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A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 168: “I Say a Little Prayer” by Aretha Franklin

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2023


Episode 168 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “I Say a Little Prayer”, and the interaction of the sacred, political, and secular in Aretha Franklin's life and work. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a forty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "Abraham, Martin, and John" by Dion. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources No Mixcloud this week, as there are too many songs by Aretha Franklin. Even splitting it into multiple parts would have required six or seven mixes. My main biographical source for Aretha Franklin is Respect: The Life of Aretha Franklin by David Ritz, and this is where most of the quotes from musicians come from. Information on C.L. Franklin came from Singing in a Strange Land: C. L. Franklin, the Black Church, and the Transformation of America by Nick Salvatore. Country Soul by Charles L Hughes is a great overview of the soul music made in Muscle Shoals, Memphis, and Nashville in the sixties. Peter Guralnick's Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm And Blues And The Southern Dream Of Freedom is possibly less essential, but still definitely worth reading. Information about Martin Luther King came from Martin Luther King: A Religious Life by Paul Harvey. I also referred to Burt Bacharach's autobiography Anyone Who Had a Heart, Carole King's autobiography A Natural Woman, and Soul Serenade: King Curtis and his Immortal Saxophone by Timothy R. Hoover. For information about Amazing Grace I also used Aaron Cohen's 33 1/3 book on the album. The film of the concerts is also definitely worth watching. And the Aretha Now album is available in this five-album box set for a ludicrously cheap price. But it's actually worth getting this nineteen-CD set with her first sixteen Atlantic albums and a couple of bonus discs of demos and outtakes. There's barely a duff track in the whole nineteen discs. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick warning before I begin. This episode contains some moderate references to domestic abuse, death by cancer, racial violence, police violence, and political assassination. Anyone who might be upset by those subjects might want to check the transcript rather than listening to the episode. Also, as with the previous episode on Aretha Franklin, this episode presents something of a problem. Like many people in this narrative, Franklin's career was affected by personal troubles, which shaped many of her decisions. But where most of the subjects of the podcast have chosen to live their lives in public and share intimate details of every aspect of their personal lives, Franklin was an extremely private person, who chose to share only carefully sanitised versions of her life, and tried as far as possible to keep things to herself. This of course presents a dilemma for anyone who wants to tell her story -- because even though the information is out there in biographies, and even though she's dead, it's not right to disrespect someone's wish for a private life. I have therefore tried, wherever possible, to stay away from talk of her personal life except where it *absolutely* affects the work, or where other people involved have publicly shared their own stories, and even there I've tried to keep it to a minimum. This will occasionally lead to me saying less about some topics than other people might, even though the information is easily findable, because I don't think we have an absolute right to invade someone else's privacy for entertainment. When we left Aretha Franklin, she had just finally broken through into the mainstream after a decade of performing, with a version of Otis Redding's song "Respect" on which she had been backed by her sisters, Erma and Carolyn. "Respect", in Franklin's interpretation, had been turned from a rather chauvinist song about a man demanding respect from his woman into an anthem of feminism, of Black power, and of a new political awakening. For white people of a certain generation, the summer of 1967 was "the summer of love". For many Black people, it was rather different. There's a quote that goes around (I've seen it credited in reliable sources to both Ebony and Jet magazine, but not ever seen an issue cited, so I can't say for sure where it came from) saying that the summer of 67 was the summer of "'retha, Rap, and revolt", referring to the trifecta of Aretha Franklin, the Black power leader Jamil Abdullah al-Amin (who was at the time known as H. Rap Brown, a name he later disclaimed) and the rioting that broke out in several major cities, particularly in Detroit: [Excerpt: John Lee Hooker, "The Motor City is Burning"] The mid sixties were, in many ways, the high point not of Black rights in the US -- for the most part there has been a lot of progress in civil rights in the intervening decades, though not without inevitable setbacks and attacks from the far right, and as movements like the Black Lives Matter movement have shown there is still a long way to go -- but of *hope* for Black rights. The moral force of the arguments made by the civil rights movement were starting to cause real change to happen for Black people in the US for the first time since the Reconstruction nearly a century before. But those changes weren't happening fast enough, and as we heard in the episode on "I Was Made to Love Her", there was not only a growing unrest among Black people, but a recognition that it was actually possible for things to change. A combination of hope and frustration can be a powerful catalyst, and whether Franklin wanted it or not, she was at the centre of things, both because of her newfound prominence as a star with a hit single that couldn't be interpreted as anything other than a political statement and because of her intimate family connections to the struggle. Even the most racist of white people these days pays lip service to the memory of Dr Martin Luther King, and when they do they quote just a handful of sentences from one speech King made in 1963, as if that sums up the full theological and political philosophy of that most complex of men. And as we discussed the last time we looked at Aretha Franklin, King gave versions of that speech, the "I Have a Dream" speech, twice. The most famous version was at the March on Washington, but the first time was a few weeks earlier, at what was at the time the largest civil rights demonstration in American history, in Detroit. Aretha's family connection to that event is made clear by the very opening of King's speech: [Excerpt: Martin Luther King, "Original 'I Have a Dream' Speech"] So as summer 1967 got into swing, and white rock music was going to San Francisco to wear flowers in its hair, Aretha Franklin was at the centre of a very different kind of youth revolution. Franklin's second Atlantic album, Aretha Arrives, brought in some new personnel to the team that had recorded Aretha's first album for Atlantic. Along with the core Muscle Shoals players Jimmy Johnson, Spooner Oldham, Tommy Cogbill and Roger Hawkins, and a horn section led by King Curtis, Wexler and Dowd also brought in guitarist Joe South. South was a white session player from Georgia, who had had a few minor hits himself in the fifties -- he'd got his start recording a cover version of "The Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor", the Big Bopper's B-side to "Chantilly Lace": [Excerpt: Joe South, "The Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor"] He'd also written a few songs that had been recorded by people like Gene Vincent, but he'd mostly become a session player. He'd become a favourite musician of Bob Johnston's, and so he'd played guitar on Simon and Garfunkel's Sounds of Silence and Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme albums: [Excerpt: Simon and Garfunkel, "I am a Rock"] and bass on Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde, with Al Kooper particularly praising his playing on "Visions of Johanna": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Visions of Johanna"] South would be the principal guitarist on this and Franklin's next album, before his own career took off in 1968 with "Games People Play": [Excerpt: Joe South, "Games People Play"] At this point, he had already written the other song he's best known for, "Hush", which later became a hit for Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Hush"] But he wasn't very well known, and was surprised to get the call for the Aretha Franklin session, especially because, as he put it "I was white and I was about to play behind the blackest genius since Ray Charles" But Jerry Wexler had told him that Franklin didn't care about the race of the musicians she played with, and South settled in as soon as Franklin smiled at him when he played a good guitar lick on her version of the blues standard "Going Down Slow": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Going Down Slow"] That was one of the few times Franklin smiled in those sessions though. Becoming an overnight success after years of trying and failing to make a name for herself had been a disorienting experience, and on top of that things weren't going well in her personal life. Her marriage to her manager Ted White was falling apart, and she was performing erratically thanks to the stress. In particular, at a gig in Georgia she had fallen off the stage and broken her arm. She soon returned to performing, but it meant she had problems with her right arm during the recording of the album, and didn't play as much piano as she would have previously -- on some of the faster songs she played only with her left hand. But the recording sessions had to go on, whether or not Aretha was physically capable of playing piano. As we discussed in the episode on Otis Redding, the owners of Atlantic Records were busily negotiating its sale to Warner Brothers in mid-1967. As Wexler said later “Everything in me said, Keep rolling, keep recording, keep the hits coming. She was red hot and I had no reason to believe that the streak wouldn't continue. I knew that it would be foolish—and even irresponsible—not to strike when the iron was hot. I also had personal motivation. A Wall Street financier had agreed to see what we could get for Atlantic Records. While Ahmet and Neshui had not agreed on a selling price, they had gone along with my plan to let the financier test our worth on the open market. I was always eager to pump out hits, but at this moment I was on overdrive. In this instance, I had a good partner in Ted White, who felt the same. He wanted as much product out there as possible." In truth, you can tell from Aretha Arrives that it's a record that was being thought of as "product" rather than one being made out of any kind of artistic impulse. It's a fine album -- in her ten-album run from I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You through Amazing Grace there's not a bad album and barely a bad track -- but there's a lack of focus. There are only two originals on the album, neither of them written by Franklin herself, and the rest is an incoherent set of songs that show the tension between Franklin and her producers at Atlantic. Several songs are the kind of standards that Franklin had recorded for her old label Columbia, things like "You Are My Sunshine", or her version of "That's Life", which had been a hit for Frank Sinatra the previous year: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "That's Life"] But mixed in with that are songs that are clearly the choice of Wexler. As we've discussed previously in episodes on Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett, at this point Atlantic had the idea that it was possible for soul artists to cross over into the white market by doing cover versions of white rock hits -- and indeed they'd had some success with that tactic. So while Franklin was suggesting Sinatra covers, Atlantic's hand is visible in the choices of songs like "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" and "96 Tears": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "96 Tears'] Of the two originals on the album, one, the hit single "Baby I Love You" was written by Ronnie Shannon, the Detroit songwriter who had previously written "I Never Loved a Man (the Way I Love You)": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Baby I Love You"] As with the previous album, and several other songs on this one, that had backing vocals by Aretha's sisters, Erma and Carolyn. But the other original on the album, "Ain't Nobody (Gonna Turn Me Around)", didn't, even though it was written by Carolyn: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Ain't Nobody (Gonna Turn Me Around)"] To explain why, let's take a little detour and look at the co-writer of the song this episode is about, though we're not going to get to that for a little while yet. We've not talked much about Burt Bacharach in this series so far, but he's one of those figures who has come up a few times in the periphery and will come up again, so here is as good a time as any to discuss him, and bring everyone up to speed about his career up to 1967. Bacharach was one of the more privileged figures in the sixties pop music field. His father, Bert Bacharach (pronounced the same as his son, but spelled with an e rather than a u) had been a famous newspaper columnist, and his parents had bought him a Steinway grand piano to practice on -- they pushed him to learn the piano even though as a kid he wasn't interested in finger exercises and Debussy. What he was interested in, though, was jazz, and as a teenager he would often go into Manhattan and use a fake ID to see people like Dizzy Gillespie, who he idolised, and in his autobiography he talks rapturously of seeing Gillespie playing his bent trumpet -- he once saw Gillespie standing on a street corner with a pet monkey on his shoulder, and went home and tried to persuade his parents to buy him a monkey too. In particular, he talks about seeing the Count Basie band with Sonny Payne on drums as a teenager: [Excerpt: Count Basie, "Kid From Red Bank"] He saw them at Birdland, the club owned by Morris Levy where they would regularly play, and said of the performance "they were just so incredibly exciting that all of a sudden, I got into music in a way I never had before. What I heard in those clubs really turned my head around— it was like a big breath of fresh air when somebody throws open a window. That was when I knew for the first time how much I loved music and wanted to be connected to it in some way." Of course, there's a rather major problem with this story, as there is so often with narratives that musicians tell about their early career. In this case, Birdland didn't open until 1949, when Bacharach was twenty-one and stationed in Germany for his military service, while Sonny Payne didn't join Basie's band until 1954, when Bacharach had been a professional musician for many years. Also Dizzy Gillespie's trumpet bell only got bent on January 6, 1953. But presumably while Bacharach was conflating several memories, he did have some experience in some New York jazz club that led him to want to become a musician. Certainly there were enough great jazz musicians playing the clubs in those days. He went to McGill University to study music for two years, then went to study with Darius Milhaud, a hugely respected modernist composer. Milhaud was also one of the most important music teachers of the time -- among others he'd taught Stockhausen and Xenakkis, and would go on to teach Philip Glass and Steve Reich. This suited Bacharach, who by this point was a big fan of Schoenberg and Webern, and was trying to write atonal, difficult music. But Milhaud had also taught Dave Brubeck, and when Bacharach rather shamefacedly presented him with a composition which had an actual tune, he told Bacharach "Never be ashamed of writing a tune you can whistle". He dropped out of university and, like most men of his generation, had to serve in the armed forces. When he got out of the army, he continued his musical studies, still trying to learn to be an avant-garde composer, this time with Bohuslav Martinů and later with Henry Cowell, the experimental composer we've heard about quite a bit in previous episodes: [Excerpt: Henry Cowell, "Aeolian Harp and Sinister Resonance"] He was still listening to a lot of avant garde music, and would continue doing so throughout the fifties, going to see people like John Cage. But he spent much of that time working in music that was very different from the avant-garde. He got a job as the band leader for the crooner Vic Damone: [Excerpt: Vic Damone. "Ebb Tide"] He also played for the vocal group the Ames Brothers. He decided while he was working with the Ames Brothers that he could write better material than they were getting from their publishers, and that it would be better to have a job where he didn't have to travel, so he got himself a job as a staff songwriter in the Brill Building. He wrote a string of flops and nearly hits, starting with "Keep Me In Mind" for Patti Page: [Excerpt: Patti Page, "Keep Me In Mind"] From early in his career he worked with the lyricist Hal David, and the two of them together wrote two big hits, "Magic Moments" for Perry Como: [Excerpt: Perry Como, "Magic Moments"] and "The Story of My Life" for Marty Robbins: [Excerpt: "The Story of My Life"] But at that point Bacharach was still also writing with other writers, notably Hal David's brother Mack, with whom he wrote the theme tune to the film The Blob, as performed by The Five Blobs: [Excerpt: The Five Blobs, "The Blob"] But Bacharach's songwriting career wasn't taking off, and he got himself a job as musical director for Marlene Dietrich -- a job he kept even after it did start to take off.  Part of the problem was that he intuitively wrote music that didn't quite fit into standard structures -- there would be odd bars of unusual time signatures thrown in, unusual harmonies, and structural irregularities -- but then he'd take feedback from publishers and producers who would tell him the song could only be recorded if he straightened it out. He said later "The truth is that I ruined a lot of songs by not believing in myself enough to tell these guys they were wrong." He started writing songs for Scepter Records, usually with Hal David, but also with Bob Hilliard and Mack David, and started having R&B hits. One song he wrote with Mack David, "I'll Cherish You", had the lyrics rewritten by Luther Dixon to make them more harsh-sounding for a Shirelles single -- but the single was otherwise just Bacharach's demo with the vocals replaced, and you can even hear his voice briefly at the beginning: [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Baby, It's You"] But he'd also started becoming interested in the production side of records more generally. He'd iced that some producers, when recording his songs, would change the sound for the worse -- he thought Gene McDaniels' version of "Tower of Strength", for example, was too fast. But on the other hand, other producers got a better sound than he'd heard in his head. He and Hilliard had written a song called "Please Stay", which they'd given to Leiber and Stoller to record with the Drifters, and he thought that their arrangement of the song was much better than the one he'd originally thought up: [Excerpt: The Drifters, "Please Stay"] He asked Leiber and Stoller if he could attend all their New York sessions and learn about record production from them. He started doing so, and eventually they started asking him to assist them on records. He and Hilliard wrote a song called "Mexican Divorce" for the Drifters, which Leiber and Stoller were going to produce, and as he put it "they were so busy running Redbird Records that they asked me to rehearse the background singers for them in my office." [Excerpt: The Drifters, "Mexican Divorce"] The backing singers who had been brought in to augment the Drifters on that record were a group of vocalists who had started out as members of a gospel group called the Drinkard singers: [Excerpt: The Drinkard Singers, "Singing in My Soul"] The Drinkard Singers had originally been a family group, whose members included Cissy Drinkard, who joined the group aged five (and who on her marriage would become known as Cissy Houston -- her daughter Whitney would later join the family business), her aunt Lee Warrick, and Warrick's adopted daughter Judy Clay. That group were discovered by the great gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, and spent much of the fifties performing with gospel greats including Jackson herself, Clara Ward, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe. But Houston was also the musical director of a group at her church, the Gospelaires, which featured Lee Warrick's two daughters Dionne and Dee Dee Warwick (for those who don't know, the Warwick sisters' birth name was Warrick, spelled with two rs. A printing error led to it being misspelled the same way as the British city on a record label, and from that point on Dionne at least pronounced the w in her misspelled name). And slowly, the Gospelaires rather than the Drinkard Singers became the focus, with a lineup of Houston, the Warwick sisters, the Warwick sisters' cousin Doris Troy, and Clay's sister Sylvia Shemwell. The real change in the group's fortunes came when, as we talked about a while back in the episode on "The Loco-Motion", the original lineup of the Cookies largely stopped working as session singers to become Ray Charles' Raelettes. As we discussed in that episode, a new lineup of Cookies formed in 1961, but it took a while for them to get started, and in the meantime the producers who had been relying on them for backing vocals were looking elsewhere, and they looked to the Gospelaires. "Mexican Divorce" was the first record to feature the group as backing vocalists -- though reports vary as to how many of them are on the record, with some saying it's only Troy and the Warwicks, others saying Houston was there, and yet others saying it was all five of them. Some of these discrepancies were because these singers were so good that many of them left to become solo singers in fairly short order. Troy was the first to do so, with her hit "Just One Look", on which the other Gospelaires sang backing vocals: [Excerpt: Doris Troy, "Just One Look"] But the next one to go solo was Dionne Warwick, and that was because she'd started working with Bacharach and Hal David as their principal demo singer. She started singing lead on their demos, and hoping that she'd get to release them on her own. One early one was "Make it Easy On Yourself", which was recorded by Jerry Butler, formerly of the Impressions. That record was produced by Bacharach, one of the first records he produced without outside supervision: [Excerpt: Jerry Butler, "Make it Easy On Yourself"] Warwick was very jealous that a song she'd sung the demo of had become a massive hit for someone else, and blamed Bacharach and David. The way she tells the story -- Bacharach always claimed this never happened, but as we've already seen he was himself not always the most reliable of narrators of his own life -- she got so angry she complained to them, and said "Don't make me over, man!" And so Bacharach and David wrote her this: [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "Don't Make Me Over"] Incidentally, in the UK, the hit version of that was a cover by the Swinging Blue Jeans: [Excerpt: The Swinging Blue Jeans, "Don't Make Me Over"] who also had a huge hit with "You're No Good": [Excerpt: The Swinging Blue Jeans, "You're No Good"] And *that* was originally recorded by *Dee Dee* Warwick: [Excerpt: Dee Dee Warwick, "You're No Good"] Dee Dee also had a successful solo career, but Dionne's was the real success, making the names of herself, and of Bacharach and David. The team had more than twenty top forty hits together, before Bacharach and David had a falling out in 1971 and stopped working together, and Warwick sued both of them for breach of contract as a result. But prior to that they had hit after hit, with classic records like "Anyone Who Had a Heart": [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "Anyone Who Had a Heart"] And "Walk On By": [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "Walk On By"] With Doris, Dionne, and Dee Dee all going solo, the group's membership was naturally in flux -- though the departed members would occasionally join their former bandmates for sessions, and the remaining members would sing backing vocals on their ex-members' records. By 1965 the group consisted of Cissy Houston, Sylvia Shemwell, the Warwick sisters' cousin Myrna Smith, and Estelle Brown. The group became *the* go-to singers for soul and R&B records made in New York. They were regularly hired by Leiber and Stoller to sing on their records, and they were also the particular favourites of Bert Berns. They sang backing vocals on almost every record he produced. It's them doing the gospel wails on "Cry Baby" by Garnet Mimms: [Excerpt: Garnet Mimms, "Cry Baby"] And they sang backing vocals on both versions of "If You Need Me" -- Wilson Pickett's original and Solomon Burke's more successful cover version, produced by Berns: [Excerpt: Solomon Burke, "If You Need Me"] They're on such Berns records as "Show Me Your Monkey", by Kenny Hamber: [Excerpt: Kenny Hamber, "Show Me Your Monkey"] And it was a Berns production that ended up getting them to be Aretha Franklin's backing group. The group were becoming such an important part of the records that Atlantic and BANG Records, in particular, were putting out, that Jerry Wexler said "it was only a matter of common decency to put them under contract as a featured group". He signed them to Atlantic and renamed them from the Gospelaires to The Sweet Inspirations.  Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham wrote a song for the group which became their only hit under their own name: [Excerpt: The Sweet Inspirations, "Sweet Inspiration"] But to start with, they released a cover of Pops Staples' civil rights song "Why (Am I treated So Bad)": [Excerpt: The Sweet Inspirations, "Why (Am I Treated So Bad?)"] That hadn't charted, and meanwhile, they'd all kept doing session work. Cissy had joined Erma and Carolyn Franklin on the backing vocals for Aretha's "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You"] Shortly after that, the whole group recorded backing vocals for Erma's single "Piece of My Heart", co-written and produced by Berns: [Excerpt: Erma Franklin, "Piece of My Heart"] That became a top ten record on the R&B charts, but that caused problems. Aretha Franklin had a few character flaws, and one of these was an extreme level of jealousy for any other female singer who had any level of success and came up in the business after her. She could be incredibly graceful towards anyone who had been successful before her -- she once gave one of her Grammies away to Esther Phillips, who had been up for the same award and had lost to her -- but she was terribly insecure, and saw any contemporary as a threat. She'd spent her time at Columbia Records fuming (with some justification) that Barbra Streisand was being given a much bigger marketing budget than her, and she saw Diana Ross, Gladys Knight, and Dionne Warwick as rivals rather than friends. And that went doubly for her sisters, who she was convinced should be supporting her because of family loyalty. She had been infuriated at John Hammond when Columbia had signed Erma, thinking he'd gone behind her back to create competition for her. And now Erma was recording with Bert Berns. Bert Berns who had for years been a colleague of Jerry Wexler and the Ertegun brothers at Atlantic. Aretha was convinced that Wexler had put Berns up to signing Erma as some kind of power play. There was only one problem with this -- it simply wasn't true. As Wexler later explained “Bert and I had suffered a bad falling-out, even though I had enormous respect for him. After all, he was the guy who brought over guitarist Jimmy Page from England to play on our sessions. Bert, Ahmet, Nesuhi, and I had started a label together—Bang!—where Bert produced Van Morrison's first album. But Bert also had a penchant for trouble. He courted the wise guys. He wanted total control over every last aspect of our business dealings. Finally it was too much, and the Erteguns and I let him go. He sued us for breach of contract and suddenly we were enemies. I felt that he signed Erma, an excellent singer, not merely for her talent but as a way to get back at me. If I could make a hit with Aretha, he'd show me up by making an even bigger hit on Erma. Because there was always an undercurrent of rivalry between the sisters, this only added to the tension.” There were two things that resulted from this paranoia on Aretha's part. The first was that she and Wexler, who had been on first-name terms up to that point, temporarily went back to being "Mr. Wexler" and "Miss Franklin" to each other. And the second was that Aretha no longer wanted Carolyn and Erma to be her main backing vocalists, though they would continue to appear on her future records on occasion. From this point on, the Sweet Inspirations would be the main backing vocalists for Aretha in the studio throughout her golden era [xxcut line (and when the Sweet Inspirations themselves weren't on the record, often it would be former members of the group taking their place)]: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Ain't Nobody (Gonna Turn Me Around)"] The last day of sessions for Aretha Arrives was July the twenty-third, 1967. And as we heard in the episode on "I Was Made to Love Her", that was the day that the Detroit riots started. To recap briefly, that was four days of rioting started because of a history of racist policing, made worse by those same racist police overreacting to the initial protests. By the end of those four days, the National Guard, 82nd Airborne Division, and the 101st Airborne from Clarksville were all called in to deal with the violence, which left forty-three dead (of whom thirty-three were Black and only one was a police officer), 1,189 people were injured, and over 7,200 arrested, almost all of them Black. Those days in July would be a turning point for almost every musician based in Detroit. In particular, the police had murdered three members of the soul group the Dramatics, in a massacre of which the author John Hersey, who had been asked by President Johnson to be part of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders but had decided that would compromise his impartiality and did an independent journalistic investigation, said "The episode contained all the mythic themes of racial strife in the United States: the arm of the law taking the law into its own hands; interracial sex; the subtle poison of racist thinking by “decent” men who deny they are racists; the societal limbo into which, ever since slavery, so many young black men have been driven by our country; ambiguous justice in the courts; and the devastation in both black and white human lives that follows in the wake of violence as surely as ruinous and indiscriminate flood after torrents" But these were also the events that radicalised the MC5 -- the group had been playing a gig as Tim Buckley's support act when the rioting started, and guitarist Wayne Kramer decided afterwards to get stoned and watch the fires burning down the city through a telescope -- which police mistook for a rifle, leading to the National Guard knocking down Kramer's door. The MC5 would later cover "The Motor City is Burning", John Lee Hooker's song about the events: [Excerpt: The MC5, "The Motor City is Burning"] It would also be a turning point for Motown, too, in ways we'll talk about in a few future episodes.  And it was a political turning point too -- Michigan Governor George Romney, a liberal Republican (at a time when such people existed) had been the favourite for the Republican Presidential candidacy when he'd entered the race in December 1966, but as racial tensions ramped up in Detroit during the early months of 1967 he'd started trailing Richard Nixon, a man who was consciously stoking racists' fears. President Johnson, the incumbent Democrat, who was at that point still considering standing for re-election, made sure to make it clear to everyone during the riots that the decision to call in the National Guard had been made at the State level, by Romney, rather than at the Federal level.  That wasn't the only thing that removed the possibility of a Romney presidency, but it was a big part of the collapse of his campaign, and the, as it turned out, irrevocable turn towards right-authoritarianism that the party took with Nixon's Southern Strategy. Of course, Aretha Franklin had little way of knowing what was to come and how the riots would change the city and the country over the following decades. What she was primarily concerned about was the safety of her father, and to a lesser extent that of her sister-in-law Earline who was staying with him. Aretha, Carolyn, and Erma all tried to keep in constant touch with their father while they were out of town, and Aretha even talked about hiring private detectives to travel to Detroit, find her father, and get him out of the city to safety. But as her brother Cecil pointed out, he was probably the single most loved man among Black people in Detroit, and was unlikely to be harmed by the rioters, while he was too famous for the police to kill with impunity. Reverend Franklin had been having a stressful time anyway -- he had recently been fined for tax evasion, an action he was convinced the IRS had taken because of his friendship with Dr King and his role in the civil rights movement -- and according to Cecil "Aretha begged Daddy to move out of the city entirely. She wanted him to find another congregation in California, where he was especially popular—or at least move out to the suburbs. But he wouldn't budge. He said that, more than ever, he was needed to point out the root causes of the riots—the economic inequality, the pervasive racism in civic institutions, the woefully inadequate schools in inner-city Detroit, and the wholesale destruction of our neighborhoods by urban renewal. Some ministers fled the city, but not our father. The horror of what happened only recommitted him. He would not abandon his political agenda." To make things worse, Aretha was worried about her father in other ways -- as her marriage to Ted White was starting to disintegrate, she was looking to her father for guidance, and actually wanted him to take over her management. Eventually, Ruth Bowen, her booking agent, persuaded her brother Cecil that this was a job he could do, and that she would teach him everything he needed to know about the music business. She started training him up while Aretha was still married to White, in the expectation that that marriage couldn't last. Jerry Wexler, who only a few months earlier had been seeing Ted White as an ally in getting "product" from Franklin, had now changed his tune -- partly because the sale of Atlantic had gone through in the meantime. He later said “Sometimes she'd call me at night, and, in that barely audible little-girl voice of hers, she'd tell me that she wasn't sure she could go on. She always spoke in generalities. She never mentioned her husband, never gave me specifics of who was doing what to whom. And of course I knew better than to ask. She just said that she was tired of dealing with so much. My heart went out to her. She was a woman who suffered silently. She held so much in. I'd tell her to take as much time off as she needed. We had a lot of songs in the can that we could release without new material. ‘Oh, no, Jerry,' she'd say. ‘I can't stop recording. I've written some new songs, Carolyn's written some new songs. We gotta get in there and cut 'em.' ‘Are you sure?' I'd ask. ‘Positive,' she'd say. I'd set up the dates and typically she wouldn't show up for the first or second sessions. Carolyn or Erma would call me to say, ‘Ree's under the weather.' That was tough because we'd have asked people like Joe South and Bobby Womack to play on the sessions. Then I'd reschedule in the hopes she'd show." That third album she recorded in 1967, Lady Soul, was possibly her greatest achievement. The opening track, and second single, "Chain of Fools", released in November, was written by Don Covay -- or at least it's credited as having been written by Covay. There's a gospel record that came out around the same time on a very small label based in Houston -- "Pains of Life" by Rev. E. Fair And The Sensational Gladys Davis Trio: [Excerpt: Rev. E. Fair And The Sensational Gladys Davis Trio, "Pains of Life"] I've seen various claims online that that record came out shortly *before* "Chain of Fools", but I can't find any definitive evidence one way or the other -- it was on such a small label that release dates aren't available anywhere. Given that the B-side, which I haven't been able to track down online, is called "Wait Until the Midnight Hour", my guess is that rather than this being a case of Don Covay stealing the melody from an obscure gospel record he'd have had little chance to hear, it's the gospel record rewriting a then-current hit to be about religion, but I thought it worth mentioning. The song was actually written by Covay after Jerry Wexler asked him to come up with some songs for Otis Redding, but Wexler, after hearing it, decided it was better suited to Franklin, who gave an astonishing performance: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Chain of Fools"] Arif Mardin, the arranger of the album, said of that track “I was listed as the arranger of ‘Chain of Fools,' but I can't take credit. Aretha walked into the studio with the chart fully formed inside her head. The arrangement is based around the harmony vocals provided by Carolyn and Erma. To add heft, the Sweet Inspirations joined in. The vision of the song is entirely Aretha's.” According to Wexler, that's not *quite* true -- according to him, Joe South came up with the guitar part that makes up the intro, and he also said that when he played what he thought was the finished track to Ellie Greenwich, she came up with another vocal line for the backing vocals, which she overdubbed. But the core of the record's sound is definitely pure Aretha -- and Carolyn Franklin said that there was a reason for that. As she said later “Aretha didn't write ‘Chain,' but she might as well have. It was her story. When we were in the studio putting on the backgrounds with Ree doing lead, I knew she was singing about Ted. Listen to the lyrics talking about how for five long years she thought he was her man. Then she found out she was nothing but a link in the chain. Then she sings that her father told her to come on home. Well, he did. She sings about how her doctor said to take it easy. Well, he did too. She was drinking so much we thought she was on the verge of a breakdown. The line that slew me, though, was the one that said how one of these mornings the chain is gonna break but until then she'll take all she can take. That summed it up. Ree knew damn well that this man had been doggin' her since Jump Street. But somehow she held on and pushed it to the breaking point." [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Chain of Fools"] That made number one on the R&B charts, and number two on the hot one hundred, kept from the top by "Judy In Disguise (With Glasses)" by John Fred and his Playboy Band -- a record that very few people would say has stood the test of time as well. The other most memorable track on the album was the one chosen as the first single, released in September. As Carole King told the story, she and Gerry Goffin were feeling like their career was in a slump. While they had had a huge run of hits in the early sixties through 1965, they had only had two new hits in 1966 -- "Goin' Back" for Dusty Springfield and "Don't Bring Me Down" for the Animals, and neither of those were anything like as massive as their previous hits. And up to that point in 1967, they'd only had one -- "Pleasant Valley Sunday" for the Monkees. They had managed to place several songs on Monkees albums and the TV show as well, so they weren't going to starve, but the rise of self-contained bands that were starting to dominate the charts, and Phil Spector's temporary retirement, meant there simply wasn't the opportunity for them to place material that there had been. They were also getting sick of travelling to the West Coast all the time, because as their children were growing slightly older they didn't want to disrupt their lives in New York, and were thinking of approaching some of the New York based labels and seeing if they needed songs. They were particularly considering Atlantic, because soul was more open to outside songwriters than other genres. As it happened, though, they didn't have to approach Atlantic, because Atlantic approached them. They were walking down Broadway when a limousine pulled up, and Jerry Wexler stuck his head out of the window. He'd come up with a good title that he wanted to use for a song for Aretha, would they be interested in writing a song called "Natural Woman"? They said of course they would, and Wexler drove off. They wrote the song that night, and King recorded a demo the next morning: [Excerpt: Carole King, "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman (demo)"] They gave Wexler a co-writing credit because he had suggested the title.  King later wrote in her autobiography "Hearing Aretha's performance of “Natural Woman” for the first time, I experienced a rare speechless moment. To this day I can't convey how I felt in mere words. Anyone who had written a song in 1967 hoping it would be performed by a singer who could take it to the highest level of excellence, emotional connection, and public exposure would surely have wanted that singer to be Aretha Franklin." She went on to say "But a recording that moves people is never just about the artist and the songwriters. It's about people like Jerry and Ahmet, who matched the songwriters with a great title and a gifted artist; Arif Mardin, whose magnificent orchestral arrangement deserves the place it will forever occupy in popular music history; Tom Dowd, whose engineering skills captured the magic of this memorable musical moment for posterity; and the musicians in the rhythm section, the orchestral players, and the vocal contributions of the background singers—among them the unforgettable “Ah-oo!” after the first line of the verse. And the promotion and marketing people helped this song reach more people than it might have without them." And that's correct -- unlike "Chain of Fools", this time Franklin did let Arif Mardin do most of the arrangement work -- though she came up with the piano part that Spooner Oldham plays on the record. Mardin said that because of the song's hymn-like feel they wanted to go for a more traditional written arrangement. He said "She loved the song to the point where she said she wanted to concentrate on the vocal and vocal alone. I had written a string chart and horn chart to augment the chorus and hired Ralph Burns to conduct. After just a couple of takes, we had it. That's when Ralph turned to me with wonder in his eyes. Ralph was one of the most celebrated arrangers of the modern era. He had done ‘Early Autumn' for Woody Herman and Stan Getz, and ‘Georgia on My Mind' for Ray Charles. He'd worked with everyone. ‘This woman comes from another planet' was all Ralph said. ‘She's just here visiting.'” [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman"] By this point there was a well-functioning team making Franklin's records -- while the production credits would vary over the years, they were all essentially co-productions by the team of Franklin, Wexler, Mardin and Dowd, all collaborating and working together with a more-or-less unified purpose, and the backing was always by the same handful of session musicians and some combination of the Sweet Inspirations and Aretha's sisters. That didn't mean that occasional guests couldn't get involved -- as we discussed in the Cream episode, Eric Clapton played guitar on "Good to Me as I am to You": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Good to Me as I am to You"] Though that was one of the rare occasions on one of these records where something was overdubbed. Clapton apparently messed up the guitar part when playing behind Franklin, because he was too intimidated by playing with her, and came back the next day to redo his part without her in the studio. At this point, Aretha was at the height of her fame. Just before the final batch of album sessions began she appeared in the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade, and she was making regular TV appearances, like one on the Mike Douglas Show where she duetted with Frankie Valli on "That's Life": [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin and Frankie Valli, "That's Life"] But also, as Wexler said “Her career was kicking into high gear. Contending and resolving both the professional and personal challenges were too much. She didn't think she could do both, and I didn't blame her. Few people could. So she let the personal slide and concentrated on the professional. " Her concert promoter Ruth Bowen said of this time "Her father and Dr. King were putting pressure on her to sing everywhere, and she felt obligated. The record company was also screaming for more product. And I had a mountain of offers on my desk that kept getting higher with every passing hour. They wanted her in Europe. They wanted her in Latin America. They wanted her in every major venue in the U.S. TV was calling. She was being asked to do guest appearances on every show from Carol Burnett to Andy Williams to the Hollywood Palace. She wanted to do them all and she wanted to do none of them. She wanted to do them all because she's an entertainer who burns with ambition. She wanted to do none of them because she was emotionally drained. She needed to go away and renew her strength. I told her that at least a dozen times. She said she would, but she didn't listen to me." The pressures from her father and Dr King are a recurring motif in interviews with people about this period. Franklin was always a very political person, and would throughout her life volunteer time and money to liberal political causes and to the Democratic Party, but this was the height of her activism -- the Civil Rights movement was trying to capitalise on the gains it had made in the previous couple of years, and celebrity fundraisers and performances at rallies were an important way to do that. And at this point there were few bigger celebrities in America than Aretha Franklin. At a concert in her home town of Detroit on February the sixteenth, 1968, the Mayor declared the day Aretha Franklin Day. At the same show, Billboard, Record World *and* Cash Box magazines all presented her with plaques for being Female Vocalist of the Year. And Dr. King travelled up to be at the show and congratulate her publicly for all her work with his organisation, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Backstage at that show, Dr. King talked to Aretha's father, Reverend Franklin, about what he believed would be the next big battle -- a strike in Memphis: [Excerpt, Martin Luther King, "Mountaintop Speech" -- "And so, as a result of this, we are asking you tonight, to go out and tell your neighbors not to buy Coca-Cola in Memphis. Go by and tell them not to buy Sealtest milk. Tell them not to buy—what is the other bread?—Wonder Bread. And what is the other bread company, Jesse? Tell them not to buy Hart's bread. As Jesse Jackson has said, up to now, only the garbage men have been feeling pain; now we must kind of redistribute the pain. We are choosing these companies because they haven't been fair in their hiring policies; and we are choosing them because they can begin the process of saying, they are going to support the needs and the rights of these men who are on strike. And then they can move on downtown and tell Mayor Loeb to do what is right."] The strike in question was the Memphis Sanitation Workers' strike which had started a few days before.  The struggle for Black labour rights was an integral part of the civil rights movement, and while it's not told that way in the sanitised version of the story that's made it into popular culture, the movement led by King was as much about economic justice as social justice -- King was a democratic socialist, and believed that economic oppression was both an effect of and cause of other forms of racial oppression, and that the rights of Black workers needed to be fought for. In 1967 he had set up a new organisation, the Poor People's Campaign, which was set to march on Washington to demand a program that included full employment, a guaranteed income -- King was strongly influenced in his later years by the ideas of Henry George, the proponent of a universal basic income based on land value tax -- the annual building of half a million affordable homes, and an end to the war in Vietnam. This was King's main focus in early 1968, and he saw the sanitation workers' strike as a major part of this campaign. Memphis was one of the most oppressive cities in the country, and its largely Black workforce of sanitation workers had been trying for most of the 1960s to unionise, and strike-breakers had been called in to stop them, and many of them had been fired by their white supervisors with no notice. They were working in unsafe conditions, for utterly inadequate wages, and the city government were ardent segregationists. After two workers had died on the first of February from using unsafe equipment, the union demanded changes -- safer working conditions, better wages, and recognition of the union. The city council refused, and almost all the sanitation workers stayed home and stopped work. After a few days, the council relented and agreed to their terms, but the Mayor, Henry Loeb, an ardent white supremacist who had stood on a platform of opposing desegregation, and who had previously been the Public Works Commissioner who had put these unsafe conditions in place, refused to listen. As far as he was concerned, he was the only one who could recognise the union, and he wouldn't. The workers continued their strike, marching holding signs that simply read "I am a Man": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Blowing in the Wind"] The Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the NAACP had been involved in organising support for the strikes from an early stage, and King visited Memphis many times. Much of the time he spent visiting there was spent negotiating with a group of more militant activists, who called themselves The Invaders and weren't completely convinced by King's nonviolent approach -- they believed that violence and rioting got more attention than non-violent protests. King explained to them that while he had been persuaded by Gandhi's writings of the moral case for nonviolent protest, he was also persuaded that it was pragmatically necessary -- asking the young men "how many guns do we have and how many guns do they have?", and pointing out as he often did that when it comes to violence a minority can't win against an armed majority. Rev Franklin went down to Memphis on the twenty-eighth of March to speak at a rally Dr. King was holding, but as it turned out the rally was cancelled -- the pre-rally march had got out of hand, with some people smashing windows, and Memphis police had, like the police in Detroit the previous year, violently overreacted, clubbing and gassing protestors and shooting and killing one unarmed teenage boy, Larry Payne. The day after Payne's funeral, Dr King was back in Memphis, though this time Rev Franklin was not with him. On April the third, he gave a speech which became known as the "Mountaintop Speech", in which he talked about the threats that had been made to his life: [Excerpt: Martin Luther King, "Mountaintop Speech": “And then I got to Memphis. And some began to say the threats, or talk about the threats that were out. What would happen to me from some of our sick white brothers? Well, I don't know what will happen now. We've got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn't matter with me now. Because I've been to the mountaintop. And I don't mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land. So I'm happy, tonight. I'm not worried about anything. I'm not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord."] The next day, Martin Luther King was shot dead. James Earl Ray, a white supremacist, pled guilty to the murder, and the evidence against him seems overwhelming from what I've read, but the King family have always claimed that the murder was part of a larger conspiracy and that Ray was not the gunman. Aretha was obviously distraught, and she attended the funeral, as did almost every other prominent Black public figure. James Baldwin wrote of the funeral: "In the pew directly before me sat Marlon Brando, Sammy Davis, Eartha Kitt—covered in black, looking like a lost, ten-year-old girl—and Sidney Poitier, in the same pew, or nearby. Marlon saw me, and nodded. The atmosphere was black, with a tension indescribable—as though something, perhaps the heavens, perhaps the earth, might crack. Everyone sat very still. The actual service sort of washed over me, in waves. It wasn't that it seemed unreal; it was the most real church service I've ever sat through in my life, or ever hope to sit through; but I have a childhood hangover thing about not weeping in public, and I was concentrating on holding myself together. I did not want to weep for Martin, tears seemed futile. But I may also have been afraid, and I could not have been the only one, that if I began to weep I would not be able to stop. There was more than enough to weep for, if one was to weep—so many of us, cut down, so soon. Medgar, Malcolm, Martin: and their widows, and their children. Reverend Ralph David Abernathy asked a certain sister to sing a song which Martin had loved—“Once more,” said Ralph David, “for Martin and for me,” and he sat down." Many articles and books on Aretha Franklin say that she sang at King's funeral. In fact she didn't, but there's a simple reason for the confusion. King's favourite song was the Thomas Dorsey gospel song "Take My Hand, Precious Lord", and indeed almost his last words were to ask a trumpet player, Ben Branch, if he would play the song at the rally he was going to be speaking at on the day of his death. At his request, Mahalia Jackson, his old friend, sang the song at his private funeral, which was not filmed, unlike the public part of the funeral that Baldwin described. Four months later, though, there was another public memorial for King, and Franklin did sing "Take My Hand, Precious Lord" at that service, in front of King's weeping widow and children, and that performance *was* filmed, and gets conflated in people's memories with Jackson's unfilmed earlier performance: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Take My Hand, Precious Lord (at Martin Luther King Memorial)"] Four years later, she would sing that at Mahalia Jackson's funeral. Through all this, Franklin had been working on her next album, Aretha Now, the sessions for which started more or less as soon as the sessions for Lady Soul had finished. The album was, in fact, bookended by deaths that affected Aretha. Just as King died at the end of the sessions, the beginning came around the time of the death of Otis Redding -- the sessions were cancelled for a day while Wexler travelled to Georgia for Redding's funeral, which Franklin was too devastated to attend, and Wexler would later say that the extra emotion in her performances on the album came from her emotional pain at Redding's death. The lead single on the album, "Think", was written by Franklin and -- according to the credits anyway -- her husband Ted White, and is very much in the same style as "Respect", and became another of her most-loved hits: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "Think"] But probably the song on Aretha Now that now resonates the most is one that Jerry Wexler tried to persuade her not to record, and was only released as a B-side. Indeed, "I Say a Little Prayer" was a song that had already once been a hit after being a reject.  Hal David, unlike Burt Bacharach, was a fairly political person and inspired by the protest song movement, and had been starting to incorporate his concerns about the political situation and the Vietnam War into his lyrics -- though as with many such writers, he did it in much less specific ways than a Phil Ochs or a Bob Dylan. This had started with "What the World Needs Now is Love", a song Bacharach and David had written for Jackie DeShannon in 1965: [Excerpt: Jackie DeShannon, "What the "World Needs Now is Love"] But he'd become much more overtly political for "The Windows of the World", a song they wrote for Dionne Warwick. Warwick has often said it's her favourite of her singles, but it wasn't a big hit -- Bacharach blamed himself for that, saying "Dionne recorded it as a single and I really blew it. I wrote a bad arrangement and the tempo was too fast, and I really regret making it the way I did because it's a good song." [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "The Windows of the World"] For that album, Bacharach and David had written another track, "I Say a Little Prayer", which was not as explicitly political, but was intended by David to have an implicit anti-war message, much like other songs of the period like "Last Train to Clarksville". David had sons who were the right age to be drafted, and while it's never stated, "I Say a Little Prayer" was written from the perspective of a woman whose partner is away fighting in the war, but is still in her thoughts: [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "I Say a Little Prayer"] The recording of Dionne Warwick's version was marked by stress. Bacharach had a particular way of writing music to tell the musicians the kind of feel he wanted for the part -- he'd write nonsense words above the stave, and tell the musicians to play the parts as if they were singing those words. The trumpet player hired for the session, Ernie Royal, got into a row with Bacharach about this unorthodox way of communicating musical feeling, and the track ended up taking ten takes (as opposed to the normal three for a Bacharach session), with Royal being replaced half-way through the session. Bacharach was never happy with the track even after all the work it had taken, and he fought to keep it from being released at all, saying the track was taken at too fast a tempo. It eventually came out as an album track nearly eighteen months after it was recorded -- an eternity in 1960s musical timescales -- and DJs started playing it almost as soon as it came out. Scepter records rushed out a single, over Bacharach's objections, but as he later said "One thing I love about the record business is how wrong I was. Disc jockeys all across the country started playing the track, and the song went to number four on the charts and then became the biggest hit Hal and I had ever written for Dionne." [Excerpt: Dionne Warwick, "I Say a Little Prayer"] Oddly, the B-side for Warwick's single, "Theme From the Valley of the Dolls" did even better, reaching number two. Almost as soon as the song was released as a single, Franklin started playing around with the song backstage, and in April 1968, right around the time of Dr. King's death, she recorded a version. Much as Burt Bacharach had been against releasing Dionne Warwick's version, Jerry Wexler was against Aretha even recording the song, saying later “I advised Aretha not to record it. I opposed it for two reasons. First, to cover a song only twelve weeks after the original reached the top of the charts was not smart business. You revisit such a hit eight months to a year later. That's standard practice. But more than that, Bacharach's melody, though lovely, was peculiarly suited to a lithe instrument like Dionne Warwick's—a light voice without the dark corners or emotional depths that define Aretha. Also, Hal David's lyric was also somewhat girlish and lacked the gravitas that Aretha required. “Aretha usually listened to me in the studio, but not this time. She had written a vocal arrangement for the Sweet Inspirations that was undoubtedly strong. Cissy Houston, Dionne's cousin, told me that Aretha was on the right track—she was seeing this song in a new way and had come up with a new groove. Cissy was on Aretha's side. Tommy Dowd and Arif were on Aretha's side. So I had no choice but to cave." It's quite possible that Wexler's objections made Franklin more, rather than less, determined to record the song. She regarded Warwick as a hated rival, as she did almost every prominent female singer of her generation and younger ones, and would undoubtedly have taken the implication that there was something that Warwick was simply better at than her to heart. [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer"] Wexler realised as soon as he heard it in the studio that Franklin's version was great, and Bacharach agreed, telling Franklin's biographer David Ritz “As much as I like the original recording by Dionne, there's no doubt that Aretha's is a better record. She imbued the song with heavy soul and took it to a far deeper place. Hers is the definitive version.” -- which is surprising because Franklin's version simplifies some of Bacharach's more unusual chord voicings, something he often found extremely upsetting. Wexler still though thought there was no way the song would be a hit, and it's understandable that he thought that way. Not only had it only just been on the charts a few months earlier, but it was the kind of song that wouldn't normally be a hit at all, and certainly not in the kind of rhythmic soul music for which Franklin was known. Almost everything she ever recorded is in simple time signatures -- 4/4, waltz time, or 6/8 -- but this is a Bacharach song so it's staggeringly metrically irregular. Normally even with semi-complex things I'm usually good at figuring out how to break it down into bars, but here I actually had to purchase a copy of the sheet music in order to be sure I was right about what's going on. I'm going to count beats along with the record here so you can see what I mean. The verse has three bars of 4/4, one bar of 2/4, and three more bars of 4/4, all repeated: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer" with me counting bars over verse] While the chorus has a bar of 4/4, a bar of 3/4 but with a chord change half way through so it sounds like it's in two if you're paying attention to the harmonic changes, two bars of 4/4, another waltz-time bar sounding like it's in two, two bars of four, another bar of three sounding in two, a bar of four, then three more bars of four but the first of those is *written* as four but played as if it's in six-eight time (but you can keep the four/four pulse going if you're counting): [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer" with me counting bars over verse] I don't expect you to have necessarily followed that in great detail, but the point should be clear -- this was not some straightforward dance song. Incidentally, that bar played as if it's six/eight was something Aretha introduced to make the song even more irregular than how Bacharach wrote it. And on top of *that* of course the lyrics mixed the secular and the sacred, something that was still taboo in popular music at that time -- this is only a couple of years after Capitol records had been genuinely unsure about putting out the Beach Boys' "God Only Knows", and Franklin's gospel-inflected vocals made the religious connection even more obvious. But Franklin was insistent that the record go out as a single, and eventually it was released as the B-side to the far less impressive "The House That Jack Built". It became a double-sided hit, with the A-side making number two on the R&B chart and number seven on the Hot One Hundred, while "I Say a Little Prayer" made number three on the R&B chart and number ten overall. In the UK, "I Say a Little Prayer" made number four and became her biggest ever solo UK hit. It's now one of her most-remembered songs, while the A-side is largely forgotten: [Excerpt: Aretha Franklin, "I Say a Little Prayer"] For much of the

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down john lennon disc frank sinatra paul mccartney gifted cream vietnam war fools democratic party springfield aretha franklin whitney houston amazing grace hal stevie wonder doubts payne blonde drums my life gandhi baldwin backstage central park jet jimi hendrix dolls kramer motown james brown reconstruction warner brothers beach boys national guard mitt romney naacp blowing meatloaf grateful dead marvin gaye goin chic richard nixon hush eric clapton mick jagger pains miles davis warwick mcgill university stonewall clive george michael george harrison quincy jones sweetheart james baldwin amin pipes blob contending tilt cooke ray charles diana ross sparkle pale marlon brando continent rosa parks lou reed little richard airborne my heart barbra streisand blues brothers monkees tony bennett gillespie sam cooke keith richards rising sun van morrison redding ella fitzgerald stills black power i believe garfunkel rock music motor city sidney poitier duke ellington cry baby supremes jimmy page invaders buddy holly atlantic records charlie watts my mind carole king gladys knight barry manilow poor people black church phil spector reach out otis redding luther vandross hathaway jump street dionne warwick incidentally philip glass eurythmics spector burt bacharach john cage dowd isley brothers debussy drifters airborne divisions columbia records twisting simon says winding road fillmore soul train jefferson airplane hilliard carol burnett jesse jackson thyme arif chain reaction let it be curtis mayfield clapton stax john newton ahmet parsley jimmy johnson les paul dizzy gillespie eartha kitt marlene dietrich hey jude clarksville pavarotti paul harvey wexler coasters magic moments muscle shoals count basie andy williams midnight hour dusty springfield witch doctors natalie cole john lee hooker dave brubeck frankie valli godspell john hammond peggy lee steve reich last train stan getz get no satisfaction donny hathaway herb alpert sarah vaughan shabazz ben e king birdland games people play mahalia jackson billy preston take my hand locomotion bridge over troubled water mc5 arista bobby womack stoller clive davis wilson pickett scepter steinway allman ginger baker sister rosetta tharpe shea stadium warrick republican presidential cab calloway god only knows schoenberg wonder bread stephen stills sammy davis barry gibb bacharach eleanor rigby berns night away big bopper buddah stax records grammies preacher man lionel hampton bill graham jackson five tim buckley stockhausen james earl ray dramatics oh happy day solomon burke sam moore duane allman cannonball adderley leiber shirelles hamp montanez woody herman thanksgiving parade phil ochs natural woman artistically lesley gore ruth brown basie precious lord wayne kramer kingpins hal david one you al kooper gene vincent bring me down southern strategy female vocalist whiter shade nile rogers world needs now joe robinson nessun dorma franklins betty carter rick hall little prayer brill building this girl you are my sunshine my sweet lord king curtis aaron cohen gerry goffin never grow old jackie deshannon norman greenbaum darius milhaud mardin henry george say a little prayer cashbox bernard purdie webern betty shabazz precious memories jerry butler so fine bernard edwards loserville james cleveland esther phillips ahmet ertegun cissy houston tom dowd fillmore west milhaud vandross jerry wexler in love with you mike douglas show david ritz john hersey arif mardin bob johnston edwin hawkins peter guralnick new africa ted white i was made champion jack dupree lady soul play that song make me over henry cowell joe south wait until pops staples ellie greenwich jesus yes john fred morris levy how i got over spooner oldham charles cooke brook benton medgar chuck rainey soul stirrers ralph burns henry stone don covay bert berns i never loved thomas dorsey way i love you larry payne will you love me tomorrow hollywood palace gospel music workshop harlem square club baby i love you fruitgum company gene mcdaniels anyone who had ertegun savoy records judy clay civil disorders national advisory commission charles l hughes tilt araiza
Rock & Roll High School With Pete Ganbarg

Miles Copeland, founder of I.R.S. Records, BTM (British Talent Management), Illegal Records, Deptford Fun City Records, New Bristol Records, and Copeland International Arts (C.I.A.). He has worked with The Police, Sting, Berlin, Dead Kennedys, The Cramps, The Go-Gos, Squeeze, R.E.M., The Alarm, and The Bangles, among others.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Drum Channel Podcast
S2 E75 - Pete Nappi

Drum Channel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2023 53:29


Hello everyone, welcome to “Billy's Bubble” here on Drum Channel. Joining Amendola for this week's cover story features one of the most popular hit-making young producers, musicians, and songwriters Pete Nappi.  Billy first met Pete in 2016 at an off-tour show in Brooklyn, New York for iHeart radio station Z-100. Nappi was drumming and producing his LA-based trio, Ocean Park Standoff, who had just released their self-titled EP on Hollywood Records. The band was riding the success of their hit single “Good News,” which became one of the most requested songs on the station's playlist.  Fast forward four years later, and Nappi is on his way to becoming a hit-making machine, producing the international #1 hit “abcdefu” by Atlantic Records' newly signed teen, Gayle. From there, Pete proceeded to work with Jared Leto (30 Seconds To Mars), Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park), Kesha, Shinedown, Meghan Trainor, and Chainsmokers, to name a few.  The Berklee College of Music student who studied film scoring and classical percussion with a minor in conducting, as well as honing his production skills, scored a publishing deal with Universal Music Group under the guidance of Arthouse publisher, singer-songwriter Kara DioGuardi.  Nappi recently wrote, played, and produced the Jonas Brothers sixth studio record, The Album, containing the first two hit singles, “Waffle House” and "Wings, as well as producing and co-writing the latest Maroon Five album.  Let's listen in as Pete tells Drum Channel his journey from touring drummer to producer/songwriter and more. Enjoy! 

Rock & Roll High School With Pete Ganbarg

Doc McGhee is a pioneer in the entertainment industry, overseeing the legendary careers of Bon Jovi, Mötley Crüe, and Skid Row. Managing the world-famous band KISS for over two decades, Doc reunited the band for their sold-out ‘96-‘97 Alive Worldwide Tour. With products ranging from coffins, to comic books, to skateboards, to pinball machines, it's hard to find a product today without KISS on it. Doc has had an amazing history rebranding acts such as Darius Rucker, who he led into being a country sensation, where he revolutionized the way we see country stars today by breaking through various genre and racial stereotypes. Doc has played a key role in the development, execution, and filming of live events that include the Moscow Music Peace Festival, the first stadium rock show in Russia, which was aired worldwide as a top-rated pay-per- view event. As an entrepreneur, he created and ran the entertainment division of Home Shopping Network for five years, was a co-owner of the LA KISS Football team. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Blerd’s Eyeview
S11E011: Cartoons and Hip-Hop with Kyle ( With Rapper Super Duper Kyle)

Blerd’s Eyeview

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2023 162:20


Known mononymously as Kyle and SuperDuperKyle (formerly known as K.i.D, an acronym for Kyle is Determined), is an American rapper from Ventura, California. He is best known for his 2016 breakout single “iSpy” (featuring Lil Yachty), which peaked at number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100. Signed to Indie-Pop and Atlantic Records,[3] Kyle is also known for his association with the SuperDuperCrew which consists of Brick, Jesus, and Maxx. Plus, Same day!! New time!! Tuesday 9/12/23 at 8 pm est we are talking cartoons, cartoons, cartoons!! The best decades, the best intros, the best animation and how all of these have evolved over time!see which ones made our list and chime in with some of your own!!! How has the evolution of cartoons benefited you? Tune in Tuesday at our new time, 8:00 pm est!!! #blerdseyeview #cartoon #cartoonintros #entertainmentnews #liveshow #fyp #hiphop #music

Broken Record with Malcolm Gladwell, Rick Rubin, and Bruce Headlam

DJ Drama is one of the most iconic mixtape DJs of all time. His legendary Gangsta Grillz tapes helped propel artists like T.I. and Young Jeezy to stardom. His classic Dedication series reinvigorated Lil' Wayne's career in the early and mid-2000s. By 2007, the underground mixtape market was booming. But in January of that year DJ Drama and his longtime business partner Don Cannon were arrested by federal agents and charged with bootlegging and racketeering. The much publicized raid only boosted DJ Drama's profile. In the years since, DJ Drama has built a successful record label and he's continued to make mixtapes. Tyler The Creator even crafted his latest album, Call Me If You Get Lost, with DJ Drama's classic adlibs all over it. It won the Grammy for best rap album in 2022. That same year though, while DJ Drama was professionally at the height of his success, personally he was battling an addiction to opioids—an ongoing struggle he's only recently started to talk about publicly. On today's episode Leah Rose talks to DJ Drama about how he got sober after being what he calls “a functioning junkie” who spent six figures a year on opioids. He also tells the story of how Lil Jon recorded his iconic “gangsta grillz” drops in Drama's laundry room. And Drama explains why he decided to sign Lil Uzi Vert and Jack Harlow to his Atlantic Records imprint, Generation Now. You can hear a playlist of some of our favorite DJ Drama songs HERE.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!
Jerry Jemmott - "The Groovemaster". Revered Session Bassist For Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Roberta Flack And Many More!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2023 29:01


Jerry Jemmott is a two-time Grammy Award winning bassist and was a key architect of the Atlantic Records and Muscle Shoals sound of the ‘60s and ‘70s. He played on songs by Aretha Franklin, B.B. King, Ray Charles, Gil Scott Heron, Wilson Pickett, The Rascals and many more. His new memoir is called “MAKE IT HAPPEN!: The Life And Times of “The Groovemaster”.My featured song is “1972”. Spotify link.---------------------------------------------The Follow Your Dream Podcast:Top 1% of all podcasts with Listeners in 200 countries!For more information and other episodes of the podcast click here. To subscribe to the podcast click here.To subscribe to our weekly Follow Your Dream Podcast email click here.To Rate and Review the podcast click here.“Dream With Robert”. Click here.—----------------------------------------“IT'S ALIVE!” is Robert's new Project Grand Slam album. Featuring 13 of the band's Greatest Hits performed “live” at festivals in Pennsylvania and Serbia.Reviews:"An instant classic!" (Melody Maker)"Amazing record...Another win for the one and only Robert Miller!" (Hollywood Digest)"Close to perfect!" (Pop Icon)"A Masterpiece!" (Big Celebrity Buzz)"Sterling effort!" (Indie Pulse)"Another fusion wonder for Project Grand Slam!" (MobYorkCity)Click here for all links.Click here for song videos—-----------------------------------------Audio production:Jimmy RavenscroftKymera Films Connect with Jerry:Website - www.jerryjemmott.comTwitter - Souler EnergyFacebook- Jerry Jemmott Connect with the Follow Your Dream Podcast:Website - www.followyourdreampodcast.comEmail Robert - robert@followyourdreampodcast.com Follow Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, and his music:Website - www.projectgrandslam.comPGS Store - www.thePGSstore.comYouTubeSpotify MusicApple MusicEmail - pgs@projectgrandslam.com

SHE TRUCKING PODCAST
S4-Ep70 The Unstoppable Rhythm of Dreams: The Jimmie Cameron Story

SHE TRUCKING PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2023 88:44


Join us on a journey through time and sound as we delve into the remarkable life of Jimmie Cameron, a true trailblazer of music and theatrics. In this special episode of The Tina Ramsay Show, we're honored to be joined by the legendary Jimmie Cameron himself, a musical maverick whose story is one of resilience, creativity, and unyielding passion. In June of 1964, against all odds, Emma Bell Cameron Simmons embarked on a transformative journey, leaving her home behind to seek better opportunities for her children. Little did she know, this act of courage would set the stage for a musical legacy that would captivate hearts around the world. At just 14 years old, Jimmie embarked on his own journey, diving headfirst into the world of music and theatrics. Through the guidance of mentors like Nichelle Nicoles of Star Trek fame and the visionary Frank Silvera, founder of the American Theater of Being, Jimmie's talent ignited like a spark on a stormy night. Imagine a theater group where Jimmie Cameron shared the spotlight with icons like Maya Angelou, Bea Richards, Isabel Sanford, and so many more. Picture the vibrant energy of Hollywood's Coronet Theater in the 1960s, where Jimmie was not just an up-and-coming star, but a force to be reckoned with. From the hallowed halls of Baldwin's "The Amen Corner" to the stages of the controversial musical "Hair" in Acapulco, Jimmie's journey was a symphony of perseverance. His unique musical style, in collaboration with Vella, became an underground sensation, touching the hearts of those lucky enough to hear it. Even without the commercial airplay, their music resonated deeply. Jimmie's path took him to New York, with a chance encounter with a song that would change his life. We'll explore the cosmic connection between Jimmie and the legendary Jimi Hendrix, and how this twist of fate led to a signing with Atlantic Records. Despite the hurdles, Jimmie and Vella shone brightly, sharing stages with legends like Cat Stevens, Patti LaBelle, and Bill Withers. Their resilience reached its peak when they signed with Unlimited Gold Records, Barry White's label, and recorded their iconic album "Song Painters." With Barry White producing alongside Jimmie and Vella, their music took on new dimensions, yet the journey wasn't without its challenges. Through highs and lows, Jimmie's spirit remained unbreakable. Join us for an inspiring conversation with Jimmie Cameron, as he reflects on his remarkable career, the power of passion, and the unwavering dedication to his craft that carried him through decades of musical exploration. Tune in to The Tina Ramsay Show as we uncover the hidden chapters of Jimmie Cameron's musical odyssey, and celebrate the indomitable spirit that continues to inspire dreamers and creators worldwide. #UnstoppableRhythm #JimmieCameronStory #MusicalMaverick #ResilienceAndCreativity #LegacyOfPassion #TrailblazingTunes #TimelessMelodies #InspiringJourney #MusicalOdyssey #BeyondTheSpotlight #UnyieldingDreams #SoulfulSounds #LegendaryTalent #HiddenChapters #CreativePersistence #HarmoniousHistory #Thetinaramsayshow #CTRMedianetwork --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/shetrucking/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/shetrucking/support

The Midnight Cinephile
Ep. 414 Mighty Joe Young Demo (STP Before The Debut)

The Midnight Cinephile

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 41:23


This is the Stone Temple Pilots demo before they were signed to Atlantic Records when they were still called Mighty Joe Young --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/wes-nations/message

She Thinks
Elisabeth Messenger: Where Do Your Union Dues Go?

She Thinks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2023 20:57


In honor of Labor Day, this week's episode is all about unions. As unions take an increasingly prominent role in political and cultural debates, especially since COVID-19, we explore how much money unions make, why union dues keep increasing though union membership has dropped, and how exactly unions spend member dues. Specifically, we ask what percentage of worker dues and fees go to activities that benefit them versus union salaries and political activities. Elisabeth Messenger is the CEO of Americans for Fair Treatment, a community of current and former public-sector employees offering resources and support to exercise their First Amendment rights. Elisabeth started her career in the publicity department at Atlantic Records in Los Angeles, CA. In 2016, Elisabeth transitioned into working with liberty-focused non-profits, with a particular focus on public-sector labor reform.--She Thinks is a podcast for women (and men) who are sick of the spin in today's news cycle and are seeking the truth. Once a week, every week, She Thinks host Beverly Hallberg is joined by guests who cut through the clutter and bring you the facts. You don't have to keep up with policy and politics to understand how issues will impact you and the people you care about most. You just have to keep up with us. We make sure you have the information you need to come to your own conclusions. Because, let's face it, you're in control of your own life and can think for yourself. You can listen to the latest She Thinks episode(s) here or wherever you get your podcasts. Then subscribe, rate, and share with your friends. If you are already caught up and want more, join our online community. Be sure to subscribe to our emails to ensure you're equipped with the facts on the issues you care about most: https://iwf.org/connect. Independent Women's Forum (IWF) believes all issues are women's issues. IWF promotes policies that aren't just well-intended, but actually enhance people's freedoms, opportunities, and choices. IWF doesn't just talk about problems. We identify solutions and take them straight to the playmakers and policy creators. And, as a 501(c)3, IWF educates the public about the most important topics of the day. Check out the Independent Women's Forum website for more information on how policies impact you, your loved ones, and your community: www.iwf.org. Subscribe to IWF's YouTube channel. Follow IWF on social media: - on Twitter- on Facebook- on Instagram#IWF #SheThinks #AllIssuesAreWomensIssues Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Rock & Roll High School With Pete Ganbarg

Steve Lillywhite, CBE is a legendary English five-time Grammy Award winning record producer. Since he began his career in 1977, Lillywhite has collaborated with a variety of musicians including U2, The Killers, The Rolling Stones, Dave Matthews Band, Peter Gabriel, Talking Heads, Morrissey, The Pogues, David Byrne, XTC, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Simple Minds, The Psychedelic Furs, Beady Eye, Phish, The Counting Crows & Thirty Seconds To Mars. He has won numerous awards including the Producer of The Year Grammy & Commander of the Order of The British Empire (CBE) in 2012 for his contributions to music.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Creator to Creator's
Creator to Creators S5 Ep 3 Livvy D

Creator to Creator's

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2023 24:05


Connect to Livvy D on all platforms for new music, videos, and social posts.Website: https://livvydmusic.com/Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.com/es-co/artists/B0C48LPTDN/livvy-dApple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/livvy-d/1686232083Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/4QWGfzFdbUVEfUmNHE9pWbYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@LivvydmusicTwitter: https://twitter.com/livvydmusicFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/livvydmusicofficialInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/livvydmusic/Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@livvydmusicofficial“Take A Number – Remix,” the new release from the rising pop country rapper Livvy D(Olivia Dunbar), featuring C4. Benard and songwriter Kenna Page, is an incredible newversion of “Take A Number,” said to be the dating anthem for this summer.Adding C4. Benard to the Remix provides a fun twist with a male perspective.The song is Livvy D's pop-country-rap-version of what she calls “the weird world ofdating.” “‘Take a Number' is a fun song everybody can relate to,” she says. “It's also about theend of a bad relationship, or a few bad relationships I've been in, and how I'm better offwithout them anyway.” The Remix features rappers C4. Benard in a hip hop-rap-pop dialogue of two sides —his and hers — to the dating scene.“It's his perspective, her perspective,” she said, “but they're not against each other. Thelistener is going to be the one who determines how they interpret the song.”“Take a Number” was co-written by Aben Eubanks, a Grammy-nominated musician,songwriter, composer and producer. He is a guitarist and songwriter for Kelly Clarkson.In the original release, earlier this year, the song was “more the woman's perspective,”said Livvy D. That version switches back and forth from pop to rap and came with thecountry flavor that infuses the Remix. Both renditions are light-hearted, creative versions of the love-gone-bad song. Her unique style was influenced by the music of Cardi B, Doja Cat, and Lizzo because, she said, “They wholeheartedly believe in their music, and their message conveyspower to their audience, something I also hope to do.”She grew up listening to all kinds of music, beginning in the womb, when her mother putheadphones on her belly to feed classical music to her unborn daughter.Livvy D, just launching her career as a singing artist, is working with a powerhouseteam. Producer and writer Eric “EJ” Johnson has worked for more than 15 years withmany Universal Music and Atlantic Records artists as well as major independent artistsacross the country.Her songs are recorded and mixed at Tom Weir's Studio City Sound in Los Angeles.Weir is a Grammy-winning mixer, engineer and producer who has made it to No. 1 onthe Billboard list. She takes inspiration from everyday life and expresses different facets of her identity in each of her songs. Livvy D was raised on a horse farm in rural Virginia. Riding horses, dancing and making music have always been parts of her life.She has also been interested in fashion, and as a child put together her own homefashion shows and choreographed dance routines. One of her recent releases, “Gucci,”is a rap banger that she calls “a tribute to the designer life.”“Boujee from birth,” she says, using a regional term to describe something upscale andluxurious. It is an apt description of her brand, evident in her videos. She says she canbe found as easily on a horse as “on a shopping spree, chilling at a swank L.A. hotel orin the studio.” She says she wants to inspire her fans to “embrace their individuality and creativity.”“Be yourself, be authentic and creative, and have fun,” she said. “Be you, not whoeveryone else thinks you should be, and always believe in yourself, even when peopletell you otherwise. Be strong. Be kind. Be creative. Be inspired. Be different. Be you.”Connect to Livvy D on all platforms for new music, videos, and social posts.

The Tina Ramsay Show and Podcast
S8 Ep210- The Unstoppable Rhythm of Dreams: The Jimmie Cameron Story

The Tina Ramsay Show and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2023 88:44


Join us on a journey through time and sound as we delve into the remarkable life of Jimmie Cameron, a true trailblazer of music and theatrics. In this special episode of The Tina Ramsay Show, we're honored to be joined by the legendary Jimmie Cameron himself, a musical maverick whose story is one of resilience, creativity, and unyielding passion. In June of 1964, against all odds, Emma Bell Cameron Simmons embarked on a transformative journey, leaving her home behind to seek better opportunities for her children. Little did she know, this act of courage would set the stage for a musical legacy that would captivate hearts around the world. At just 14 years old, Jimmie embarked on his own journey, diving headfirst into the world of music and theatrics. Through the guidance of mentors like Nichelle Nicoles of Star Trek fame and the visionary Frank Silvera, founder of the American Theater of Being, Jimmie's talent ignited like a spark on a stormy night. Imagine a theater group where Jimmie Cameron shared the spotlight with icons like Maya Angelou, Bea Richards, Isabel Sanford, and so many more. Picture the vibrant energy of Hollywood's Coronet Theater in the 1960s, where Jimmie was not just an up-and-coming star, but a force to be reckoned with. From the hallowed halls of Baldwin's "The Amen Corner" to the stages of the controversial musical "Hair" in Acapulco, Jimmie's journey was a symphony of perseverance. His unique musical style, in collaboration with Vella, became an underground sensation, touching the hearts of those lucky enough to hear it. Even without the commercial airplay, their music resonated deeply. Jimmie's path took him to New York, with a chance encounter with a song that would change his life. We'll explore the cosmic connection between Jimmie and the legendary Jimi Hendrix, and how this twist of fate led to a signing with Atlantic Records. Despite the hurdles, Jimmie and Vella shone brightly, sharing stages with legends like Cat Stevens, Patti LaBelle, and Bill Withers. Their resilience reached its peak when they signed with Unlimited Gold Records, Barry White's label, and recorded their iconic album "Song Painters." With Barry White producing alongside Jimmie and Vella, their music took on new dimensions, yet the journey wasn't without its challenges. Through highs and lows, Jimmie's spirit remained unbreakable. Join us for an inspiring conversation with Jimmie Cameron, as he reflects on his remarkable career, the power of passion, and the unwavering dedication to his craft that carried him through decades of musical exploration. Tune in to The Tina Ramsay Show as we uncover the hidden chapters of Jimmie Cameron's musical odyssey, and celebrate the indomitable spirit that continues to inspire dreamers and creators worldwide. #UnstoppableRhythm #JimmieCameronStory #MusicalMaverick #ResilienceAndCreativity #LegacyOfPassion #TrailblazingTunes #TimelessMelodies #InspiringJourney #MusicalOdyssey #BeyondTheSpotlight #UnyieldingDreams #SoulfulSounds #LegendaryTalent #HiddenChapters #CreativePersistence #HarmoniousHistory #Thetinaramsayshow #CTRMedianetwork --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/thetinaramsayshow/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/thetinaramsayshow/support

theGrio Daily, Michael Harriot
What Is The Blackest Music?

theGrio Daily, Michael Harriot

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2023 10:37


"There is no form of American music that Black people didn't create." This episode is going to make you laugh and dance all at the same time. Michael Harriot breaks down the top ten Black people music categories, including "old people music," "fight song music," and more.  Credits:  “Turn It Up” Rare Essence and Dj Kool INgrooves, Rare One RecordsRob “R.J.” Folson and Rare Essence “Congo Drum” The Huck a BucksINgrooves, Sound By CharlieRoy Battle, Joseph Timms, Ricky Yancy “Burgers and Fries” Charley PrideRCA Records, Sony Music Entertainment Ben Peters, Jerry Bradley, Charley Pride “Sweet Hour of Prayer”Mahalia Jackson Sony Music Entertainment, Columbia Records Irving Townsend, William Bradbury, W. W. Walford “The Entertainer”Scott JoplinJohn Stark & Son  “Knuck If You Buck”Crime MobCrunk Incorporated, Reprise, Warner RecordsLil jay  “Stagger Lee”Lloyd PriceVictor, RCA Records Ray Lopez, Don Costa “Meeting In my Bedroom”SilkElektra Records Darrell Allamby "I Wanna Rock"Uncle LukeLuke Records, Atlantic Records, Lil Joe Records Mike “Fresh” McCray “Freak It”LathumSo So Def Recordings, Columbia Records, Sony Music Entertainment  Lil Jon, Paul Lewis “Good Riddance” Green Day Warner Music Group, Reprise RecordsRob Cavallo, Green Day “Cult of Personality”Living ColourCleopatra Records, Epic Records, CBS Records, Sony Music Entertainment Ed Stasium “Strokin”Clarence CarterColossal Records, The Orchard MusicClarence Carter "I Need To Know"Youngboy Never Broke AgainNever Broke Again, Motown Records, Universal Music GroupBJondatrakk, We Love Heavy & D-Roc "Before I Let Go"Frankie Beverly And MazeCapitol RecordsFrankie Beverly "Back That Thang Up"Juvenile, Lil Wayne, Mannie Fresh Cash Money Records, Universal RecordsMannie Fresh “We Fall Down” Donnie McClurkinVerity RecordsDonnie McClurkin Drumroll sound effect from Pixabay Additional music and sound effects by Transition Music See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The 20 Podcast With DJ Spider
Bailey Small: How Being a DJ Influences Him as an A&R at Atlantic Records

The 20 Podcast With DJ Spider

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2023 100:14


After a two-month summer hiatus, DJ Spider returns to "The 20 Podcast" for an interview with Atlantic Records A&R, Bailey Small. The Miami native is originally a DJ and producer, and has been involved with hundreds of releases, including Ty Dolla $ign and Chris Brown's new single, "Motion." In the interview, Bailey gives insight into his process as an A&R and how being a DJ and producer influences him in that role. He also offers valuable advice to up-and-coming music industry professionals. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Rock & Roll High School With Pete Ganbarg

Bob Gruen is one of the most respected rock and roll photographers of all time. His iconic images— including John Lennon wearing a New York City t-shirt (1974), Led Zeppelin standing in front of their airplane and Sid Vicious eating a hot dog (in the permanent collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London)—have appeared worldwide in every form, from magazine covers, posters, T-shirts and even postage stamps. He is the author of 15 books including "Rock Seen, John Lennon: The New York Years", "Green Day: Photographs by Bob Gruen" and a new autobiography "Right Place, Right Time."See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MasterYourMix Podcast
Jon Kaplan: Problem Solving Your Mixes

MasterYourMix Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2023 64:56


Jon Kaplan is a Grammy award winning Mixer, Producer and Composer who has enjoyed every minute of the past 25+ years working in the studio Following a dream defining stretch in the 1990s as a member of Atlantic Records' band The Hatters, his career behind the glass began in NYC as an engineer on hit records for *N Sync, Jennifer Lopez, LL Cool J, Mariah Carey and others. As a producer and mixer he has lent an ear to records across the musical spectrum for artists including Paul McCartney, Elton John, Neon Trees, Bebe Rexha, Jonas Brothers, Black Pumas, Brittany Howard, Allen Stone, Sara Bareilles, Upsahl, Ray LaMontagne, Zach Williams, Gavin DeGraw and Brett Young. To date, his name has appeared on albums totalling over 25 million in sales, as well as eight Grammy nominated recordings and the one shiny little gold statue on the mantle. IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN ABOUT: Figuring out your passions and niche in audio Navigating the old music industry model vs. the current one Using the rough mix as the foundation of what you do Problem solving balance issues in a mix Making a vocal sit right  Having a repeatable process for mixing so you know when you're done with it Tuning kick drums to match the key of the song Saturating bass Using references to learn your speakers Why gain-matching is so important throughout a mix Using mono vs stereo reverbs Delay vs reverb Notable gear mentioned in this episode: 1176 - https://sweetwater.sjv.io/AWE4MR To learn more about Jon Kaplan, visit: https://jfkmix.com/ For tips on how to improve your mixes, visit https://masteryourmix.com/ Looking for 1-on-1 feedback and training to help you create pro-quality mixes? Check out my new coaching program Amplitude and request a demo: https://masteryourmix.com/amplitude/ Download your FREE copy of the Ultimate Mixing Blueprint: https://masteryourmix.com/blueprint/ Get your copy of the #1 Amazon bestselling book, The Mixing Mindset – The Step-By-Step Formula For Creating Professional Rock Mixes From Your Home Studio: https://masteryourmix.com/mixingmindsetbook/ Join the FREE MasterYourMix Facebook community: https://links.masteryourmix.com/community To make sure that you don't miss an episode, make sure to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or on Android. Have your questions answered on the show. Send them to questions@masteryourmix.com Thanks for listening! Please leave a rating and review on iTunes!

Rock & Roll High School With Pete Ganbarg

A vital force behind the sound of some of rock's most powerful female artists, like Tina Turner & Pat Benatar among others, singer/songwriter Holly Knight's iconic musical imprint is woven into the very fabric of the MTV generation. Throughout the 1980s, she composed anthems including "Better Be Good To Me, "The Best," "Love is A Battlefield," and many others that have become the soundtrack for millions of people's lives, and created and crafted empowering odes to independence, liberation, and equality. In 2013, Holly was inducted into the Songwriters Hall Of Fame.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME
Barbie ovládla kiná. Sladkú romancu nečakajte (26. 7. 2023)

Dobré ráno | Denný podcast denníka SME

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2023 26:01


Barbie valcuje kiná. Za prvý víkend premietania zarobila 155 miliónov dolárov, čo je zatiaľ najviac v tomto roku. Trblietavý ružový svet plastovej bábiky však neponúka plochý ničnehovoriaci príbeh, ale sofistikovanú kritiku moderného sveta. Kritiku si počas desaťročí svojej existencie vypočula aj samotná Barbie, ktorá bola obrazom nerealistického symbolu krásy. Ako sa popasoval film s touto kontroverziou a aké sú jeho hlavné posolstvá? Jana Maťková sa v podcaste Dobré ráno s redaktorkou kultúry denníka SME Kristínou Kúdelovou. Zdroj zvukov: Youtube/Warner Bros. Pictures, Dua Lipa, Atlantic Records, Ava Max, FIFTY FIFTY Official Odporúčanie: O Barbie a aj ďalšom filmovom hite týchto dní Oppenheimerovi sa rozprávali aj naši kolegovia Peter Konečný a Juraj Malíček v podcaste Vertigo. Každú sobotu v ňom nájdete tipy na skvelé novinky v kinách ale aj na filmy a seriály na streamovacích službách. Vertigo nájdete vo svojej podcastovej appke alebo na webe sme.sk. – Všetky podcasty denníka SME nájdete na⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ sme.sk/podcasty⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ – Odoberajte aj denný newsletter⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ SME.sk⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ s najdôležitejšími správami na⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ sme.sk/brifing⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ – Ďakujeme, že počúvate podcast Dobré ráno.

Rock & Roll High School With Pete Ganbarg

A founding member of The Rascals (AKA The Young Rascals), Felix is an inductee of the Songwriters, Rock and Roll, Hammond, Hit Parade, and Musicians halls of fame. Playing organ and piano with The Rascals, he frequently collaborated with bandmate Eddie Brigati to write some of the band's most successful songs, such as “How Can I Be Sure?,” “I've Been Too Lonely Too Long,” “A Beautiful Morning,” and “Groovin'.” The band had 3 #1 Billboard Hot 100 hits including “Good Lovin',” a song that the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame has included on its list of the 500 songs that shaped Rock & Roll. Their Civil Rights anthem “People Got To Be Free” became their final No. 1 track in both the U.S. and Canada. Felix went on to release six solo albums, be a touring member of Ringo Starr's third All-Starr Band, perform with Billy Joel, record an album with Steve Cropper, and starred in a heralded Broadway musical revue, Once Upon A Dream, in 2013. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Sadye

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2023 27:45


We had the pleasure of interviewing Sadye over Zoom video!Dark alt pop singer/songwriter Sadye signed to vnclm_ x Atlantic Records, and recently released a new song called "Biblical". The song is about "going back to someone you know is bad for you over and over again. Like, yes, I'm caught in this person's web, but maybe I know exactly what I'm doing," confides the artist. Inspired by her intense struggle with cancer, discovering self-worth, and dealing with toxic relationships, her lyrics are steeped in a sarcastic form of catharsis as she learns to love her literal, and figurative, scars; a theme beautifully juxtaposed by catchy, modern melodies and edgy pop production. Her music has received placements in ABC/HULU's Abbott Elementary and Netflix's Working Moms.Sadye transcends the limits of experimental and mainstream alt-pop, challenging listeners and breathing new life into the genre with otherworldly mystique and uncompromising vision. From humble beginnings as a small town singer/songwriter, Sadye writes with depth and heart, often taking on unexpectedly dark and heavy themes. Inspired by her intense struggle with cancer, discovering self-worth, and dealing with toxic relationships, her lyrics are steeped in a sarcastic form of catharsis as she learns to love her literal, and figurative, scars; a theme beautifully juxtaposed by catchy, modern melodies and edgy pop production, appealing to fans of Kim Petras and Charlie XCX to Nine Inch Nails and The Weeknd. Sadye's debut single, “Biblical,” represents a rebirth of sorts, building on what came before, but charging forward without looking back – beautiful and catchy, yet dark and familiar, Sadye invites listeners to join her ethereal cult and indulge their deepest inhibitions.We want to hear from you! Please email Hello@BringinitBackwards.com. www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #Sadye #Biblical #NewMusic #ZoomListen & Subscribe to BiBhttps://www.bringinitbackwards.com/follow Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! https://www.facebook.com/groups/bringinbackpodThis show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/4972373/advertisement

Another FN Podcast
AFP - JERRY JEMMOTT (ATLANTIC RECORDS/MUSCLE SHOALS/ARETHA/WILSON PICKETT)

Another FN Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2023 56:40


iconic bass player Jerry Jemmott is back after a few years to talk about his book Make It Happen!: The Life and Times of "The Groovemaster," live at 6pm PST.Jerry Jemmott is a two-time Grammy Award winning bassist and was a key architect of the Atlantic Records and Muscle Shoals sound of the 1960s & 1970s. Jerry's body of work provided the soundtrack to the Civil Rights Era. He played on Nina Simone Sings the Blues, Gil Scott Heron's “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” Aretha Franklin's “Think,” B.B. King's “The Thrill is Gone,” Wilson Pickett's “Hey Jude,” Jerry Jeff Walker's “Mr. Bojangles,” and albums by the Rascals, Freddie King, Freddie Hubbard, and many more. He was also the interviewer in Modern Electric Bass video with Jaco Pastorius and more recently had a starring role in the feature documentary Jaco , along with live televised performances with Gregg Allman and with Aretha Franklin on Late Night with David Letterman .

Music Business Worldwide
'People really like music. But the music industry lets everyone else capture the value.'

Music Business Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2023 18:12


Welcome to the Music Business Worldwide podcast supported by Voly Music.On this 'cast, MBW founder Tim Ingham is joined by Travis Rosenblatt, founder of the SaaS platform for A&R research and scouting, Meddling.Rosenblatt is a particularly interesting person to speak to because, by his own admission, he spends a lot of his time NOT consumed in his day job. This allows him the bandwidth to think deeply about the music business, its challenges, and where it might be headed in future.Meddling is very clever, gathering data from multiple touchpoints on new artists for clients that have included the likes of  Republic Records, Kobalt, Columbia Records, and Atlantic Records.But as a SaaS platform, Meddling largely runs itself – enabling Rosenblatt's mind to wander toward various crucial topics for the modern music industry.On this podcast, Ingham asks Rosenblatt about Meddling – a bit – but their conversation also dives into PROs, DIY distribution, music's role on video platforms, and much more besides…The Music Business Worldwide Podcast is supported by Voly Music.

This Song Is Yours

Get ready to dance as we welcome indie dance trio Blusher to the podcast! After coming together as separate solo artists at a songwriting camp, they released their hit debut single ‘Softly Spoken'. Since then, Blusher has been on a whirlwind journey, playing shows across Australia and Europe, signing with Atlantic Records, and releasing their brilliant debut EP ‘Should We Go Dance?', a five-track masterpiece capturing the essence of nights out in 2023. In today's episode, Lauren, Jade, and Miranda share their respective musical journeys, how 2000s pop influences their sound, and what we can expect from their electrifying live shows. Blusher: Instagram / Facebook / Spotify.Thanks again to Blusher for their time. We also want to give a special shout out to Emma from Positive Feedback for her help with this episode.Follow our brand new sibling podcast 'TSIY RADIO' exclusively on Spotify hereYou can help follow and support here: TSIY Insta / TSIY FB / TSIY TikTok / TSIY Youtube / TSIY Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Creative Chat with Dr. Judi Bloom and Richard Skipper : Celebrating Returns!

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2023 59:00


In the late 80s and early 90s. Jenny Burton had four national number one R&B/Dance hits -- "One More Shot," rose to Billboard's number five slot and led to Burton's first major-label solo deal. Atlantic Records released her first LP, "In Black & White," which included the hit single, “I Remember What You Like". “Bad Habits,” off her second album was a #1 dance hit in America and rose to #12 on the R&B charts. Moving more into an Inspirational direction, she created with producer/composer Peter Link, The Jenny Burton Experience, an award winning Inspirational group ran for seven years to sold out standing room only audiences at New York City's "Don't Tell Mama". The Jenny Burton Experience also opened at Trump Marina for Al Green, performed with The Gap Band and Morris Day and The Times at The Indianapolis Black Expo for 80,000 people, opened for Stevie Wonder at Lincoln Center in NYC, and completed a one month run headlining at Resorts International in Atlantic City, the first Gospel group to ever headline in Atlantic City. Recently, Jenny joined the cast of Rosemary and Thyme, a Musical Podcast written and composed by Peter Link, which premiered Christmas of 2022 and is now running in 135 countries around the world. Presently, Jenny is working on a new CD with producer/composer Peter Link, due out in the fall of 2023. Barbara Minkus originally from Chicago began in NYC in Julius Monk's "Bit's and Pieces", was Lucy in the original "You're A Good Man Charlie Brown" album, toured as Fanny Brice in "Funny Girl", costarred on Broadway in "The Education Of Hyman Kaplan". Barbara was a regular on Love American Style for 6 season's and played Gittle The Witch on ABC's Curiosity Shop. 

Drum Channel Podcast
S2 E66 - Debbie Gibson

Drum Channel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2023 28:59


Hello everyone and welcome to “Billy's Bubble” here on Drum Channel. Today's guest is singer-songwriter, actress, TV personality, and Broadway star Debbie Gibson.  Debbie has released eleven studio albums, six compilation albums, one box set, and forty-six singles.  Gibson's career goes back to 1986, while still in her early teenage years, writing and recording her debut Atlantic Records album Out the Blue. The first single “Only In My Dreams,” landed in the top five on the Billboard charts and put Debbie on the map as one of the youngest artists to write and record their own material. The track featured our very own DC podcast host Billy Amendola on Simmons drums. It went on to sell five million copies to date and went gold and platinum.  Still relevant today Debbie is on “The Body Remembers Encore” U.S. summer tour for her latest album, The Body Remembers, which features former Cinderella drummer Fred Coury as one of the producers.  Debbie and Billy catch up on a phone call to talk about all things drums and more. Enjoy! 

tv dc broadway bubbles simmons atlantic records debbie gibson fred coury drum channel only in my dreams
CiTR -- The Jazz Show
John Coltrane: "Giant Steps"

CiTR -- The Jazz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2023 217:22


Tonight an iconic recording and a classic. Tenor saxophone master John Coltrane and his seminal recording "Giant Steps". Coltrane performs here with a hand picked quartet with the magnificent Tommy Flanagan on piano who with his light touch and lyricism provides a perfect foil for Coltrane's intensity. Coltrane's favorite bassist is here...Mr. P.C. aka Paul Chambers and drum great Arthur Taylor whom Coltrane liked for his tough swing and great cymbal ride. All the compositions are by Coltrane and they cover the gamut of feelings from blasting intensity to the soft ballad styling of "Naima" dedicated to Mrs. Coltrane to the playfulness of Syeeda's Song Flute, for his daughter.. All of this was recorded in New York for Atlantic Records on May 8, 9,1959. "Naima" was from a later recording date with Coltrane, Wynton Kelly on piano, Chambers on bass and Jimmy Cobb on drums. Coltrane chose the sequence of tunes and liked this later version of Naima and chose it for the album. That's it...tonight's Jazz feature: "Giant Steps".

Black Information Network Daily
July 10, 2023. Jason Flom Wrongful Convictions - Part 3

Black Information Network Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2023 32:57


Jason Flom is the Founder and CEO of Lava for Good Podcasts and Lava Media. He was the Chairman and CEO of Atlantic Records, and is also the host of "Wrongful Conviction", the hit podcast featuring conversations with people who have spent decades in prison for crimes they did not commit, See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rock & Roll High School With Pete Ganbarg

Ranked among Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time and named The World's Greatest Living Guitar Player by Mojo magazine, Steve is a founding member of Booker T. & the M.G.'s, the Mar-Keys, and the Blues Brothers. As a songwriter, he's co-written some of the biggest songs of all time including Wilson Pickett's “In the Midnight Hour,” Eddie Floyd's “Knock on Wood,” and Otis Redding's “(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay.” Over his celebrated career, Steve has worked with Sam & Dave, Stevie Wonder, Carla Thomas, Neil Young, Rod Stewart, José Feliciano, Jeff Beck, Johnny Cash, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, John Lennon, Tom Petty, and countless others. In 1992, Steve (as part of Booker T. & the M.G.'s) was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 2005, he was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.