Podcasts about Redmond

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Latest podcast episodes about Redmond

Ballistic Chronicles
Inside Radian Weapons with Josh Underwood

Ballistic Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 41:12


 Joshua Underwood grew up in a small town in the foothills ofthe Cascades where he learned to hunt and learned to shoot and absorbedbusiness ideas from the old guys in his neighborhood. A two-year exposure toCAD/CAM theory set him on his course and he turned his love for highperformance machines into a thriving business. Today we take a tour of the RadianWeapons factory in Redmond, Oregon, and get a glimpse into the innovations sparkedby the company's founder. We find out the risks he took to start this companyin a barn in Salem, Oregon, and how he got out of Salem and to the dry side ofthe mountains.  If you want to support free speech and good hunting contentin the Internet Age, look for our coffee and books at https://www.garylewisoutdoors.com/shop/  We recommend our latest book Bob Nosler Born Ballistic. Youcan find it on our web site and on Nosler.com and Amazon too.  You can watch select episodes of Frontier Unlimited on ournetwork of affiliates around the U.S. and on Hunt Channel TV https://vimeo.com/showcase/6773400or click https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=gary+lewis+outdoors+frontier+unlimited  

Jude 3 Project
Why Trust the Old Testament? - Special Guest: Dr. Eric Redmond

Jude 3 Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 60:47


On this episode, Dr. Eric Redmond discusses why we trust the Old Testament.  Watch the documentary and access additional resources at https://unspokenmovie.com/ Support the mission and vision of Jude 3 Project here: https://www.jude3project.org/donate Grab our curriculum here: https://www.jude3project.org Take an online course that will help you know what you believe and why here: https://learn.jude3project.org/library/  

Best Horse Practices Podcast
BHPS presenters discuss!

Best Horse Practices Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 46:22


This is Episode 15 of Season Three. A special episode! You listeners might know that I direct the Best Horse Practices Summit, an annual conference with academic and arena presentations. This year, it was held in Kentucky and we had many fabulous presenters on everything from colic to stockmanship to saddlefit. At the last minute, however, Dr. Doug Thal, a veterinarian from New Mexico, came down with Covid and was not able to present. We needed to improvise quickly and decided to fill his presentation slots with two Q and A sessions. We asked attendees for questions and we had a group curate them – basically weeding out questions that were inappropriate or directed at just one presenter. Pepper Landson, who delivered a great women's leadership elective during the Summit, agreed to moderate it. So the voices you will hear are Pepper, Amy Skinner, Daniel Dauphin, Katrin Silva, and Nahshon Cook. At the very end, you'll hear Allanna Salmon, a Summit steering committee member, who speaks up with some thoughts. In case you have any trouble hearing the prompts. Here they are: Do you have thoughts on bringing a horse from a harsher form of training to this better, more attuned way of training. Are there things to be cautious about? Exercises or ways for keeping yourself regulated, centered, and to maintain energetic clarity? What are your thoughts around training young horses in today's modern settings and facilities? How do we open up our community to a more diverse population? This is a bit longer than most of our episodes, and the sound is not as spiffy, but I promise, it is well worth it. Thanks to the Summit board for giving us permission to air it here. Our title sponsor is Lucerne Farms, producers of quality forage feeds.  Forage is chopped, packaged hay. Sometimes it's alfalfa, sometimes timothy, sometimes blended, and sometimes with a touch of molasses. Always scrumptious. After hay and grass, it's pretty much the best alternative and a great way to supplement your winter feeding. Check them out here or at your local feed story. And thank you, Redmond Equine and Pharm Aloe – for generously sponsoring our podcast. My favorite product from Redmond is Rock on a Rope. I'm actually watching one of my horses lick this chunk of salt right now. They love it. And Summiteers may be familiar Pharm Aloe because many found complimentary Pharm Aloe pellets in their swag bags. Check out links to their pages in our show notes. We thank Kate's Real Food and Patagonia WorkWear for their continued support. And, hey, thank you, thank you to those who donated last week. Yep. We have a donation page set up. If you get something of value from our podcast, please drop a tip in the jar for us. We sure would appreciate it.  Donate here.

Weekly Dose of BS
Shah Sighting

Weekly Dose of BS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 33:13


Have you heard the news about Coach Shah meeting with the coaching staff at TCU? Treay is the one who broke this news here! Join Brandi, Stephanie, and Trey on their debut live streamed podcast! This episode is packed with your questions - including some housewives tea you've been wanting to know! Subscribe to our YouTube channel and get notified when you can participate in our next Live Stream!https://www.youtube.com/@weeklydoseofbsIf you enjoyed this episode, leave a review and make sure you subscribe! If you want to connect with Brandi and Stephanie directly, message them at: www.instagram.com/brandiredmondwww.instagram.com/stephhollmanwww.instagram.com/bsthepodcastIf you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Brandi & Stephanie as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.comSponsors:

Better Help - Visit www.betterhelp.com/weeklydose and get 10% off your first monthProducers: Mike Morse / Madelyn Grimes For YEA Networks

In Total Alignment
140. Getting In Self Care Stress-Free with Rachel Redmond

In Total Alignment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 51:35


This week I am chatting with Doctor of Oriental Medicine, Ayurvedic practitioner and women's health expert, Rachel Redmond about how you can add self care in to your routine so you can feel energized and productive every single day. In this episode Rachel shares ways to implement self care that will help you heal, balance your hormones, and help you work through this chronic stress that we're all living through. CONNECT WITH RACHEL As a Doctor of Oriental Medicine, Ayurvedic practitioner and women's health expert, Rachel teaches her clients how to apply the ancient wisdom of Eastern Medicine traditions to the challenges posed by our hectic modern lives. As a result, many of her clients notice that their health issues resolve and they feel better in every way. Rachel believes that self care doesn't need to be stressful or something extra on your to do list. She's on a mission to help every woman she meets learn how to simplify their self care so they can feel 10X better and live a productive and fulfilling life. Website: www.rachel-redmond.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/rachel.e.redmond MORE FROM MICHELLE Instagram: www.instagram.com/michellepfile Facebook: www.facebook.com/michellepfilecoaching Website: www.michellepfile.com Join The Wellness Hub: www.michellepfile.com/wellnesshub MENTIONED RESOURCES Lumen Metabolic Tracker www.michellepfile.com/lumen Use code MICHELLEPFILE for $50 off your device

Quit Your Day Job with Alisha Fernandez Miranda

Before her 50s, New York Times bestselling author Pamela Redmond was a different person. Well, the same person perhaps, but with a different job and a different life. Now, she writes novels (including Younger, that was adapted into a TV series), lives in California (with the occasional stint in London), and is the CEO of Nameberry. Join Alisha to hear about Pamela's fascinating pivot and her advice for those seeking reinvention. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Disrupt The Everyday Podcast
Episode 99 - Helping Children Speak Up with Jackie Bailey

Disrupt The Everyday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 51:03


Watch Here: https://youtu.be/jfMxjJ1dKzI  HOW DO WE GET OUR KIDS TALKING? On this episode we are joined by Jackie Bailey. Jackie is a Conversation Coach for kids. On this episode we discuss: Transforming an abusive childhood into a mission of empowering children Helping children have empowered voices Transitioning from a shy child and adult to World Champion of Public Speaking semi-finalist For places to listen, places to connect on social media, to be a guest, collaborate with or sponsor DTE visit: https://linktr.ee/DisruptTheEveryday Jackie's website: https://www.speakfeedlead.org Jackie's Instagram and Twitter @speakfeedlead About Jackie Jackie Bailey runs The Speak Feed Lead Public Speaking Studio in Redmond, Washington; and is the founder and executive director of The Speak Feed Lead Project, a nonprofit with a mission to empower children, teens, and adults with public speaking skills. Jackie is the author of SELF-Centered Leadership: Becoming Influential, Intentional, and Exceptional published in 2014, and a 2015 semi-finalist in The World Championship of Public Speaking – placing her in the top 98 speakers of 33,000 competitors. From Voiceless Victim to Master of Message is a presentation in which Jackie shares her survival and triumph over childhood sexual abuse by using her voice and discovering her value. Today, Jackie is known as the conversation coach for kids since she has developed curriculum for, and teaches courses, camps, and workshops to children, teens, and young adults to empower their public speaking confidence.

Co-Movement Gym Podcast
Learn How To Set Goals and Accomplish Them - Co-Movement Gym Podcast S2E43

Co-Movement Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 20:46


The following is a conversation on goal setting. 92% of people that set goals never accomplish them. It doesn't have to be this way. In this episode I layout a very specific framework designed to help people set goals and actually accomplish them. Sponsors:NativePath:Follow the link below to see all of NativePath's Pure Grass-Fed, Organic, Clean Supplements and use the CoMo15 code at checkout for 15% off!https://www.nativepath.com/Lombardi Chiropractic:https://www.lombardichiropractic.com/Mention the Co-Movement Gym Podcast when scheduling your initial appointment for 50% off Initial Consultation and X-Rays!Redmond:redmond.lifeOur team at Co-Movement Gym has used Redmond's Real Sea Salt, Seasonings, Re-Lyte Electrolyte drink and other products for years! This is a U.S. company whose products are simple, clean and taste great. Support them by using the link above or entering the code CoMo15 at checkout and you will receive 10% OFF your order!Reach out to us at info@co-movement.com or visit our website co-movement.com and learn more on how we can assist you in achieving your maximum health and fitness potential!Help us spread these fitness truths to as many people as possible by sharing this podcast with your friends and family! There is a lot of fitness information out there and we want everyone to know what really works! The information we provide in this podcast series has helped thousands of clients here in Upstate NY, and we hope to help you achieve your fitness goals too!Check out our Online Private Coaching at www.co-movement.com/onlinecoachingCheck out our main website www.co-movement.comCheck out our Video Podcast Clip on our YouTube Channel Co-Movement

The Commute with Carlson
January 20, 2023 show

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 117:06


6am hour -- GUEST: founder and president of Americans for Tax Reform, Grover Norquist, to explain the Congressional debt ceiling limit and showdown, debt ceiling expired last night, RIP to '60s/'70s singer/guitarist David Crosby, SCOTUS internal investigation of May 2022 draft opinion leak finds no source for the un-precedented leak, why the failure to find the source could lead to more Supreme Court leaks in the future, two more big tenants in downtown Seattle are leaving after Nike's announcement, an advocate for WA's flawed police pursuit law refuses a KVI interview request 7am hour -- pinpointing the downfall of Seattle's socialist city councilwoman Kshama Sawant, in a new 'manifesto' Sawant attacks progressives including Pramila Jayapal and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez "tearing up the joint from within", Sawant tells reporter her proudest moment at the city council is "being thorn in the side of Seattle's ruling class", have you ever met a leftist/socialist who is/was happy and not resentful?, is America ready for Kshama Sawant?, a police training ground facility in Georgia was attacked by a shooter, the security threat is from an Anti-fa member who was implicated in shooting at the officers in training, yet no national news reporting on this attack, Anti-fa gets violent when they lose, Kirkland police connect armed car-jackings and robberies to crimes in Seattle, Bellevue, Redmond and Burien involving repeat criminal crime ring. 8am hour -- three years ago yesterday was the news story of the first case in America of a man hospitalized after contracting COVID-19 and it was in Everett WA, transgender sports politics and politics invading sports, an example of progressive liberals defending some athletes free speech while condemning the speech of other athletes, Rep. Eric Swalwell tries to bet Sen. Ted Cruz on an NFL playoff game, RIP David Crosby of '60s/'70s (and one 1980s hit) music fame, celebrated actress Octavia Spencer says racism in Hollywood is more problematic than what she experienced growing up in Alabama in the 1970s and 1980s, new polling on Trump and DeSantis, in text message voting KVI listeners say they lean toward DeSantis in 2024 by a 60% to 40% edge.

Heartland Labor Forum
Fred Redmond and Bill Lucy on MLK and Rep Jamie Johnson on the MO Leg

Heartland Labor Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 59:10


AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Fred Redmond and retired AFSCME and civil rights leader Bill Lucy on labor and Martin Luther King. Then we'll ask Missouri's freshman legislator Jaime Johnson about the new […] The post Fred Redmond and Bill Lucy on MLK and Rep Jamie Johnson on the MO Leg appeared first on KKFI.

The XS Noize Podcast
#114. Ricky Warwick of Black Star Riders on 'The Wrong Side of Paradise'

The XS Noize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 27:57


In episode #114 of The XS Noize Podcast, Mark Millar catches up with Ricky Warwick of masters of anthemic rock ‘n' roll Black Star Riders to talk about their fifth album 'The Wrong Side of Paradise'. Black Star Riders celebrate their 10th anniversary this year with 'The Wrong Side of Paradise' and a string of UK dates. The Album, featuring 11 tracks, was recorded in the Autumn of 2021 at Studio 606 in Northridge, California and Toochtoon Sound in Redmond, Oregon, with producer and longtime BSR associate Jay Ruston. In this interview, Ricky talks about writing and recording the new album – what fans can expect from the live shows and lots more. Check out the article on XS Noize - https://bityl.co/Gj1i Follow XS Noize: Website - https://www.xsnoize.com/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/xsnoizemusic Twitter - https://twitter.com/xsnoizemusic Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/xsnoizemusic/

The Cannabis Review
HOW TO INVEST IN CANNABIS STOCKS | Jesse Redmond (Founder & Managing Partner, Higher Calling LLC)

The Cannabis Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 15:40


In this episode, we are joined by Jesse Redmond. Jesse is a former co-founder of two hedge funds and a rising retail cannabis collective. He began his career at Franklin Templeton and Fisher Investments and then spent a decade managing multiple hedge funds. In 2016 he changed course and opened a cannabis dispensary. Over the next three years, this business became the number one medical collective in his region. Through these experiences, he offers a unique perspective on how to make money investing in cannabis. Topics: 1. How To Invest In Cannabis 2. Green Giants * Twitter - @TheCannabisRev2 * LinkedIn - @thecannabisreview * Episode Library - https://www.thecannabisreview.ie + Green Giants https://www.greengiants.net/

Take the Upgrade
220. 7 reasons why Sodium is crucial to your wellness with Kari Coody, Pharm D.

Take the Upgrade

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 12:02


Links to my favorite sodium sources: - Crucial Four m- salt is my favorite. use code KCPHARMD10 to save  - Redmond real salt- second best, easy to buy in bulk, budget-friendly. use code KCPHARMD to save. I also like re-lyte for electrolytes to add to water!   Connect with me: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/karicoodyPharmD  Instagram: www.instagram.com/karicoody/  YouTube: bit.ly/karicoodyyoutube  Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/karicoodypharmd/  Website: www.karicoody.com  Email: kari@karicoody.com  

Co-Movement Gym Podcast
Learn the Handstand with Dr. Wes Hendricks - Co-Movement Gym Podcast S2E42

Co-Movement Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 37:39


The following is a conversation with Dr. Wes Hendricks. Wes received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from the University of Western States in Portland, OR in 2014. Wes is the founder of Rebuild Brand Co., which provides online programming working with coaches, competitors and every day athletes across the country.  In today's episode Wes and Josh layout a step by step process to achieving your first handstand.  You are listening to the Co-Movement Gym podcast, where we inspire people to move and live courageously. If you are enjoying this content, please support our sponsors in the description. I thank each and every one of you for being on this journey with us, now please enjoy the show. Links:Instagram: @drweshendricksWebsite: Rebuildbrandco.comYouTube: Dr. Wes HendricksSponsors:NativePath:Follow the link below to see all of NativePath's Pure Grass-Fed, Organic, Clean Supplements and use the CoMo15 code at checkout for 15% off!https://www.nativepath.com/Lombardi Chiropractic:https://www.lombardichiropractic.com/Mention the Co-Movement Gym Podcast when scheduling your initial appointment for 50% off Initial Consultation and X-Rays!Redmond:redmond.lifeOur team at Co-Movement Gym has used Redmond's Real Sea Salt, Seasonings, Re-Lyte Electrolyte drink and other products for years! This is a U.S. company whose products are simple, clean and taste great. Support them by using the link above or entering the code CoMo15 at checkout and you will receive 10% OFF your order!Reach out to us at info@co-movement.com or visit our website co-movement.com and learn more on how we can assist you in achieving your maximum health and fitness potential!Help us spread these fitness truths to as many people as possible by sharing this podcast with your friends and family! There is a lot of fitness information out there and we want everyone to know what really works! The information we provide in this podcast series has helped thousands of clients here in Upstate NY, and we hope to help you achieve your fitness goals too!Check out our Online Private Coaching at www.co-movement.com/onlinecoachingCheck out our main website www.co-movement.comCheck out our Video Podcast Clip on our YouTube Channel Co-Movement

Weekly Dose of BS
Savannah Chrisley Unlocked

Weekly Dose of BS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 35:51


Brandi and Stephanie recap their hilarious experiences in Nashville and talk to Savannah Chrisley from the popular TV show, "Chrisley Knows Best", about growing up in front of the camera, her parents, and ways she has had to defend her beliefs. Follow Savannah on social media and check out her podcast, "Unlocked With Savannah Chrisley", here:www.instagram.com/savannahchrisleywww.youtube.com/@savannahchrisley2578/featuredpodcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/unlocked-with-savannah-chrisley/id1649201369open.spotify.com/show/4ybDhM2GsHhXQ20OKcA60P?si=e3c7e2f4a2484d67www.podcastone.com/pd/Unlocked-with-Savannah-ChrisleyIf you enjoyed this episode, leave a review and make sure you subscribe! If you want to connect with Brandi and Stephanie directly, message them at: www.instagram.com/brandiredmondwww.instagram.com/stephhollmanwww.instagram.com/bsthepodcastIf you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Brandi & Stephanie as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.comProducers: Mike Morse / Madelyn Grimes For YEA NetworksSponsors:
Better Help - Visit www.betterhelp.com/weeklydose and get 10% off your first monthUnlocked With Savannah Chrisley is a production of PodcastOne and The Cast Collective.

Chit Chat Money
Microsoft (Ticker: MSFT) Not So Deep Dive

Chit Chat Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 61:21


Microsoft operates in three segments: Productivity and Business Processes, Intelligent Cloud, and More Personal Computing. The company was founded in 1975 and is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. At the end of the month, we will publish an Arch Capital episode that will cover the company: Alphabet. Listen closely as Brett and Ryan go through the history, financials, and future prospects of Microsoft. Enjoy the show! ****************************** This episode is sponsored by Stratosphere.io, a web-based terminal for financial data, KPIs, and more. Try it out for FREE or use code “CCM” for 15% off any paid plan. Sign up here: https://www.stratosphere.io/ ****************************** Subscribe to our Substack to receive free show notes and charts that go along with every episode: https://chitchatmoney.substack.com/ Want updates on future shows and projects? Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/chitchatmoney Contact us: chitchatmoneypodcast@gmail.com Timestamps Company Background | (3:01) Industry | (18:26) Management & Ownership | (23:43) Earnings | (27:19) Balance Sheet | (34:42) Valuation | (36:53) Our Analysis | (38:54) Disclosure: Chit Chat Money hosts and guests are not financial advisors, and nothing they say on this show is formal advice or a recommendation. Brett Schafer and Ryan Henderson are general partners and portfolio managers at Arch Capital. Arch Capital and its partners may hold securities discussed on this show.

Co-Movement Gym Podcast
Improve Your Financial Health with Andy Schectman - Co-Movement Gym Podcast S2E41

Co-Movement Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 79:50


The following is a conversation with Andy Schectman. Andy is the President & Owner of Miles Franklin Precious Metals. Prior to starting Miles Franklin. in 1989, Andrew became a Licensed Financial Planner, specializing in Swiss Franc Investments and alternative investments. At Miles Franklin, a company that has eclipsed $5 billion in sales, Andrew has developed an operation that maintains trust, collaboration, and ethical behavior, superior customer service and satisfaction to better serve their clients. He is responsible for overseeing the firm's operations and business functions; including strategy and planning, account management, finance, and new business. I discovered Andy through Robert Kiyoski, the best-selling author of Rich Dad Poor Dad. Andy and Robert are close friends and their latest conversation on YouTube blew my mind, so I decided to reach out to Andy and invite him on the podcast. Over the last year I have been diving into the world of finance, trying to understand how fiat money, banks, assets and debt all work as a system. Some of you may be asking yourself, what does this have to do with health? Well one of the top sources of stress affecting people's health today is MONEY. So in this conversation Andy and I are going to get into a 101 version of the history of banking, and how money works or doesn't work for you. I am deeply disturbed that they do not teach basic finance in high school or college, nor do they give our youth any kind of education setting them up for financial success down the road, hence why I'll be diving deeper into this topic as the months and years go on. I recommend listening to this episode more than once. Links:Website: https://www.milesfranklin.com/author/andyschectman/Twitter: @MilesFranklinCoSponsors:NativePath:Follow the link below to see all of NativePath's Pure Grass-Fed, Organic, Clean Supplements and use the CoMo15 code at checkout for 15% off!https://www.nativepath.com/Lombardi Chiropractic:https://www.lombardichiropractic.com/Mention the Co-Movement Gym Podcast when scheduling your initial appointment for 50% off Initial Consultation and X-Rays!Redmond:redmond.lifeOur team at Co-Movement Gym has used Redmond's Real Sea Salt, Seasonings, Re-Lyte Electrolyte drink and other products for years! This is a U.S. company whose products are simple, clean and taste great. Support them by using the link above or entering the code CoMo15 at checkout and you will receive 10% OFF your order!Reach out to us at info@co-movement.com or visit our website co-movement.com and learn more on how we can assist you in achieving your maximum health and fitness potential!Check out our Online Private Coaching at www.co-movement.com/onlinecoachingCheck out our main website www.co-movement.comCheck out our Video Podcast Clip on our YouTube Channel Co-Movement

The Pastor Theologians Podcast
A New Book on Confronting Racial Injustice | Gerald Hiestand & Eric Redmond

The Pastor Theologians Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 37:11


On this week's episode, Zach Wagner is joined by Gerald Hiestand and Eric Redmond to discuss their contributions to a newly published volume of essays on racial injustice. These chapters were adapted from the presentations at the CPT's 2021 theology conference.The book can be purchased here:https://wipfandstock.com/9781666737349/confronting-racial-injustice/And here:https://www.amazon.com/Confronting-Racial-Injustice-Theory-Theologians/dp/1666737348

The No Nonsense Wellness Podcast  |  Healthy Mind, Healthy Body
Intentional Living & Simple Meal Planning for Busy Moms | with Special Guest Julie Redmond of Mom Made Plans

The No Nonsense Wellness Podcast | Healthy Mind, Healthy Body

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 35:30


Intentional Living Made Simple   It's hard to believe it's January 2023! I know that this is the time of year where we're all really focused on getting our crap together.  We all want to get a little bit more organized so that we feel like we're heading into the year with a plan. I thought this was the perfect time to share with you guys my interview with Julie Redmond of Mom Made Plans. Julie is all about intentional living made simple. She's on a mission to make life feel easier and meaningfully productive through the ultimate life hack of self awareness and intentional living.    Julie is a mom of twins so had to learn really fast how to get organized so she could get more done.  She also had to learn how to give herself a whole lot of grace for what she DIDN'T get done!     In this episode, Julie shares some of her best tips and tricks about being more intentional in your day, especially with your meal planning.  All to often we overcomplicate things to the point we get overwhelmed and then don't do anything.  Meal planning and being intentional with food can be way easier than we make it! These tips will be great for new meal planners and those who have been doing it awhile.    If you want to hear more from Julie, check out the Mom Made Plans Podcast, and check out her Etsy store for all her amazing organizational printables at Paper Made Plans.   XOXO Tara   Guest Links: Connect with Julie Redmond of Mom Made Plans! Podcast >  Mom Made Plans Podcast  Instagram >  @mommadeplans  Email >  julie@papermadeplans.com  Productivity Printables > www.etsy.com/shop/papermadeplans    If you struggle with yo-yo dieting, emotional eating or creating lasting weight loss and health, then check out the Healthy Mind, Healthy Body Program and Membership so you can ditch the diets and finally make peace with food.  

America's Work Force Union Podcast
Dorsey Hager (Columbus/Central Ohio BCTC) / Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio)/ Fred Redmond (AFL-CIO)

America's Work Force Union Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 54:40


U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) joined the AWF Union Podcast and spoke about the Brent Spence Bridge corridor project. He also touched on some of the items included in the ominbus spending bill and how it will impact Americans.      Dorsey Hager, Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the Columbus/Central Ohio Building and Construction Trades Council, joined the AWF Union Podcast and provided an update on the Intel project in Central Ohio and the amount of work in his jurisdiction that will be performed under Project Labor Agreements. He also discussed how his affiliated unions donated their time to help their communities over the holidays.     Fred Redmond, AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer, called into the AWF Union Podcast while at the Consumer Electronic Show in Las Vegas. He discussed concerns union members have about technology and the need to organize in the high-tech sector. Redmond also talked about the upcoming Martin Luther King Jr. Conference and how Dr. King's message remains a central point of organized labor.

The Commute with Carlson
January 5th, 2022 show

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 120:46


6am hour -- power outtages impact Bellevue/Issaquah and eastern King County after overnight wind storms, still no new Republican House Speaker after 6 votes, US alpine skiing phenom Mikaela Shiffrin is about to topple some career records for women's skiing, Lynnwood WA neighbors object to plan for opiod treatment center after receiving barely any warning that public hearing(s), the Lynnwood transparency concerns parallel 2022 stories about citing homeless hotels in Kirkland and Redmond, drug possession's now a 1st time offense in Marysville WA unlike the flimsy state law currently in effect thanks to Gov. Jay Inslee and Legislative Democrats, KVI's Lars Larson explains the gruesome attack at a Gresham OR light rail station where the allegedly intoxicated suspect bit off portions of the victims face. 7am hour -- KOMO 4's Northwest Bail Fund story, KOMO reports statistics that show recipients of the NW Bail Fund are more likely to skip future court appearances and be arrested for other crimes while out on bail than non-recipients, the bail fund is coordinated by public defenders and funded by activist groups, a regular KVI guest--the President of WaFd bank, Brent Beardall--survives a fatal plane crash that killed the pilot, turns out the FBI had a bead on Moscow IS quadruple murder suspect Bryan Kohberger and were tracking his cross-country drive from WA to PA when the FBI asked Indiana State Patrol to pull over the car--twice!, GUEST: National Review columnist, John Fund, examines the House Speaker vote drama and the opposition to leading contender Kevin McCarthy, the perception of Kevin McCarthy's "blind ambition" to be Speaker, the problem with cutting a deal with "the rebels", how this could eventually result in Steve Scalise becoming House Speaker, the optics problem of McCarthy moving into the Speaker's office before securing the actual vote. 8am hour -- how the drama over the vote for US House Speaker underscores a lack of civics education in America, some educators are under fire for teaching what kids should want the government to do instead of the actual Constitution or separation of powers, the WA Dept. of Health just issued a 5-part curriculum for public schools on climate change that appears to be agenda driven, some predictions for the Seattle City Council regarding three positions where incumbents won't seek re-election in 2023, was this Portland homeless woman too candid when asked to describe what its like to be homeless in the city??, Marysville has a new law on drug possession which is much tougher than the existing state law installed by Gov. Jay Inslee and Legislative Democrats, a new poll of WA voters says economic issues (taxes and inflation), public safety and homelessness are the three dominant priorities Legislators need to have for the coming session starting next week.

Hacks & Wonks
Senator Manka Dhingra: Addressing Law & Safety Issues with Data-Driven Best Practices

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 50:02


On today's midweek show, Crystal welcomes Senator Manka Dhingra, Chair of the Senate Law & Justice Committee, to preview the tough issues her committee will take on in the upcoming legislative session. Senator Dhingra walks through her data-driven and community-informed approach to legislating and how this lens guides her thinking on revisiting the Blake decision fix, a temporary solution put in place by the Legislature in 2021 when the Washington Supreme Court struck down the state's drug possession law as unconstitutional. Despite widespread recognition of the need for a public health approach to substance use disorder, Crystal and Senator Dhingra lament the unfortunate political truth that the public is often ahead of elected officials and that the Blake fix will likely not be based on best practices.  The two then discuss the pushback from some in law enforcement interests in response to bills that restricted their use of high-speed vehicle pursuits and sought to hold officers liable for taking wrong actions. Senator Dhingra stands by these policies that solve the issues of unnecessary bystander deaths and community demands for reduction in police violence. Finally, the show wraps up with what a trauma-informed criminal justice system could look like, where implementation of the 988 crisis system is, and Senator Dhingra's delightful tradition of introducing legislation from teenagers in her district. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Senator Manka Dhingra at @Dhingrama.   Senator Manka Dhingra Manka Dhingra is Deputy Majority Leader of the Washington State Senate. She brings two decades of experience as a prosecutor to her role as Chair of the Senate Law & Justice Committee. She also serves on the Senate Health & Long Term Care Committee and Senate Ways & Means Committee.  In November 2017, Dhingra was elected to the Senate by the constituents of the 45th Legislative District, the first Sikh legislator in the nation. Since then, she has sponsored and passed legislation addressing a wide range of issue areas, including: curbing domestic violence and sexual assault, preventing firearm violence, providing property tax relief for seniors and people with disabilities, prosecuting financial fraud, and reforming the criminal justice system with an evidence-based approach.  During her time in the Senate, Dhingra has helped pass legislation and funding to transform the Washington State behavioral health system, reorienting it around prevention rather than crisis response. She continues to strive to ensure that Washingtonians with behavioral health needs get the treatment they need and deserve. As a member of the Special Committee on Economic Recovery, she is helping the state craft an economic plan to lead an equitable recovery from the COVID economic downturn. She also serves on several task forces dedicated to reducing poverty, reforming the criminal justice system, improving equity in state government, and providing a sound and fair fiscal footing for the state.  Dhingra continues to serve as a Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney with the King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office. As Chair of the Therapeutic Alternative Unit, Manka helped develop and oversee the Regional Mental Health Court, the Veterans Court, and the Community Assessment and Referral for Diversion program. As a mental health and crisis intervention expert, she has also been an instructor at the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission for the 40-hour Crisis Intervention Training for law enforcement officers to reduce the risk of tragedy and improve the response to people in crisis.  Outside the courtroom, Dhingra is a community leader and anti-domestic violence advocate on the Eastside. She co-founded Chaya, an organization that assists South Asian survivors of domestic violence and led the organization's work to end systemic violence through education and prevention. She also serves on the board of Hopelink.   Resources Senator Manka Dhingra | Washington Senate Democrats   “With Dhingra's Win, Democrats Take Control of the State Senate” by Hayat Norimine from SeattleMet   Q & A: The Blake Decision | ACLU of Washington   “In Last-Minute Move, Legislature Adopts New Approach to Drug Possession” by Paul Kiefer from PubliCola   “WA lawmakers try to thread needle on drug possession, to mixed reviews” by David Kroman from Crosscut   “Washington Voters Want to Decriminalize Drug Possession and Fund Substance Abuse Resources” by Anika Dandekar with Data For Progress   State v. Blake: ESB 5476 and behavioral health expansion | Washington Health Care Authority   “Not all crimes merit high-speed chases that risk bystanders' lives” by Manka Dhingra in The Seattle Times   “Pursuits and Fatalities in WA since 2015” by Martina Morris from Next Steps Washington and Washington Coalition for Police Accountability   2021-2022 Washington State Legislature Policing Bills Explainer | People Power Washington   “State leaders prepare for implementation of the 988 call line” by Shane Ersland from State of Reform   “Meet the students who fought for free menstrual products at Washington schools — and won” by Sara Gentzler from The Olympian   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. So today I'm absolutely thrilled to have joining us the Deputy Majority Leader of the Washington State Senate, Manka Dhingra. Welcome. [00:00:47] Senator Manka Dhingra: Thank you so much. It is such a pleasure to be here with you. [00:00:50] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely a pleasure to have you - have followed your work and admired your work for quite some time. So you are also the Chair of the Senate Law & Justice Committee, you've done a lot of work. I just wanted to start off with - what was your path to the State Senate and what have you been working on? [00:01:11] Senator Manka Dhingra: So I'll just say my path to the State Senate has been extremely unusual. I don't know anyone else who came into politics the way I did. I, as a young person, knew very early that I wanted to go to law school and that I wanted to be a prosecutor. I got involved in gender-based violence early on because my grandmother used to help survivors of domestic violence back in India. And so I went to law school, became a prosecutor with King County. I actually created and ran the first ever Therapeutic Alternative Unit where we really took a look at alternatives to incarceration, crisis intervention. I helped train law enforcement in the 40-hour crisis intervention training at the Criminal Justice Training Center. And I considered myself a good Democrat because I voted. And then we had our 2016 national election. And for the first time in my life, I was actually having an Election Night party at my house because I really wanted my children to see the face of the first U.S. woman president. Clearly the night did not go as I had planned. And so I went to my first Democratic Party meeting that December. And when I went there, I can tell you that the room was full - packed - with women. When I looked around that room, I recognized so many of the PTSA moms. And most of us were there, again, for the very first time because we felt we had to do something. And I didn't know what that something would look like. And a very good friend of mine who was on city council saw me there and she said, We have to have coffee. And so we sat down for coffee and her first question was, Do you want to run for office? And my response was, I don't think I'm qualified. And she literally fell off her chair laughing. And later I realized what a cliché my response was because apparently that's what all of us women say - we think we're not qualified. So she kind of worked on me and we had a Senate seat that was available. And February 14th, I announced I was running for the Senate. So my entire political engagement from the time from my first meeting to me announcing for Senate was two months. [00:03:25] Crystal Fincher: Wow. Well, and then you ran in a district where your victory was certainly not guaranteed - very competitive race - where you were successful and victorious and a first yourself, the first Sikh member of our state Senate. How did you use all of your lived experience in the Senate and how was your first term? [00:03:56] Senator Manka Dhingra: So the election was exciting because my seat actually flipped our State Senate. So our Senate was controlled by the Republicans and when I won, Democrats got in control. So the first session was actually pure chaos because we'd had gridlock in Olympia for so many years because we really couldn't pass meaningful bills. We had a session that would go into special session year after year because budgets couldn't be agreed upon. The year I was running, there were three special sessions and they still did not have all their budgets passed. And so when I won, normally people have orientation or some kind of onboarding. But when I won - because of the change - we had new Chairs, all this legislation that had been blocked for so many years like the flood gates had opened. So it was a very exciting time because I think we just passed such amazing progressive legislation and really were this beacon of light for the entire country on what a progressive legislation could look like or what a progressive state can look like. But I got to tell you, I was kind of lost in the mix there. But luckily I was able to hold my own and was very proud of the nine bills I passed my first session. [00:05:16] Crystal Fincher: And what were some of those bills? [00:05:17] Senator Manka Dhingra: So a lot of those bills were things that had really irked me for a very long time as an attorney and as a prosecutor. So there were a lot of bills around helping survivors of domestic violence, there were bills around sexual assault, around trafficking, and I had a Medicaid fraud unit bill, work around behavior health because I have been very concerned about mental illness and substance use disorder in our state. And normally when you're a first-time legislator, they do this thing on the Senate floor where your first bill - people actually kind of tease you a little about it or kind of give you a hard time. And when they looked at all my bills, they were all of such serious matters that they couldn't figure out which one should be my first bill. And so actually the Medicaid fraud unit was my first bill because that was the least serious about my other bills. But this was legislation that I knew that had to be fixed and we needed to do it. And frankly, I think the reason why I was so successful is because most of my bill ideas come from people who do the work and are able to really articulate what the problems are and then have the solutions because they're the experts in that field. And so I have maintained that manner of doing my work - is really making sure I hear from the people on the ground doing the work. [00:06:42] Crystal Fincher: And you have built that reputation of being very in touch with the community, of reaching out to stakeholders for your various bills, making sure that you speak with, inform, get feedback from people who are involved with and impacted by legislation you're proposing and the issues you're trying to address. One such issue was spurred by the Blake decision - that the Supreme Court found in our state - that essentially decriminalized personal use possession. And because of some challenges that that presented, like a potential patchwork of different laws passed by different cities all throughout the state, the Legislature decided to take action to try and pass one uniform policy all across the state. What was your approach to that and where did that end up? [00:07:30] Senator Manka Dhingra: Thank you. That is really the issue and the question that has been - people have been interested in for the last two years. Any time legislation is required, my question always is why? And what you gave in your question was really one of the reasons why we knew that legislation - is because we wanted a uniform way of making sure enforcement is the same for people, that they're not treated differently because they're using at a different intersection down the street. So that's why we wanted to make sure we had state legislation. This decision came out in the middle of session, so the timing was not optimal. And then it was very important to me to have a solution that is based on best practices and that is practical. So the original bill that I had was actually based on what the policy of the King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office was, along with a lot of the other prosecuting attorney's offices around the state. Because what we found at that time is - a lot of people doing this work had realized - that dealing with substance use disorder, it's not a criminal justice issue, it's a public health issue. And treating it like a criminal justice issue is what has really led us to where we are today. But you have to make sure you're focused on getting people into the treatment that they need. And so I was really trying to come up with a solution that said you have to have public health lead. And you also have to understand that while using the substance shouldn't be illegal, if there's criminal activity around that - like theft, criminal trespass, possession of weapons - that is still a criminal offense, but really being able to focus on treatment. So after a lot of negotiations, because I'll tell you, elected officials are very nervous of criminal justice issues. And I come from it differently because I practiced for 17 years. And we unfortunately did not get a bill that was based on best practices. We came close, but not quite. So what became the law of the land is that law enforcement was going to offer diversion the first two times that they came into contact with an individual. And then only after that would they refer that for a criminal case. And we took this opportunity to really provide a lot of resources for treatment - so we ensured that we had substance use disorder navigators who can help get people into treatment, we provided funding for treatment like Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, to wraparound teams like HOST - Homeless Outreach Stabilization Teams, PACT - these assertive community treatment models. So really making sure that those resources go hand-in-hand, because if people have no place to go and they don't have treatment, nothing's going to really work. I also wanted to make sure that because we were creating this in the middle of session, that we had an expiration date. So I insisted that this law expire in three years. And we created a committee or task force made up of a wide variety of individuals - people with lived experience, people in the treatment community, housing people, law enforcement, prosecutors, defense - everyone who deals with this issue to come together to come up with recommendations. So those recommendations have officially been made. And our law expires this 2023, so we as the Legislature have to actually pass another substance use disorder law to make sure that we're, again, pushing ourselves to doing things that are based on - with best practices. [00:11:16] Crystal Fincher: Now the bill did not end up - at that time what passed - was not what you were ultimately happy with and didn't earn your vote at that time. But you did say that - because of some of those things that were funded, you really wanted to focus on getting those implemented and working across the state, because it's important to - if someone is going to make a referral for treatment or for services, that those services be available. And we were in a situation where those were not available in sufficient quantities around the state and people may not have been able to get their needs met. Where do those stand today? How far have we made it in terms of implementation and availability of services? [00:12:02] Senator Manka Dhingra: So I'll just say - on paper - the funding, the availability of services looked amazing. And then COVID hit. And one of the biggest barriers became COVID, because we weren't really able to implement everything that we wanted to. We had inpatient treatment services that had to be dramatically reduced because of social distancing - they had to limit their bed capacity. And so it's very challenging to talk about how successful or not successful this program could have been because it was greatly hampered by COVID. And we know from years and years of data and just knowing how humans behave - that when there is a huge incident like COVID - people do tend to self-medicate because of anxiety and depression. And we saw that. We saw use of alcohol and drugs go up exponentially because people were dealing with trauma. And so the combination of factors made it a lot more challenging. And so the resources weren't able to be deployed as timely as we would have liked. Now we're in a position - with this summer, we were able to do statewide deployment of the substance use navigators, so now they're around. We have funded a lot more options for law enforcement assisted diversions. So we have this program set up, but unfortunately we also had a lot of inpatient treatments that actually closed - because of COVID and their not being sustainable. The other issue also became is - there are a lot of individuals who really feel that there has to be an option for court-directed treatment - the court has to force you to do treatment. And so one of the things we had talked about is - if you want the option of that, you still have that through Drug Court, Mental Health Court, Veterans Court - if people engage in other criminal activity in addition to substance use disorder. We also have a civil commitment statute - we have Involuntary Treatment Act - we have assisted treatment where if you really want it to be court-ordered, you can do it through the civil system. And so we were really hoping to ramp up our civil system to do that. And again, due to COVID and what happened with our judicial system, we weren't really able to get there. So I would say where we are now from when the bill was passed - not as far along as we would have liked. And we simply haven't had the time to give these programs the setup that they actually needed. So in an ideal situation, I would have liked to see one more year of us working under this bill to really see what's working and what's not, and then come up with a different solution. But unfortunately we don't have that time and COVID did make things more challenging in terms of implementation. [00:15:00] Crystal Fincher: So in terms of these programs and what was funded and addressing the capacity and now increased staffing issues with a lot of these services, is there going to be a push for increased funding? Does the existing funding already cover the implementation? What action needs to be taken from the legislature to ensure that in another year's time we are where we do want to be? [00:15:24] Senator Manka Dhingra: So absolutely the funding needs to continue and it will. The cities and the counties that do have the programs up and running - because it was a gradual start - have actually shown really positive results. We are seeing individuals getting the help they need. We have had law enforcement in those areas actually appreciate the resources that have been provided to the community to do this work. We also have to take a look at - how do we staff inpatient units? The way we pay them for per bed usage doesn't really work when you have pandemics because a third of the beds can't be used. So if you're only paying them for the beds, they can't do full staffing if they're not allowed to use a third of their beds. So we really have to rethink what that payment for treatment looks like. And there've been some really interesting ideas on integration, and paying for the whole person, and paying for programs rather than for each beds. And that's what COVID really taught us - being really creative on how we are supporting some of our community clinics, so I think you're going to see some really exciting stuff coming in on more integrated community-led efforts. Our federal government, in the last two years under President Biden, has really made a lot of federal dollars available for us to do this work. And Washington is really set up very well to take advantage of these federal dollars. I think it's still an exciting time and - it always gets darkest before the light, but I do think we are going to be turning the corner on the opioid epidemic. [00:17:06] Crystal Fincher: I hope so. And so now you're going to be taking up this legislation again - you're forced to - and many people were supportive of the sunset and revisiting of this legislation this session. It looks like there, once again, is a mixed variety of opinions on the right way forward this session. And it looks like there are a growing amount of people, supported by what looks like changing public sentiment, or absolutely a number of polls in support of a public health approach as opposed to a criminalized approach to substance use disorder and possession of personal amounts. Is there the opportunity this session to move towards a full public health approach and move away from criminalization of personal possession of substances? [00:17:59] Senator Manka Dhingra: I wish I could tell you there was. This is unfortunately the truth in politics that I've learned - is that normally the public is way ahead of elected officials. Over and over again, I've heard from the public that when they see their loved one, their neighbor, their friend, or even the stranger struggling with substance use disorder, they want treatment. The first response isn't to send someone to prison. And so the recommendation out of this committee - it's actually called SURSAC [Substance Use Recovery Services Advisory Committee] - was for decriminalization of personal use. And so the bill that I will be sponsoring is based on the committee's recommendation, because I think it's really important to honor that work. That work and their conclusions are based on best practices, it's data driven through looking at what has worked around the world - not just in the United States - because we know this is a worldwide problem. We don't have the votes for that in the Senate or in the House. So I'll have my bill, which is based on best practices and data. We are going to have another bill by Senator Robinson, who is going to take a lot of the treatment recommendations coming out of that group, but it does make possession of personal use a gross misdemeanor. It encourages diversion, but that's where it's at. We're going to have other individuals who may want to make it back as a felony - I don't think there's appetite at all to have it be a felony because that has failed so miserably. And I know there's some interest in making it a misdemeanor. All of those have issues, right? No one is going to agree on one version of it, but I think the best decisions are always the decisions that are made when they're data-driven. I don't think our legislature is there. I don't think the Blake fix is going to be evidence-based or data-driven. It will criminalize personal drug use with a lot of options for diversion. And the hope really is that the prosecutors, the judges are in a position to make those referrals. The hope really is that community resources come in and are able to help people outside of the criminal justice system. I'm a little disappointed, but that's human nature. All you can do is continue to make the case on trying to do things that work. [00:20:40] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. [00:20:41] Senator Manka Dhingra: But people are driven by fear. [00:20:43] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. And appreciate your continued work to continue to make the case and for standing by that when it comes to voting. Is there the opportunity with this to implement another sunset - for as you said, as we get more infrastructure set up around the state, accounting for the COVID delays and challenges, that maybe we get to revisit this in another couple of years? [00:21:08] Senator Manka Dhingra: You know, I'm not sure about that - we'll have to see how it works. The reality is you can have whatever laws you want - it depends on what implementation looks like. So when the Blake decision came out, the current individuals who were charged with drug possession cases - all those cases had to be dismissed. And if they were in custody, they had to be released. Now, I was very curious to know how many of those individuals currently existed, because I had heard and know that most of these cases weren't being prosecuted - that they were actually being deferred. And that was actually true. People thought the Drug Courts would close - they didn't. There were very few Drug Courts that actually had individuals that were only there for drug possession cases, because the culture of enforcement has changed so much. Because the people that do that work know that having someone go through the court system or look at incarceration does not improve the substance use disorder. It actually makes it worse. And so practically, there were not people in Drug Court to any significant degree when this decision came out. And that's why I tried to tell people - that there was already that recognition in our criminal justice system that said, We're not prosecuting these individuals, they're being offered diversions at the time of booking. Or they end up pleading guilty to a reduced sentence and finish that time in jail and leave. So there is a disconnect between the laws on our book and what is being implemented. And I think all we can do is actually make that community treatment program really robust and provide those resources, and destigmatize substance use disorder so that people can actually feel comfortable going for treatment and acknowledging that they have a problem. [00:22:56] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. Another issue that has been an issue that has been talked about throughout the community has been those surrounding police pursuits. High speed vehicle chases - I suppose some may not be at high speeds - but pursuing people who they suspect of fleeing because of some crime or being wanted for a reason. And lots of talk in the community and data and evidence about the injuries and deaths caused by police pursuits - and really weighing whether the risk of pursuit is worth it in cases where someone is not wanted for a violent crime and people's health and wellbeing seem to be in immediate jeopardy, as opposed to a property crime or something else like that. What is the work that you've done on that? And do you anticipate that being an issue? Where do you stand on that? [00:23:53] Senator Manka Dhingra: I go back to the way I deal with legislation - I start off with what is the problem you're trying to solve? So when it came to police pursuits, the question was - what is the problem we're trying to solve? And the problem we were trying to solve is data that came out that said 50% of the people that are killed during police chases are individuals that have nothing to do with the incident. These are innocent bystanders who get killed. And that number is at 50% in the state. That is an unacceptable number. So we took a look and said, OK, how can we reduce that number? And so the police pursuit bill that was passed by the Senate and the House and signed into law is one that's actually based in best practices. It was based on a policy that very closely mirrored what a lot of our cities were already doing. So we do have some cities that had very similar policies and others that frankly were not good partners in doing this work. And so we passed that. There were a few cities who didn't really have to change their policies because that is what their official policy was. And there were others that were forced to change their policy. And this is exactly what you mentioned, Crystal - it is about doing that analysis. We made sure that if it's a domestic violence case, you can pursue the vehicle. If it's a case involving violence, you can pursue the vehicle. If it's a DUI, you can pursue the vehicle. But when it comes to property, we said, No, you can't - because there are other ways to catch an individual in today's day and age. And guess what? We haven't had innocent people dying since this policy was enacted. So did we solve the problem of not having 50% of the fatalities be uninvolved? We absolutely did. We do not have innocent people dying in vehicle pursuits. And I've heard criticism that, Oh, people are just fleeing and not getting caught. And I've asked the question, Are they not getting caught in that instant? Are they getting arrested the next day or a few days later? Guess what? They're being arrested, they're just arrested a few days later. And now they're being charged with a felony - attempting to elude - because they fled. So I know that there are cities and law enforcement agencies that want us to go back on our vehicle pursuit bill. And I have asked them for data - because I do tend to be data-driven - and I've said, Show me how many people have not been caught because of this data. The only data they can show me is the number of pursuits is up. And I'm like, And what happens the day after? Because when they share the stories with me, they always end with, Oh, yes, and we caught the guy two days later or the next day. And so again, I think for those who want us to change our policy, I come back with what is the problem you're trying to solve and where is the data supporting that? And I have not seen the data that tells me that this is the wrong policy. [00:26:53] Crystal Fincher: Well, and I appreciate the approach you take in being very data-driven because really - there's a lot of conflicting information out there. There's a lot of people who sometimes are scared just by change. And so looking at what the situation actually is based on evidence makes a lot of sense. This was an issue with a number of bills around public safety in prior sessions where there - in 2020 - where a number of accountability bills passed. And then following that, some seeming cold feet amid pushback from some law enforcement officials and others saying, Well, you have prevented us from being able to do our jobs and you're putting public safety at risk by holding us more accountable. What was your take on that, and on some of the legislation that rolled back some of the accountability progress that was made? [00:27:53] Senator Manka Dhingra: When people started saying - Oh, the Legislature prevented us from doing our work, my question was - No, we made sure you can be held liable for taking wrong actions. If they choose not to act because they're afraid of liability, that is not the Legislature preventing them from doing their job. It's that they have to relearn how to do their job. Or go back to best practices that they were taught - but over time, those practices have kind of gone away because you just kind of start doing what everyone else does and not really focus on best practices. And the bottom line is this. We had to do all of that work because of George Floyd. And the years and years and years of Black people telling us that they're being killed at the hands of law enforcement and frankly, the world not listening - until we had COVID, was stuck in our house, didn't have any new Hollywood movies coming out or new TV shows coming out - and we had to watch the video that was captured. And finally acknowledge and say, Yes, what people have been saying is true and real. We, as elected officials, have to do something about it. So it comes down to, again, what is the problem that we were trying to solve? And the problem is that Black and Brown men and women are treated unfairly with law enforcement. And when you see that so blatantly and so starkly that you cannot make excuses for it anymore, like we have been for decades, you have to do something and you cannot do business as usual. There has to be accountability. And like you said, change is hard. People don't like making change. But unless they do it themselves, it is thrusted upon them and that is - the job of electeds and the Legislature is to make sure we are standing up for each and every human being. I represent cities like Duvall and Woodinville, Redmond, Kirkland - each and every one of these cities had a Black Lives Matter protest - down in Duvall, Woodinville, Redmond, Kirkland. I was there at all of them. This is something that our population demanded and the Legislature provided. And it's going to take a while for people to make the changes, but these are changes that are needed. We are an outlier in the United States when it comes to fatalities at the hand of law enforcement. No other country has that rate like the US does. And it's time we took it seriously and put in practices that are going to prevent it. [00:30:46] Crystal Fincher: Agreed. And as you talked about before, lots of times the public is more in tune with data and reality - because they're living it - than some of the elected officials. We just saw in these past elections in November where we had a county prosecutor race where people with two very different views were running. One focused on more punitive punishment measures, focused a lot on criminalization and focusing on that. Another one who's saying, Okay, we're not going to not follow the law, but we need to follow the evidence and start to pursue policies, or continue the path of pursuing policies like diversion that have been shown to be more successful in helping people get on a productive path to not commit any more crimes and to reduce the amount of people who are victimized. As you continue through this path of various legislation in this session, what is your message to people who do say that police accountability gets in the way of public safety? [00:31:54] Senator Manka Dhingra: And I just say that is absolutely not true. Holding someone responsible for bad actions has nothing to do with public safety. Public safety is about your perception of safety. You can talk about domestic violence and I can tell you, and I'm going to say mostly women - because we are talking mostly women who are victims or survivors - they have not felt safe in their house for decades. And people will not say that that is a public safety issue because they're thinking about what happens when they walk down the street, not what is happening in their own home. When we talk about sexual assault, it's a different concept of public safety. When we talk about trafficking, it's different. And so we have to - when we talk about public safety, it's not about property crimes. It's about individuals feeling safe - at home, in their school, or out in the street. And so we have to be focused on human safety and them feeling safe in whatever environment they're in. Right now when people talk about public safety, they're only talking about car thefts, and thefts from businesses, and graffiti, and seeing people using drugs on the street - that's not public safety. Those all tend to be public health issues and systems that aren't funded appropriately. And frankly, the systemic racism that has occurred in this country for generations that has allowed these wealth inequities. So we have to talk about public safety as the human feeling safe. And I can tell you - it is women, women of color who are most at risk of being victims of public safety, but we don't talk about that. I do. And that is how I frame these issues is - we have done a terrible job when it comes to investigating, reporting, prosecuting sexual assault. Same thing about domestic violence, same thing about trafficking. And when you take a look at the ills in our society, it comes down to gender-based violence. It comes down to our children being raised in households where they see domestic violence, the trauma that occurs through there. So public safety is a lot more complicated than seeing there's a rise in their concerns about public safety - because when you really take a look at the holistic concept of public safety, there isn't. And I'll just say for decades, crime in our country has been reducing. Then the last three years, because of the pandemic, you've seen a rise in violence and a rise in crimes, but overall, when you take a look at trend over decades, we are at a downward trend. It is still the best time to live in America right now than it ever has been. That is actually true. Technology is there to help us, we have more access to resources, there are more people being fed, and there are more people who are actually safe. So let's try to change that conversation on public safety because the sound bites are not based in reality. [00:34:55] Crystal Fincher: They really aren't. And it looks like by these - once again - most recent election results, the public recognizes that and wants to move towards more evidence-based solutions. I also want to talk about - you talk about who are most often victims of crime. And when we talk about victims, so often it's in the context of, Well, victims would want this person punished. And what are you going to say to the victims if this person doesn't spend a whole bunch of time in jail? But it seems like we engage less on - how do we actually best support victims? How do we do that? And how can we do better? [00:35:32] Senator Manka Dhingra: That is such a great question. Thank you so much for framing it the way you just did because that's absolutely true. People - because of TV shows - mostly have this image of this victim who's like this innocent, fragile, vulnerable person who has never done anything wrong in her life. That is not who the victim is. Victims are as complicated as any single human being. And many times when you take a look at a victim of crime, especially in our society, they're not strangers. You normally know the perpetrator of violence, and there's that connection. And so when you talk about what the victim wants, it isn't necessarily punishment or prison time for 20 years. It is much more nuanced and much more complicated. As I mentioned, I used to run the Therapeutic Alternative Unit, and we really used to make sure - we were the first in the country, actually, to not have any criminal history that's a bar to participate in this program. But I insisted that part of this program, we have a victim advocate. And that when there were crimes involving victims, that the victim's voice would be part of what the resolution is. And I cannot tell you - over and over again, when you provided victims the resources and the services and you explained the program, they wanted that defendant to go through that program. Because they want that person to get better, they want to make sure that what happened to them doesn't happen to anyone else. And when the victim feels supported and has resources on their own, they can actually deal with their own trauma and move on - because no one wants to hold on to that hurt and that anger. It is not good for anybody. But unless we as a society can provide those resources and that support, the victims aren't going to get better. And when they don't, you just have that cycle over and over again. And one of the bills that I'm really proud of - I passed a couple of years ago - and it was about making sure that if you are a survivor of domestic violence, sexual assault or trafficking, when you are on your path to recovery, you can get your criminal history, your convictions expunged. And the reason I really wanted that bill is because - trauma exerts itself as a reaction, not just as a memory. And so there are so many people in the criminal justice system who are survivors - they're survivors of violence. And they're engaging in the criminal justice system because of that trauma. And we don't have a criminal justice system that is trauma-informed. We're trying to get there. But being trauma-informed means you have to understand that anyone coming into that system may and most probably has suffered trauma. And unless you deal with that underlying trauma, you're going to continue on that cycle. So I think there's a lot more work we need to do in being trauma-informed throughout our criminal justice system. [00:38:31] Crystal Fincher: Well, I appreciate that and appreciate your work. And also, your work on the 988 system. Can you explain what that is and where that stands in terms of implementation? [00:38:43] Senator Manka Dhingra: Absolutely - you're asking about my favorite bills. I've been working with the mental health community for a very long time in my other job as a Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney. And one of the things people have wanted for a very, very long time is a mental health crisis line. Because it's not illegal to be mentally ill, yet we call 911 and have law enforcement show up. And so 988 is a national number that went live in July. And we took this opportunity in the state of Washington to create an entire crisis system around 988. So right now, if anyone who needs help - if they're suicidal or in crisis, that's a mental health substance use disorder crisis - they can call 988. The 988 phone number is actually staffed by mental health professionals - individuals who are trained in how to deescalate and help with situations. And so we made sure that we provided funding for the people responding to the calls - that they had the credentials needed to do this work. We made sure that these hubs of 988 are actually going to - in the next few years, they are going to have a mobile response team that is made up of community mental health professionals along with peers. We are connecting 911 and 988 in the sense that there's cross-training - because a lot of the calls that come to 911 are actually mental health calls. So we want them to be able to transfer those calls through 988. And there may be times when a call comes into 988, but there's a weapon involved or a gun involved, and they need that help from 911. So we're working on cross-training and some kind of cross-mobilization. But what we have found is - from other states that have done some of this work - is that when you have a mental health professional answering these calls, 90% of the calls are able to be resolved. The 10% that need someone to show up for them - 7% can be handled with a mental health professional going out along with a peer, and only 3% need law enforcement. And so being a lot smarter about how we are responding to people in crisis - because they don't need to go to jail, most of them don't even need to go to an emergency room. We also took this opportunity to set up a structure where we can have more technology and data. We would love to do a bed tracking system, so someone who needs help - the 988 operator can take a look and know that there is a bed available for them, that they can connect them to treatment. Come January, our state mandates next-day appointments. So if you call the crisis line, your insurance or Medicaid - whatever it can be - is mandated that the next day you are going to go see somebody. And that's going to be a game changer because you're making sure people get the treatment they need when they need it. So I am super excited about this system. More work to be done on it, but we are well on our path to do it. We - normally, in the state of Washington, while we can be proud of so much, we are not the state that is in the top 10 for mental health services, but our 988 bill is the national model in the country. And I have to say, I was very proud - with Representative Orwall who sponsored the bill, and I - both of us got an award, actually a national award, recognizing us for our 988 bill. So very, very exciting time and so much more to come on this. [00:42:20] Crystal Fincher: Excellent. And what do you say to people who are concerned that - who are trying to avoid a situation that may be escalated, especially with some of the challenges that law enforcement have in responding to and deescalation, deescalating situations - whether it's people of color, or disabled people, or people in crisis - that calling 988 could result in a law enforcement response or an involuntary confinement for behavioral health treatment. [00:42:53] Senator Manka Dhingra: When I said the numbers on the percentage of calls and the manner in which they're dealt with, what you find is when you have the right resources right at the beginning, you don't need law enforcement, you don't need civil commitment because you are able to, again, use your motivational interviewing skills. You're able to offer people services and support. That next-day appointment is critical. Because if they're willing to go see someone - a doctor, a nurse, a mental health specialist, whoever that person may be - they don't need to be involuntary treatment, ITA'ed as they call it, because they're going in for treatment. So you have to make early intervention options available as much as possible. There are always those individuals who may need a high level of care, so you have to make sure that you are able to meet them wherever they are - but you got to make sure you're providing early intervention. I will have a bill next session that actually sets up these facilities called 23-hour facilities. And so the hope really is that those individuals who can't wait for the next-day appointment, that we are actually able to take them to these 23-hour facilities where the hope really is that they're there for 23 hours - because they can't stay there longer than that - and then you have to have a transition plan on how you're going to get them connected to other services and support. And that's what we have found is that - the right intervention at the right time - really, people want help, that's why they're calling. They're not calling because they actually want to kill themselves. It's because they're like, Help me, I'm afraid I'm going to do this. And so you have to provide the help that they're asking for. [00:44:31] Crystal Fincher: Much appreciated. I appreciate you taking the time to go through all of this with us today. As we close, I wanted to talk about one of my favorite things that you, or any legislator does - and that is working with youth. How do you do that? And what were you able to accomplish? [00:44:49] Senator Manka Dhingra: I love working with our youth. When I first ran for office five years ago - at that time, my kids were 13 and 15. And I used to coach Destination Imagination, and Math Team, and a lot of teams. And so I had to tell them that, Hey, I'm going to run for office, so I'm going to have to step aside from coaching these teams. And the teens were like, Can we help? And I'm like, Yes. So I had 250 teenagers helping me on my first and second campaign - no one had heard, seen so many teenagers working on a campaign. And so my promise to them was - I will continue engaging with them. So I sponsor bills that have been brought to me by teens every year for the last five years. And my favorite bill for next session is going to be one - is one - that's been brought to me by teens in my district. And that's around eliminating gender-based pricing. They literally went to Target and Costco and took pictures of a bike helmet that's pink in color and the exact same helmet - same company, same everything - that's blue in color. And the blue helmet is for $20 and the pink helmet is for $25. And they even did that with adult diapers. I didn't know this, but apparently women's adult diapers are much more expensive than men adult diapers - no clue why. So I'm going to have that bill next session - I'm super excited about it. But these teens are the ones that made sure we now have menstrual products in all our schools and college bathrooms. We no longer, in Washington, pay taxes on menstrual products. And it's not just this stuff they care about - they care about access to mental health treatment and services, and substance use disorder, and criminal justice reform. You name it, and these teens want to make positive changes. And I cannot tell you how excited I feel looking at the next generation. [00:46:44] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And this isn't even the first bill that they've brought to you. In fact, we have better access to menstrual products because of youth bringing up legislation, correct? [00:46:54] Senator Manka Dhingra: Absolutely. They really want to make sure that they can change the world. And that bill came about because of a conversation I was having with some of the teens. And the teens in the Redmond High School said they have menstrual products in their school. And I knew that teens in Kent and Moses Lake did not. And they started talking about how that's just not fair - that our school districts in more affluent communities are actually providing menstrual products than schools that are not in affluent areas. And guess who needs it more? And so just the fact that these teens think about access - and think about who is getting services and resources and who isn't - is just heartwarming for me. And the fact that they're willing to fight for others. So yes, all schools in Washington and colleges provide menstrual products in bathrooms now. [00:47:51] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And if people want to learn more about the work that you're doing or support legislation that you have, what's the best way for them to get engaged? [00:48:00] Senator Manka Dhingra: The best way is to email my office, or get a hold of me on social media, and subscribe to my newsletter. If anyone is interested in any particular bill or issue, my office can help you get connected to how to get more information. But check out our website, leg.wa.gov - they have a lot of resources on how you can follow a bill, how you can sign up to testify. Our hearings are all hybrid, so you can testify on an issue from the comfort of your home or your car - as long as you're not driving. And if you don't want to testify, you can send in written testimony or simply show your support for a bill or opposition to a bill - and all of that gets counted. And democracy is not an individual sport - it is a team sport. You got to play and you got to be part of a team - and that's the only way we make our world better. [00:48:56] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you so much today, Senator Manka Dhingra, for joining us and for sharing all of the work that you're doing. [00:49:02] Senator Manka Dhingra: Thank you so much. This was a great conversation and I loved absolutely chatting about these tough issues with you. [00:49:09] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you and we will stay in touch. Thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler. Our assistant producer is Shannon Cheng, and our Post-Production Assistant is Bryce Cannatelli. You can find Hacks & Wonks on Twitter @HacksWonks, and you can follow me @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered right to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

Talk Cosmos
Planet Buzz - 2023 Dynamic Thresholds

Talk Cosmos

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 55:55


Global mega Astrologer Rick Levine joins the show kicking off the New Year's focus, “2023 Dynamic Thresholds". Rick's the Special Guest joining January's Planet Buzz, a panel now scheduled every first Sunday of the month. “Solar system cycles operate like gears on a complex clock. Impactful influences move between inner planet's faster orbits versus outer planets and celestial bodies' long cycles. Immediately, 2023 starts off with a reset of heart and mind with Mercury and Mars in apparent retrograde motion, re-evaluating values for purposeful actions. But perhaps this connects the end of cycles. Because soon by March, energies re-align dynamic changes of consciousness. Transmuting Pluto enters unique Aquarius in March and grounded Saturn enters nebulous imaginative mystic Pisces,” said Sue Minahan, founder, and host of the weekly show. "That's the start because Jupiter in Aries expands all spark plugs to begin anew with dashing courage and instinct. We experience a world participating to become another version of identity.” Join Planet Buzz and Sue Rose Minahan of Kailua-Kona, Big Island of Hawaii, founder of Talk Cosmos and Astrologer/Consultant, special visiting guest Rick Levine, of Redmond, WA, and panel member Dr. Laura Tadd of Chattahoochee Hills, GA. See bios on Talk Cosmos website.

Weekly Dose of BS
NEVER Say This To A Housewife!!!

Weekly Dose of BS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 28:18


Stephanie's surprise gift for her housekeeper, New Years resolutions, the popular Tik Tok 12-3-30 workout (Link Below), watch smuggling in cooters, who is thinking about adopting a baby, and the #1 thing you should NEVER say to a Housewife!12-3-30 Workout Plan: https://fortune.com/well/2022/11/26/what-is-12-3-30-workout-does-it-work/If you enjoyed this episode, leave a review and make sure you subscribe! If you want to connect with Brandi and Stephanie directly, message them at: www.instagram.com/brandiredmondwww.instagram.com/stephhollmanwww.instagram.com/bsthepodcastIf you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Brandi & Stephanie as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.comProducers: Mike Morse / Madelyn Grimes For YEA NetworksSponsors:
Better Help - Visit www.betterhelp.com/weeklydose and get 10% off your first month

The Lunar Society
Aarthi & Sriram - Twitter, 10x Engineers, & Marriage

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 81:23


I had fun chatting with Aarthi and Sriram.We discuss what it takes to be successful in technology, what Sriram would say if Elon tapped him to be the next CEO of Twitter, why more married couples don't start businesses together, and how Aarthi hires and finds 10x engineers.Aarthi Ramamurthy and Sriram Krishnan are the hosts of The Good Times Show. They have had leading roles in several technology companies from Meta to Twitter to Netflix and have been founders and investors. Sriram is currently a general partner at a16z crypto and Aarthi is an angel investor.Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Timestamps(00:00:00) - Intro(00:01:19) - Married Couples Co-founding Businesses(00:09:53) - 10x Engineers(00:16:00) - 15 Minute Meetings(00:22:57) - a16z's Edge?(00:26:42) - Future of Twitter(00:30:58) - Is Big Tech Overstaffed?(00:38:37) - Next CEO of Twitter?(00:43:13) - Why Don't More Venture Capitalists Become Founders?(00:47:32) - Role of Boards(00:52:03) - Failing Upwards(00:56:00) - Underrated CEOs(01:02:18) - Founder Education(01:06:27) - What TV Show Would Sriram Make?(01:10:14) - Undervalued Founder ArchetypesTranscriptThis transcript was autogenerated and thus may contain errors.[00:00:00] Aarthi: it's refreshing to have Elon come in and say, we are gonna work really hard. We are gonna be really hardcore about how we build things.[00:00:05] Dwarkesh: Let's say Elon and says Tomorrow, Sriram, would you be down to be the [00:00:08] Sriram: CEO of Twitter Absolutely not. Absolutely not. But I am married to someone. We [00:00:12] Aarthi: used to do overnights at Microsoft. Like we'd just sleep under our desk,, until the janitor would just , poke us out of there , I really need to vacuum your cubicle. Like, get out of here. There's such joy in , Finding those moments where you work hard and you're feeling really good about it. [00:00:25] Sriram: You'd be amazed at how many times Aarthi and I would have a conversation where be, oh, this algorithm thing.I remember designing it, and now we are on the other side We want to invest in something , where we think the team and the company is going to win and if they do win, there's huge value to be unlocked. [00:00:40] Dwarkesh: Okay. Today I have the, uh, good pleasure to have Arty and Sriram on the podcast and I'm really excited about this.So you guys have your own show, the Arty Andre Good Time show. Um, you guys have had some of the top people in tech and entertainment on Elon Musk, mark Zuckerberg, Andrew Yang, and you guys are both former founders. Advisors, investors, uh, general partner at Anderson Horowitz, and you're an angel investor and an advisor now.Um, so yeah, there's so much to talk about. Um, obviously there's also the, uh, recent news about your, uh, your involvement on, uh, twitter.com. Yeah, yeah. Let's get started. [00:01:19] Married Couples Starting Businesses[00:01:19] Dwarkesh: My first question, you guys are married, of course. People talk about getting a co-founder as finding a spouse, and I'm curious why it's not the case that given this relationship why more married people don't form tech startups.Is, does that already happen, [00:01:35] Aarthi: or, um, I actually am now starting to see a fair bit of it. Uhhuh, . Um, I, I do agree that wasn't a norm before. Um, I think, uh, I, I think I remember asking, uh, pg p the same thing when I went through yc, and I think he kind of pointed to him and Jessica like, you know, YC was their startup , and so, you know, there were even pride.There are a lot of husband and wife, uh, companies. Over the last like decade or so. So I'm definitely seeing that more mainstream. But yeah, you're right, it hasn't been the norm before. Yeah, the, the good time show is our project. It's [00:02:09] Sriram: our startup. Very, I mean, there are some good historical examples. Cisco, for example, uh, came from, uh, uh, husband, wife as a few other examples.I think, you know, on, on the, in, on the pro side, uh, you know, being co-founders, uh, you need trust. You need to really know each other. Uh, you, you go through a lot of like heavy emotional burdens together. And there's probably, and if you, you're for the spouse, hopefully you probably have a lot of chemistry and understanding, and that should help.On the con side, I think one is you, you're prob you know, you, you're gonna show up at work, you know, and startups are really hard, really intense. And you come home and both of you are gonna the exact same wavelength, the exact same time, going through the exact same highs and lows as opposed to two people, two different jobs have maybe differing highs and lows.So that's really hard. Uh, the second part of it is, uh, in a lot of. Work situations, it may just be more challenging where people are like, well, like, you know, person X said this person Y said this, what do I do? Uh, and if you need to fire somebody or you know, something weird happens corporate in a corporate manner, that may also be really hard.Uh, but having said that, you know, uh, [00:03:13] Aarthi: you know, yeah, no, I think both of those are like kind of overblown , like, you know, I think the reason why, um, you know, you're generally, they say you need to have you, it's good to have co-founders is so that you can kind of like write the emotional wave in a complimentary fashion.Uh, and you know, if one person's like really depressed about something, the other person can like pull them out of it and have a more rational viewpoint. I feel like in marriages it works even better. So I feel like to your first point, They know each other really well. You're, you're, you are going to bring your work to home.There is no separation between work and home as far as a startup is concerned. So why not do it together? Oh, [00:03:51] Sriram: well, I think there's one problem, uh, which is, uh, we are kind of unique because we've been together for over 21 years now, and we start for, we've been before, uh, let's not. Wow. There's gonna be some fact checking 19 on this video.99. Close enough. Close enough, right? Like close enough. He wishes he was 21. Oh, right, right, right. Gosh, feels like 21. We have do some, um, [00:04:15] Aarthi: editing on this video. No, no, no. I think 20 years of virtually knowing, 19 years of in-person. [00:04:20] Sriram: There we go. Right. Uh, fact check accurate. Um, ex experts agree. But, um, you know, but when you first met, we, we originally, even before we dating, we were like, Hey, we wanna do a company together.And we bonded over technology, like our first conversation on Yahoo Messenger talking about all these founders and how we wanted to be like them. And we actually then worked together pretty briefly when you were in Microsoft. Uh, before we actually started dating. We were on these sort of talent teams and we kind of met each of the word context.I think a lot of. You know, one is they have never worked together. Um, and so being in work situations, everything from how you run a meeting to how you disagree, uh, you know, uh, is just going to be different. And I think that's gonna be a learning curve for a lot of couples who be like, Hey, it's one thing to have a strong, stable relationship at home.It'll be a different thing to, you know, be in a meeting and you're disagreeing art's meetings very differently from I do. She obsesses over metrics. I'm like, ah, it's close enough. It's fine. , uh, it's close enough. It's fine. as e uh, here already. But, uh, so I do think there's a learning curve, a couples who is like, oh, working together is different than, you know, raising your family and being together.I mean, obviously gives you a strong foundation, but it's not the same thing. Have you guys [00:05:25] Dwarkesh: considered starting a company or a venture together at some point? [00:05:28] Aarthi: Yeah. Um, we've, uh, we've always wanted to do a project together. I don't know if it's a, a startup or a company or a venture. You have done a project together,Yeah, exactly. I think, uh, almost to today. Two years ago we started the Good Time Show, um, and we started at, uh, live Audio on Clubhouse. And, you know, we recently moved it onto video on YouTube. And, um, it's, it's been really fun because now I get to see like, it, it's neither of our full-time jobs, uh, but we spend enough, um, just cycles thinking through what we wanna do with it and what, uh, how to have good conversations and how to make it useful for our audience.So that's our [00:06:06] Sriram: project together. Yep. And we treat it like a, with the intellectual heft of a startup, which is, uh, we look at the metrics, uh, and we are like, oh, this is a good week. The metrics are up into the right and, you know, how do we, you know, what is working for our audience? You know, what do we do to get great guests?What do we do to [00:06:21] Aarthi: get, yeah, we just did our first, uh, in-person meetup, uh, for listeners of the podcast in Chennai. It was great. We had like over a hundred people who showed up. And it was also like, you know, typical startup style, like meet your customers and we could like go talk to these people in person and figure out like what do they like about it?Which episodes do they really enjoy? And it's one thing to see YouTube comments, it's another to like actually in person engage with people. So I think, you know, we started it purely accidentally. We didn't really expect it to be like the show that we are, we are in right now, but we really happy. It's, it's kind of turned out the way it has.[00:06:59] Sriram: Absolutely. And, and it also kind of helps me scratch an edge, which is, uh, you know, building something, you know, keeps you close to the ground. So being able to actually do the thing yourself as opposed to maybe tell someone else, telling you how to do the, so for example, it, it being video editing or audio or how thumbnails, thumbnails or, uh, just the mechanics of, you know, uh, how to build anything.So, uh, I, I dot think it's important. Roll up your sleeves metaphorically and get your hands dirty and know things. And this really helped us understand the world of creators and content. Uh, and it's fun and [00:07:31] Aarthi: go talk to other creators. Uh, like I think when we started out this thing on YouTube, I think I remember Shram just reached out to like so many creators being like, I wanna understand how it works for you.Like, what do you do? And these are people who like, who are so accomplished, who are so successful, and they do this for a living. And we clearly don. And so, uh, just to go learn from these experts. It's, it's kind of nice, like to be a student again and to just learn, uh, a new industry all over again and figure out how to actually be a creator on this platform.Well, you know [00:08:01] Dwarkesh: what's really interesting is both of you have been, uh, executives and led product in social media companies. Yeah. And so you are, you designed the products, these creators, their music, and now on the other end, you guys are building [00:08:12] Sriram: the, oh, I have a great phrase for it, right? Like, somebody, every once in a while somebody would be like, Hey, you know what, uh, you folks are on the leadership team of some of these companies.Why don't you have hundreds of millions of followers? Right? And I would go, Hey, look, it's not like every economist is a billionaire, , uh, uh, you know, it doesn't work that way. Uh, but during that is a parallel, which, which is, uh, you'd be amazed at how many times Aarthi and I would have a conversation where be, oh, this algorithm thing.I remember designing it, or I was in the meeting when this thing happened, and now we are on the other side, which is like, Hey, you might be the economist who told somebody to implement a fiscal policy. And now we are like, oh, okay, how do I actually go do this and create values and how? Anyway, how do we do exactly.Create an audience and go build something interesting. So there is definitely some irony to it, uh, where, uh, but I think hopefully it does give us some level of insight where, uh, we have seen, you know, enough of like what actually works on social media, which is how do you build a connection with your audience?Uh, how do you build, uh, content? How do you actually do it on a regular, uh, teams? I think [00:09:07] Aarthi: the biggest difference is we don't see the algorithm as a bra, as a black box. I think we kind of see it as like when the, with the metrics, we are able to, one, have empathy for the teams building this. And two, I think, uh, we kind of know there's no big magic bullet.Like I think a lot of this is about showing up, being really consistent, um, you know, being able to like put out some really interesting content that people actually want to, and you know, I think a lot of people forget about that part of it and kind of focus. If you did this one thing, your distribution goes up a lot and here's this like, other like secret hack and you know Sure.Like those are like really short term stuff, but really in the long term, the magic is to just like keep at it. Yeah. And, uh, put out really, really good content. [00:09:48] Sriram: Yeah. Yeah. And yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. Um, that's good to hear. . [00:09:53] 10x Engineers[00:09:53] Dwarkesh: Um, so you've both, um, led teams that have, you know, dozens or even hundreds of people.Um, how easy is it for you to tell who the 10 X engineers are? Is it something that you as managers and executives can tell easily or [00:10:06] Sriram: no? Uh, absolutely. I think you can tell this very easily or repeat of time and it doesn't, I think a couple of ways. One is, uh, Uh, before, let's say before you work with someone, um, 10 x people just don't suddenly start becoming 10 x.They usually have a history of becoming 10 x, uh, of, you know, being really good at what they do. And you can, you know, the cliche line is you can sort of connect the dots. Uh, you start seeing achievements pile up and achievements could be anything. It could be a bunch of projects. It could be a bunch of GitHub code commits.It could be some amazing writing on ck, but whatever it is, like somebody just doesn't show up and become a 10 x person, they probably have a track record of already doing it. The second part of it is, I've seen this is multiple people, uh, who are not named so that they don't get hired from the companies actually want them to be in, or I can then hire them in the future is, uh, you know, they will make incredibly rapid progress very quickly.So, uh, I have a couple of examples and almost independently, I know it's independently, so I have a couple of. Um, and I actually, and name both, right? Like, so one is, uh, this guy named, uh, Vijay Raji, uh, who, uh, was probably one of Facebook's best engineers. He's now the CEO of a company called Stats. And, um, he was probably my first exposure to the real TenX engineer.And I remembered this because, uh, you know, at the time I was. Kind of in my twenties, I had just joined Facebook. I was working on ads, and he basically built a large part of Facebook's ad system over the weekend. And what he would do is he would just go, and then he con he [00:11:24] Aarthi: continued to do that with Facebook marketplace.Yeah. Like he's done this like over and over and over [00:11:28] Sriram: again. . Yeah. And, and it's not that, you know, there's one burst of genius. It's just this consistent stream of every day that's a code checkin stuff is working. New demo somebody, he sent out a new bill or something working. And so before like a week or two, you just like a, you know, you running against Usain Bolt and he's kind of running laps around you.He's so far ahead of everyone else and you're like, oh, this guy is definitely ahead. Uh, the second story I have is, uh, of, uh, John Carmack, uh, you know, who's legend and I never worked with him in, uh, directly with, you know, hopefully someday I can fix. But, uh, somebody told me a story about him. Which is, uh, that the person told me story was like, I never thought a individual could replace the output of a hundred percent team until I saw John.And there's a great story where, um, you know, and so John was the most senior level at Facebook and from a hr, you know, employment insecurity perspective for an individual contributor, and it at, at that level, at Facebook, uh, for folks who kind of work in these big tech companies, it is the most, the highest tier of accomplishment in getting a year in a performance review is something called xcs Expectations, or, sorry, redefines, right?Which basically means like, you have redefined what it means for somebody to perform in this level, right? Like, it's like somebody, you know, like somebody on a four minute mile, I'll be running a two minute mile or whatever, right? You're like, oh, and, and it is incredibly hard sometimes. You doing, and this guy John gets it three years in a row, right?And so there's this leadership team of all the, you know, the really most important people on Facebook. And they're like, well, we should really promote John, right? Like, because he's done this three years in a row, he's changing the industry. Three years in a row and then they realized, oh wait, there is no level to promote him to Nick be CEOWell, maybe I don't think he wanted to. And so, uh, the story I heard, and I dunno, it's true, but I like to believe it's true, is they invented a level which still now only John Carmack has gotten. Right. And, um, and I think, you know, it's his level of productivity, uh, his, uh, intellect, uh, and the consistency over time and mu and you know, if you talk to anybody, Facebook work with him, he's like, oh, he replaced hundred people, teams all by themselves and maybe was better than a hundred percent team just because he had a consistency of vision, clarity, and activity.So those are [00:13:32] Aarthi: the two stories I've also noticed. I think, uh, actually sheam, I think our first kind of exposure to 10 x engineer was actually Barry born, uh, from Microsoft. So Barry, um, uh, basically wrote pretty much all the emulation engines and emulation systems that we all use, uh, and uh, just prolific, uh, and I think in addition to what Fred had said with like qualities and tenets, Um, the, I've generally seen these folks to also be like low ego and kind of almost have this like responsibility to, um, mentor coach other people.Uh, and Barry kind of like took us under his wing and he would do these like Tuesday lunches with us, where we would just ask like, you know, we were like fresh out of college and we just ask these like really dumb questions on, you know, um, scaling things and how do you build stuff. And I was working on, uh, run times and loaders and compilers and stuff.And so he would just take the time to just answer our questions and just be there and be really like, nice about it. I remember when you moved to Redmond, he would just like spend a weekend just like, oh yeah. Driving you about and just doing things like that, but very low ego and within their teams and their art, they're just considered to be legends.Yes. Like, you know, everybody would be like, oh, Barry Bond. Yeah, of course. [00:14:47] Sriram: Yeah. It, I can't emphasize enough the consistency part of it. Um, you know, with Barry. Or I gotta briefly work with Dave Cutler, who's kind of the father of modern operating systems, uh, is every day you're on this email li list at the time, which would show you check-ins as they happen.They would have something every single day, um, every day, and it'll be tangible and meaty and you know, and you just get a sense that this person is not the same as everybody else. Um, by the, this couple of people I can actually point to who haven't worked with, uh, but I follow on YouTube or streaming. Uh, one is, uh, Andrea Ling who builds Serenity Os we had a great episode with him.Oh, the other is George Hart's, uh, geo Hart. And I urge people, if you haven't, I haven't worked with either of them, uh, but if I urge which to kinda watch their streams, right? Because, uh, you go like, well, how does the anti killing build a web browser on an operating system? Which he builds by himself in such a sharp period of time and he watches stream and he's not doing some magical new, you know, bit flipping sorting algorithm anybody has, nobody has seen before.He's just doing everything you would do, but. Five bits of speed. I, yep, exactly. [00:15:48] Dwarkesh: I I'm a big fan of the George Hot Streams and Yeah, that's exactly what, you know, it's like yeah, you, he's also curling requests and he is also, you know, you know, spinning up an experiment in a Jupyter Notebook, but yeah, just doing it [00:15:58] Aarthi: away way faster, way efficiently.Yeah. [00:16:00] 15 Minute Meetings[00:16:00] Dwarkesh: Yeah. That's really interesting. Um, so ar Arthur, I'm, you've gone through Y Combinator and famously they have that 15 minute interview Yes. Where they try to grok what your business is and what your potential is. Yeah, yeah. But just generally, it seems like in Silicon Valley you guys have, make a lot of decisions in terms of investing or other kinds of things.You, in very short calls, you know. Yeah. . Yeah. And how much can you really, what is it that you're learning in these 15 minute calls when you're deciding, should I invest in this person? What is their potential? What is happening in that 15 minutes? [00:16:31] Aarthi: Um, I can speak about YC from the other side, from like, uh, being a founder pitching, right.I think, yes, there is a 15 minute interview, but before that, there is a whole YC application process. And, uh, I think even for the, for YC as, uh, this bunch of the set of investors, I'm sure they're looking for specific signals, but for me as a founder, the application process was so useful, um, because it really makes you think about what you're building.Why are you building this? Are you the right person to be building this? Who are the other people you should be hiring? And so, I mean, there are like few questions or like, one of my favorite questions is, um, how have you hacked a non-computer system to your advantage? Yeah. . And it kind of really makes you think about, huh, and you kind of noticed that many good founders have that pattern of like hacking other systems to their advantage.Um, and so to me, I think more than the interview itself, the process of like filling out the application form, doing that little video, all of that gives you better, um, it gives you the, the entire scope of your company in your head because it's really hard when you have this idea and you're kind of like noodling about with it and talking to a few people.You don't really know if this is a thing. To just like crystallize the whole vision in your head. I think, uh, that's on point. Yes. Um, the 15 minute interview for me, honestly, it was like kind of controversial because, uh, I went in that morning, I did the whole, you know, I, I had basically stayed at the previous night, uh, building out this website and, uh, that morning I showed up and I had my laptop open.I'm like really eager to like tell them what you're building and I keep getting cut off and I realize much later that that's kind of my design. Yeah. And you just like cut off all the time. Be like, why would anybody use this? And you start to answer and be like, oh, but I, I don't agree with that. And there's just like, and it, it's like part of it is like, makes you upset, but part of it is also like, it makes you think how to compress all that information in a really short amount of time and tell them.Um, and so that interview happens, I feel really bummed out because I kind of had this website I wanted to show them. So while walking out the door, I remember just showing Gary, Dan, um, the website and he like kind of like. Scrolls it a little bit, and he is like, this is really beautifully done. And I was like, thank you.I've been wanting to show you this for 15 minutes. Um, and I, I mentioned it to Gary recently and he laughed about it. And then, uh, I didn't get selected in that timeframe. They gave me a call and they said, come back again in the evening and we are going to do round two because we are not sure. Yeah. And so the second interview there was PG and Jessica and they both were sitting there and they were just grueling me.It was a slightly longer interview and PG was like, I don't think this is gonna work. And I'm like, how can you say that? I think this market's really big. And I'm just like getting really upset because I've been waiting this whole day to like get to this point. And he's just being like cynical and negative.And then at some point he starts smiling at Jessica and I'm like, oh, okay. They're just like baiting me to figure it out. And so that was my process. And I, by the evening, I remember Shera was working at. I remember driving down from Mountain View to Facebook and Sheam took me to the Sweet Stop. Oh yeah.Which is like their, you know, Facebook has this like, fancy, uh, sweet store, like the ice cream store. I [00:19:37] Sriram: think they had a lot more perks over the years, but that was very fancy back then. [00:19:40] Aarthi: So I had like two scoops of ice cream in each hand in, and, uh, the phone rang and I was like, oh, hold onto this. And I grabbed it and I, and you know, I think it was Michael Sibu or I don't know who, but somebody called me and said, you're through.So that was kind of my process. So even though there was only 15 minutes, mine was actually much longer after. But even before the, the application process was like much more detailed. So it sounds [00:20:01] Dwarkesh: like the 15 minutes it's really there. Like, can they rattle you? Can they, can they [00:20:06] Aarthi: you and how do you react?Yeah, yeah, yeah. Um, I also think they look for how sex you can be in explaining what the problem is. They do talk to hundreds of companies. It is a lot. And so I think, can you compress a lot of it and convince, if you can convince these folks here in three months or four months time, how are you going to do demo day and convince a whole room full of investors?[00:20:27] Sriram: Yeah. Yeah. For, I think it's a bit different for us, uh, on the VC side, uh, because two things. One, number one is, uh, the day, you know, so much of it is having a prepared mind before you go into the meeting. And, for example, if you're meeting a. very early. Are we investing before having met every single other person who's working in this space, who has ideas in the space.So you generally know what's going on, you know, what the kind of technologies are or go to market approaches are. You've probably done a bunch of homework already. It's usually, uh, it does happen where you meet somebody totally cold and uh, you really want to invest, but most often you've probably done some homework at least in this space, if not the actual company.Um, and so when you're in the meeting, I think you're trying to judge a couple of things. And these are obviously kind of stolen from Christ Dixon and others. Um, one is their ability to kind of go walk you through their idea, ma. And so very simply, um, you know, the idea MAs is, uh, and I think say the biology of Christen came with this, the idea that, hey, um, uh, How you got to the idea for your company really matters because you went and explored all the data ends, all the possibilities.You're managing around for years and years, and you've kind of come to the actual solution. And the way you can tell whether somebody's gone through the idea Mac, is when you ask 'em questions and they tell you about like five different things they've tried, did not work. And it, it's really hard to fake it.I mean, we, you maybe fake it for like one or two questions, but if you talk about like how we tried X, Y, and Z and they have like an opinion what of the opinions, if they've thought about it, you're like, okay, this person really studied the idea, ma. And that's very powerful. Uh, the second part of it is, uh, you know, Alex sample.Uh, uh, one of my partner says this, Yes, some this thing called the Manifestation Framework, which sounds like a self-help book on Amazon, but it's not, uh, uh uh, you know, but what if is, is like, you know, so many, so much of early stage startup founders is about the ability to manifest things. Uh, manifest capital, manifest the first hire, uh, manifest, uh, the first BD partnership.And, um, usually, you know, if you can't, if you don't have a Cigna sign of doing that, it's really hard to then after raising money, go and close this amazing hotshot engineer or salesperson or close this big partnership. And so in the meeting, right? If you can't convince us, right? And these are people, our day job is to give you money, right?Like, if I spent a year without giving anybody money, I'll probably get fired. If you can't, uh, if you can't convince us to give you money, right? If you wanna find probably a hard time to close this amazing engineer and get that person to come over from Facebook or close this amazing partnership against a competitor.And so that's kind of a judge of that. So it is never about the actual 60 Minutes where you're like, we, we are making up of a large part of makeup of mind is. That one or two conversations, but there's so much which goes in before and after that. Yeah, yeah. Speaking of [00:22:57] What is a16z's edge?[00:22:57] Dwarkesh: venture capital, um, I, I'm curious, so interest and Horowitz, and I guess why Combinator too?Um, but I mean, any other person who's investing in startups, they were started at a time when there were much less capital in the space, and today of course, there's been so much more capital pour into space. So how do these firms, like how does A 16 C continue to have edge? What is this edge? How can I sustain it [00:23:20] Sriram: given the fact that so much more capital is entered into the space?We show up on podcasts like the Lunar Society, , and so if you are watching this and you have a startup idea, Uh, come to us, right? Uh, no. Come, come to the Lunar society. . Well, yes. I mean, maybe so Trust me, you go in pat, you're gonna have a find, uh, a Thk pat right there. Uh, actually I, you think I joked, but there's a bit of truth.But no, I've had [00:23:40] Dwarkesh: like lu this [00:23:40] Aarthi: suddenly became very different [00:23:43] Sriram: conversation. I have had people, this is a totally ludicrous [00:23:46] Dwarkesh: idea, but I've had people like, give me that idea. And it's like, it sounds crazy to me because like, I don't know what, it's, what a company's gonna be successful, right? So, but I hasn't [00:23:55] Aarthi: become an investor.[00:23:57] Sriram: I honestly don't know. But it is something like what you're talking about Lu Society Fund one coming up, right? You heard it here first? Uh, uh, well, I think first of all, you know, I think there's something about the firm, uh, um, in terms of how it's set up philosophically and how it's set up, uh, kind of organizationally, uh, and our approach philosoph.The firm is an optimist, uh, uh, more than anything else. At the core of it, we are optimist. We are optimist about the future. We are optimist about the impact of founders on their, on the liberty to kind of impact that future. Uh, we are optimist at heart, right? Like I, I tell people like, you can't work at a six and z if you're not an optimist.That's at the heart of everything that we do. Um, and very tied to that is the idea that, you know, um, software is eating the world. It is, it's true. 10 years ago when Mark wrote that, peace is as true now, and we just see more and more of it, right? Like every week, you know, look at the week we are recording this.You know, everyone's been talking about chat, G p T, and like all the industries that can get shaped by chat, G P T. So our, our feature, our, our idea is that software is gonna go more and more. So, one way to look at this is, yes, a lot more capitalists enter the world, but there should be a lot more, right?Like, because these companies are gonna go bigger. They're gonna have bigger impacts on, uh, human lives and, and the world at large. So that's, uh, you know, uh, one school of thought, the other school of thought, uh, which I think you were asking about, say valuations, uh, et cetera. Is, uh, you know, um, again, one of my other partners, Jeff Jordan, uh, uh, always likes to tell people like, we don't go discount shopping, right?Our, the way we think about it is we want to, when we're investing in a market, We want to really map out the market, right? Uh, so for example, I work on crypto, uh, and, uh, you know, we, you know, if, if you are building something interesting in crypto and we haven't seen you, we haven't talked to you, that's a fail, that's a mess, right?We ideally want to see every single interesting founder company idea. And a category can be very loose. Crypto is really big. We usually segmented something else. Or if you look at enterprise infrastructure, you can take them into like, you know, AI or different layers and so on. But once you map out a category, you want to know everything.You wanna know every interesting person, every interesting founder you wanna be abreast of every technology change, every go to market hack, every single thing. You wanna know everything, right? And then, uh, the idea is that, uh, we would love to invest in, you know, the what is hopefully becomes the market.Set category, uh, or you know, somebody who's maybe close to the, the market leader. And our belief is that these categories will grow and, you know, they will capture huge value. Um, and as a whole, software is still can used to be undervalued by, uh, a, you know, the world. So, um, we, so, which is why, again, going back to what Jeff would say, he's like, we are not in the business of oh, we are getting a great deal, right?We, we are like, we want to invest in something which, where we think the team and the company and their approach is going to win in this space, and we want to help them win. And we think if they do win, there's a huge value to be unlocked. Yeah, I see. I see. Um, [00:26:42] Future of Twitter[00:26:42] Dwarkesh: let's talk about Twitter. [00:26:44] Sriram: Uh, . I need a drink. I need a drink.[00:26:48] Dwarkesh: um, Tell me, what is the future of Twitter? What is the app gonna look like in five years? You've, um, I mean obviously you've been involved with the Musk Venture recently, but, um, you've, you've had a senior position there. You were an executive there before a few years ago, and you've also been an executive at, uh, you've both been at Meta.So what [00:27:06] Sriram: is the future of Twitter? It's gonna be entertaining. Uh, uh, what is it El say the most entertaining outcome is the most, [00:27:12] Aarthi: uh, uh, like, best outcome is the most, uh, most likely outcome is the most entertaining outcome. [00:27:16] Sriram: Exactly right. So I think it's gonna be the most entertaining outcome. Um, I, I mean, I, I, I think a few things, uh, first of all, uh, ideally care about Twitter.Yeah. Uh, and all of my involvement, uh, you know, over the years, uh, uh, professionally, you know, uh, has, it's kind of. A lagging indicator to the value I got from the service person. I have met hundreds of people, uh, through Twitter. Uh, hundreds of people have reached out to me. Thousands. Exactly. Uh, and you know, I met Mark Andresen through Twitter.Uh, I met like, you know, uh, people are not very good friends of mine. We met through Twitter. We met at Twitter, right. There we go. Right. Uh, just [00:27:50] Aarthi: like incredible outsized impact. Yeah. Um, and I think it's really hard to understate that because, uh, right now it's kind of easy to get lost in the whole, you know, Elon, the previous management bio, like all of that.Outside of all of that, I think the thing I like to care about is, uh, focus on is the product and the product experience. And I think even with the product experience that we have today, which hasn't like, dramatically changed from for years now, um, it's still offering such outsized value for. If you can actually innovate and build really good product on top, I think it can, it can just be really, really good for humanity overall.And I don't even mean this in like a cheesy way. I really think Twitter as a tool could be just really, really effective and enormously good for everyone. Oh yeah. [00:28:35] Sriram: Twitter is I think, sort of methodically upstream of everything that happens in culture in uh, so many different ways. Like, um, you know, there was this, okay, I kinda eli some of the details, uh, but like a few years ago I remember there was this, uh, sort of this somewhat salacious, controversial story which happened in entertainment and uh, and I wasn't paying attention to, except that something caught my eye, which was that, uh, every story had the same two tweets.And these are not tweets from any famous person. It was just some, like, some, um, you know, somebody had some followers, but not a lot of, a lot of followers. And I. Why is this being quoted in every single story? Because it's not from the, you know, the person who was actually in the story or themselves. And it turned out that, uh, what had happened was, uh, you know, somebody wrote in the street, it had gone viral, um, it started trending on Twitter, um, and a bunch of people saw it.They started writing news stories about it. And by that afternoon it was now, you know, gone from a meme to now reality. And like in a lot of people entertainment say, kind of go respond to that. And I've seen this again and again, again, right? Uh, sports, politics, culture, et cetera. So Twitter is memetically upstream of so much of life.Uh, you know, one of my friends had said like, Twitter is more important than the real world. Uh, which I don't, I don't know about that, but, uh, you know, I do think it's, um, it has huge sort of, uh, culture shaping value. Yeah. I thing I think about Twitter is so much of. The network is very Lindy. So one of the things I'm sure from now is like five years from now, you know, what does that mean?Well that, uh, is that something which has kind of stood the test of time to some extent? And, um, and, uh, well the Lindy effect generally means, I don't think it's using this context with ideas like things which, with withstood the test of time tend to also with some test of time in the future, right? Like, like if we talked to Naim is like, well, people have lifting heavy weights and doing red wine for 2000 years, so let's continue doing that.It's probably a good thing. Um, but, but, but that's Twitter today. What is the future of Twitter? Well, uh, well, I think so one is, I think that's gonna continue to be true, right? 10 years from now, five years from now, it's still gonna be the metic battleground. It's still gonna be the place where ideas are shared, et cetera.Um, you know, I'm very. Unabashedly a a big fan of what Elon, uh, as a person, as a founder and what he's doing at Twitter. And my hope is that, you know, he can kind of canoe that and, you know, he's, you know, and I can't actually predict what he's gonna go Bill, he's kind of talked about it. Maybe that means bringing in other product ideas.Uh, I think he's talked about payments. He's talked about like having like longer form video. Uh, who knows, right? But I do know, like five years from now, it is still gonna be the place of like active conversation where people fight, yell, discuss, and maybe sometimes altogether. Yeah. Yeah. Uh, the Twitter, [00:30:58] Is Big Tech Overstaffed?[00:30:58] Dwarkesh: um, conversation has raised a lot of, a lot of questions about how over or understaffed, uh, these big tech companies are, and in particular, um, how many people you can get rid of and the thing basically functions or how fragile are these code bases?And having worked at many of these big tech companies, how, how big is the bus factor, would you guess? Like what, what percentage of people could I fire at the random big tech [00:31:22] Sriram: company? Why? I think, uh, [00:31:23] Aarthi: yeah, I think. That's one way to look at it. I think the way I see it is there are a few factors that go into this, right?Like pre covid, post covid, like through covid everybody became remote, remote teams. As you scaled, it was kind of also hard to figure out what was really going on in different parts of the organization. And I think a lot of inefficiencies were overcome by just hiring more people. It's like, oh, you know what, like that team, yeah, that project's like lagging, let's just like add 10 more people.And that's kind of like it became the norm. Yeah. And I think a lot of these teams just got bigger and bigger and bigger. I think the other part of it was also, um, you lot of how performance ratings and culture of like, moving ahead in your career path. And a lot of these companies were dependent on how big your team was and uh, and so every six months or year long cycle or whatever is your performance review cycle, people would be like, this person instead of looking at what has this person shipped or what has like the impact that this person's got had, uh, the team's done.It became more of like, well this person's got a hundred percent arc or 200% arc and next year they're gonna have a 10% increase and that's gonna be like this much. And you know, that was the conversation. And so a lot of the success and promo cycles and all of those conversations were tied around like number of headcount that this person would get under them as such, which I think is like a terrible way to think about how you're moving up the ladder.Um, you should really, like, even at a big company, you should really be thinking about the impact that you've had and customers you've reached and all of that stuff. And I think at some point people kind of like lost that, uh, and pick the more simpler metric, which just headcount and it's easy. Yeah. And to just scale that kind of thing.So I think now with Elon doing this where he is like cutting costs, and I think Elon's doing this for different set of reasons. You know, Twitter's been losing money and I think it's like driving efficiency. Like this is like no different. Anybody else who like comes in, takes over a business and looks at it and says, wait, we are losing money every day.We have to do something about this. Like, it's not about like, you know, cutting fat for the sake of it or anything. It's like this, this business is not gonna be viable if we keep it going the way it is. Yeah. And just pure economics. And so when he came in and did that, I'm now seeing this, and I'm sure Sheam is too at like at eight 16 Z and like his companies, uh, but even outside, and I see this with like my angel investment portfolio of companies, um, and just founders I talk to where people are like, wait, Elon can do that with Twitter.I really need to do that with my company. And it's given them the permission to be more aggressive and to kind of get back into the basics of why are we building what we are building? These are our customers, this is our revenue. Why do we have these many employees? What do they all do? And not from a place of like being cynical, but from a place of.I want people to be efficient in doing what they do and how do we [00:34:06] Sriram: make that happen? Yeah. I, I stole this, I think somebody said this on Twitter and I officially, he said, Elon has shifted the overturn window of, uh, the playbook for running a company. Um, which is, I think if you look at Twitter, uh, you know, and by the way, I would say, you know, you know the sort of, the warning that shows up, which is don't try this at home before, which is like, so don't try some of these unless you're er and maybe try your own version of these.But, you know, number one is the idea that you, you can become better not through growth, but by cutting things. You can become better, by demanding more out of yourself and the people who work for you. Uh, you, you can become better by hiring a, you know, a higher bar, sitting a higher bar for the talent that you bring into the company and, uh, that you reach into the company.I think at the heart of it, by the way, uh, you know, it's one of the things I've kinda observed from Elon. His relentless focus on substance, which is every condition is gonna be like, you know, the, the meme about what have you gotten done this week is, it kinda makes sense to everything else, which is like, okay, what are we building?What is the thing? Who's the actual person doing the work? As opposed to the some manager two levels a about aggregating, you know, the reports and then telling you what's being done. There is a relentless focus on substance. And my theory is, by the way, I think maybe some of it comes from Iran's background in, uh, space and Tesla, where at the end of the day, you are bound by the physics of the real world, right?If you get something wrong, right, you can, the rockets won't take off or won't land. That'd be a kalo, right? Like what, what's a, the phrase that they use, uh, rapid unplanned disassembly is the word. Right? Which is like better than saying it went kaboom. Uh, but, you know, so the constraints are if, if, you know, if you get something wrong at a social media company, people can tell if you get something really wrong at space with the Tesla.People can tap, right? Like very dramatically so and so, and I think, so there was a relentless focus on substance, right? Uh, being correct, um, you know, what is actually being done. And I think that's external Twitter too. And I think a lot of other founders I've talked to, uh, uh, in, sometimes in private, I look at this and go, oh, there is no different playbook that they have always I instituted or they were used to when they were growing up.We saw this when we were growing up. They're definitely seen some other cultures around the world where we can now actually do this because we've seen somebody else do this. And they don't have to do the exact same thing, you know, Elon is doing. Uh, they don't have to, uh, but they can do their variations of demanding more of themselves, demanding more of the people that work for them.Um, focusing on substance, focusing on speed. Uh, I think our all core element. [00:36:24] Aarthi: I also think over the last few years, uh, this may be controversial, I don't know why it is, but it somehow is that you can no longer talk about hard work as like a recipe for success. And you know, like growing up for us. When people say that, or like our parents say that, we just like kind of roll our eyes and be like, yeah, sure.Like, we work hard, like we get it. Yeah. But I think over the last couple of years, it just became not cool to say that if you work hard, then you can, there is a shot at like finding success. And I think it's kind of refreshing almost, uh, to have Elon come in and say, we are gonna work really hard. We are gonna be really hardcore about how we build things.And it's, it's very simple. Like you have to put in the hours. There is no kind of shortcut to it. And I think it's, it's nice to bring it all tight, all back to the basics. And, uh, I like that, like, I like the fact that we are now talking about it again and it's, it's sad that now talking about working really hard or having beds in your office, we used to do that at MicrosoftYeah. Uh, is now like suddenly really controversial. And so, um, I'm, I'm all for this. Like, you know, it's not for everyone, but if you are that type of person who really enjoys working hard, really enjoys shipping things and building really good things, Then I think you might find a fit in this culture. And I think that's a good thing.Yeah. I, [00:37:39] Sriram: I think there's nothing remarkable that has been built without people just working really hard. It doesn't happen for years and years, but I think for strong, some short-term burst of some really passionate, motivated, smart people working some really, you know, and hard doesn't mean time. It can mean so many different dimensions, but I don't think anything great gets built without that.So, uh, yeah, it's interesting. We [00:37:59] Aarthi: used to like do overnights at Microsoft. Like we'd just like sleep under our desk, um, until the janitor would just like, poke us out of there like, I really need to vacuum your cubicle. Like, get out of here. And so we would just like find another bed or something and just like, go crash on some couch.But it was, those were like some of our fun days, like, and we look back at it and you're like, we sh we built a lot. I think at some point sh I think when I walked over to his cubicle, he was like looking at Windows Source code and we're like, we are looking at Windows source code. This is the best thing ever.I think, I think there's such joy in like, Finding those moments where you like work hard and you're feeling really good about it. [00:38:36] Sriram: Yeah, yeah, yeah. Um, so you [00:38:37] Next CEO of Twitter?[00:38:37] Dwarkesh: get working hard and bringing talent into the company, uh, let's say Elon and says Tomorrow, you know what, uh, Riam, I'm, uh, I've got these other three companies that I've gotta run and I need some help running this company.And he says, Sriram would you be down to be the next, [00:38:51] Sriram: uh, next CEO of Twitter Absolutely not. Absolutely not. But I am married to someone. No, uh uh, no, uh uh, you know, you know when, uh, I don't think I was, the answer is absolutely not. And you know this exactly. Fun story. Um, uh, I don't think it says in public before. So when you, when I was in the process, you know, talking to and nor words and, you know, it's, it's not like a, uh, it's not like a very linear process.It's kind of a relationship that kind of develops over time. And I met Mark Andreen, uh, multiple times over the years. They've been having this discussion of like, Hey, do you want to come do venture or do you want to, if you wanna do venture, do you wanna come do with us? And um, and, and one of the things Mark would always tell me is, uh, something like, we would love to have you, but you have to scratch the edge of being an operator first.Um, because there are a lot of, there are a lot of ways VCs fail, uh, operator at VCs fail. Um, and I can get, get into some of them if you're interested, but one of the common ways that they fail is they're like, oh, I really want to go back to, um, building companies. And, uh, and now thing is like antis more than most interest, like really respects entrepreneurship, fraud's the hard of what we do.But he will, like, you have to get that out of a system. You have to be like, okay, I'm done with that word. I want to now do this. Uh, before you know, uh, you want to come over, right? And if you say so, let's have this conversation, but if not, we will wait for you. Right. And a woman telling me this all the time, and at some point of time I decided, uh, that, uh, you know, I just love this modoc.Um, you know, there are many things kind of different about being an operator versus a BC uh, and you kind of actually kind of really train myself in what is actually a new profession. But one of the things is like, you know, you kind of have to be more of a coach and more open to like, working with very different kinds of people without having direct agency.And it's always a very different mode of operation, right? And you have to be like, well, I'm not the person doing the thing. I'm not the person getting the glory. I'm here to fund, obviously, but really help support coach be, uh, a lending hand, be a supporting shoulder, whatever the, uh, the metaphor is, or for somebody else doing the thing.And so you kind of have to have the shift in your brain. And I think sometimes when VCs don't work out, the few operator on VCs don't work out. There are few reasons. Uh, number one reason I would say is when an operator, and I, I hate the word operator by the way, right? It just means you have a regular job.Uh, you know, uh, and, uh, but the number one reason is like when you have a regular job, you know, you're an engineer, you're, you're a product manager, you're a marketer, whatever. , you get feedback every single day about how you're doing. If you're an engineer, you're checking in code or you know your manager, you hire a great person, whatever it is.When you're at Visa, you're not getting direct feedback, right? You know, maybe today what I'm doing now, recording this with you is the best thing ever because some amazing fund is gonna meet it and they're gonna come talk to me, or maybe it's a total waste of time and I should be talking some else. You do have no way of knowing.So you really have to think very differently about how you think about patients, how we think about spending your time, and you don't get the dopamine of like, oh, I'm getting this great reinforcement loop. Um, the second part of it is because of that lack of feedback loop, you often don't know how well you're doing.Also, you don't have that fantastic product demo or you're like, you know, if an engineer like, oh, I got this thing working, the builder is working, it's 10 x faster, or this thing actually works, whatever the thing is, you don't get that feedback loop, uh, because that next great company that, you know, the next Larry and Sergey or Brian Armstrong might walk in through your door or Zoom meeting tomorrow or maybe two years from now.So you don't really have a way to know. Um, so you kind of have to be, you have a focus on different ways to do, uh, get. Kind of figured out how well you're doing. The third part of it is, uh, you know, the, uh, the feedback loops are so long where, uh, you know, you, you can't test it. When I was a product manager, you would ship things, something you, if you don't like it, you kill it, you ship something else.At, at our firm in, you invest in somebody, you're working with them for a decade, if not longer, really for life in some ways. So you are making much more intense, but much less frequent decisions as opposed to when you're in a regular job, you're making very frequent, very common decisions, uh, every single day.So, uh, I get a lot of differences and I think, you know, sometimes, uh, you know, folks who, who are like a former CEO or former like VP product, uh, uh, I talk a lot of them sometimes who went from, came to BC and then went back and they either couldn't adapt or didn't like it, or didn't like the emotions of it.And I had to really convince myself that okay. Hopefully wouldn't fate those problems. I probably, maybe some other problems. And, uh, uh, so yes, the long way of saying no, , [00:43:13] Why Don't More Venture Capitalists Become Founders?[00:43:13] Dwarkesh: um, the desk partly answer another question I had, which was, you know, there is obviously this pipeline of people who are founders who become venture capitalists.And it's interesting to me. I would think that the other end or the converse of that would be just as common because if you're, if you're an angel investor or venture capitalist, you've seen all these companies, you've seen dozens of companies go through all these challenges and then you'd be like, oh, I, I understand.[00:43:36] Sriram: Wait, why do you think more VCs driven apart? You have some strong opinions of this . [00:43:40] Dwarkesh: Should more venture capitalists and investors become founders? I think [00:43:43] Aarthi: they should. I don't think they will. Ouch. I dunno, why not? Um, I think, uh, look, I think the world is better with more founders. More people should start companies, more people should be building things.I fundamentally think that's what needs to happen. Like our single biggest need is like, we just don't have enough founders. And we should just all be trying new things, building new projects, all of that. Um, I think for venture capital is, I think what happens, and this is just my take, I don't know if Farram agrees with it, but, um, I think they see so much from different companies.And if you're like really successful with what you do as a vc, you are probably seeing hundreds of companies operate. You're seeing how the sausage is being made in each one of them. Like an operating job. You kind of sort of like have this linear learning experience. You go from one job to the other.Here you kind of sort of see in parallel, like you're probably on like 50, 60 boards. Uh, and oftentimes when it comes to the investor as like an issue, it is usually a bad problem. Um, and you kind of see like you, you know, you kind of see how every company, what the challenges are, and every company probably has like, you know, the best companies we know, I've all had this like near death experience and they've come out of that.That's how the best founders are made. Um, you see all of that and I think at some point you kind of have this fear of like, I don't know. I just don't think I wanna like, bet everything into this one startup. One thing, I think it's very hard to have focus if you've honed your skillset to be much more breath first and go look at like a portfolio of companies being helpful to every one of them.And I see Sure. And do this every day where I, I have no idea how he does it, but key context, which is every 30 minutes. Yeah. And it's crazy. Like I would go completely and say, where if you told me board meeting this founder pitch, oh, sell this operating role for this portfolio company. Second board meeting, third, board meeting founder, pitch founder pitch founder pitch.And that's like, you know, all day, every day nonstop. Um, that's just like, you, you, I don't think you can like, kind of turn your mindset into being like, I'm gonna clear up my calendar and I'm just gonna like work on this one thing. Yeah. And it may be successful, it may not be, but I'm gonna give it my best shot.It's a very, very different psychology. I don't know. What do you [00:45:57] Sriram: think? Well, Well, one of my partners Triess to say like, I don't know what VCs do all day. The job is so easy, uh, uh, you know, they should start complaining. I mean, being a founder is really hard. Um, and I think, you know, there's a part of it where the VCs are like, oh, wait, I see how hard it is.And I'm like, I'm happy to support, but I don't know whether I can go through with it. So, because it's just really hard and which is kind of like why we have like, so much, uh, sort of respect and empathy, uh, for the whole thing, which is, I, [00:46:20] Aarthi: I do like a lot of VCs, the best VCs I know are people who've been operators in the past because they have a lot of empathy for what it takes to go operate.Um, and I've generally connected better with them because you're like, oh, okay, you're a builder. You've built these things, so, you know, kind of thing. Yeah. Um, but I do think a lot more VCs should become [00:46:38] Sriram: founders than, yeah. I, I think it's some of the couple of other things which happened, which is, uh, uh, like Arthur said, like sometimes, uh, you know, when we see you kind of, you see, you kind of start to pattern match, like on.And you sometimes you analyze and, and you kind of, your brain kind of becomes so focused on context switching. And I think when need a founder, you need to kind of just dedicate, you know, everything to just one idea. And it, it's not just bbc sometimes with academics also, where sometimes you are like a person who's supporting multiple different kinds of disciplines and context switching between like various speech students you support.Uh, but it's very different from being in the lab and working on one problem for like long, long years. Right. So, um, and I think it's kind of hard to then context switch back into just doing the exact, you know, just focus on one problem, one mission, day in and day out. So I think that's hard, uh, and uh, but you should be a founder.Yeah, I think, yeah, I think more people should try. [00:47:32] Role of Boards[00:47:32] Dwarkesh: . Speaking of being on boards, uh, what the FTX Saga has raised some questions about what is like the role of a board, even in a startup, uh, stage company, and you guys are on multiple boards, so I'm curious how you think about, there's a range of between micromanaging everything the CEO does to just rubber stamping everything the CEO does.Where, what is the responsibility of a board and a startup? [00:47:54] Aarthi: What, what, what are the, this is something I'm really curious about too. I'm [00:47:57] Sriram: just, well, I just wanna know on the FDX soccer, whether we are gonna beat the FTX episode in interviews in terms of view your podcast, right? Like, so if you folks are listening, right?Like let's get us to number one. So what you YouTube like can subscriber, they're already listening. [00:48:10] Aarthi: What do you mean? Get us [00:48:10] Sriram: to number one? Okay, then, then spread the word, right? Like, uh, don't [00:48:13] Aarthi: watch other episodes. It's kinda what you [00:48:15] Sriram: should, I mean, if there's [00:48:16] Dwarkesh: like some sort of scandal with a 16 Z, we could definitely be to fdx.[00:48:21] Sriram: Uh, uh, yeah, I think it's gonna, well, it's gonna be really hard to read that one. Uh, , uh, uh, for for sure. Uh, uh, oh my goodness. Um, uh, but no, [00:48:29] Aarthi: I'm, I'm genuinely curious about [00:48:31] Sriram: these two. Well, uh, it's a few things, you know, so the multiple schools of thought, I would say, you know, there's one school of thought, which is the, uh, uh, you know, which I don't think I totally subscribe to, but I think some of the other later stages, especially public market folks that I work with sometimes subscribe to, which is the only job of a, uh, board is to hire and fire the ceo.I don't think I really subscribe to that. I think because we deal with more, uh, early stage venture, um, and our job is like, uh, you know, like lot of the companies I work with are in a cdc c, b, you know, they have something working, but they have a lot long way to go. Um, and hopefully this journey, which goes on for many, many years, and I think the best way I thought about it is to, people would say like, you want to be.Wave form dampener, which is, uh, you know, for example, if the company's kind of like soaring, you want to kind of be like kind the check and balance of what? Like, hey, okay, what do we do to, uh, you know, um, uh, to make sure we are covering our bases or dotting the is dotting the, crossing The ts be very kind of like careful about it because the natural gravitational pool of the company is gonna take it like one direct.On the other hand, uh, if the company's not doing very well and everybody's beating us, beating up about it, you're, you know, your cust you're not able to close deals. The press is beating you up. You want to be the person who is supportive to the ceo, who's rallying, everybody helping, you know, convince management to stay, helping convince, close host, hire.So, um, there are a lot of things, other things that go into being a board member. Obviously there's a fiscal responsibility part of things, and, um, you know, um, because you kind of represent so many stakeholders. But I think at the heart of it, I kind of think about, uh, you know, how do I sort of help the founder, uh, the founder and kind of dampen the waveform.Um, the other Pinteresting part was actually the board meetings. Uh, Themselves do. Uh, and I do think like, you know, about once a year or, uh, so like that there's every kind of, there's, there's almost always a point every 18 months or so in a company's lifetime where you have like some very decisive, interesting moment, right?It could be good, it could be bad. And I think those moments can be, uh, really, really pivotal. So I think there's, there's huge value in showing up to board meetings, being really prepared, uh, uh, where you've done your homework, you, you know, you've kind of had all the conversations maybe beforehand. Um, and you're coming into add real value, like nothing kind of annoying me if somebody's just kind of showing up and, you know, they're kind of maybe cheering on the founder once or twice and they kind of go away.So I don't think you can make big difference, but, uh, you know, I think about, okay, how are we sort of like the waveform, the, you know, make sure the company, [00:50:58] Aarthi: but I guess the question then is like, should startups have better corporate governance compared to where we are today? Would that have avoided, like, say the FTX [00:51:08] Sriram: saga?No, I mean, it's, I mean, we, I guess there'll be a legal process and you'll find out right when the FTX case, nobody really knows, you know, like, I mean, like what level of, uh, who knew what, when, and what level of deceptions, you know, deception, uh, uh, you know, unfolded, right? So, uh, it, yeah. Maybe, but you know, it could have been, uh, it could have been very possible that, you know, uh, somebody, somebody just fakes or lies stuff, uh, lies to you in multiple ways.[00:51:36] Aarthi: To,

Co-Movement Gym Podcast
Thrive with Salt, Die Without (with Redmond Real Salt) - Co-Movement Gym Podcast S2E40

Co-Movement Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 69:15


The following is a conversation with Darryl Bosshardt. Darryl is a Business Development Specialist at Redmond. Redmond produces clean, simple and delicious products such as Real Salt, Relyte, Seasonings, and hygiene products. Darryl is passionate about healthy living, healthy eating and life-long learning. He grew up working for the family mineral business in Redmond, UT and then earned a Bachelor of Science degree at Southern Utah University followed by an MBA at Western Governor's University.  Redmond is one of our podcast sponsors and a company we truly believe in. The majority of people are deficient in electrolytes, they have been told salt is bad for them and do not understand how much to consume each day, and as a result are struggling with low energy, muscle cramps, brain fog and a whole host of other aliments that can possibly be improved with proper electrolyte and salt intake. For the reasons just stated, this is why I reached out to Darryl, with hopes he can dive into these important topics and leave all listeners with some viable steps to improving their health.Sponsors:NativePath:Follow the link below to see all of NativePath's Pure Grass-Fed, Organic, Clean Supplements and use the CoMo15 code at checkout for 15% off!https://www.nativepath.com/Lombardi Chiropractic:https://www.lombardichiropractic.com/Mention the Co-Movement Gym Podcast when scheduling your initial appointment for 50% off Initial Consultation and X-Rays!Redmond:redmond.lifeOur team at Co-Movement Gym has used Redmond's Real Sea Salt, Seasonings, Re-Lyte Electrolyte drink and other products for years! This is a U.S. company whose products are simple, clean and taste great. Support them by using the link above or entering the code CoMo15 at checkout and you will receive 10% OFF your order!Reach out to us at info@co-movement.com or visit our website co-movement.com and learn more on how we can assist you in achieving your maximum health and fitness potential!Help us spread these fitness truths to as many people as possible by sharing this podcast with your friends and family! There is a lot of fitness information out there and we want everyone to know what really works! The information we provide in this podcast series has helped thousands of clients here in Upstate NY, and we hope to help you achieve your fitness goals too!Check out our Online Private Coaching at www.co-movement.com/onlinecoachingCheck out our main website www.co-movement.comCheck out our Video Podcast Clip on our YouTube Channel Co-Movement

The Friday Habit
Practical Leadership Strategies with Tim Redmond (Part 2)

The Friday Habit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 19:04


Tim is CEO of Redmond Growth Consulting and has been growing highly successful businesses for over 35 tears including his work at PriceWaterhouseCoopers, growing a software company from 2 to 400 employees then selling it to Intuit, Inc., and helping thousands of business owners gain time and financial freedom. Tim is also an author (the book is POWER TO CREATE) and speaker whose leadership maxims have been featured in John Maxwell's 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership.Recap / Takeaways One of the keys to success is successfully managing the pain More important than strategy, marketing, or anything is the tenacity and grit A high performance team is highly motivated and inspired by their leader You don't attract what you want, you attract who you are The missing ingredient is respect (it's not something you demand, it's a gift that you give someone Respect is valuing the differences without having to agree Progress is the clashing of ideas When someone brings a problem, ask them "how would you like to solve that problem?" "The absent one safe is among us" Don't demand things from your team, but show them the way If you had a friend that talked about you the way you think about yourself, would they still be your friend? Don't demand perfection, celebrate progress As a team member, you can make the team more effective by contributing positive energy Go to TheFridayHabit.com to find show notes for this episode. There you can also find links to our websites and ways to get in touch. At the bottom of the page you can download our guide to the Friday Habit system that will show you how to set aside one full day each week dedicated to working on your business instead of in your business.Subscribe & ReviewIf you enjoyed this episode please subscribe and leave us a review in the Apple podcasts app.Voice MemoIf you have a question or a topic you'd like us to cover don't forget to record us a quick voice memo and send it to hello@thefridayhabit.com

Screened on the Spot
Get to Know Michelle Davidson & Kinsey Redmond Through Movies

Screened on the Spot

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 41:15


Our last episode of the year welcomes Michelle Davidson and Kinsey Redmond to get to know them through movies and hear all about their movie Accidental Family, which was filmed in St. Joe, Missouri! Available now to rent or own!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Locked On Sooners
Signs say 5-star Peyton Bowen is indeed flipping from Notre Dame to the Oklahoma Sooners! Meanwhile, Jalen Redmond opts out.

Locked On Sooners

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 38:46


The magic 8-ball says signs are pointing to five-star Denton Guyer safety Peyton Bowen flipping his commitment from the Notre Dame Fighting Irish to the Oklahoma Sooners. What would his addition add to this class and what would it signal about OU Football. Plus, Tausili Akana is forecasting the Sooners' way, too. Finally, what do hosts John Williams and Josh Helmer think about Jalen Redmond opting out of the Cheez-It Bowl against Florida State? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Co-Movement Gym Podcast
The Sustainable Human by Josh Lewis - Co-Movement Gym Podcast S2E39

Co-Movement Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 34:42


The following is a conversation with myself, Josh Lewis. Today I will be discussing a project I have been working on for nearly a year, it's called the Sustainable Human Project. This project is nothing more than me organizing some topics and ideas that I find vitally important in order for society and humans to thrive. My hopes are that some of these resonate with you and help give you some framework to orientate your life properly. While this talk is filled with 9 main talking points, all of which that can have a positive effect on your life, I want all of you to remember that it takes action and implementation to actually see change not only in yourself but in society as a whole. Sponsors:NativePath:Follow the link below to see all of NativePath's Pure Grass-Fed, Organic, Clean Supplements and use the CoMo15 code at checkout for 15% off!https://www.nativepath.com/Lombardi Chiropractic:https://www.lombardichiropractic.com/Mention the Co-Movement Gym Podcast when scheduling your initial appointment for 50% off Initial Consultation and X-Rays!Redmond:redmond.lifeOur team at Co-Movement Gym has used Redmond's Real Sea Salt, Seasonings, Re-Lyte Electrolyte drink and other products for years! This is a U.S. company whose products are simple, clean and taste great. Support them by using the link above or entering the code CoMo15 at checkout and you will receive 10% OFF your order!Reach out to us at info@co-movement.com or visit our website co-movement.com and learn more on how we can assist you in achieving your maximum health and fitness potential!Help us spread these fitness truths to as many people as possible by sharing this podcast with your friends and family! There is a lot of fitness information out there and we want everyone to know what really works! The information we provide in this podcast series has helped thousands of clients here in Upstate NY, and we hope to help you achieve your fitness goals too!Check out our Online Private Coaching at www.co-movement.com/onlinecoachingCheck out our main website www.co-movement.comCheck out our Video Podcast Clip on our YouTube Channel Co-Movement

One Starfish with Angela Bradford
Do the work first with Tim Redmond

One Starfish with Angela Bradford

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 41:03


For over 35 years, Tim Redmond has been growing highly successfulbusinesses including his work at PriceWaterhouseCoopers, growing a softwarecompany from 2 to 400 employees then selling it to Intuit, Inc., and helpingthousands of business owners gain time and financial freedom. Tim is also anauthor and speaker throughout the world whose leadership maxims have beenfeatured in John Maxwell's 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership.Tim also runs a non-profit, Redmond Leadership Institute, that trainspastors, business leaders, and government officials in developing countries.Tim works with all kinds of business owners with a variety of beliefs. For thosewho request it, he provides a Biblical framework around every GrowthPrinciple he implements.Tim is madly in love with his hot wife Sandy and his 4 above average children.He is a wicked harmonica player. Tim also loves reading, playing tennis andchasing his wife around beautiful resorts.Website: https://redmondgrowth.com/IG: https://www.instagram.com/tim_redmond/Connect and tag me at:https://www.instagram.com/realangelabradford/You can subscribe to my YouTube Channel herehttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDU9L55higX03TQgq1IT_qQFeel free to leave a review on all major platforms to help get the word out and change more lives!

RTÉ - Sunday with Miriam
Red Óg Murphy

RTÉ - Sunday with Miriam

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 27:42


Redmond and Geraldine, The remarkable parents of young Sligo footballer Red Óg Murphy who died by suicide in April, implore anyone in a dark place this Christmas, to speak with someone and talk about their problems.

The Friday Habit
Practical Leadership Strategies with Tim Redmond (Part 1)

The Friday Habit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 22:20


Tim is CEO of Redmond Growth Consulting and has been growing highly successful businesses for over 35 tears including his work at PriceWaterhouseCoopers, growing a software company from 2 to 400 employees then selling it to Intuit, Inc., and helping thousands of business owners gain time and financial freedom. Tim is also an author (the book is POWER TO CREATE) and speaker whose leadership maxims have been featured in John Maxwell's 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership.Recap / Takeaways One of the keys to success is successfully managing the pain More important than strategy, marketing, or anything is the tenacity and grit A high performance team is highly motivated and inspired by their leader You don't attract what you want, you attract who you are The missing ingredient is respect (it's not something you demand, it's a gift that you give someone Respect is valuing the differences without having to agree Progress is the clashing of ideas When someone brings a problem, ask them "how would you like to solve that problem?" "The absent one safe is among us" Don't demand things from your team, but show them the way If you had a friend that talked about you the way you think about yourself, would they still be your friend? Don't demand perfection, celebrate progress As a team member, you can make the team more effective by contributing positive energy Go to TheFridayHabit.com to find show notes for this episode. There you can also find links to our websites and ways to get in touch. At the bottom of the page you can download our guide to the Friday Habit system that will show you how to set aside one full day each week dedicated to working on your business instead of in your business.Subscribe & ReviewIf you enjoyed this episode please subscribe and leave us a review in the Apple podcasts app.Voice MemoIf you have a question or a topic you'd like us to cover don't forget to record us a quick voice memo and send it to hello@thefridayhabit.com

Source Weekly Update
Redmond's growth and opportunities with City Councilor Clifford Evelyn

Source Weekly Update

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 48:00


Clifford B Evelyn was born and raised in Harlem, New York by his Caribbean parents. Clifford attended New York University where he studied Business Administration. He later attended Los Angeles Trade Tech where he studied Business Management. Clifford enlisted in the US Navy in 1977 and received an Honorable Discharge as a Petty Officer 2nd Class in 1985. In 1989, Clifford was hired by the Clark County Sheriff's Office, serving as Correctional Deputy, and then Sergeant, Lieutenant, and finally Commander. In 2017, Clifford was asked to be the Executive Board President for New Priorities Family Services, a (501) C3 non-profit counseling service located in Redmond, Oregon. In 2021, Clifford ran and was elected as the first Black person on the Redmond City Council. In this podcast, Evelyn chats about his hopes for the future of Redmond following the 2022 election, reasons to visit Redmond and much more. See more of our work at https://www.bendsource.com

Weekly Dose of BS
Christmas Twisters And Near-Death Experiences

Weekly Dose of BS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 45:16


Join Brandi Redmond, Stephanie Hollman and Trey Stewart as they discuss Near-Death Experiences, Christmas Twisters, Nextdoor App Craziness, Harry & Megan, and Real Housewives Of Miami Drama!If you enjoyed this episode, leave a review and make sure you subscribe! If you want to connect with Brandi and Stephanie directly, message them at: www.instagram.com/brandiredmondwww.instagram.com/stephhollmanwww.instagram.com/bsthepodcastIf you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Brandi & Stephanie as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.comProducers: Mike Morse / Madelyn Grimes For YEA NetworksSponsors:
Better Help - Visit www.betterhelp.com/weeklydose and get 10% off your first monthNutrafol - Get $15 OFF and FREE SHIPPING at Nutrafol.com when you use promo code WEEKLYDOSENextevo - For 25% off subscription orders of $40 or more, use promo code WEEKLYDOSE at www.NextEvo.com

The Do Zone
Casualness causes casualties with Tim Redmond

The Do Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 30:22


Tim is a student of the Pareto Principle and we did a little calculation about how much you ACTUALLY do in a single day. The results may shock you.

The Deep Wealth Podcast - Extracting Your Business And Personal Deep Wealth
Power Coach Tim Redmond On How To Eliminate Scarcity Ann Produce Massive Results (#186)

The Deep Wealth Podcast - Extracting Your Business And Personal Deep Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 46:05 Transcription Available


“Leap a little bit further because you will have leaped and you will have failed, but you got up every time and you got up stronger, and so let's accelerate that education” - Tim RedmondFor over 35 years, Tim Redmond has been growing highly successful businesses including his work at PriceWaterhouseCoopers, growing a software company from 2 to 400 employees then selling it to Intuit, Inc. and helping over thousands of business owners gain time and financial freedom. Tim is also an author and speaker throughout the world whose leadership maxims have been featured in John Maxwell's 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. He currently leads one of the most successful business growth coaching firms in the world whose team has led over 1500 business owners through their unique and powerful processes to improve all areas of their business to more than double revenues, triple profits and realign their businesses to releases the owners to boldly live their purpose, love their families and better serve their communities.Click here to subscribe to The Sell My Business Podcast to save time and effort.SELECTED LINKS FOR THIS EPISODEtim@redmondgrowth.comRedmond Growth ConsultingTim Redmond (@TimRedmond) / TwitterRedmond Growth Consulting (@redmondgrowth) • Instagram photos and videosRedmond Growth Consulting: Marketing for Contractors | Tulsa OKRedmond Growth Consulting - YouTubeTim Redmond - CEO - Redmond Growth Consulting | LinkedInThe Deep Wealth Sell My Business Podcasthttps://www.amazon.com/Dave-Bookbinder/e/B075SDJ12F/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1Cockroach Startups: What You Need To Know To Succeed And ProsperFREE Deep Wealth eBook on Why You Suck At Selling Your Business And What You Can Do About It (Today)Book Your FREE Deep Wealth Strategy CallContact Deep Wealth: Tweet @JeffreyFeldberg LinkedIn Instagram Subscribe to The Deep Wealth Podcast Email podcast@deepwealth.com Help us pay it forward by leaving a review.Here's to you and your success!

Everything Coworking
283. Peter Chee, Founder of Coworking Brand Thinkspace, on Getting Perspective

Everything Coworking

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 64:06


Follow Us on YouTube Everything Coworking Featured Resources:   The SEO Action Guide Masterclass: 3 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets to Opening a Coworking Space The Everything Coworking Academy Community Manager University Creative Coworking Partnerships: How to negotiate and structure management agreements from the landlord and operator perspective Resources Mentioned in this Podcast: Peter Chee on LI Think Space Peter Chee founded Thinkspace in 2008. He had bought a 40,000-square-foot building with his dad and wanted to re-create the collaborative environment he'd enjoyed during his startup days. He turned half of the building into the original Thinkspace location. He now also leases space in Redmond, Washington for his 2nd location. His spaces focus mostly on the tech startup community and are office heavy because that's what his members want... but they're also modern and community-focused.  Peter recently had some reckoning to do with himself about where to focus his time and he decided to get some perspective, he'd buy one-way flights to different cities until he was tired of being on the road. He worked from coworking spaces around the US for three months with a stopover in Chicago to run a marathon. He shares his story, what's working today in his business model, and his unique approach to getting clarity on what's next.

Co-Movement Gym Podcast
7 Day Carnivore Diet Experience (Beginners Guide) Part 3 - Co-Movement Gym Podcast S2E38

Co-Movement Gym Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 45:11


In this episode Josh chats with Andrew and they discuss his experience completing a 7 day Carnivore diet. In addition they provide listeners numerous educational nuggets regarding the benefits of consuming animal products and some very important tips you will not want to miss. Sponsors:NativePath:Follow the link below to see all of NativePath's Pure Grass-Fed, Organic, Clean Supplements and use the CoMo15 code at checkout for 15% off!https://www.nativepath.com/Lombardi Chiropractic:https://www.lombardichiropractic.com/Mention the Co-Movement Gym Podcast when scheduling your initial appointment for 50% off Initial Consultation and X-Rays!Redmond:redmond.lifeOur team at Co-Movement Gym has used Redmond's Real Sea Salt, Seasonings, Re-Lyte Electrolyte drink and other products for years! This is a U.S. company whose products are simple, clean and taste great. Support them by using the link above or entering the code CoMo15 at checkout and you will receive 10% OFF your order!Reach out to us at info@co-movement.com or visit our website co-movement.com and learn more on how we can assist you in achieving your maximum health and fitness potential!Help us spread these fitness truths to as many people as possible by sharing this podcast with your friends and family! There is a lot of fitness information out there and we want everyone to know what really works! The information we provide in this podcast series has helped thousands of clients here in Upstate NY, and we hope to help you achieve your fitness goals too!Check out our Online Private Coaching at www.co-movement.com/onlinecoachingCheck out our main website www.co-movement.comCheck out our Video Podcast Clip on our YouTube Channel Co-Movement

Weekly Dose of BS
Snoop On The Stoop & $1k Christmas Trees

Weekly Dose of BS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 26:19


⚠️ PARENT WARNING ⚠️ At the 17:20 mark you should listen when there are no kids around! In this episode Brandi, Stephanie and Trey each reveal their crazy and exorbitant Christmas tree traditions, Elf On The Shelf FAILS, Snoop On The Stoop, and what Brandi's latest obsession is!If you enjoyed this episode, leave a review and make sure you subscribe! If you want to connect with Brandi and Stephanie directly, message them at: www.instagram.com/brandiredmondwww.instagram.com/stephhollmanwww.instagram.com/bsthepodcastIf you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Brandi & Stephanie as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.comProducers: Mike Morse / Madelyn Grimes For YEA Networks

the school district - hosted by Adam Welcome
192 - Meghan Redmond (Middle School Principal)

the school district - hosted by Adam Welcome

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 21:51


Be sure to follow and connect with Meghan on Twitter - @alaska22redmond Meghan and I talk about an array of leadership topics in education and her passion for kids, schools and education is so very evident! Be sure to check out Episode 69 of this podcast for the first time Meghan came on the show! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-principal-crew-podcast/id1543504849?i=1000522743637 You're going to enjoy this one, thanks for being here! Book Adam for your next event! mradamwelcome.com/speaking Adam's Books: Kids Deserve It - amzn.to/3JzaoZv Run Like a Pirate - amzn.to/3KH9fjT Teachers Deserve It - amzn.to/3jzATDg Empower Our Girls - amzn.to/3JyR4vm Social Media: @mradawelcome

Twins Talk it Up Podcast
Twins Talk it Up Episode 126: Microsoft's Black Partner Growth Initiative

Twins Talk it Up Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 64:27


Microsoft is one of the largest companies in the world, but does it have to be a daunting task to navigate and find success working with the tech giant? What should we know about their Black Partner Growth Initiative (BPGI)? We are fortunate to have the leaders of Microsoft's BPGI join us to speak about their Innovation Tour and what Microsoft is doing to elevate the Black Partner. Raamel Mitchell is the Global Director of the Black Partner Growth Initiative, and Regina Johnson is a Senior Manager for Global Partner Solutions, where she serves as the strategic lead for programs with over 1000 tech business owners. We ask them to share what BPGI is and how Microsoft is supporting Black tech companies and entrepreneurs. We also learn about:Focus on growing their equity initiative and strengthening their channel partner ecosystem strategyCommitment to provide access to information, resources, capital and opportunities to connect with like-minded partnersTrends that they see for the upcoming yearTheir Partner Community, including BCPA & IAMCP BPGI Innovation Tour with the next stop being in Atlanta, GA on the 8th of December. Global Black Partner Growth Initiative Summit in April, being held at Microsoft's HQ in Redmond, WashingtonBonus: Regina is currently reading Build for Tomorrow by Jason Feifer, and Raamel is reading Age of AI: And our Human Future by Henry KissingerConnect with Regina Johnson and Raamel Mitchell on LinkedIn. To learn more about the Microsoft Black Partner Growth Initiative (BPGI), visit https://rb.gy/rnitj7--- more ---If you are looking to learn the art of audience engagement while listening for methods to conquer speaking anxiety, deliver persuasive presentations, and close more deals, then this is the podcast for you.Twins Talk it Up is a podcast where identical twin brothers Danny Suk Brown and David Suk Brown discuss leadership communication strategies to support professionals who believe in the power of their own authentic voice. Together, we will explore tips and tools to increase both your influence and value. Along the way, let's crush some goals, deliver winning sales pitches, and enjoy some laughs.Danny Suk Brown and David Suk Brown train on speaking and presentation skills. They also share from their keynote entitled, “Identically Opposite: the Pursuit of Identity”.Support and Follow us:YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCL18KYXdzVdzEwMH8uwLf6gInstagram: @twinstalkitupInstagram: @dsbleadershipgroupTwitter: @dsbleadershipLinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/twins-talk-it-up/LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/dsbleadershipgroup/Facebook: facebook.com/TwinsTalkitUpFacebook: facebook.com/dsbleadership/Website: dsbleadershipgroup.com/TwinsTalkitUp

Barista Talk
Episode 59: 50 Coffee Shops, 50 Weeks, 50 States - Washington - Anthem Coffee

Barista Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 21:34


Bryan Reynolds is the co-owner of Anthem Coffee in Puyallup and Tacoma, WA. Bryan, alongside his wife and his parents, started Anthem Coffee with a dream to help his dad retire and care for his adopted siblings along with building a thriving gathering space for the community. This business venture allowed Bryan to do what he's truly passionate about which is to help people step into their gifts. His zeal for life (and especially for coffee) is tangible in this episode. Thank you, Kirsten, for recommending Anthem Coffee for this episode! Looking for other shops to visit around Washington? These are the shops recommended by Bryan: 5 Stones Coffee Co. in Bellevue and Redmond, WA CRAFT.19 in Sumner, WA Ebony and Ivory Coffee in Lacey, WA Electric Coffee House in Sumner, WA Want more great places to get coffee (or tea) as you're visiting new states across the U.S.? Follow along as we feature one coffee shop a week in all 50 states. If you have questions you want to be answered for the recap episode of this series, send us your ideas at baristatalkshow@gmail.com. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/baristatalk/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/baristatalk/support

Weekly Dose of BS
Lucky Leprechauns & Runny Bunnies

Weekly Dose of BS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 37:55


In this episode Brandi, Stephanie and Trey discuss overweight dogs, “runny bunnies”, Lucky Leprechaun Cake, and the Balenciaga debacle!If you enjoyed this episode, leave a review and make sure you subscribe! If you want to connect with Brandi and Stephanie directly, message them at: www.instagram.com/brandiredmondwww.instagram.com/stephhollmanwww.instagram.com/bsthepodcastIf you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Brandi & Stephanie as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.comProducers: Mike Morse / Madelyn Grimes For YEA NetworksSponsors:
Better Help - Visit www.betterhelp.com/weeklydose and get 10% off your first monthNextevo - For 25% off subscription orders of $40 or more, use promo code WEEKLYDOSE at www.NextEvo.com/podcast