe Place finds Phil, Paul & David discussing a wide-range of topics --  from Paul's education alongside classmates David Hasselhoff and Katey Sagal at Cal Arts to The Groundlings to his pre-fame work in restaurant kitchens to a wide range of unforgettable encounters with famous Pee Wee fans like Little Richard, Prince, Tom Petty, Joey Ramone and Clint Eastwood.  Reubens explains two reasons he became a comedian. "I was terrible at math," he says, "and I didn't want to have to have to wear a suit to work." Here's a funny look at how Paul Reubens ended up in the suit of Pee Wee Herman and still wears it so well. To learn more about building community through food and "Somebody Feed the People," visit the Philanthropy page at philrosenthalworld.com.

cocktailnation
Evenings At The Penthouse-Wise Words Of Little Richard

cocktailnation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 60:09


Here are some words to live by..... www.cocktailnation.net Bill Evans Come Rain Or Come Shine Frank Sinatra -Moonlight In Vermont Matt Monro-Merci Cherie George Shearing-Satin Doll Nat King Cole- I Got It Bad James Spencer-Love Is Here To Stay Jackie Gleason-That Certain Party Martini Kings-Enchanted Lovers John Coltrane-Blue Train James Morrison Girl Talk Chet Baker and strings-You Better go Now Barbara Levy Daniel -Imagination James Morrison-Girl Talk

GENTE EN AMBIENTE
Disfruta desde HOY de la TERCERA PARTE de "GENTE EN AMBIENTE" del sábado 22 con los mejores recuerdos de la TERCERA SEMANA de OCTUBRE en diferentes DÍAS y AÑOS

GENTE EN AMBIENTE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 53:06


De JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE, NELLY, a ELVIS PRESLEY, LITTLE RICHARD y NAT "KING" COLE BAILA con JOE CUBA ("BANG BANG"), LOS MONKEES, LOS BEAH BOYS, CHICAGO, MAROON 5,... CANTA con JOSE FELICIANO, MINA, FRANK SINATRA, JOHNNY HALLIDAY, LUCHO GATICA,... RECUERDA "BEN-HUR", "EL HOMBRE DEL BRAZO DE ORO", "EL PACIENTE INGLES"... EL BEST-SELLER "EL ABOGADO DEL DIABLO"... y mucho mas! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genteenambiente/support

I Love Rock & Roll Podcast
1 2 3 4 w Alvin Taylor

I Love Rock & Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 63:32


Drummer Alvin Taylor makes his ILRR debut to talk about joining Little Richard's band at the age of thirteen, being the opening act for Elvis in Vegas and meeting kings, queens and presidents, recording with George Harrison and Stevie Wonder, and having Ronnie Wood name an album after him. Alvin has led an amazing life and stayed humble through it all! These stories are not to be missed!

WATCH YOUR LIPS
Watch Your Lips THIRTY34 | Little Richard

WATCH YOUR LIPS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 79:11


Ep.34...First, we apologize! This episode is not available on YouTube but please go subscribe! The Nolan Ryan episode is just what your morning...or afternoon needed. Jake's brother Ricky joins in and we go way off topic to start. We get in our picks for week 6 and of course our kickers. Please share, subscribe and follow..

Music Talks
Episode 78 - Michael Elliott - Have A Little Faith

Music Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 71:52


My guest in this episode is Michael Elliott a DJ, radio exec, writer and a man who has overcome a lot of adversity to get to a better place today.He lives in Raleigh NC and is a southerner born and bred with all the challenges and contradictions that brings. An only child he was born with cataracts in both eyes and was partially blind until the age of 50. He grew up surrounded by a music loving family and imagination and creativity were his best friends. He developed an interest in radio at an early age and used to sit in on the morning show at his local station which led to a career of almost 30 years in radio, spanning being a live DJ through to senior management. In 2012, after long term challenges with alcohol he found sobriety which continues to this day despite several subsequent life changing challenges.During this period, he also met the love of his life Liz who he is now happily married to. Liz encouraged him to pursue his passion for music and writing and he is now a contributor to the pioneering roots music authority No Depression and his writing has also appeared in PopMatters, Americana UK, Albumism, and The Bitter Southerner.He has interviewed and produced profiles on musicians as diverse as Isaac Hayes, Charlie Daniels, Little Richard, Kurt Vile and Daniel Lanois. In September 2021 he published the critically acclaimed biography of John Hiatt entitled “Have A Little Faith' with a foreword by Elvis Costello.  Do please look at Michael's website https://michael-elliott.com/ where you will find numerous plaudits for his book from people such as Bonnie Raitt, Rosanne Cash and Rodney Crowell. Michael's song choices were:·         70's -     East Bound and Down                                   Jerry Reed ·         80's -     Sweetheart Like You                                       Bob Dylan·         90's -     Buffalo River Home                                         John Hiatt·         00's -     Get Ur Freak On                                                Missy Elliott·         10's -     Drunk In Love                                                    Beyonce (feat. Jay-Z) ·         20's -     I Don't Live Here Anymore                           The War on Drugs (feat. Lucius) Enjoy ! 

Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max
Butcher Brown talks Butcher Brown Presents Triple Trey & more ”Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max”

Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 27:19


Thank you to Richmond, Virginia's own Jazz and Hip-Hop group Butcher Brown for coming on my show for an interview! Butcher Brown talked about their new album Butcher Brown Presents Triple Trey, meeting at Virginia Commonwealth University Health, and #KingButch being their first official studio album. They discussed making their albums in the studio vs. performing their work live, deconstructing big band jazz and reshaping it into solar music, and signing to Concord. They also got into their Tiny Desk experience, their cover of Little Richard's Rip It Up being used for the theme song of Monday Night Football in 2020 and 2021, and covering The Notorious B.I.G.'s classic song Unbelievable off of Ready to Die. Stay tuned! Butcher Brown's new album Butcher Brown Presents Triple Trey is available on all platforms, including Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/butcher-brown-presents-triple-trey/1629105184. Go checkout Butcher Brown's website for all of their news, tour dates, and merchandise: https://butcherbrown.com/. Follow Butcher Brown on Instagram: @butcherbrown Follow me on Instagram and Twitter: @thereelmax. Website: https://maxcoughlan.com/index.html. Website live show streaming link: https://maxcoughlan.com/sports-and-hip-hop-with-dj-mad-max-live-stream.html. MAD MAX Radio on Live365: https://live365.com/station/MAD-MAX-Radio-a15096. Subscribe to my YouTube channel Sports and Hip Hop with DJ Mad Max: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCE0107atIPV-mVm0M3UJyPg.  Butcher Brown on "Sports and Hip-Hop with DJ Mad Max" visual on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtR0Y1fWVw4&t=1s. 

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY
PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY - Episode 249

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 31:32


Andy eulogizes Jean-Luc Godard then plays clips of Charlamagne tha God, LL Cool J, and Little Richard and discusses them. On Rachel's Chart Chat, Rachel from Des Moines finds gems in charts from 1977 and 1981. You can find a playlist for Rachel's Chart Chat here. Follow Rachel on Last.fm here.

GENTE EN AMBIENTE
Programa "GENTE EN AMBIENTE" del SABADO 8 de OCTUBRE (TRES HORAS) con los grandes éxitos, Idolos, películas,... de la SEGUNDA SEMANA del mes

GENTE EN AMBIENTE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 163:34


Estos son algunos de los artistas del programa de hoy, para que bailes y cantes con ellos: Maroon 5, Boyz II Men, Carlos Santana, Orquesta Aragon, Las 4 Monedas, Richie Ray, Bobby Cruz, 4 Seasons, Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Stand Getz,... Paul Anka, Enrique Guzman, Elvis Presley, Lulu, Bobby Vinton, Bee Gees, Mina, Three Dog Nigth, Moody Blues, Procol Harum, Madonna, Mariah Carey, Lucho Gatica, Ray Charles, Eric Clapton, Diana Ross, Queen,.... y muchos mas!; ademas de las PELICULAS MAS TAQUILLERAS, PROGRAMAS DE TV, IDOLOS DEPORTIVOS, BEST-SEL;LERS,... de la SEGUNDA SEMANA de OCTUBRE en diferentes años y décadas --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genteenambiente/support

How can U just leave me standing? ...in search of Prince Rogers Nelson.
Who was Prince really? In 1985 Neal Karlen interviewed the world's biggest - and most reclusive star. In the years that followed they developed an unlikely friendship. He tells us about the dilemmas of writing a book following the star's untimel

How can U just leave me standing? ...in search of Prince Rogers Nelson.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 53:02


Author Neal Karlen, in conversation with Sam Bleazard.Introduction - New York Times, Rolling Stone magazine, author...friend?1-3mins: "Please don't let my scoop go away!" - Memories from another lifetime...and the BBC Omnibus documentary4mins ...time to stop writing - and talking about - Prince, wanting to be a fan again and not a critic...7mins - MPLS, segregation and the 'Minneapolis Sound'9mins30s - Prince as an 11-year-old kid, and a story from one of his substitute teachers11mins30s - Was Prince's life a sad story or a triumphant story of success?13mins30s - 'This Thing Called Life' - were you worried that by being so candid it would create a backlash on the book?17mins - the audiobook, the showman and Prince off the record in the 1980s19mins - small aspects of the real guy being revealed: showing the imperfect human being behind the star.20mins30s - "I Love U..."? And how it feels...22mins30s - Humour in the book and 'The Crusher'!24mins30s - The dilemma of releasing tapes of Prince speaking from the 1980s...'the most compartmentalised person I've ever met'27mins - "Prince who?" - "The real Prince!"29mins - The only person still awake at 4am and happy to shoot the breeze...30mins30s - Different personalities and the blurring between friendship and employment33mins - Not deifying Prince...and his relationship with his mother and father49mins - the last conversation with Prince (3 weeks before his passing)50mins - any things you wished you'd put in the book?

F1 And Done
The Wild Ones, Car Wrap, Crash Balls, Supplicant, Corollary, Little Richard, Heroes Among Us, Coolio, LeCrap, Bad Brains, Ime Udoka, Buck Naked, Dubai, Hustle, Pepperidge Farm, Flatline

F1 And Done

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 42:40


Questlove Supreme
Ramon Hervey II

Questlove Supreme

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 119:41 Very Popular


Ramon Hervey II is a manager, publicist, and trusted confident to heavyweights like Richard Pryor, Bette Midler, Little Richard, Quincy Jones, Don Cornelius, the Bee Gees, Herb Alpert, Andrae Crouch, Vanessa Williams, Rick James, Paul McCartney, Luther Vandross, Peter Frampton, James Caan, Aaliyah and more. He joins Questlove Supreme to talk about his experiences in the entertainment industry, and discuss his new book, The Fame Game.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ajax Diner Book Club
Ajax Diner Book Club Episode 221

Ajax Diner Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 176:36


Old 97's "I Don't Wanna Die In This Town"Valerie June "Workin' Woman Blues"Mary Wells "The One Who Really Loves You"The Replacements "Alex Chilton"The Hold Steady "Entitlement Crew"Joe Tex "Hold What You Got"Fiona Apple "Sleep to Dream"Mavis Staples "If All I Was Was Black"Esther Phillips "Release Me"Lucero "That Much Further West"Shaver "Live Forever"Gillian Welch "Caleb Meyer"Ray Charles "I've Got A Woman"Nicole Atkins "Brokedown Luck"James Brown "Please Please Please"Will Johnson "A Solitary Slip"Slobberbone "Pinball Song"Will Johnson "Cornelius"The O "Candy"Eilen Jewell "I'm Gonna Dress In Black"Willie Nelson/Waylon Jennings "Good Hearted Woman"Charlie Parr "Empty Out Your Pockets"Aretha Franklin "Dr. Feelgood (Love Is Serious Business)"Mississippi John Hurt "Monday Morning Blues"JD McPherson "Bridgebuilder"Little Richard "The Girl Can't Help It"Johnny Cash "Sea of Heartbreak"Etta James "At Last"R.E.M. "So. Central Rain"Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers "Learning To Fly"Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers "Room At The Top"Bobby Bland "I Pity The Fool"Ruth Brown "Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean"Two Cow Garage "My Concern"Patterson Hood "Better Off Without"Ramones "Do You Remember Rock And Roll Radio"Ike & Tina Turner "Proud Mary"Sierra Ferrell "Jeremiah"James Carr "The Dark End of the Street"New Moon Jelly Roll Freedom Rockers feat. Alvin Youngblood Hart "She's About a Mover"Wilson Pickett "634-5789"Willie Mae 'Big Mama' Thornton "Hound Dog"Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit "The Blue"Magnolia Electric Co. "Northstar Blues"Brook Benton "Rainy Night in Georgia"The Devil Makes Three "Car Wreck"

Caffé Latté
#883 (Oct. 2, 2022) – Hour 2:

Caffé Latté

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 52:19


The Black Roots segment this week includes new songs from John Legend & Stan Walker + classics by Aretha Franklin, Little Richard, Etta James, Donny Hathaway, Beyoncé, Quincy Jones &... LEARN MORE The post #883 (Oct. 2, 2022) – Hour 2: appeared first on Caffé Latté.

Call It Like I Don't See It
Leaks, Squeaks, and Nyquil grease!

Call It Like I Don't See It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 91:46


This is what we're yapping about in this 96th episode! Guest co-host Cou$tikz is in the hot seat this week! Listen in as he talk about being a new uncle, His AC going out, and smoking some cannabis for his week. (1:20) GP's week talks about getting paint work done inside his home, watching the first three eps of Andor, and finishing little nightmares plus starting Cyberpunk 2077. (4:10) Time to get angry at the NFL and fake ads on social media during CALL IT OUT! (9:58) A segment that has been brought back to the living, called Past Slaps! (18:40) A 5 billion resort of the moon will be created in Dubai. (30:39) When you cook chicken with Nyquil you get The Nyquil Chicken Challenge. (40:33) Quick Bits! Where we talk real news real fast! (50:50) We do a quick review of She-Hulk Attorney at Law, episodes 5 & 6. (1:01:03) We get our Little Richard on with Call a Reminisce over Casper! (1:05:31) Put yo Face In This!!! (1:21:47) Positive Chakra! (1:27:37) Yell outs before we head out! (1:29:11) Rate, Comment, Like, and Subscribe if you diggin the show For everything about the show visit our link tree here linktr.ee/Callitlikeidontseeit

Rockonteurs with Gary Kemp and Guy Pratt
S3E3: Noddy Holder

Rockonteurs with Gary Kemp and Guy Pratt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 86:33 Very Popular


This week on Rockonteurs we meet the total tour de force that is Noddy Holder. Slade were one of the UK's most successful bands of the 1970s with a string of unforgettable hits. In this episode he chats to Guy and Gary about those ‘crazee' days that included driving a young Robert Plant around, his love of Little Richard, inventing part of the stage runway that all the major acts of today use and trying to avoid playing THE Christmas song to an audience of 65,000 at the Reading Festival in the middle of summer! Noddy is a legend and you can hear the band at their live best in ‘All The World Is A Stage' – it's as good a live box set as you'll hear. It's out now! Rockonteurs is produced by Gimme Sugar Productions Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Gaudy Positive
Gaudy Positive EP11S2 - Where does Oat Milk come from with Les Greene

Gaudy Positive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 71:47


Les Green does it all. He is a talented performer, singer, songwriter, and a fashionable man about town - he is also the lead singers of The Swayzees, a band you have the see to believe. Kat and Jenny catch up with the voice of Little Richard and talk about his humble beginnings from cruise ships to the stage and all the way cinema! Enjoy :)   FOLLOW US! RATE US! @gaudypositiveshow @jennyzigrino @styleethic @iamlesgreene

Poured Over
Saeed Jones on ALIVE AT THE END OF THE WORLD

Poured Over

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 45:17


“This book feels very much…drawing from the Black Saints: Whitney Houston, Paul Mooney, Little Richard, Luther Vandross, almost my own canon, my own tradition, my own history, to make sense of what's happening now. I'm not going back to Homer, necessarily. I'm kind of trying to create a new lineage, because I feel that we've been betrayed by our presented histories.” Saeed Jones joins us on the show to riff on his incredibly personal and indelible new poetry collection Alive at the End of the World, along with the pervasiveness of grief, how both he and his writing have changed since he published his memoir, what's up with his new podcast, Vibe Check, and much more with Poured Over's host Miwa Messer.   Featured Books (episode) Alive at the End of the World by Saeed Jones Prelude to Bruise by Saeed Jones How We Fight for Our Lives by Saeed Jones Furious Cool by David Henry and Joe Henry   Poured Over is produced and hosted by Miwa Messer and mixed by Harry Liang. Follow us here for new episodes Tuesdays and Thursdays (with occasional Saturdays).   A complete transcript of this episode is available here.

On this day in Blues history
On this day in Blues history for September 14th

On this day in Blues history

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 2:00


Today's show features music performed by Little Richard and B.B. King

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Rock's Backpages: Jason King on Queen + Sylvester + Boy George + Beyoncé

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 92:24


In this episode, we invite Jason King to tell us about his multi-faceted career, from his Canadian upbringing to his chairmanship of Brooklyn's Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music.Along the way, Jason talks about his writing on LGBTQ icons from Sylvester and Luther Vandross to Queen's Freddie Mercury, of whom he is writing a major biography. Jason recalls writing for Vibe and the Village Voice in the Noughties, listens to clips from Bill Brewster's 2002 audio interview with Boy George and discusses the brilliant career of — and new album by — Beyoncé.After Jason and his co-hosts pay homage to revered Warner-Reprise chief Mo Ostin, Mark quotes from newly-added library pieces about John Lennon, the Jam, AC/DC and Primal Scream. Jasper rounds things off with remarks on a 1998 interview with Mo Ostin signing Prince, then known as "The Artist Formerly Known as..."Many thanks to special guest Jason King. Find him on Instagram and Twitter @jasonkingsays.Pieces discussed: Little Richard, Queen, Pop's great awokening, Gay soul, Boy George audio, Destiny's Child, Beyoncé, Beyoncé in the movies, Mo Ostin, John Lennon, The Jam, Joan Jett, Primal Scream, Newport Folk Festival, Tim Buckley, AC/DC, Radiohead and Prince.

Bureau of Lost Culture
Smells Like Teen Spirit

Bureau of Lost Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 60:34


*"Teenage savages go wild in a jungle of lust and lawlessness!"   *Countercultural commentator and writer JOHN HIGGS comes to the Bureau. We head out into the feverish febrile pheromone filled phase of self consciousness, sex drugs and rock'n'roll known as adolescence as we investigate the birth of the teenage in the late 40s and 50s.     *Was it all really kicked off by Little Richard's Tutti Frutti?       *We chart the rise of youth culture on both sides of the Iron Curtain and debate that while ‘all you need is love', ‘you can't always get what you want' as we trace counterculture through beats, mods, hippies, punks, ravers, grunge and britpop, touch down briefly on gender politics and the death of Kurt Cobain and wonder if 70 will one day be the new seventeen.   For more on John https://johnhiggs.com   The Bureau of Lost Culture https://www.bureauoflostculture.com #counterculture #littlerichard #teenage #rockandroll #kurtcobain #beatles #rollingstones #hippie 

Pacific Street Blues and Americana
Episode 115: Exploring the Musical Influence of Chuck Berry

Pacific Street Blues and Americana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 120:52


Pacific St Blues & AmericanaSeptember 11, 2022We have a really smokin' show this week including numerous homegrown specials and an in-depth exploration of the music of Chuck Berry. Over the past several months we have explored the roots of 'rock music' of the 60s and 70s. While there are the clear influences of Elvis Presley and Little Richard, less obvious, but arguably more profound, as the influences of three blues artists: Robert Johnson, Willie Dixon, and Chuck Berry. It has been suggested, and I agree, that the influence of an artist is determined, at least in part, by the frequency of others covering their music and recording their songs.Specifically, we've examined the musical influences of the King of the Delta Blues, Robert Johnson, Chess Records ' songwriter Willie Dixon, and this week we'll take an in-depth look at the music and influence of the legendary, St Louis born, Chuck Berry, the poet laureate of rock n' roll. Berry spent most of his career recording for the Chicago-based blues label, Chess Records. Along with stable mates Willie Dixon and Muddy Waters, one can make a pretty solid argument that the music we all knew and grew up with had its roots firmly planted at 2010 South Michigan Avenue and the home of Chess Records. Join me today for some great music and good stories. 1. BB King / Jack You're Dead2. Blue House & the Rent to own Horns / Hey Martha!3. Dana Fuchs / Hard Road 4. Tommy Castro / Ninety-Nine and One Half 5. Mike Farris / Monkey Man (The Rock House Nashville All Stars) 6. Josh Hoyer / Gimme7. Marcus King / Hard Working Man 8. Billy Gibbons w/ Larkin Poe / Shakin' Bones9. Lou Ann Barton / One Way Street10. Sass Jordan / Still Alive and Well 11. Lucinda Williams / Car Wheels on a Gravel Road 12. Rex Granite Band / Open Up Your Window21. George Benson / How You've Changed22. Joe Bonamassa w/ Mike Zito / Wee Wee Hours23. Louis Jordan / Ain't That Just Like a Woman24. Johnnie Johnson / Tanquery25. Rolling Stones / Little Queenie26. Chuck Berry / Little Queenie27. T Rex / Bang a Gong28. Linda Ronstadt / Back in the USA29. Aaron Neville / You Never Can Tell30. The Beatles / Roll Over Beethoven31. Ike & Tina Turner / Come Together32. Chuck Berry / You Can't Catch Me33. Ronnie Wood / Blue Feeling 34. Elvis Presley / Promised Land  35. George Thorogood / Let It Rock36. Lonnie Mack w/ Stevie Ray Vaughan / Memphis37. Johnny Winter / Johnnie B Goode 

Poem-a-Day
Peter Balakian: "Little Richard"

Poem-a-Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 4:07


Recorded by Peter Balakian for Poem-a-Day, a series produced by the Academy of American Poets. Published on September 9, 2022. www.poets.org

KooperKast
Black 'n' White 'n' Rock 'n' Roll - Three

KooperKast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 9:36


In this third episode of Black 'n' White 'n' Rock 'n' Roll we talk about Al learning first hand about race at an Alan Freed show, the strange origin of Hound Dog and many other hits done by Black groups, and Little Richard vs Pat Boone.

The Sound of Success with Nic Harcourt
Patti Smith joins Nic to discuss returning to live performance after lockdown, and the soundtrack of her life. From Little Richard, Marvin Gaye, Dylan and Hendrix to Television, Bronski Beat, Rhianna, Adele, Ariana Grande and Harry Styles.

The Sound of Success with Nic Harcourt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 56:26


Patti Smith is a singer songwriter, poet, author, and visual artist who was at the forefront of the New York city punk movement. Her 1975 debut album 'Horses' announced her arrival, and since then she has carved out a career that allows her to speak truth to power in and outside of her work, and is cited by many artists including Michael Stipe, Johnny Marr and Shirley Manson as an important influence on their own work. In this wide ranging conversation with Nic, Patti talks about getting back out on the road and connecting with audiences after the seclusion of pandemic lockdown, why climate change is the issue of our time, and her upcoming "Evidence" exhibition with 'Soundwalk Collective' at Center Pompidou in Paris. Patti also shares her first live music experience, attending the Motown Revue bus tour with Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye and "Little" Stevie Wonder in Philadelphia in 1963, her stairwell conversation with Jimi Hendrix at the opening of his Electric Lady Studios just three weeks before his tragic death and her love of Opera, orchestral movie soundtracks, and many different styles of popular music.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 152: “For What It’s Worth” by Buffalo Springfield

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022


Episode 152 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “For What It's Worth”, and the short but eventful career of Buffalo Springfield. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" by Glen Campbell. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, there's a Mixcloud mix containing all the songs excerpted in the episode. This four-CD box set is the definitive collection of Buffalo Springfield's work, while if you want the mono version of the second album, the stereo version of the first, and the final album as released, but no demos or outtakes, you want this more recent box set. For What It's Worth: The Story of Buffalo Springfield by Richey Furay and John Einarson is obviously Furay's version of the story, but all the more interesting for that. For information on Steve Stills' early life I used Stephen Stills: Change Partners by David Roberts.  Information on both Stills and Young comes from Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young by David Browne.  Jimmy McDonough's Shakey is the definitive biography of Neil Young, while Young's Waging Heavy Peace is his autobiography. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before we begin -- this episode deals with various disabilities. In particular, there are descriptions of epileptic seizures that come from non-medically-trained witnesses, many of whom took ableist attitudes towards the seizures. I don't know enough about epilepsy to know how accurate their descriptions and perceptions are, and I apologise if that means that by repeating some of their statements, I am inadvertently passing on myths about the condition. When I talk about this, I am talking about the after-the-fact recollections of musicians, none of them medically trained and many of them in altered states of consciousness, about events that had happened decades earlier. Please do not take anything said in a podcast about music history as being the last word on the causes or effects of epileptic seizures, rather than how those musicians remember them. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things you notice if you write about protest songs is that a lot of the time, the songs that people talk about as being important or impactful have aged very poorly. Even great songwriters like Bob Dylan or John Lennon, when writing material about the political events of the time, would write material they would later acknowledge was far from their best. Too often a song will be about a truly important event, and be powered by a real sense of outrage at injustice, but it will be overly specific, and then as soon as the immediate issue is no longer topical, the song is at best a curio. For example, the sentencing of the poet and rock band manager John Sinclair to ten years in prison for giving two joints to an undercover police officer was hugely controversial in the early seventies, but by the time John Lennon's song about it was released, Sinclair had been freed by the Supreme Court, and very, very few people would use the song as an example of why Lennon's songwriting still has lasting value: [Excerpt: John Lennon, "John Sinclair"] But there are exceptions, and those tend to be songs where rather than talking about specific headlines, the song is about the emotion that current events have caused. Ninety years on from its first success, for example, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" still has resonance, because there are still people who are put out of work through no fault of their own, and even those of us who are lucky enough to be financially comfortable have the fear that all too soon it may end, and we may end up like Al begging on the streets: [Excerpt: Rudy Vallee, "Brother Can You Spare a Dime?"] And because of that emotional connection, sometimes the very best protest songs can take on new lives and new meanings, and connect with the way people feel about totally unrelated subjects. Take Buffalo Springfield's one hit. The actual subject of the song couldn't be any more trivial in the grand scheme of things -- a change in zoning regulations around the Sunset Strip that meant people under twenty-one couldn't go to the clubs after 10PM, and the subsequent reaction to that -- but because rather than talking about the specific incident, Steve Stills instead talked about the emotions that it called up, and just noted the fleeting images that he was left with, the song became adopted as an anthem by soldiers in Vietnam. Sometimes what a song says is nowhere near as important as how it says it. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What It's Worth"] Steve Stills seems almost to have been destined to be a musician, although the instrument he started on, the drums, was not the one for which he would become best known. According to Stills, though, he always had an aptitude for rhythm, to the extent that he learned to tapdance almost as soon as he had learned to walk. He started on drums aged eight or nine, after somebody gave him a set of drumsticks. After his parents got sick of him damaging the furniture by playing on every available surface, an actual drum kit followed, and that became his principal instrument, even after he learned to play the guitar at military school, as his roommate owned one. As a teenager, Stills developed an idiosyncratic taste in music, helped by the record collection of his friend Michael Garcia. He didn't particularly like most of the pop music of the time, but he was a big fan of pre-war country music, Motown, girl-group music -- he especially liked the Shirelles -- and Chess blues. He was also especially enamoured of the music of Jimmy Reed, a passion he would later share with his future bandmate Neil Young: [Excerpt: Jimmy Reed, "Baby, What You Want Me To Do?"] In his early teens, he became the drummer for a band called the Radars, and while he was drumming he studied their lead guitarist, Chuck Schwin.  He said later "There was a whole little bunch of us who were into kind of a combination of all the blues guys and others including Chet Atkins, Dick Dale, and Hank Marvin: a very weird cross-section of far-out guitar players." Stills taught himself to play like those guitarists, and in particular he taught himself how to emulate Atkins' Travis-picking style, and became remarkably proficient at it. There exists a recording of him, aged sixteen, singing one of his own songs and playing finger-picked guitar, and while the song is not exactly the strongest thing I've ever heard lyrically, it's clearly the work of someone who is already a confident performer: [Excerpt: Stephen Stills, "Travellin'"] But the main reason he switched to becoming a guitarist wasn't because of his admiration for Chet Atkins or Hank Marvin, but because he started driving and discovered that if you have to load a drum kit into your car and then drive it to rehearsals and gigs you either end up bashing up your car or bashing up the drum kit. As this is not a problem with guitars, Stills decided that he'd move on from the Radars, and join a band named the Continentals as their rhythm guitarist, playing with lead guitarist Don Felder. Stills was only in the Continentals for a few months though, before being replaced by another guitarist, Bernie Leadon, and in general Stills' whole early life is one of being uprooted and moved around. His father had jobs in several different countries, and while for the majority of his time Stills was in the southern US, he also ended up spending time in Costa Rica -- and staying there as a teenager even as the rest of his family moved to El Salvador. Eventually, aged eighteen, he moved to New Orleans, where he formed a folk duo with a friend, Chris Sarns. The two had very different tastes in folk music -- Stills preferred Dylan-style singer-songwriters, while Sarns liked the clean sound of the Kingston Trio -- but they played together for several months before moving to Greenwich Village, where they performed together and separately. They were latecomers to the scene, which had already mostly ended, and many of the folk stars had already gone on to do bigger things. But Stills still saw plenty of great performers there -- Miles Davis and Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonius Monk in the jazz clubs, Woody Allen, Lenny Bruce, and Richard Pryor in the comedy ones, and Simon and Garfunkel, Richie Havens, Fred Neil and Tim Hardin in the folk ones -- Stills said that other than Chet Atkins, Havens, Neil, and Hardin were the people most responsible for his guitar style. Stills was also, at this time, obsessed with Judy Collins' third album -- the album which had featured Roger McGuinn on banjo and arrangements, and which would soon provide several songs for the Byrds to cover: [Excerpt: Judy Collins, "Turn, Turn, Turn"] Judy Collins would soon become a very important figure in Stills' life, but for now she was just the singer on his favourite record. While the Greenwich Village folk scene was no longer quite what it had been a year or two earlier, it was still a great place for a young talented musician to perform. As well as working with Chris Sarns, Stills also formed a trio with his friend John Hopkins and a banjo player called Peter Tork who everyone said looked just like Stills. Tork soon headed out west to seek his fortune, and then Stills got headhunted to join the Au Go Go Singers. This was a group that was being set up in the same style as the New Christy Minstrels -- a nine-piece vocal and instrumental group that would do clean-sounding versions of currently-popular folk songs. The group were signed to Roulette Records, and recorded one album, They Call Us Au-Go-Go Singers, produced by Hugo and Luigi, the production duo we've previously seen working with everyone from the Tokens to the Isley Brothers. Much of the album is exactly the same kind of thing that a million New Christy Minstrels soundalikes were putting out -- and Stills, with his raspy voice, was clearly intended to be the Barry McGuire of this group -- but there was one exception -- a song called "High Flyin' Bird", on which Stills was able to show off the sound that would later make him famous, and which became so associated with him that even though it was written by Billy Edd Wheeler, the writer of "Jackson", even the biography of Stills I used in researching this episode credits "High Flyin' Bird" as being a Stills original: [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "High Flyin' Bird"] One of the other members of the Au-Go-Go Singers, Richie Furay, also got to sing a lead vocal on the album, on the Tom Paxton song "Where I'm Bound": [Excerpt: The Au-Go-Go Singers, "Where I'm Bound"] The Au-Go-Go Singers got a handful of dates around the folk scene, and Stills and Furay became friendly with another singer playing the same circuit, Gram Parsons. Parsons was one of the few people they knew who could see the value in current country music, and convinced both Stills and Furay to start paying more attention to what was coming out of Nashville and Bakersfield. But soon the Au-Go-Go Singers split up. Several venues where they might otherwise have been booked were apparently scared to book an act that was associated with Morris Levy, and also the market for big folk ensembles dried up more or less overnight when the Beatles hit the music scene. But several of the group -- including Stills but not Furay -- decided they were going to continue anyway, and formed a group called The Company, and they went on a tour of Canada. And one of the venues they played was the Fourth Dimension coffee house in Fort William, Ontario, and there their support act was a rock band called The Squires: [Excerpt: The Squires, "(I'm a Man And) I Can't Cry"] The lead guitarist of the Squires, Neil Young, had a lot in common with Stills, and they bonded instantly. Both men had parents who had split up when they were in their teens, and had a successful but rather absent father and an overbearing mother. And both had shown an interest in music even as babies. According to Young's mother, when he was still in nappies, he would pull himself up by the bars  of his playpen and try to dance every time he heard "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie": [Excerpt: Pinetop Smith, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie"] Young, though, had had one crucial experience which Stills had not had. At the age of six, he'd come down with polio, and become partially paralysed. He'd spent months in hospital before he regained his ability to walk, and the experience had also affected him in other ways. While he was recovering, he would draw pictures of trains -- other than music, his big interest, almost an obsession, was with electric train sets, and that obsession would remain with him throughout his life -- but for the first time he was drawing with his right hand rather than his left. He later said "The left-hand side got a little screwed. Feels different from the right. If I close my eyes, my left side, I really don't know where it is—but over the years I've discovered that almost one hundred percent for sure it's gonna be very close to my right side … probably to the left. That's why I started appearing to be ambidextrous, I think. Because polio affected my left side, and I think I was left-handed when I was born. What I have done is use the weak side as the dominant one because the strong side was injured." Both Young's father Scott Young -- a very famous Canadian writer and sports broadcaster, who was by all accounts as well known in Canada during his lifetime as his son -- and Scott's brother played ukulele, and they taught Neil how to play, and his first attempt at forming a group had been to get his friend Comrie Smith to get a pair of bongos and play along with him to Preston Epps' "Bongo Rock": [Excerpt: Preston Epps, "Bongo Rock"] Neil Young had liked all the usual rock and roll stars of the fifties  -- though in his personal rankings, Elvis came a distant third behind Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis -- but his tastes ran more to the more darkly emotional. He loved "Maybe" by the Chantels, saying "Raw soul—you cannot miss it. That's the real thing. She was believin' every word she was singin'." [Excerpt: The Chantels, "Maybe"] What he liked more than anything was music that had a mainstream surface but seemed slightly off-kilter. He was a major fan of Roy Orbison, saying, "it's almost impossible to comprehend the depth of that soul. It's so deep and dark it just keeps on goin' down—but it's not black. It's blue, deep blue. He's just got it. The drama. There's something sad but proud about Roy's music", and he would say similar things about Del Shannon, saying "He struck me as the ultimate dark figure—behind some Bobby Rydell exterior, y'know? “Hats Off to Larry,” “Runaway,” “Swiss Maid”—very, very inventive. The stuff was weird. Totally unaffected." More surprisingly, perhaps, he was a particular fan of Bobby Darin, who he admired so much because Darin could change styles at the drop of a hat, going from novelty rock and roll like "Splish Splash" to crooning "Mack The Knife" to singing Tim Hardin songs like "If I Were a Carpenter", without any of them seeming any less authentic. As he put it later "He just changed. He's completely different. And he's really into it. Doesn't sound like he's not there. “Dream Lover,” “Mack the Knife,” “If I Were a Carpenter,” “Queen of the Hop,” “Splish Splash”—tell me about those records, Mr. Darin. Did you write those all the same day, or what happened? He just changed so much. Just kinda went from one place to another. So it's hard to tell who Bobby Darin really was." And one record which Young was hugely influenced by was Floyd Cramer's country instrumental, "Last Date": [Excerpt: Floyd Cramer, "Last Date"] Now, that was a very important record in country music, and if you want to know more about it I strongly recommend listening to the episode of Cocaine and Rhinestones on the Nashville A-Team, which has a long section on the track, but the crucial thing to know about that track is that it's one of the earliest examples of what is known as slip-note playing, where the piano player, before hitting the correct note, briefly hits the note a tone below it, creating a brief discord. Young absolutely loved that sound, and wanted to make a sound like that on the guitar. And then, when he and his mother moved to Winnipeg after his parents' divorce, he found someone who was doing just that. It was the guitarist in a group variously known as Chad Allan and the Reflections and Chad Allan and the Expressions. That group had relatives in the UK who would send them records, and so where most Canadian bands would do covers of American hits, Chad Allan and the Reflections would do covers of British hits, like their version of Geoff Goddard's "Tribute to Buddy Holly", a song that had originally been produced by Joe Meek: [Excerpt: Chad Allan and the Reflections, "Tribute to Buddy Holly"] That would later pay off for them in a big way, when they recorded a version of Johnny Kidd and the Pirates' "Shakin' All Over", for which their record label tried to create an air of mystery by releasing it with no artist name, just "Guess Who?" on the label. It became a hit, the name stuck, and they became The Guess Who: [Excerpt: The Guess Who, "Shakin' All Over"] But at this point they, and their guitarist Randy Bachman, were just another group playing around Winnipeg. Bachman, though, was hugely impressive to Neil Young for a few reasons. The first was that he really did have a playing style that was a lot like the piano style of Floyd Cramer -- Young would later say "it was Randy Bachman who did it first. Randy was the first one I ever heard do things on the guitar that reminded me of Floyd. He'd do these pulls—“darrr darrrr,” this two-note thing goin' together—harmony, with one note pulling and the other note stayin' the same." Bachman also had built the first echo unit that Young heard a guitarist play in person. He'd discovered that by playing with the recording heads on a tape recorder owned by his mother, he could replicate the tape echo that Sam Phillips had used at Sun Studios -- and once he'd attached that to his amplifier, he realised how much the resulting sound sounded like his favourite guitarist, Hank Marvin of the Shadows, another favourite of Neil Young's: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] Young soon started looking to Bachman as something of a mentor figure, and he would learn a lot of guitar techniques second hand from Bachman -- every time a famous musician came to the area, Bachman would go along and stand right at the front and watch the guitarist, and make note of the positions their fingers were in. Then Bachman would replicate those guitar parts with the Reflections, and Neil Young would stand in front of him and make notes of where *his* fingers were. Young joined a band on the local circuit called the Esquires, but soon either quit or was fired, depending on which version of the story you choose to believe. He then formed his own rival band, the Squires, with no "e", much to the disgust of his ex-bandmates. In July 1963, five months after they formed, the  Squires released their first record, "Aurora" backed with "The Sultan", on a tiny local label. Both tracks were very obviously influenced by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Squires, "Aurora"] The Squires were a mostly-instrumental band for the first year or so they were together, and then the Beatles hit North America, and suddenly people didn't want to hear surf instrumentals and Shadows covers any more, they only wanted to hear songs that sounded a bit like the Beatles. The Squires started to work up the appropriate repertoire -- two songs that have been mentioned as in their set at this point are the Beatles album track "It Won't Be Long", and "Money" which the Beatles had also covered -- but they didn't have a singer, being an instrumental group. They could get in a singer, of course, but that would mean splitting the money with another person. So instead, the guitarist, who had never had any intention of becoming a singer, was more or less volunteered for the role. Over the next eighteen months or so the group's repertoire moved from being largely instrumental to largely vocal, and the group also seem to have shuttled around a bit between two different cities -- Winnipeg and Fort William, staying in one for a while and then moving back to the other. They travelled between the two in Young's car, a Buick Roadmaster hearse. In Winnipeg, Young first met up with a singer named Joni Anderson, who was soon to get married to Chuck Mitchell and would become better known by her married name. The two struck up a friendship, though by all accounts never a particularly close one -- they were too similar in too many ways; as Mitchell later said “Neil and I have a lot in common: Canadian; Scorpios; polio in the same epidemic, struck the same parts of our body; and we both have a black sense of humor". They were both also idiosyncratic artists who never fit very well into boxes. In Fort William the Squires made a few more records, this time vocal tracks like "I'll Love You Forever": [Excerpt: The Squires, "I'll Love You Forever"] It was also in Fort William that Young first encountered two acts that would make a huge impression on him. One was a group called The Thorns, consisting of Tim Rose, Jake Holmes, and Rich Husson. The Thorns showed Young that there was interesting stuff being done on the fringes of the folk music scene. He later said "One of my favourites was “Oh Susannah”—they did this arrangement that was bizarre. It was in a minor key, which completely changed everything—and it was rock and roll. So that idea spawned arrangements of all these other songs for me. I did minor versions of them all. We got into it. That was a certain Squires stage that never got recorded. Wish there were tapes of those shows. We used to do all this stuff, a whole kinda music—folk-rock. We took famous old folk songs like “Clementine,” “She'll Be Comin' 'Round the Mountain,” “Tom Dooley,” and we did them all in minor keys based on the Tim Rose arrangement of “Oh Susannah.” There are no recordings of the Thorns in existence that I know of, but presumably that arrangement that Young is talking about is the version that Rose also later did with the Big 3, which we've heard in a few other episodes: [Excerpt: The Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] The other big influence was, of course, Steve Stills, and the two men quickly found themselves influencing each other deeply. Stills realised that he could bring more rock and roll to his folk-music sound, saying that what amazed him was the way the Squires could go from "Cottonfields" (the Lead Belly song) to "Farmer John", the R&B song by Don and Dewey that was becoming a garage-rock staple. Young in turn was inspired to start thinking about maybe going more in the direction of folk music. The Squires even renamed themselves the High-Flying Birds, after the song that Stills had recorded with the Au Go Go Singers. After The Company's tour of Canada, Stills moved back to New York for a while. He now wanted to move in a folk-rock direction, and for a while he tried to persuade his friend John Sebastian to let him play bass in his new band, but when the Lovin' Spoonful decided against having him in the band, he decided to move West to San Francisco, where he'd heard there was a new music scene forming. He enjoyed a lot of the bands he saw there, and in particular he was impressed by the singer of a band called the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Somebody to Love"] He was much less impressed with the rest of her band, and seriously considered going up to her and asking if she wanted to work with some *real* musicians instead of the unimpressive ones she was working with, but didn't get his nerve up. We will, though, be hearing more about Grace Slick in future episodes. Instead, Stills decided to move south to LA, where many of the people he'd known in Greenwich Village were now based. Soon after he got there, he hooked up with two other musicians, a guitarist named Steve Young and a singer, guitarist, and pianist named Van Dyke Parks. Parks had a record contract at MGM -- he'd been signed by Tom Wilson, the same man who had turned Dylan electric, signed Simon and Garfunkel, and produced the first albums by the Mothers of Invention. With Wilson, Parks put out a couple of singles in 1966, "Come to the Sunshine": [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Come to the Sunshine"] And "Number Nine", a reworking of the Ode to Joy from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: [Excerpt: The Van Dyke Parks, "Number Nine"]Parks, Stills, and Steve Young became The Van Dyke Parks Band, though they didn't play together for very long, with their most successful performance being as the support act for the Lovin' Spoonful for a show in Arizona. But they did have a lasting resonance -- when Van Dyke Parks finally got the chance to record his first solo album, he opened it with Steve Young singing the old folk song "Black Jack Davy", filtered to sound like an old tape: [Excerpt: Steve Young, "Black Jack Davy"] And then it goes into a song written for Parks by Randy Newman, but consisting of Newman's ideas about Parks' life and what he knew about him, including that he had been third guitar in the Van Dyke Parks Band: [Excerpt: Van Dyke Parks, "Vine Street"] Parks and Stills also wrote a few songs together, with one of their collaborations, "Hello, I've Returned", later being demoed by Stills for Buffalo Springfield: [Excerpt: Steve Stills, "Hello, I've Returned"] After the Van Dyke Parks Band fell apart, Parks went on to many things, including a brief stint on keyboards in the Mothers of Invention, and we'll be talking more about him next episode. Stills formed a duo called the Buffalo Fish, with his friend Ron Long. That soon became an occasional trio when Stills met up again with his old Greenwich Village friend Peter Tork, who joined the group on the piano. But then Stills auditioned for the Monkees and was turned down because he had bad teeth -- or at least that's how most people told the story. Stills has later claimed that while he turned up for the Monkees auditions, it wasn't to audition, it was to try to pitch them songs, which seems implausible on the face of it. According to Stills, he was offered the job and turned it down because he'd never wanted it. But whatever happened, Stills suggested they might want his friend Peter, who looked just like him apart from having better teeth, and Peter Tork got the job. But what Stills really wanted to do was to form a proper band. He'd had the itch to do it ever since seeing the Squires, and he decided he should ask Neil Young to join. There was only one problem -- when he phoned Young, the phone was answered by Young's mother, who told Stills that Neil had moved out to become a folk singer, and she didn't know where he was. But then Stills heard from his old friend Richie Furay. Furay was still in Greenwich Village, and had decided to write to Stills. He didn't know where Stills was, other than that he was in California somewhere, so he'd written to Stills' father in El Salvador. The letter had been returned, because the postage had been short by one cent, so Furay had resent it with the correct postage. Stills' father had then forwarded the letter to the place Stills had been staying in San Francisco, which had in turn forwarded it on to Stills in LA. Furay's letter mentioned this new folk singer who had been on the scene for a while and then disappeared again, Neil Young, who had said he knew Stills, and had been writing some great songs, one of which Furay had added to his own set. Stills got in touch with Furay and told him about this great band he was forming in LA, which he wanted Furay to join. Furay was in, and travelled from New York to LA, only to be told that at this point there were no other members of this great band, but they'd definitely find some soon. They got a publishing deal with Columbia/Screen Gems, which gave them enough money to not starve, but what they really needed was to find some other musicians. They did, when driving down Hollywood Boulevard on April the sixth, 1966. There, stuck in traffic going the other way, they saw a hearse... After Steve Stills had left Fort William, so had Neil Young. He hadn't initially intended to -- the High-Flying Birds still had a regular gig, but Young and some of his friends had gone away for a few days on a road trip in his hearse. But unfortunately the transmission on the hearse had died, and Young and his friends had been stranded. Many years later, he would write a eulogy to the hearse, which he and Stills would record together: [Excerpt: The Stills-Young Band, "Long May You Run"] Young and his friends had all hitch-hiked in different directions -- Young had ended up in Toronto, where his dad lived, and had stayed with his dad for a while. The rest of his band had eventually followed him there, but Young found the Toronto music scene not to his taste -- the folk and rock scenes there were very insular and didn't mingle with each other, and the group eventually split up. Young even took on a day job for a while, for the only time in his life, though he soon quit. Young started basically commuting between Toronto and New York, a distance of several hundred miles, going to Greenwich Village for a while before ending up back in Toronto, and ping-ponging between the two. In New York, he met up with Richie Furay, and also had a disastrous audition for Elektra Records as a solo artist. One of the songs he sang in the audition was "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", the song which Furay liked so much he started performing it himself. Young doesn't normally explain his songs, but as this was one of the first he ever wrote, he talked about it in interviews in the early years, before he decided to be less voluble about his art. The song was apparently about the sense of youthful hope being crushed. The instigation for it was Young seeing his girlfriend with another man, but the central image, of Clancy not singing, came from Young's schooldays. The Clancy in question was someone Young liked as one of the other weird kids at school. He was disabled, like Young, though with MS rather than polio, and he would sing to himself in the hallways at school. Sadly, of course, the other kids would mock and bully him for that, and eventually he ended up stopping. Young said about it "After awhile, he got so self-conscious he couldn't do his thing any more. When someone who is as beautiful as that and as different as that is actually killed by his fellow man—you know what I mean—like taken and sorta chopped down—all the other things are nothing compared to this." [Excerpt: Neil Young, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing (Elektra demo)"] One thing I should say for anyone who listens to the Mixcloud for this episode, that song, which will be appearing in a couple of different versions, has one use of a term for Romani people that some (though not all) consider a slur. It's not in the excerpts I'll be using in this episode, but will be in the full versions on the Mixcloud. Sadly that word turns up time and again in songs of this era... When he wasn't in New York, Young was living in Toronto in a communal apartment owned by a folk singer named Vicki Taylor, where many of the Toronto folk scene would stay. Young started listening a lot to Taylor's Bert Jansch albums, which were his first real exposure to the British folk-baroque style of guitar fingerpicking, as opposed to the American Travis-picking style, and Young would soon start to incorporate that style into his own playing: [Excerpt: Bert Jansch, "Angie"] Another guitar influence on Young at this point was another of the temporary tenants of Taylor's flat, John Kay, who would later go on to be one of the founding members of Steppenwolf. Young credited Kay with having a funky rhythm guitar style that Young incorporated into his own. While he was in Toronto, he started getting occasional gigs in Detroit, which is "only" a couple of hundred miles away, set up by Joni and Chuck Mitchell, both of whom also sometimes stayed at Taylor's. And it was in Detroit that Neil Young became, albeit very briefly, a Motown artist. The Mynah Birds were a band in Toronto that had at one point included various future members of Steppenwolf, and they were unusual for the time in that they were a white band with a Black lead singer, Ricky Matthews. They also had a rich manager, John Craig Eaton, the heir to the Eaton's department store fortune, who basically gave them whatever money they wanted -- they used to go to his office and tell him they needed seven hundred dollars for lunch, and he'd hand it to them. They were looking for a new guitarist when Bruce Palmer, their bass player, bumped into Neil Young carrying an amp and asked if he was interested in joining. He was. The Mynah Birds quickly became one of the best bands in Toronto, and Young and Matthews became close, both as friends and as a performance team. People who saw them live would talk about things like a song called “Hideaway”, written by Young and Matthews, which had a spot in the middle where Young would start playing a harmonica solo, throw the harmonica up in the air mid-solo, Matthews would catch it, and he would then finish the solo. They got signed to Motown, who were at this point looking to branch out into the white guitar-group market, and they were put through the Motown star-making machine. They recorded an entire album, which remains unreleased, but they did release a single, "It's My Time": [Excerpt: The Mynah Birds, "It's My Time"] Or at least, they released a handful of promo copies. The single was pulled from release after Ricky Matthews got arrested. It turned out his birth name wasn't Ricky Matthews, but James Johnson, and that he wasn't from Toronto as he'd told everyone, but from Buffalo, New York. He'd fled to Canada after going AWOL from the Navy, not wanting to be sent to Vietnam, and he was arrested and jailed for desertion. After getting out of jail, he would start performing under yet another name, and as Rick James would have a string of hits in the seventies and eighties: [Excerpt: Rick James, "Super Freak"] Most of the rest of the group continued gigging as The Mynah Birds, but Young and Palmer had other plans. They sold the expensive equipment Eaton had bought the group, and Young bought a new hearse, which he named Mort 2 – Mort had been his first hearse. And according to one of the band's friends in Toronto, the crucial change in their lives came when Neil Young heard a song on a jukebox: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Young apparently heard "California Dreamin'" and immediately said "Let's go to California and become rock stars". Now, Young later said of this anecdote that "That sounds like a Canadian story to me. That sounds too real to be true", and he may well be right. Certainly the actual wording of the story is likely incorrect -- people weren't talking about "rock stars" in 1966. Google's Ngram viewer has the first use of the phrase in print being in 1969, and the phrase didn't come into widespread usage until surprisingly late -- even granting that phrases enter slang before they make it to print, it still seems implausible. But even though the precise wording might not be correct, something along those lines definitely seems to have happened, albeit possibly less dramatically. Young's friend Comrie Smith independently said that Young told him “Well, Comrie, I can hear the Mamas and the Papas singing ‘All the leaves are brown, and the skies are gray …' I'm gonna go down to the States and really make it. I'm on my way. Today North Toronto, tomorrow the world!” Young and Palmer loaded up Mort 2 with a bunch of their friends and headed towards California. On the way, they fell out with most of the friends, who parted from them, and Young had an episode which in retrospect may have been his first epileptic seizure. They decided when they got to California that they were going to look for Steve Stills, as they'd heard he was in LA and neither of them knew anyone else in the state. But after several days of going round the Sunset Strip clubs asking if anyone knew Steve Stills, and sleeping in the hearse as they couldn't afford anywhere else, they were getting fed up and about to head off to San Francisco, as they'd heard there was a good music scene there, too. They were going to leave that day, and they were stuck in traffic on Sunset Boulevard, about to head off, when Stills and Furay came driving in the other direction. Furay happened to turn his head, to brush away a fly, and saw a hearse with Ontario license plates. He and Stills both remembered that Young drove a hearse, and so they assumed it must be him. They started honking at the hearse, then did a U-turn. They got Young's attention, and they all pulled into the parking lot at Ben Frank's, the Sunset Strip restaurant that attracted such a hip crowd the Monkees' producers had asked for "Ben Frank's types" in their audition advert. Young introduced Stills and Furay to Palmer, and now there *was* a group -- three singing, songwriting, guitarists and a bass player. Now all they needed was a drummer. There were two drummers seriously considered for the role. One of them, Billy Mundi, was technically the better player, but Young didn't like playing with him as much -- and Mundi also had a better offer, to join the Mothers of Invention as their second drummer -- before they'd recorded their first album, they'd had two drummers for a few months, but Denny Bruce, their second drummer, had become ill with glandular fever and they'd reverted to having Jimmy Carl Black play solo. Now they were looking for someone else, and Mundi took that role. The other drummer, who Young preferred anyway, was another Canadian, Dewey Martin. Martin was a couple of years older than the rest of the group, and by far the most experienced. He'd moved from Canada to Nashville in his teens, and according to Martin he had been taken under the wing of Hank Garland, the great session guitarist most famous for "Sugarfoot Rag": [Excerpt: Hank Garland, "Sugarfoot Rag"] We heard Garland playing with Elvis and others in some of the episodes around 1960, and by many reckonings he was the best session guitarist in Nashville, but in 1961 he had a car accident that left him comatose, and even though he recovered from the coma and lived another thirty-three years, he never returned to recording. According to Martin, though, Garland would still sometimes play jazz clubs around Nashville after the accident, and one day Martin walked into a club and saw him playing. The drummer he was playing with got up and took a break, taking his sticks with him, so Martin got up on stage and started playing, using two combs instead of sticks. Garland was impressed, and told Martin that Faron Young needed a drummer, and he could get him the gig. At the time Young was one of the biggest stars in country music. That year, 1961, he had three country top ten hits, including a number one with his version of Willie Nelson's "Hello Walls", produced by Ken Nelson: [Excerpt: Faron Young, "Hello Walls"] Martin joined Faron Young's band for a while, and also ended up playing short stints in the touring bands of various other Nashville-based country and rock stars, including Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, and the Everly Brothers, before heading to LA for a while. Then Mel Taylor of the Ventures hooked him up with some musicians in the Pacific Northwest scene, and Martin started playing there under the name Sir Raleigh and the Coupons with various musicians. After a while he travelled back to LA where he got some members of the LA group Sons of Adam to become a permanent lineup of Coupons, and they recorded several singles with Martin singing lead, including the Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet song "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day", later recorded by the Monkees: [Excerpt: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons, "Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"] He then played with the Standells, before joining the Modern Folk Quartet for a short while, as they were transitioning from their folk sound to a folk-rock style. He was only with them for a short while, and it's difficult to get precise details -- almost everyone involved with Buffalo Springfield has conflicting stories about their own careers with timelines that don't make sense, which is understandable given that people were talking about events decades later and memory plays tricks. "Fast" Eddie Hoh had joined the Modern Folk Quartet on drums in late 1965, at which point they became the Modern Folk Quintet, and nothing I've read about that group talks about Hoh ever actually leaving, but apparently Martin joined them in February 1966, which might mean he's on their single "Night-Time Girl", co-written by Al Kooper and produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: The Modern Folk Quintet, "Night-Time Girl"] After that, Martin was taken on by the Dillards, a bluegrass band who are now possibly most famous for having popularised the Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith song "Duellin' Banjos", which they recorded on their first album and played on the Andy Griffith Show a few years before it was used in Deliverance: [Excerpt: The Dillards, "Duellin' Banjos"] The Dillards had decided to go in a country-rock direction -- and Doug Dillard would later join the Byrds and make records with Gene Clark -- but they were hesitant about it, and after a brief period with Martin in the band they decided to go back to their drummerless lineup. To soften the blow, they told him about another band that was looking for a drummer -- their manager, Jim Dickson, who was also the Byrds' manager, knew Stills and his bandmates. Dewey Martin was in the group. The group still needed a name though. They eventually took their name from a brand of steam roller, after seeing one on the streets when some roadwork was being done. Everyone involved disagrees as to who came up with the name. Steve Stills at one point said it was a group decision after Neil Young and the group's manager Frazier Mohawk stole the nameplate off the steamroller, and later Stills said that Richey Furay had suggested the name while they were walking down the street, Dewey Martin said it was his idea, Neil Young said that he, Steve Sills, and Van Dyke Parks had been walking down the street and either Young or Stills had seen the nameplate and suggested the name, and Van Dyke Parks says that *he* saw the nameplate and suggested it to Dewey Martin: [Excerpt: Steve Stills and Van Dyke Parks on the name] For what it's worth, I tend to believe Van Dyke Parks in most instances -- he's an honest man, and he seems to have a better memory of the sixties than many of his friends who led more chemically interesting lives. Whoever came up with it, the name worked -- as Stills later put it "We thought it was pretty apt, because Neil Young is from Manitoba which is buffalo country, and  Richie Furay was from Springfield, Ohio -- and I'm the field!" It almost certainly also helped that the word "buffalo" had been in the name of Stills' previous group, Buffalo Fish. On the eleventh of April, 1966, Buffalo Springfield played their first gig, at the Troubadour, using equipment borrowed from the Dillards. Chris Hillman of the Byrds was in the audience and was impressed. He got the group a support slot on a show the Byrds and the Dillards were doing a few days later in San Bernardino. That show was compered by a Merseyside-born British DJ, John Ravenscroft, who had managed to become moderately successful in US radio by playing up his regional accent so he sounded more like the Beatles. He would soon return to the UK, and start broadcasting under the name John Peel. Hillman also got them a week-long slot at the Whisky A-Go-Go, and a bidding war started between record labels to sign the band. Dunhill offered five thousand dollars, Warners counted with ten thousand, and then Atlantic offered twelve thousand. Atlantic were *just* starting to get interested in signing white guitar groups -- Jerry Wexler never liked that kind of music, always preferring to stick with soul and R&B, but Ahmet Ertegun could see which way things were going. Atlantic had only ever signed two other white acts before -- Neil Young's old favourite Bobby Darin, who had since left the label, and Sonny and Cher. And Sonny and Cher's management and production team, Brian Stone and Charlie Greene, were also very interested in the group, who even before they had made a record had quickly become the hottest band on the circuit, even playing the Hollywood Bowl as the Rolling Stones' support act. Buffalo Springfield already had managers -- Frazier Mohawk and Richard Davis, the lighting man at the Troubadour (who was sometimes also referred to as Dickie Davis, but I'll use his full name so as not to cause unnecessary confusion in British people who remember the sports TV presenter of the same name), who Mohawk had enlisted to help him. But Stone and Greene weren't going to let a thing like that stop them. According to anonymous reports quoted without attribution in David Roberts' biography of Stills -- so take this with as many grains of salt as you want -- Stone and Greene took Mohawk for a ride around LA in a limo, just the three of them, a gun, and a used hotdog napkin. At the end of the ride, the hotdog napkin had Mohawk's scrawled signature, signing the group over to Stone and Greene. Davis stayed on, but was demoted to just doing their lights. The way things ended up, the group signed to Stone and Greene's production company, who then leased their masters to Atlantic's Atco subsidiary. A publishing company was also set up for the group's songs -- owned thirty-seven point five percent by Atlantic, thirty-seven point five percent by Stone and Greene, and the other twenty-five percent split six ways between the group and Davis, who they considered their sixth member. Almost immediately, Charlie Greene started playing Stills and Young off against each other, trying a divide-and-conquer strategy on the group. This was quite easy, as both men saw themselves as natural leaders, though Stills was regarded by everyone as the senior partner -- the back cover of their first album would contain the line "Steve is the leader but we all are". Stills and Young were the two stars of the group as far as the audience were concerned -- though most musicians who heard them play live say that the band's real strength was in its rhythm section, with people comparing Palmer's playing to that of James Jamerson. But Stills and Young would get into guitar battles on stage, one-upping each other, in ways that turned the tension between them in creative directions. Other clashes, though were more petty -- both men had very domineering mothers, who would actually call the group's management to complain about press coverage if their son was given less space than the other one. The group were also not sure about Young's voice -- to the extent that Stills was known to jokingly apologise to the audience before Young took a lead vocal -- and so while the song chosen as the group's first A-side was Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing", Furay was chosen to sing it, rather than Young: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"] On the group's first session, though, both Stills and Young realised that their producers didn't really have a clue -- the group had built up arrangements that had a complex interplay of instruments and vocals, but the producers insisted on cutting things very straightforwardly, with a basic backing track and then the vocals. They also thought that the song was too long so the group should play faster. Stills and Young quickly decided that they were going to have to start producing their own material, though Stone and Greene would remain the producers for the first album. There was another bone of contention though, because in the session the initial plan had been for Stills' song "Go and Say Goodbye" to be the A-side with Young's song as the B-side. It was flipped, and nobody seems quite sure why -- it's certainly the case that, whatever the merits of the two tracks as songs, Stills' song was the one that would have been more likely to become a hit. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" was a flop, but it did get some local airplay. The next single, "Burned", was a Young song as well, and this time did have Young taking the lead, though in a song dominated by harmonies: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Burned"] Over the summer, though, something had happened that would affect everything for the group -- Neil Young had started to have epileptic seizures. At first these were undiagnosed episodes, but soon they became almost routine events, and they would often happen on stage, particularly at moments of great stress or excitement. Several other members of the group became convinced -- entirely wrongly -- that Young was faking these seizures in order to get women to pay attention to him. They thought that what he wanted was for women to comfort him and mop his brow, and that collapsing would get him that. The seizures became so common that Richard Davis, the group's lighting tech, learned to recognise the signs of a seizure before it happened. As soon as it looked like Young was about to collapse the lights would turn on, someone would get ready to carry him off stage, and Richie Furay would know to grab Young's guitar before he fell so that the guitar wouldn't get damaged. Because they weren't properly grounded and Furay had an electric guitar of his own, he'd get a shock every time. Young would later claim that during some of the seizures, he would hallucinate that he was another person, in another world, living another life that seemed to have its own continuity -- people in the other world would recognise him and talk to him as if he'd been away for a while -- and then when he recovered he would have to quickly rebuild his identity, as if temporarily amnesiac, and during those times he would find things like the concept of lying painful. The group's first album came out in December, and they were very, very, unhappy with it. They thought the material was great, but they also thought that the production was terrible. Stone and Greene's insistence that they record the backing tracks first and then overdub vocals, rather than singing live with the instruments, meant that the recordings, according to Stills and Young in particular, didn't capture the sound of the group's live performance, and sounded sterile. Stills and Young thought they'd fixed some of that in the mono mix, which they spent ten days on, but then Stone and Greene did the stereo mix without consulting the band, in less than two days, and the album was released at precisely the time that stereo was starting to overtake mono in the album market. I'm using the mono mixes in this podcast, but for decades the only versions available were the stereo ones, which Stills and Young both loathed. Ahmet Ertegun also apparently thought that the demo versions of the songs -- some of which were eventually released on a box set in 2001 -- were much better than the finished studio recordings. The album was not a success on release, but it did contain the first song any of the group had written to chart. Soon after its release, Van Dyke Parks' friend Lenny Waronker was producing a single by a group who had originally been led by Sly Stone and had been called Sly and the Mojo Men. By this time Stone was no longer involved in the group, and they were making music in a very different style from the music their former leader would later become known for. Parks was brought in to arrange a baroque-pop version of Stills' album track "Sit Down I Think I Love You" for the group, and it became their only top forty hit, reaching number thirty-six: [Excerpt: The Mojo Men, "Sit Down I Think I Love You"] It was shortly after the first Buffalo Springfield album was released, though, that Steve Stills wrote what would turn out to be *his* group's only top forty single. The song had its roots in both LA and San Francisco. The LA roots were more obvious -- the song was written about a specific experience Stills had had. He had been driving to Sunset Strip from Laurel Canyon on November the twelfth 1966, and he had seen a mass of young people and police in riot gear, and he had immediately turned round, partly because he didn't want to get involved in what looked to be a riot, and partly because he'd been inspired -- he had the idea for a lyric, which he pretty much finished in the car even before he got home: [Excerpt: The Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The riots he saw were what became known later as the Riot on Sunset Strip. This was a minor skirmish between the police and young people of LA -- there had been complaints that young people had been spilling out of the nightclubs on Sunset Strip into the street, causing traffic problems, and as a result the city council had introduced various heavy-handed restrictions, including a ten PM curfew for all young people in the area, removing the permits that many clubs had which allowed people under twenty-one to be present, forcing the Whisky A-Go-Go to change its name just to "the Whisk", and forcing a club named Pandora's Box, which was considered the epicentre of the problem, to close altogether. Flyers had been passed around calling for a "funeral" for Pandora's Box -- a peaceful gathering at which people could say goodbye to a favourite nightspot, and a thousand people had turned up. The police also turned up, and in the heavy-handed way common among law enforcement, they managed to provoke a peaceful party and turn it into a riot. This would not normally be an event that would be remembered even a year later, let alone nearly sixty years later, but Sunset Strip was the centre of the American rock music world in the period, and of the broader youth entertainment field. Among those arrested at the riot, for example, were Jack Nicholson and Peter Fonda, neither of whom were huge stars at the time, but who were making cheap B-movies with Roger Corman for American International Pictures. Among the cheap exploitation films that American International Pictures made around this time was one based on the riots, though neither Nicholson, Fonda, or Corman were involved. Riot on Sunset Strip was released in cinemas only four months after the riots, and it had a theme song by Dewey Martin's old colleagues The Standells, which is now regarded as a classic of garage rock: [Excerpt: The Standells, "Riot on Sunset Strip"] The riots got referenced in a lot of other songs, as well. The Mothers of Invention's second album, Absolutely Free, contains the song "Plastic People" which includes this section: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Plastic People"] And the Monkees track "Daily Nightly", written by Michael Nesmith, was always claimed by Nesmith to be an impressionistic portrait of the riots, though the psychedelic lyrics sound to me more like they're talking about drug use and street-walking sex workers than anything to do with the riots: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Daily Nightly"] But the song about the riots that would have the most lasting effect on popular culture was the one that Steve Stills wrote that night. Although how much he actually wrote, at least of the music, is somewhat open to question. Earlier that month, Buffalo Springfield had spent some time in San Francisco. They hadn't enjoyed the experience -- as an LA band, they were thought of as a bunch of Hollywood posers by most of the San Francisco scene, with the exception of one band, Moby Grape -- a band who, like them had three guitarist/singer/songwriters, and with whom they got on very well. Indeed, they got on rather better with Moby Grape than they were getting on with each other at this point, because Young and Stills would regularly get into arguments, and every time their argument seemed to be settling down, Dewey Martin would manage to say the wrong thing and get Stills riled up again -- Martin was doing a lot of speed at this point and unable to stop talking, even when it would have been politic to do so. There was even some talk while they were in San Francisco of the bands doing a trade -- Young and Pete Lewis of Moby Grape swapping places -- though that came to nothing. But Stills, according to both Richard Davis and Pete Lewis, had been truly impressed by two Moby Grape songs. One of them was a song called "On the Other Side", which Moby Grape never recorded, but which apparently had a chorus that went "Stop, can't you hear the music ringing in your ear, right before you go, telling you the way is clear," with the group all pausing after the word "Stop". The other was a song called "Murder in my Heart for the Judge": [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Murder in my Heart for the Judge"] The song Stills wrote had a huge amount of melodic influence from that song, and quite a bit from “On the Other Side”, though he apparently didn't notice until after the record came out, at which point he apologised to Moby Grape. Stills wasn't massively impressed with the song he'd written, and went to Stone and Greene's office to play it for them, saying "I'll play it, for what it's worth". They liked the song and booked a studio to get the song recorded and rush-released, though according to Neil Young neither Stone nor Greene were actually present at the session, and the song was recorded on December the fifth, while some outbursts of rioting were still happening, and released on December the twenty-third. [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "For What it's Worth"] The song didn't have a title when they recorded it, or so Stills thought, but when he mentioned this to Greene and Stone afterwards, they said "Of course it does. You said, 'I'm going to play the song, 'For What It's Worth'" So that became the title, although Ahmet Ertegun didn't like the idea of releasing a single with a title that wasn't in the lyric, so the early pressings of the single had "Stop, Hey, What's That Sound?" in brackets after the title. The song became a big hit, and there's a story told by David Crosby that doesn't line up correctly, but which might shed some light on why. According to Crosby, "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing" got its first airplay because Crosby had played members of Buffalo Springfield a tape he'd been given of the unreleased Beatles track "A Day in the Life", and they'd told their gangster manager-producers about it. Those manager-producers had then hired a sex worker to have sex with Crosby and steal the tape, which they'd then traded to a radio station in return for airplay. That timeline doesn't work, unless the sex worker involved was also a time traveller,  because "A Day in the Life" wasn't even recorded until January 1967 while "Clancy" came out in August 1966, and there'd been two other singles released between then and January 1967. But it *might* be the case that that's what happened with "For What It's Worth", which was released in the last week of December 1966, and didn't really start to do well on the charts for a couple of months. Right after recording the song, the group went to play a residency in New York, of which Ahmet Ertegun said “When they performed there, man, there was no band I ever heard that had the electricity of that group. That was the most exciting group I've ever seen, bar none. It was just mind-boggling.” During that residency they were joined on stage at various points by Mitch Ryder, Odetta, and Otis Redding. While in New York, the group also recorded "Mr. Soul", a song that Young had originally written as a folk song about his experiences with epilepsy, the nature of the soul, and dealing with fame. However, he'd noticed a similarity to "Satisfaction" and decided to lean into it. The track as finally released was heavily overdubbed by Young a few months later, but after it was released he decided he preferred the original take, which by then only existed as a scratchy acetate, which got released on a box set in 2001: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Mr. Soul (original version)"] Everyone has a different story of how the session for that track went -- at least one version of the story has Otis Redding turning up for the session and saying he wanted to record the song himself, as his follow-up to his version of "Satisfaction", but Young being angry at the idea. According to other versions of the story, Greene and Stills got into a physical fight, with Greene having to be given some of the valium Young was taking for his epilepsy to calm him down. "For What it's Worth" was doing well enough on the charts that the album was recalled, and reissued with "For What It's Worth" replacing Stills' song "Baby Don't Scold", but soon disaster struck the band. Bruce Palmer was arrested on drugs charges, and was deported back to Canada just as the song started to rise through the charts. The group needed a new bass player, fast. For a lipsynch appearance on local TV they got Richard Davis to mime the part, and then they got in Ken Forssi, the bass player from Love, for a couple of gigs. They next brought in Ken Koblun, the bass player from the Squires, but he didn't fit in with the rest of the group. The next replacement was Jim Fielder. Fielder was a friend of the group, and knew the material -- he'd subbed for Palmer a few times in 1966 when Palmer had been locked up after less serious busts. And to give some idea of how small a scene the LA scene was, when Buffalo Springfield asked him to become their bass player, he was playing rhythm guitar for the Mothers of Invention, while Billy Mundi was on drums, and had played on their second, as yet unreleased, album, Absolutely Free: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Call any Vegetable"] And before joining the Mothers, Fielder and Mundi had also played together with Van Dyke Parks, who had served his own short stint as a Mother of Invention already, backing Tim Buckley on Buckley's first album: [Excerpt: Tim Buckley, "Aren't You the Girl?"] And the arrangements on that album were by Jack Nitzsche, who would soon become a very close collaborator with Young. "For What it's Worth" kept rising up the charts. Even though it had been inspired by a very local issue, the lyrics were vague enough that people in other situations could apply it to themselves, and it soon became regarded as an anti-war protest anthem -- something Stills did nothing to discourage, as the band were all opposed to the war. The band were also starting to collaborate with other people. When Stills bought a new house, he couldn't move in to it for a while, and so Peter Tork invited him to stay at his house. The two got on so well that Tork invited Stills to produce the next Monkees album -- only to find that Michael Nesmith had already asked Chip Douglas to do it. The group started work on a new album, provisionally titled "Stampede", but sessions didn't get much further than Stills' song "Bluebird" before trouble arose between Young and Stills. The root of the argument seems to have been around the number of songs each got on the album. With Richie Furay also writing, Young was worried that given the others' attitudes to his songwriting, he might get as few as two songs on the album. And Young and Stills were arguing over which song should be the next single, with Young wanting "Mr. Soul" to be the A-side, while Stills wanted "Bluebird" -- Stills making the reasonable case that they'd released two Neil Young songs as singles and gone nowhere, and then they'd released one of Stills', and it had become a massive hit. "Bluebird" was eventually chosen as the A-side, with "Mr. Soul" as the B-side: [Excerpt: Buffalo Springfield, "Bluebird"] The "Bluebird" session was another fraught one. Fielder had not yet joined the band, and session player Bobby West subbed on bass. Neil Young had recently started hanging out with Jack Nitzsche, and the two were getting very close and working on music together. Young had impressed Nitzsche not just with his songwriting but with his arrogance -- he'd played Nitzsche his latest song, "Expecting to Fly", and Nitzsche had said halfway through "That's a great song", and Young had shushed him and told him to listen, not interrupt. Nitzsche, who had a monstrous ego himself and was also used to working with people like Phil Spector, the Rolling Stones and Sonny Bono, none of them known for a lack of faith in their own abilities, was impressed. Shortly after that, Stills had asked Nitzsch