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Structure or mechanism of social order and cooperation governing the behaviour of a set of individuals within a given community

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Best podcasts about institutions

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Latest podcast episodes about institutions

The Trey Gowdy Podcast
Reflecting On Institutions Worthy Of Your Respect

The Trey Gowdy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 13:46


This week, Trey admires the grace and class shown by rival teams during rivalry week in College Football, discusses the importance of distinguishing the difference between fact and opinion, and commends Axios reporter, Jonathan Swan for being an equal opportunity questioner.  Later, Trey talks about being able to reflect on institutions that are worthy of respect such as the court and jury system which follows rules with the common goal of finding the truth.  Follow Trey on Twitter: @TGowdySC

Other Life
Exit, Voice, and Loyalty by Albert Hirschman (Lecture)

Other Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:50


A lecture on Albert Hirschman's classic book from 1970. More info below.✦ Read the lecture notes at https://OtherLife.co✦ Subscribe to the Other Life podcast https://plnk.to/otherlife

The Lawfare Podcast
Timothy Frye on ‘Weak Strongman: The Limits of Power in Putin's Russia'

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 46:54


Dominic Cruz Bustillos sat down with Timothy Frye, the Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy within the Department of Political Science at Columbia University, editor of “Post-Soviet Affairs” and co-director of the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Professor Frye is the author of the new book, “Weak Strongman: The Limits of Power in Putin's Russia,” which draws on cutting-edge social science research to emphasize Russia's similarities to other autocracies and highlight the difficult trade-offs that confront the Kremlin. They discussed Frye's challenges to the conventional wisdom on Putin's Russia, Russia's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, the European energy crisis, the recent State Duma elections, U.S.-Russia relations and more. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
Americans’ Trust in Their Institutions is Failing

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 57:18


As examples of those in government abusing our trust, we have to ask ourselves two questions. First, do you trust those in government? Second, what are we going to do about it? These examples of the abusive power of government should encourage most Americans to action. Sadly, examples of parents standing up to abusive...

The Remote Real Estate Investor
How Mariusz started with 10K and became a millionaire with microcap stocks

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 34:53


Mariusz Skonieczny is the founder of MicroCap Explosions. He is also the author of 11 books on the subject of investing. He graduated Indiana University in 2003 with a finance degree. From 2003 to 2008, he was in the residential and comercial real estate industry as an apprasier and broker. During the 2008/2009 financial crisis, he left the industry to focus exclusively on stock market investing. In 2009, he started with  $10,000. By 2019, his account reached $1 million or 100x since the beginning. By the end of 2021, it reached $7 million. In this episode, Mariusz tells us about his journey, his process and how you can employ this powerful investment strategy.  --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals. Hey, everyone,   Michael: Welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum. And today with me, I have Mariusz from Micro Cap Explosions. And he's gonna be talking to us today about how he utilized micro cap stocks to become a millionaire. And what are some things that we as everyday individual investors can look out for to do the same. So let's get into it.   Hey, Mariusz, thank you so much for taking the time and joining me today. I really appreciate you coming on.   Mariusz: Yeah, thank you very much Michael.   Michael: My pleasure. So you've got kind of a unique background and have done quite a lot of things both in real estate and the stock market. So for all the listeners who don't know who you are, can you give us a little bit of a background on? Where did you come from? And what have you done in the real estate and stock market sectors?   Mariusz: Okay, so yeah, it's a little unique. I, I am a full time investor right now full time micro cap investor focused on small companies. So mostly in the stock market, on the secondary exchanges, which I will get into more in a minute. But I started off in real estate. Yes. So I graduated college in 2003. And that was around the time where the Poor Dad Rich Dad books were coming out. And so he kind of got me interested in real estate, I read them and I was like, Yeah, I want to be financially free. But of course, I didn't have any money. So I figured what the best way to start in real estate, it's to kind of learn how to value real estate. Okay.   So I became a real estate appraiser. And I did this residential appraising and then I moved up to commercial real estate and I appraised apartments, office industrial, mobile, home parks, you know, anything associated with income producing properties. And then at some point, I went into the broker side, so I worked in a group under in Marcus Miller chap that sold apartments in the Midwest. And so I worked there a little bit. And then, but during this entire time that I was doing real estate, I was also investing in the stock market, learning about Warren Buffett, and, and when the financial crisis hit in 2008 2009, I, I said to my boss, I'm leaving, I want to go full time into the stock market, because I see opportunities. And, and I didn't really have the passion for real estate the way I did for, for the stock market investing. So I just, you know, left the industry, but there's so many similarities between between them, but that's kind of like, you know, a little shot this summary.   So, from 2009, literally, January 1 2009. That's what I entered the stock market. And so now it's like 12-13 years. So I started it with 10,000. At that point, that was actually from a sale of an apartment. I had a and then so over this 12 year period, that 10,000 I turned it into six, 7 million now over this, you know, 12 year period?   Michael: Holy smokes, have you calculated what that return is, in terms of percentage, it's insane.   Mariusz: You know, I don't really I don't really calculate the percentages, because in the in the hedge fund world, financial world, everybody likes to say, Oh, I do this much. This much return per year, per month, you know, I don't really look at it. I don't compare myself to the market. Because when I do compare myself to the market, that's when you do stupid things like, oh, you know, I need to keep or how did I do this month? It's just like, forget it. I don't care. I really, people are really surprised that I don't look at the market in general and how I do and I really don't I have no idea what the S&P is doing, how much did How would you know what was in the other quarter? Because I am much more patient, I am much better investor, if I just focus on myself my ideas, you know, and if I beat the market, one quarter, or it doesn't matter to me is so yeah. So I couldn't even tell you. I just know, you know, what I started and what I have, and, you know, I don't look at it like that.   Michael: Oh, that's awesome. What a unique perspective. And so you were mentioning that you are a micro cap investor. Can you explain to our listeners what that is?   Mariusz: Okay, when everybody talks about the stock market, they talk about NASDAQ, s&p 500 New York Stock Exchange just CNBC, you turn it on, Apple Tesla Gamestop right. those popular names, that's what they think of the stock market. But people don't realize that there are many, many different exchanges out there, not just NASDAQ, not just New York Stock Exchange. And there are secondary exchanges that cater to maybe smaller companies or venture companies. And, for example, OTC markets in the US, it's not even an exchange, or TSX Venture, Toronto Stock Exchange venture or Canadian stock exchange, or AIM in London, those exchanges a cater to smaller companies that wouldn't qualify to be on NASDAQ, or maybe companies that are international and they want to access North America.   But their secondary exchanges and not many people pay attention to them. And when you're talking about smaller companies, anything between like 100 million market cap? They are they are hated and frowned upon by the financial industry. There are penny stocks don't touch them. They're risky. And that. So those companies don't get a lot of attention. And, and to be fair, I would say yeah, 80 to 90% of these companies trading at these exchanges, I wouldn't touch either because you know, they might be looking for gold or trying to find a cure for this or that or, you know, cannabis or you name it. Yeah, I wouldn't touch those companies.   But among those 10 to 20 of percent of the companies, there are some real, really interesting companies there might be up and coming. But they have they have revenues, they have real customers, but nobody's paying attention to them. Nobody is paying attention to them. And I can take my time, study them, figure out what's going on. And maybe they are on the way to to NASDAQ maybe they are in three years going to upload or whatever, why can get them when nobody's paying attention. And then when they do come on NASDAQ, you know, they're gonna get repriced and I feel like being in that space. I feel like I am, you know, playing a game that's easy to win. Because think about, and it's not that I want to be in the game, I am there because I have very little competition, because what's my competition? Retail, retail investors or institutions? Right? These are the two entities, right?   Well, what's retail doing? Well, they're chasing Tesla, GameStop, Bitcoin, right? Apple, Microsoft, I mean, that's where they're, they're chasing that they're busy. Institutions. Well, institutions are in the game of gathering assets under management, because they get paid a percentage of what they manage. So in order for them to make money, they have to manage lots, lots, lots and lots of money, billions. And if you manage billions, what are you going to go and find this tiny little thing? $10 million? Market cap? No, because you would have to find like, 1000s of those companies, and there is not 1000s Of those, there's maybe a handful of interesting opportunities, but you too big, you're too fat, you have to go after the big ones. So that, so retail is out, institutions are out. And like who is there? Yeah, some mom and pop investors or some micro cap investors, but there's not a lot of them. So right away from the start, I am playing a game where there's barely any competition.   And if I do the, if I play the game, right, if I choose the right companies, if I do the right work, and then then, you know, my chances of winning the game are very high compared to playing where everyone else is playing. What kind of advantage do I have investing in Microsoft when there's 60? Other analysts looking at it? Zero. Can I get on the phone and get to see on the phone? Absolutely no chance. But with the smaller companies, so many times? They don't they don't have any analyst coverage, zero, absolutely zero. And then I can pick up the phone and the CEO will answer the phone. And it will help me and answer the questions that I need answered.   Michael: And so when you're picking up the phone and calling these people, what kind of questions are you answering? I mean, can you give us an idea or someone who's interested in kind of following in your footsteps? What kind of due diligence what kind of research is helpful to do if someone doesn't even know where to begin? If someone's ever invested in as Tesla, you know, how could they go after one of these micro cap companies?   Mariusz: Okay, so first thing, what I'll do is, let's say I'm interested, and that's what I did with, I'll go through every company on the exchange, I'll go like recently, I went to the Canadian stock exchange, and there's only there's only like four 700 companies listed on Canadian Stock Exchange. And, and when I say Canadian stock exchange, people think oh, it's Canadian companies. No, it's not Canadian companies. It's most of the companies like they serve you, us. They have stores or clients in the US, they just trade on Canadian Stock Exchange because the listing fees are so low compared to NASDAQ and they are at the development stage or where they are. They would rather pay $250,000 to be listed there now versus going on NASDAQ and spending million or two, so it's but they might be US companies.   And so I went through every company 700 one by one. And because like I said, 8080 to 90% are something that I'm not interested. So if it's mining or oil and gas, like, No, thank you, or if it's cannabis, no, thank you, or we're gonna find a cure for cancer. Yeah, right? No, no, thank you. So I go go through them, you know, one by one and eliminate the ones that I know I'm not interested. And then from from that 700, I narrowed it down to maybe like 50. And then from that 50, I'm like, okay, these are real companies that have real products, real customers. And then let's say I have, you know, narrowed down to five or, or two.   So, so then at that point, I'm like, Okay, I like these companies. Now, I want to know, what they are about. So of course, I'm going to read what's publicly available. But that's not enough, in my opinion, with the smaller companies, because let's face it smaller, they are riskier, right? So if the industry says it's toxic, and this and that, okay, they're riskier, so I need to do more work. So after reading the public information on these companies, I will get on the phone, and I will call the customers, I will call the customers and say, Hey, why are you using this company? You know, what kind of problems? Is this product solving for you? How does it compare to the competitors, so I'll find out firsthand from the customers why they are using this product.   Now, if the product is good, and the feedback is great, then I know, okay, therefore real, therefore real. And now I understand what's going on. And of course, I will call the management, I will usually talk to the CEO, at few board members, current or past directors, I'll try to go to LinkedIn to find some employees, former employees are good, because they'll tell you all the dirt that you know. So you know, after you, you get on the phone, and you talk to us individuals, you really start to learn the story of is this company really special? Is there something there that I should get involved in? And this is the kind of research that we'll do on these companies?   Michael: That makes total sense? And how do you find out who their customers are and get their contact information? I mean, what does that look like?   Mariusz: Well sometimes it's easier than others, because usually, sometimes they will list in the description of the business, they will list what kind of customers they have. Or sometimes you just know who the customers are, because you can Google them. Or maybe there's not that many players. So it's, you know, there's ways but it's not always the same way. Like for example, recently, I was looking at a company that is in the business of providing software for governmental agencies, to help them manage like health safety for restaurants. So, you know, think of government agency that has to make sure that all the restaurants comply with the regulations?   Well, it's not that hard to get a list of health inspection agencies in the United States. And you just, you know, call one by one and see who who answers the phone.   Michael: Interesting. And then when you're calling the company members themselves, board member CEO, what does that script look like? You say, Hey, I'm a potential investor, I'm interested in buying your stock. What does that look like?   Mariusz: That's pretty much it. You I call them up and I say, Hey, I'm looking at your company. This looks interesting. You know, tell me about it. Me sell me on the idea. Tell me how you got involved in the company. What's your story? You know, is there anything I'm missing here? And any usually, usually successful people, you might think that they're busy, too busy to talk to you, but they're kind of lonely. Like, they're just out there running the company, and someone calls them out of blue. Like, they'll talk to you. And yeah, like, I barely had anyone that didn't want to talk to me, and they'll talk and talk and talk. And then the next thing, you know, you have their cell phone number. So when you have questions, you can just call them and, and you know, it's about like establishing the relationship.   You, you first. It's amazing what you can learn, especially with the small companies. And I'm not saying like you're trying to get some kind of insider information. You're not, you're just trying to learn about it. But come on, you're having a conversation, right? Like, I don't know what you can tell me. He doesn't know what he can tell me. You always learn more than you should.   Michael: Yeah, yeah. No, I that's what I found in my past career. Working as a fire protection engineer, if you ask open ended questions, it's amazing what people will share with you, especially if it's a good conversation, if it's a good working relationship. You're so right. And I think that people don't give other people enough credit for what they might share. So that's, that's a really interesting tip.   Mariusz: Yeah. And you know, when you read about when you read about companies on paper, that they, you know, they tell you what the lawyers allowed them to tell you. And but when you actually phoned somebody up, and you really get to understand the strategy, they're thinking, Where are they going, why are they doing this? It's just, it puts the whole picture together the whole thesis, but by doing those kinds of work,   Michael: It makes total sense. But submersion. Do you square with the fact that you have your own opinions, biases, and then if you're getting the CEO on the phone, I would imagine that most CEOs are convicted, and are semi convincing that their business idea is a great one, and it's going somewhere, Otherwise, they wouldn't be the CEO. So how do you square those two with each other?   Mariusz: So So that's, that's why I'm talking with either individuals, like, you know, the directors or, or the customers, or, or even the competitors. Because like, recently, for example, I call I call this I didn't term this, but it's called a scuttlebutt research by talking to the individuals that so, so we have this company that recently came out on my public channel, Globex, Globex. And what they have is a is a private email and messaging application that like, doesn't do any data mining, no big tech hosted in Switzerland. So you know, everything against, you know, data mining. And so, when I first started researching this company, I sent out an email to my group at micro cap explosions, which is the website that I run.   And I said, Hey, you know, I don't know much about this space, but some of you guys might be in this space. So help me and also, my girlfriend's brother is a security expert. So so I figured I would get some feedback. And oh, my goodness, 20 people give me feedback, any, and you couldn't have two people agree on the same thing. Especially when you get two techies in a room talking about open source is better or closed source is better, or this is like, Oh, my goodness. But that's what you deal with as an investor is like, you get all of these feedbacks, good, bad average. And then you have to decide on your own, from all that feedback from the CEO selling on the company, from this guy telling you this is horrible from this guy telling you it might succeed, you have to make a choice, you have to make a call.   And then from that, what I realized that at some point is like, Okay, I'm not, there's no way I can figure out if the technology is the best, or this or that there's no way. But what I can't figure out is whether people are going to buy the product, and what is going on through the head of the people that are buying the product. And if they're gonna buy the product, if the if it solves their problem. That's all that matters. Because the critics do not generate revenues. It's a customer to generate revenue. So it's like, if nine people are complaining and don't like it, but one that one buys it, will all I have all all the company has to do is find those ones, right? And then and then everything will be fine.   Michael: That's such a great insight. That's such a great insight. So how does someone get started in this if they have a full time job, because they can go invest in REITs passively, they can go invest in the stock market passively. But it sounds like this, there's a little bit more legwork a little bit more research involved. So how does one get started doing this kind of work?   Mariusz: Well, I would say, I would say study businesses. That's number one. Because I'm not really, I don't really care what the company trades. As long as the business is good, the business is going to do well. So study businesses, figure out what businesses work, what is a good business? What is an average business, what is a better business? And start with that. Because if you go, if you go to the secondary exchanges, like you said, if you pick up the phone, every single CEO will sell you, and you will think is the great idea every time. It's like, you know, watching a commercial and buying everything that you see on TV.   So you kind of have to know, you know, you have to know what is good, what has potential, and, you know, probably should probably have some mistakes be under your belt too. But yeah, it definitely, this kind of investing definitely is more, it takes more work, but it's more rewarding at the same time. So like if the best way to passively do it. I'm gonna, you know, plug myself in here is you know, my website microcapexplosions.com. I mean, I share that research with my people. So, so they, they get the benefit of my research. And you know, of course they pay me for it. But if you want to do it on your own, you know, study businesses and then go to these secondary exchanges and study to come look at the companies one by one, don't screen. Forget about screening, just look at them one by one, it's like 700 of them, you can look at 700 companies when 90 90% of them are junk and you're just gonna throw them away just after looking at them. So it doesn't take that long, but But it's definitely worth it if you if you want to put in the work.   Michael: Okay. And of that 80 and 90% that you think is junk. I mean, I know you mentioned cannabis oil and gas mining. Are there other sectors that are definite non starters for you or are ones that you think specifically Yes, these are these are you No, always gonna be a go for you.   Mariusz: Well, I like I like to look at, I like to own companies that are there are decent. So in other words, what are good businesses? Well, businesses that have recurring revenues, they're better than the non recurring revenues, because on January you don't start from scratch. So that's that. I like businesses that have some kind of switching costs once a client signs up. They know it's a little bit painful to switch. I like businesses that just kind of like Warren Buffett talks about with Moats. So they have some kind of brand, brand awareness, and maybe that brand is getting better and better and better. Or maybe they have what's called the network effect, as more people use the service more others want to use it like like auctions, you know, you go to auctions, when a lot of people are using the auction, you want to sell it in action when there's a lot of buyers, so, and I like also businesses that are not capital intensive. So in order to grow revenues, it doesn't cost that much.   So that's one of the things that turned me off from real estate is that it's so capital intensive. If you have a four unit apartment building, and you want to grow that revenue, well, you have to buy another apartment building or you have to add units. Yes, you can raise price, of course, you can raise price, but there is limit to it as so it's capital intensive. And yes, you can leverage and borrow and all that. But it's capital intensive. And if you compare it to the company that I talked about Globex, for example, which has an email, messaging, communication, well, they have a server in Switzerland, okay. It doesn't matter, they can have 100,000 people on it or a million people. It doesn't you, they don't have to get another server when they get a million more users. They just, you know, they might at some point need another server, but it's very scalable. And it doesn't cost that much to grow revenues.   So so these are the kinds of businesses that I look for. So I've done it for so long that when I look at a business, I can tell right away, well, is it recurring? Is it a good business? Is it a is it an average or decent business? And so yeah,   Michael: Makes total sense. And you mentioned that real estate is so capital intensive, and I agree, it oftentimes can be, do you see the two asset classes, stock market and real estate as totally separate and mutually exclusive? Or are you finding that it's easy enough to invest in both of them simultaneously?   Mariusz: I'm actually, so I started off in real estate, then I went to the stock market. And now I'm looking back at real estate again, because it has a place in somebody's portfolio, you know, I would like to have I like mobile home parks. And actually, next week, I'm going to California to look at some mobile home parks. Because I would like to create a revenue stream, take some of my profits that I made in the stock market and put it into more like real assets that can generate some income.   And so so it has a place but I think where people go, you know, wrong with this constant debate. And actually, in my first book that I wrote, why are we so clueless about the stock market? There's a chapter real estate versus stocks, which is better? And the answer is there is not that one is better, because stock market is just a vehicle to own own particular businesses. And real estate is also a vehicle to own a business. If you own an apartment building, that's your business, your tenants are your clients, you have expenses, that's your business, and you own it privately. Okay.   Now, in the stock market, you can also own real estate publicly, right, like REITs, you can do that you don't have the same control. But it's the same thing. So people focus so much on it. And I say, it doesn't matter if it's public, or non public focus on the business, you can lose money in real estate, if the tenants don't pay you, especially when you have a lot of debt. So don't think you've saved there. Just focus on good properties, whether it is to flip them or to renovate them, or so many people use different strategies in real estate. So you know, focus on what you do focus on the business and the stock market. There's no such thing as stock market is bad. There's some companies that I wouldn't touch and others I would so I focus on what's good, and not about, you know, how it's being owned. It's just a vehicle.   And, you know, I find it funny, going back to a little bit this whole discussion with micro cap stocks, you know, how the industry is like, stay away, it's, it's a penny stock. So picture, picture owning 100 unit apartment building, or 50, or whatever, you have an apartment building, and it's worth, you know, $2 million, or let's say $10 million. Okay, so, there's so many people out there that have their entire life savings, their entire retirement, owning apartment buildings, that's their retirement, that's their entire life worth of work. That's okay. That's okay to own a $10 million apartment building or portfolio of apartment buildings. But if you put that apartment building into public vehicle that's trading on an exchange now $10 million that's toxic because it's microcap. Now you can't touch it, because you're gonna go bankrupt. Lalala is the same thing.   So how can you say that, you know, $10 million worth of assets in a private ownership, that's a smart thing to do. But if you own a $10 million in a public market through a stock now, that's a penny stock, you're an idiot, you shouldn't touch it. See how crazy and ridiculous this is?   Michael: Yeah. But could it be argued that the penny stock or the stock at really any stock could go to zero versus the real estate? Can I mean, in theory could never actually get to zero?   Mariusz: Well, I mean, if a business fails, you can go to zero. And if your if your tenants stopped paying you guess what the real estate is gonna be there. But your ownership, your equity can go to zero, because the bank can take it away. So don't think you're safe. Just because, you know, a building is still there. Are you going to be the one owning it?   Michael: Right? Now makes total sense. Makes total sense. Mariusz, I'm curious, can you share with us some of your your big wins that you've had in the micro cap, stock picking world? Since you've been? got started?   Mariusz: Yeah, so I'll share with you a big win. And I'll share with you what I'm currently doing for hopefully a future win. So the biggest one I had was a company called Oracle, where I, I bought it for four cents. And today, it's almost $3. And I still hold the shares. So almost 100 times I put like, I think 80,000 into it. And today, it's like six or 7 million just that one position. And I still hold the shares. And so it's kind of interesting, because it has Similarities to real estate, because Oracle is a is a company that owns a copper project. Okay, so it's a real estate. It's, it's, it's a copper project located in Mexico.   And now with all this electric cars, everybody's you know, the developing world is, you know, getting more developed. And so we're consuming more copper, and there's not a lot of copper out there, or the copper supply is not keeping up with the demand. So I found this company in 2017. And what was interesting about it was a special situation because in 2000, that property is called Santa Tomas Copper Project was sold from a gentleman, Mexican gentleman to a crook, the crook bought it for 10 million back then, and never paid for the property. So the Mexican guy wanted to get the property back. But it was it was complicated because it was like in three different jurisdictions Bahamas, Mexico and the United States.   So that company said to him, You know what, we'll we'll get you your property back, we'll pay for the lawyers will win you the property back but in return, we will earn 50% interest in the property. So it took them like 10 years to win the lawsuit. So they won the lawsuit in in Bahamas. And when I got involved, they already won the lawsuit in Bahamas, but they still had to kind of finish the lawsuit and have everything correctly the title registered in Mexico. And and then what was happening in Arizona was that it was crazy because the two parties that were fighting with each other Oracle, Oracle had ownership interest in both parties. Like I kid you not they own both parties. And but what was happening in Arizona was that they were kind of in receivership of that other party. So they were foreclosing on that interest.   And so, so I was looking at a lawsuit and you know, I don't speak Spanish but I speak English. So in Arizona, I was buying the legal documents directly from the courthouse as the court as the lawsuit was going on. So I was like getting documents right away faster than the company faster than the lawyers because the moment is showed up I already got on the phone and I bought the document. So I saw that they were like winning every single step every single step the other party said something to the judge was like nope, you don't know what you're talking about wrong wrong wrong. So I didn't even have the legal experience. But I could tell that like there's no way they were going to lose so So I bought all these shares and of course they won the lawsuit they foreclosed on the property they registered the property in Mexico and and and and nobody was paying attention like I was the only one buying the legal documents the only one studying this it was on the company was trading on TSX Venture so you know toxic exchange know what no one was gonna touch it. They institutions didn't want to look into it because they don't get involved in the legals.   Okay. Well, I got involved and I studied it and it was it was easy. It was simple. And then I even wrote like a 20 page analysis on my website and I was uploading the documents for everybody who wanted to see too See it. So the long story short is, you know, the stock goes up like 100 times, you know, we, in total, the people that were following me, I would say they made like $300 million. Today, today, I get gifts, all kinds of gifts people send me thank you change my life and all this. But it was an example of it of a of a situation where nobody wanted to look at there was no competition, it was so easy, so easy to see when you actually rolled up your sleeves and did some work.   So that was an example of a success. And I still own the shares, because I still think they're going to go much, much higher from here, because now now the situation is a little different, the title is registered. Now they, they are kind of confirming the historical results that were on this property. Because this was not some kind of little dinky property. This was a property that was massive copper deposit that was even used as examples of a good depositing geological books. So I knew I was dealing with something major. But you know, when I was buying the shares, the market cap, or the value of the company was $3 million. I looked at it, and I already knew back then I said, this is worth half a billion dollars. And today, it's even worth more because copper is hot. Everybody's talking about electrification. So not I mean, now it's probably gonna sell for a billion or 2 billion. Who knows? But that's an example of a success story.   Michael: Wow. And how long did the process take from when you bought it at four cents for the stock to get up to $3 a share?   Mariusz: Well, from 2017 to two now. So actually, what was interesting is that it kind of took a dip, because of COVID. So it was like it was on its way to $1. And then the COVID came and it crashed. Because everything crashed, it crashed to like 20 cents. And then the moment COVID COVID recovered and, and copper recovered, it went from like 20 cents to, to over over three bucks. It went to as high as 3.66. And now it pulled back to like 2.60. But, you know, on my watch on my watch, it was almost 100 times, but it was more than 100 times because the lowest stock was was one penny. So it did go to $3. That's like 300 times, but I wasn't I wasn't involved when it was at one penny. I was involved when it was like four.   So So yeah, so that I mean, it's incredible story, but it just shows you that these opportunities exist. And it's kind of like a real estate example, because it's a real estate. It's a property, okay, it's not an apartment, but it's a property.   Michael: Awesome. So now I love your story Mariusz, and I want to let you get out of here. But before I do any final words of wisdom recommendations that you want to share with folks who are listening?   Mariusz: I would just say, Look, just think independently. Think for yourself. Yeah, I know, it's nice to be invested alongside with what everybody else is talking about. But the biggest money is made when you just think for yourself. I always use the example of if you're selling a house, would you like? Or if you buying a house? Would you like to be buying it when there's 100 Other people bidding with you? Or would you be the only one buying it? Right? It's it's obvious and when you're selling your house? When you selling a house? Would you like a lot of people looking at your house? Or would you like one person looking at your house? Again, obvious answer.   So then why do we like up investment opportunities or stocks only when everybody else is looking at them? Flip it. Think for yourself, look for yourself. Buy it when they're not watching and then sell it when they're watching.   Michael: Right, right. Oh, that's so good. That's so good. And if people want to get ahold you want to reach out to you want to learn more about what you're doing in my company's general what's the best way for them to get in touch?   Mariusz: Just visit my website microcap.explosions.com. You will find a link to my YouTube channel to my email. That's the best way to get ahold of me.   Michael: Amazing. Rich, thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate you coming on and we'll definitely chat soon.   Mariusz: Yeah, thanks a lot.   All right, everyone. That was our episode a big big big thank you to Mariusz, I will definitely be going online to check out his website micro cap explosions. You enjoyed the episode. Leave us a rating or review wherever it is you get your podcasts. And as always look forward to seeing you on the next one. Happy investing

Campus Technology Insider
Digital Transformation in Higher Ed: What It Means and Where to Start

Campus Technology Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 24:53


The digital transformation of higher ed has been going on for years, but the current pandemic has brought that process into laser focus – and accelerated digital efforts perhaps like nothing else could. Institutions are going through deep shifts in culture, workforce and technology, enabling new educational models, transforming operations, and even changing the whole value proposition of a higher education. Yet at the same time, digital transformation is so expansive it can be difficult to define, and even harder to manage. We spoke with Betsy Reinitz, director of enterprise and IT programs at EDUCAUSE, about what digital transformation means, how to start a Dx journey, the biggest obstacles to Dx and more.   Resource links: EDUCAUSE survey: Institutional Engagement in Digital Transformation Dx Institutional Self-Assessment tool (EDUCAUSE membership required) Guide to Design Your Dx Strategy Dx Signals Checklist EDUCAUSE Dx Journey Roadmap Music: Mixkit Duration: 25 minutes Transcript

Trusteeship Radio
The Essential Partnership between Foundations and Institutions

Trusteeship Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 25:22


Institutionally related foundations are critical to the future success of colleges and universities. The most effective foundations foster relationships between the president and the foundation through the CEO and board chair based on trust, transparency, and open communication. In this podcast, Colorado State University President Joyce McConnell and George Mason University Foundation Board Chair Terri Beirne discuss with AGB Senior Fellow George Watt how alignment of goals and expectations has led to a strong partnership for each of their institutions.

All About Skills!
054 Dr. Arthur W. Zimiga, Native American Educator and Member of the Oglala Lakota Teton Nation and Charlie Jett discuss the Critical Skills

All About Skills!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 75:11


Dr. Arthur W. Zimiga, a master and doctorate graduate from the Graduate School of Education, Harvard University, is known nationally and worldwide as a top Native American educator. Dr. Zimiga has presented curriculum material and has lectured on such subjects as Native American Education and business development for the “Cultural Different.” Institutions where he has either taught or lectured include foreign educational agencies and major universities in the United States including Harvard University, UCLA, University of Arizona, University of South Dakota, and others. Dr. Zimiga has an extensive background in Native American cultures and specializes in the Lakota Culture of which he is a member of Oglala Lakota Teton Nation. He is well respected by his fellow colleagues in business development as well as higher learning as well as elementary and secondary education worldwide. His humor and can-do attitude are refreshing attributes that audiences enjoy. Dr. Zimiga is a poet, writer, soldier, artist, sportsman, executive, business developer, politician, educator, community leader, and family-oriented person. He is also my friend – we were elementary school classmates in Hot Springs, South Dakota. He brings insights that enlighten audiences – so you are in for a big surprise with Dr. Arthur Zimiga.

UpOnly with Cobie & Ledger
Paradigm founders Fred Ehrsam and Matt Huang

UpOnly with Cobie & Ledger

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 93:33


LinksMatt TwitterFred TwitterWebShow PartnerThis episode is presented by FTX. Trade on an awesome mobile interface fee-free, and still get all the great portfolio tracking features you know and love: https://uponly.tv/ftxShow NotesHow'd You Meet?– Coinbase pitched Sequoia– Fred pitched the basis of the metaverse on the blockchain when Matt was at Sequoia– Then Matt and Fred emailed back and forth, then the rest is history– This was 2017Metaverse– Fred: “People don't yet realize that crypto is the metaverse”– It's not just some VR world– Cobie: “How do you think this plays out over the next 15 to 20 years?”– Matt: “To state the obvious people are spending more time in these digital worlds. As people spend more time there they are also spending money”– Blockchain can enable property rights in the metaverseNext Levels of Crypto– Crypto will not be fully decentralized at every level that is the wrong way to think about it– Think gaming companies might be able to make the jump to crypto– Social media probably not– Matt: “all monarchies are dictatorships” (quoting someone else)– Network effects based businesses have a chicken and an egg problem– Overcoming is hard– Crypto presents the first real solve to potentially getting new network effectsPlay-to-earn– Play to earn has been around for a very long time– It's just been under the table– Play to earn games present it in a transparent way with an open economy– People see work as purpose – this could fall into line with play to earn games– Cobie was skeptical, but what made it click for him was thinking about old Halo gameplay when he spent ages trying to earn a special helmet– Cobie bullish on interoperable assets for p2e gaming– Fred: “I played WoW for thousands of hours and all i cared about was how my character looked”– To the parents who always say you're wasting your time playing video games – the founder of Paradigm did the same thing!– You can have multiple identities in the metaverseParadigm Now– In 2017 all the big internet companies had already be built– Crypto felt like the next frontier– Tried to make Paradigm a place where brilliant, curious people would want to spend their time– Didn't care about roles just wanted the best talent– Talented young people are the people that actually create the future – 20yrs ago it was Goldman etc., 10 years ago it was Google etc., today it is crypto– FOLLOW THE TALENTED YOUNG PEOPLE– The quality of crypto investors has gone up– Crypto will be a powerful movement that takes over the worldHow to Keep Talent?– Help the most ambitious people keep building– Getting to work on multiple projects at once is very attractive– How many anons on Paradigm?– At least Samczsun and Hasu, another joining soonDeFi– Matt: “I think we're super early. If we're building a financial system from the ground up there is still so much left to build”– Cobie: “What takes us from 100Bs to multi-trillions?”– Matt: “I think it just takes time”– This is the progression of new tech– Institutions will like a middle man at first to help use– Ledger: “It reminds me of when elevators came out and there was an attendant just cause it made people feel safer”– Laughing thinking about Ledger being 190 years old and around when elevators came outSmartest Person Bearish Crypto?– Struggle to think of an example of someone who is very well informed and still bearish– Only people who are worried about regulation– Ledger: “What about Charlie Munger?”– Matt: “I mean he also missed the internet”– DUNK!New Paradigm $2.5B Fund– “We are looking at the growth over the next 10 years”– Trying to orient vision out there instead of shorter term– Cobie: “It makes it easier if you think in 10 years – if you're thinking 10 years from now you might be seed investing in the main L1 today lol”– Fred: “We're finally getting to a place where people can build and create mainstream applications with crypto”– Matt: “We are wired as humans to underestimate what exponential growth looks like”Future of Web3– Top level framing – there's an iPhone bundling moment that's happening with crypto– Fred: “The same way the iPhone put all mp3s, email, a telephone, etc into one thing, crypto is bundling all of your internet identity into your wallet”– Ledger: “Can we do this and maintain any type of financial or personal privacy?”– Fred: “Zero-Knowledge Proofs.”– Privacy will be really importantQuickfire QsPunks – overvalued vs. undervalued?– Fred: “So we don't give out investment advice”Biggest mistake/ worst investment?– Prediction marketsHow to work for Paradigm?– Always interested in thoughtful/ energetic people– “Send us something cool you made on the internet”FINAL ALPHA– Matt: “It's easy in life to sweat the small stuff. Zoom out and find the 1 or 2 things that really matter (for life, investing, etc). If you get those right everything else works out”– Fred: “All the people that do things that really matter think through things for themselves. They think from first principles and think what makes sense for them”Notes by KevinMusic by GiovanniPickle

Gensler Design Exchange
The Future of the Museum Experience: Diverse, Inclusive, and Digital

Gensler Design Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 34:49


As society emerges from a time of uncertainty and isolation, cultural institutions are leading the way because they intuitively understand that their mission-driven work is part of something greater. Rather than taking a passive role as collectors and exhibitors, museums can and should become dynamic places of learning, engagement, and inspiration that showcase the rich items of our past, while expanding their collections for and making themselves more accessible to diverse audiences of the future. This week on the Gensler Design Exchange, Bevin Savage-Yamazaki who leads our Foundations, Associations & Organizations global practice, as well our culture and museums practice in Gensler's New York office, sits down with Rachel Goslins, the director of Smithsonian's historic Arts + Industries Building (AIB), America's first National Museum, to explore the future of the museum experience.  In this episode, we'll be exploring how museums are adapting to changing visitor expectations and an increasingly digital world, and get an exclusive look into the AIB's groundbreaking new museum experience “FUTURES” which opens to the public on Saturday, November 20, 2021.

The Clement Manyathela Show
South Africans trust in public institutions on the decline

The Clement Manyathela Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:01


Clement speaks to Prof Narnia Bohler-Muller, the Executive director of the Human Sciences Research Council ‘s research programme on democracy, governance and service delivery on the decline in the public's faith in political institutions.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Culture Matters
Denominations and Institutions Part 2: Looking Ahead

Culture Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 42:48


We're continuing our conversation around denominations and institutions with Kyle Worley this week. We consider what the future of denominations, particularly the SBC, could look like in the near future and the implications of a church's affiliation with these institutions. Are they beneficial? Are they detrimental? Are they crumbling and if so, is that a bad thing? 

The Jon Gaunt Show
So have we built a Land fit for Heroes to live in?

The Jon Gaunt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 43:27


Have we got anywhere near Lloyd George's vision? A Royal family being attacked from within by Megan and Harry? Return of sleaze in politics, did it ever go away? Mistrust of the Police and other Institutions. Our Borders wide open and gang warfare on the streets of the UK. Is this a Land fit for heroes and if not , why not. Tell me here. www.jongaunt.com          

CFR On the Record
Higher Education Webinar: The Role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Antonio Flores, president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), leads a conversation on the role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions in higher education. FASKIANOS: Welcome to CFR's Higher Education Webinar. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted and honored to have Dr. Antonio Flores with us today to discuss the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions. Dr. Flores is president and chief executive officer of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Established in 1986, HACU represents more than five hundred colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and Europe. During his tenure as president of HACU, the association has nearly tripled its membership and budget, expanded its programs, and improved legislation for Hispanic Serving Institutions, and increased federal and private funding for HSIs. He previously served as director of programs and services for the Michigan Higher Education Assistance Authority, and the Michigan Higher Education Student Loan Authority. And, needless to say, he's taught at public and private institutions, conducted research and policy studies on higher education issues. And so it really is wonderful to have him with us today to talk about HACU, how HACU is committed to the role of Hispanic Serving Institutions, and to serving underrepresented populations. Obviously, we are very much looking to develop talent for the next generation of foreign policy leaders, and really look forward to this conversation. So, Antonio, thank you for being with us. It would be great if you could talk about the Hispanic Serving Institutions, their role in higher education, and your strategic vision for HACU broadly. FLORES: Thank you, Irina, for those very flattering remarks and introduction. And of course, we're delighted to be part of the series here today and talk a little bit about what HSIs are doing and how they can do more of the great work they've been doing for the nation, and HACU's role as well in promoting them. And suffice to say that Hispanic Serving Institutions have become the backbone of not only Hispanic higher education, but also the American labor force. Because there are more—there are more than 560 now HSIs across the nation, enroll the vast majority, more than 5.2 million of them, of underserved students who historically have not been adequately served in higher education, including Latinos. And it just happens that this population, the Hispanic population, is contributing more than half of all the new workers joining the American labor force today. And that proportion is likely to continue to increase in the years ahead. In addition, of course, they serve scores of African Americans, of Asian Americans, Native Americans, and all Americans. So they are really a microcosm of American diversity. And for that very reason, going forward as these populations continue to increase demographically, their representation in the labor force will only continue to develop. The latest Census Bureau report for 2010 to 2020 indicates that more than 51 percent of all the population growth in the nation is attributed to Hispanics. So there we have it. It's just the reality of the facts. And therefore, HSIs are now the backbone of America's labor force, because ultimately the demands of the global economy are such that we need to step up to the plate and really educate at a much higher level, and train at a much higher level those underserved populations, particular Hispanics, so that we can remain competitive in that global economy. And that includes the preparation of top-notch leaders for foreign service careers. And so if we were to summarize how we view HSIs with respect to America's challenges today, and opportunities in the future, I would say that there are three dimensions that define HSIs vis a vis the United States of America and its future in the world. Number one is diversity. And I already alluded to some of that. But diversity is not just with respect to the fact that they have the most diverse student population on their campuses. But it's also the diversity across types of institutions because we have community colleges, we have regional universities, and we have research-intensive, or R1 institutions. So we have within campuses tremendous diversity, and we have across campuses nationwide institutionally diversity as well. And so that's the name of the game. And that's the name of the game for America, is diversity. And it's the name of the game for the world. It's a very diverse world out there. And so the more attuned those top-notch leaders that were looking to educate in our institutions are with respect to their diversity, the more not only knowledgeable and experienced and sensitive to that diverse reality of the world and of America, the much better leaders they are going to be. And so diversity, again, is that one unavoidable element of our world and of our country. The second, I think, very important element or dimension of HSIs is the dynamism. They are very dynamic institutions that are really doing a magnificent job with fewer resources than the rest of the field. They don't have the big pockets or big endowments. They don't have the applications they need from the federal government they should get. And yet, they excel at educating those who come to their campuses. Just to give you an idea, Opportunity Insights is a name of an organization that does socioeconomic analysis of graduates from students from colleges across the country. And particularly they focus on how institutions educate and position in careers those who come from the lowest quintile of entering freshmen to college. And they believe that those who graduate, they graduate and see what proportion of those who came in the lowest quintile move to the top quintile in terms of earnings. And in the last report I saw, nine of the ten top institutions in that regard were Hispanic Serving Institutions. Nine of the top ten. It's not the Ivy League institutions, for sure. It is those institutions that I mentioned that are part of our group of HSIs. And in fact, the number one is Cal State LA in that report that I saw. And so, again, because they are very dynamic, creative, innovative, and resourceful with respect to using what little they have to optimize the educational outcomes of those who come to their campuses. And not just educational outcomes, but career outcomes. Once they are in the workforce, their earnings are higher than those of others from the same lowest quintile when they enter college. So dynamism is the second major component. And I would say deliverance. Deliverance for underserved populations is another important quality that HSIs represent, because they are ultimately serving—for the most part, the majority of their students are first-generation college students, many of them from immigrant families who are unfamiliar with the educational system and with the intricacies of going through a college education, because they themselves never had that opportunity to pass down. So they are at a very distinct socioeconomic disadvantage coming from those types of families who are also low income, because to be an HSI not only does an institution have to have more than 25 percent of its enrollment being Hispanic, but also they have to show that the majority of their students are Pell Grant eligible—in other words, needy, low-income students. And the other criterion is that they have to spend on average per student less than the average of their peer institutions. So they are efficient, very cost-effective, and they serve the neediest of our society. So there you have it. Diversity, dynamism, and deliverance for the most needed in our society. That's what HSIs are all about. And so they really are in need of much greater support from the federal government, the state governments, and from the corporate community and the philanthropic community. And our association advocates for that to be the case, with some success but not enough. We have been able to increase the appropriations for them from Congress over the years, but they are way behind other cohorts of minority-serving institutions that get much more money per student than HSIs do, despite the fact that they—for instance, they not only educate 67 percent of all the 3.8 million Hispanics in college today; they also educate three times as many African Americans as all the HBCUs combined. Let me repeat that: More than three times as many African Americans go to HSIs as they go to HBCUs, OK? And more than 42 percent of all the Asian Americans in college today attend HSIs. They also educate more than twice as many Native Americans as all the tribal colleges and universities put together. And then we have other groups of different national origins who come to our campuses. So they are extremely diverse. And so that's, in a nutshell, what HSIs are all about. And they've been growing, about thirty new HSIs per year, because demographically it's how the country's moving. There are more Hispanic young people emerging from high school and going to college than from any other group. And conversely, the non-Hispanic White student enrollment has been declining continually year after year for the last ten years. Look at the numbers. And that's not going to stop. In major states, like California and Texas, for example, the two largest in the nation, more than 50 percent—about 52-55 percent of the K-12 enrollment is Hispanic. If you add the other minority populations, overwhelmingly these states futures are diverse and Hispanic. And so is the country. Other states are moving in the same direction, whether it's Florida, or Illinois, or New York, New Jersey. The main states in the nation are moving in those—in that direction. So that's why it's so essential for Congress, the states, corporate America, and philanthropic America to invest in these institutions much more than they have been doing, because they represent the very future of this nation. To the extent that the new generations of graduates coming out of them are equipped with the right tools to succeed as scientists, as technicians, as professionals in whatever field they choose, our country will thrive. And the opposite will happen if we don't. It's that simple. And so that's what I wanted to just briefly say as an introductory commentary on HSIs. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Thank you very much for that. We're going to go to the group now for their questions. (Gives queuing instructions.) So I'm going to first go to Manuel Montoya, who has raised his hand. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And, Dr. Flores, it's a real pleasure to have you on the call. I appreciate all the work that you do for HACU and for Hispanic Serving Institutions. I am with the University of New Mexico. I'm an associate professor in international management at UNM, but I also do a lot of work with my cohorts on supporting HSI—our HSI designation. We are a Hispanic Serving Institution and an R1 institution as well. All of the things you said are really important. And I had a comment and then a question. I think this question of—this idea of diversity being the name of the game is not to be underestimated. I think that the students that go through HSI-designated institutions, I think that they have the potential to reshape and recalibrate what we mean when we say we are ambassadorial in the world. And the United States needs to upgrade and change its relational dynamics, political and economic, to include diverse voices that come from the learned and lived experiences of people who traditionally come from first-generation families, first-generation students. And HSIs are equipped to do that. So my question becomes, you mentioned wanting to track some people into the foreign service exam. But what other types of experiences or opportunities do you think are best practices for students that are coming out of HSIs to participate in the larger international relations frameworks and careers that are setting the global agenda? FLORES: That's a good question, Professor Montoya. And let me share with you briefly something that I mentioned before we started the webinar to friends at CFR. And that is that HACU has a very robust national internship program that places upwards of five hundred undergraduates, and some of our graduate students, with federal agencies, including the State Department. We signed an MOU with the late Secretary Powell, who at that time was very much committed to increasing the number of Latinos in the Foreign Service, and other underrepresented populations. And that remains in place, although not with the numbers that we would like to see. And yet, there are other agencies that also have a foreign or abroad projection, like Department of Agriculture, for example. And others that have offices across the world. And so we are very much into helping them find the right talent they need, and getting them also as interns experience those agencies, and putting them on the right track to become full-fledged employees once they graduate. So that's one of the things that we've been doing. We need to do much more of that. I accept that the number is, as impressive as they may sound, are very minute when it comes to the populations that we're talking about. And our own association has made it a priority to expand its international reach. And we have, depending on the year, anywhere from forty to fifty universities across Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain that are affiliated with us to do precisely what you suggest, which is student mobility and experience abroad. And so—and in both directions, also that they would come to be in the U.S. And so we have the beginnings, I think, of a major push to make sure that many, many more young people who—they have a kind of an almost organic connection to international affairs, in this case Latinos, because most of them come from families who immigrated or have roots in other countries, and are really very much culturally adept to international roles. So your point is well-taken. And you'll see a lot more activity from our end as an association in that regard. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Shoshana Chatfield. Q: Yes, hello. I wanted to say thank you for such a wonderful presentation and for really exposing me to some of the issues that I wasn't aware of previously. I am the president of the United States Naval War College. And since I've been here over the past two years, I have been actively trying to expand our recruiting effort to make our vacancies on our faculty available to members of the community. And yet, I'm not seeing any appreciable difference in the applicant pool. And I wondered if you could advise me how I might approach this differently to raise awareness about hiring to these war colleges who have not traditionally had a high representation of faculty who come from the same backgrounds that you described. FLORES: Thank you. Thank you for your very timely question, President Chatfield. Let me say that one of the first things that I would suggest is that you join our association as a college. Why would that be helpful to your effort? Because then you will connect with presidents and CEOs of five hundred-plus community colleges, regional university, and so forth, and school districts that are also affiliated with that, that are defined as Hispanic-serving school districts. So that even in high school you will have a presence through our association's outreach to them, and that you also would network with peers of diverse institutions across the country who may have robust pipelines of Ph.D. graduates and others who could fit your own aspirations, in terms of getting some of those faculty on your campus, some of those administrators, and some of those as students. Because, at the end of the day, probably—you probably want to have a much more diverse student body. And that can come from precisely that opportunity to not only interact but formally establish relationships with some of those colleges to transfer, for instance, from community colleges or from high schools that we interact with on a regular basis. So that would be one suggestion. We also have in our association a very, very nimble system called ProTalento. It's online. That is P-R-O-T-A-L-E-N-T-O, ProTalento. And that that—you can go to our website, find it. And we have on that website a very robust database of individuals who are looking for opportunities at different colleges. That are already teaching, or doing research, or both, and are looking for other opportunities. And also, we have institutions that are looking for them. And the system basically matches them. So you can go there and find a goldmine, so to speak, of talent. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Great question. And we have a written question, a couple written questions in the chat. This one comes from Andrea Purdy, who is an associate professor of Spanish at Colorado State University. We are anticipating reaching HSI status. And in talking to my students, a comment they have made to me is that they don't always feel welcomed all over the university. There are niches, but overall the sense of belonging is not felt. They also commented that while they are beginning to see themselves in classrooms, they don't see themselves in the faculty. What suggestions do you have for universities to make sure that the inclusivity is felt at all levels? FLORES: Well, it's similar to the previous question in some—in some regards, because ultimately the first thing you want to do as a college or university, it has to be job number one, is to create a climate—a campus climate of support and welcoming feelings for the students, that they feel not only appreciated but they feel really supported and welcome to the institution. And so the point made is how can we recruit or how can we diversify faculty and staff? Well, again, you go—you know, when you want to catch fish, you go fishing where the fish are. And the fish are in some of the HSIs, those that are already more developed institutions. And many of them are regional universities or R1s or R2s. And those could be a source of talent for institutions like Colorado State, that is lacking some of their representation. And of course, I want to insist that please visit ProTalento. And you may be surprised how much success you could have in getting people from that database to consider your institution. But of course, faculty and staff who look like the students are essential to create that culture, that campus climate of appreciation and welcoming, I would say. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Rosa Cervantes, who has a raised hand. And please unmute yourself and tell us your affiliation. Q: Good afternoon. Thank you for taking my questions. My name is Rosa Isela Cervantes. I'm the director of El Centro de la Raza at the University of New Mexico, and also special assistant to the president on Latino Affairs. And I really interested in what you said, Mr. Flores, about the diversity of students at HSIs, and that we serve three times the amount of—if I heard correctly—of African American students at HSIs than BCUs, is that correct? Is that— FLORES: That is correct, yes. Q: OK. And I wanted to see if you could expand a little bit about that, and also maybe think through or talk to how we can do some coalition building with folks. Because I really feel like HSIs are completely underfunded, right? You've stated it, we've heard it. But yet, they're so robust and they do so many different things for so many different students. I wonder how we might continue—and we're a member of HACU—but I wonder how we maybe think through some conversations to really get out the word about that idea, that HSIs are that robust, that HSIs do served large populations of students. And sometimes some of the most neediest students that require more money, right, for their funding. And so I just think that's very interesting. I think—I don't think a whole lot of people know about it or understand that. I had a faculty member at a different institution actually question me, because I had read that somewhere. And I think we need to talk more about it. So I'm just wondering your thoughts about coalition building and what else we can do, and how other ways that HACU needs our support to make that happen. FLORES: Thank you for your excellent question, Ms. Cervantes. And let me share with you that last week I was in Washington, D.C. most of the week and met with a number of Congress individually, including your great senator, Mr. Lujan. And guess what? There was a lot of good conversation about that point. And I have also talked with a number of African American members of Congress who didn't know that, and who actually had themselves—(background noise)—and who actually have themselves a significant number of HSIs in their districts. And they didn't know that they had all these HSIs in their districts. And so I think the word is getting out there. And, more importantly, the appreciation for the fact that these institutions really are very diverse, and not only do they educate the vast majority of Latinos and Latinas, but they also educate a larger number, as we said, of African Americans and others than the HBCUs, for example. And they didn't know that. And then—so I think that mindset might begin to change, because at the end of the day the funding and support should be focused on the students. And ultimately, if you help the neediest of students you have the more diverse population, but you have the fewest dollars per student coming from Congress. There has to be something wrong there with that equation. So there is an inequity that we are, as an association, trying to remedy. And we need all the help we can get from all—our own Latino organizations and HSIs, but also from others including the HBCUs. It's not about reducing funding for them or anything like that. They can and should be getting even more. But not—but HSIs shouldn't be treated as second-class institutions. They are not. They are the backbone, again, of America's labor force, in terms of training that labor force to be competitive in the global economy. So they have to be treated appropriately and equitably. Basically, it's about equity in terms of funding. And right now, things are not at all equitable, but we're changing that gradually. And thank you for your question. Q: Gracias. FASKIANOS: So we have a written—several written questions. So Sandra Castro, who is assistant dean of the undergraduate programs at Adelphi University says: What recommendations do you have for institutions that are striving to become HSIs in preparing for this designation? What internal changes and institutional infrastructure is necessary to truly serve the Latino student body? FLORES: I will suggest three things. One is, begin to work more closely with institutions that are already HSIs and that are doing a good job being HSIs, that are recognized for having, as they say, best practices with respect to being an HSI. And learn from them. Learn how it is that they do what they do well. And begin to then—and the second point is, educate your own leadership at your institution about how they can be much more effective and receptive to the inevitable demographic change in their student population to become an HSI, and how they can make the most of it in terms of student success, and also learning the ropes of how to get grants and funding to improve services for this population. And the third thing that I would recommend very strongly is that, you know, take a very hard look at all of your outreach and marketing materials, and revise them accordingly so that you reflect that commitment to diversity, in particular to Latino inclusion, in terms of bilingual materials and outreach to families and communities. Because many times the decision about whether to go to college or where to go to college by a student is really influenced very heavily by the family, the parents particularly, because of the tremendous pressure that many of them have in starting to work to contribute to the family income, because they come from low-income families. So working with those families and making them aware of the importance of getting a degree, a college degree, and postponing some of that lower-income—some of the minimum-wage salary that they could get as a high school graduate, and working with those families is very important. Working in their language and culture is even more important for some of them. FASKIANOS: Great. I think this is a good segue to the next question from Eric Hoffman, who got an upvote. He's the dean of the Honors College at Miami Dade College. And his question is: How can we get the Hispanic and Latinx students out of their community and expand their aspirations to colleges and universities in states and areas far from home? FLORES: Well, you know, it's an excellent question, in the sense that historically—because these are first-generation college students for the most part, whose families have not had the opportunity to educate themselves in college. And their temptation is to stay home. Especially sometimes it's worse for female students to move away from home. And my suggestion is that you, again, will work with those families as closely as you can to make them aware of the fact that moving away doesn't mean—moving away physically doesn't mean moving away from the family otherwise, that they will ultimately remain connected to the family. And now with technology it's even easier. You know, we have Facetime. We have all kinds of other ways of interacting that were not available just some years ago. And they ultimately need to consider the best options in terms of financial aid and the quality of education they're going to get, and a few of the studies that they want to pursue. Sometimes all of those things are not available locally, so you have to go where all of those are. And I think that once there is a process of education for the family in that regard, they tend to be much more flexible. We experience some of that with our own national internship program, because we place them primarily in the Washington area, but also in other places. And I personally get to intervene sometimes with some families in their language, in Spanish, to reassure them that the young woman that was going to be placed somewhere else in Washington, D.C. or elsewhere was going to be OK, and she was going to come back home after the ten-week experience, or fifteen-week internship. And, guess what? After they experienced that, their siblings—they were trailblazers for their siblings and for neighbors, and all that. Now we don't have that problem, at least with our internship program. We have thousands of applicants and, unfortunately, we can only place about five hundred a year, annually. And so it does pay off to invest in working with families closely. And again, it's a generational effect, because then younger siblings or relatives will not have that kind of issue going forward. FASKIANOS: You had mentioned that you were in D.C. last week meeting with members of Congress. And we obviously have a new secretary of education, Dr. Cardona. Have you seen a shift from the Biden administration in their approach and what they're doing from a federal level to support the HSIs? FLORES: Oh, absolutely. I mean, there is just no question about that. The shift has been dramatic. And this administration and Congress are—have shifted gears and are actually investing more than anything else in people, investing in the economy to create more jobs, investing in education to prepare the labor force much better, investing in health to protect people from not just the pandemic but from other diseases that we experience. And just in general, the infrastructure, they just passed that bill in the House, is to improve the lives of people across cities, across states, by improving their infrastructure. It is not just about roads and bridges. It is also about water systems that are decaying and are affecting the health of people. It is about the lack of access to broadband connectivity. It is all of those things that will improve the lives of people. And so there, no question. And HSIs have improved—again, not to the extent that they should be supported. But we are in a much better situation now than we were just a couple of years ago. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take Nathan Carter's written question, and then Mike Lenaghan, I know you wrote a comment/question in the chat, but I'd love for you just to raise it and speak it, because I'm afraid I might not get it exactly correct. So Nathan Carter from Northern Virginia Community College in the Washington D.C. metro area. I am the—NOVA's chief diversity equity and inclusion officer. We are an emerging HSI. When we look at our enrollment data here in fall 2021, we see a clear decline in quote/unquote “new” Hispanic students, both male and female. We wish to discuss this growing issue and recognize what may be the current obstacles or community issues happening right now in the Hispanic community that will help us explain what we see and how we can reach out to the Hispanic community to help address what could be a growing problem across various states. So I think if you could comment on that, and how to, you know, have that discussion. FLORES: Well, thank you for that question. It's something that, of course, has been exacerbated by the pandemic. Because a lot of our colleges and universities, HSIs and others, did not have the endowments or the money to immediately make—shift gears in the direction of the technology required to move from in-person to online teaching and learning, and to train faculty and staff to manage all of those new systems. And that's on the institutional side, that there was that kind of reality of not getting all of the necessary resources to make that shift immediately and successfully. On the receiving end you have families and communities that do not always have the connectivity to broadband and the devices at home and the space at home to learn online. And so it was a one-two punch—institutional and students were hit very hard. And therefore, many of them withdrew. And apart from the fact that when it comes to the rate of infection, hospitalization and death, Latinos were worse hit than any other population, so much so that during the pandemic Latinos shrank their life expectancy by three years, compared to two years for Black and 0.68 years, so less than a year, for non-Hispanic Whites. So you do have all of those things. And ultimately, that means that the students served by these institutions come from those very families that were hardest hit in their health as well. So they couldn't go to school. They were trying to survive. And many did not. And so there was a drop in the enrollment, and particularly at community colleges, is where the—they were the hardest hit with respect to that, just like that community that is emerging as an HSI. So we are pushing very hard for that to be remedied, not just for the pandemic, but for the long term. Because I think the hybrid models of teaching and learning should—will remain in place for the long haul. And we need to make sure that those families, those communities that have been historically underserved and underfunded get that necessary technology at home to do that type of educational experience. We also need to make sure that the institutions that are suffering the most get the most help to beef up their infrastructure. And not just in terms of technology, but also in terms of expanding classrooms and also creating labs that are very expensive to create for technology of science or engineering types of degrees, which are the most in demand. And in some states, it's even—it's worse than in others because a lot of students are homeless. A lot of students are homeless. And in a state like California, where we have the largest concentration of Latinos, for example, that problem has been rampant and recognized by the state as a huge priority. So what they need to do is also build affordable housing even on campuses, so that those students have a place to live in a decent, humane way. And so there are many things that come to create this perfect storm against populations like low-income Latinos, and African Americans, and others. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to ask Mike Lenaghan to ask his question live. Q: Thank you very much, Irina. And it's a pleasure to see you, Dr. Flores. I am Mike Lenaghan from Miami Dade College, and truly cherish the empowerment we've enjoyed through the vehicle of HACU. It's been my experience, basically with a great deal of labor-intensive and purposeful leadership development, to have my scholars—just me, as one faculty member—successfully transfer to over 139 colleges and universities in the United States, all of whom required financial support and almost all of whom were able to avoid loans. This is over a twenty-year period. My question is: How might I, as a faculty member, also someone who's labor-intensive, be empowered, possibly mediated by HACU, to share basically how to set up my Hispanic students and their families and their relatives for the kind of success my scholars have enjoyed at Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Georgetown, UVA, Duke, UCal Berkeley, and so on? Which, when the right combination of chemistry and self-identification occurs, each of my Hispanic/Latinx scholars basically knows what they uniquely bring and add, as well as what they uniquely can address and engage in each school. I realize I am just a microcosm in a larger macrocosm, but I'm wondering does HACU have a role to play that might mediate some education and sharing, not just a book or a strategy, but something that could be shared, including some of what I like to call my all-stars, who have enjoyed operating in the context of HACU as a launching pad. Thank you, sir. FLORES: Thank you for your very, very important work, Professor Lenaghan. And thank you for your very caring teaching and supporting our students, your scholars. And ultimately, you have a lot to offer to the academic community as a faculty who cares about these students not only doing well but excelling and going to places that perhaps their families never thought of them being able to go. And I think it begins with learning from people like you what is it you've been doing so well to help those that you have helped to excel. And HACU can be a platform for you to share that. We ultimately have annual conferences and other meetings where your expertise and your success can be shared with others to adapt it to their own needs and replicate what you've been doing so well in other places, so that many more can go onto those very selective institutions, and others. And of course, I don't know if we've been connecting—I insist on this point, on connecting with families, because many of the Latino families—and maybe in the Miami area it's a little different because a lot of the Cuban and South American families perhaps come from a more middle-class background than in places like Texas or California. And maybe they had already some collegiate experience in their home countries, and they immigrated there, or whatever. But that helps a lot, OK? When they come with that background. But when they don't, when they are immigrants who come without even a high school diploma from their home countries, and they don't know the language, their highest expectation is at least to get their high school diploma and start working somewhere. And so taking them to the next level, it takes a lot of work. And it takes a lot of work in terms of making sure that they understand that if their child has the talent, and has the persistence and discipline, et cetera, et cetera, to go places, that they can be very helpful to him or her in ensuring that there is a space at home where they can study, that they do concentrate on their studies, and that they really aim for those places that you mentioned and don't settle for second-best of going to some institution, but make that their goal: I'm going to go to X or Y Ivy League or very selective institution because I have with it takes, but it's going to take a lot of nurturing and support. And the parents can be very helpful, even if they don't have an education, by really making sure that their child has the space and the time at home to concentrate and study. That will go a long way. But really, let them flourish. And so HACU can be a platform in three different ways. One is, allowing individuals like yourself, who are excelling in their teaching, to share their best practices with others. Secondly, we also, of course, have to recognize that we have some programs already in HACU that are very effective, especially those that are focused on moving a critical mass into STEM degrees. And we're going to emphasize that even more going forward. And thirdly, that we, as an association, have the ability to influence federal agencies and others—and corporations to invest in the kinds of practices that you may be successful at. And I'll give you a couple examples. We just got a planning grant from NSF, HACU did. And we are almost done with the planning for one year, because we want to submit a multiyear, multimillion grant to NSF with an emphasis on moving as high as possible, to the PhD. in fact, Latinos all the way from community college up to the research one institutions. And we are working on that proposal to be submitted early next year. But we could, I'm sure, learn from what you're doing. And so we could influence agencies to also invest more. We have a new program under NSF for HSIs that you can apply for a grant to expand what you're doing with more students, more parents. And the same thing is true with respect to other agencies. I was just in Washington last week and met with the undersecretary of the Department of Commerce to discuss the technology program, where our institutions will each have a role to play. And so we have the role of advocating and influencing agencies and Congress to invest in institutions like yours, Miami Dade, and professors like you, so that you can do more of exactly what you are doing. So please feel free to send us an email at HACU. You can send it to my attention. And I'll make sure that it finds its way to the right staff in charge of the kinds of programs that you are dealing with. We do have great staff that follows up on situations like yours. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. We will circulate after this an email with some of the resources you've mentioned and the email that we should be sharing, Dr. Flores. So we have another question, and it follows onto Mike's question, from Arturo Osorio, who's an associate professor at Rutgers University. Any advice or programs that you know to help connect the parents of the Hispanic Latino Students to the higher education experience? Many of our students are first-generation Americans and also first-generation college students. This creates a large cultural and experiential gap for parents to bridge on their understanding of what kids are going through and support them. As a result, many of the students have very stressful moments as they navigate away from the family to their college life. FLORES: Yeah. Excellent question. And my suggestion is that please send us an email. We have an office in HACU that is designated to promote pre-K-12 and higher education collaboration. The executive director of that office is Jeanette Morales. Jeanette Morales has a team, and they work with clusters or consortia of colleges, universities and K-12 schools, particularly secondary schools, to move out successfully many more of those underserved students to college and be better prepared to succeed in college. It is more substantive than just a college visitation thing or admissions officers talking with them at an event. They actually have early college interventions for high school students. So they actually earn even college credit when they are creating high school for the most advanced students. But they also have opportunity for professors from some of those universities and community college to teach as visiting teachers in those high schools, where they may not get the resources to hire faculty for advanced courses and for the courses that are required to be successful in especially STEM degrees, like advanced math, advanced science, and so forth. So that office and our association has been in place for the last seventeen years. It was that far back when we first saw that more than half of the battle to succeed in college has to be won in K-12. And it has to be won with families on your side, because first-generation college students do depend largely on families to make decision after high school. So please feel free to contact Jeanette Morales or myself in my email at our San Antonio headquarters. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. We are at the end of our time. I just wanted to ask if you could just do really briefly what you're doing internationally to encourage—you know, and we don't have a lot of time. But I don't want to leave without—you had told me in our pre-call just a little bit. So if I you could just give us a wrap-up on that, that would be fantastic. FLORES: Yeah. We think of international education not as an appendage, not as a luxury, not as an add-on proposition, but as an integral part of a college education, in this case. And we hope that the vast majority of our young people will have a chance to experience a study abroad. And of course, it's like a big dream, because right now if you look at the numbers, only about 5 to 7 percent, max, of all the 350,000 American students going to study abroad are Latino. And the same number, roughly the same percentage, is African Americans and others. And conversely, only about maybe 3 percent of all the students coming from other countries come from Latin America—1.3 percent only from Mexico, which is right next door to us, OK? So that has to change. And it has to change because people who have an international experience ultimately expand their horizons and their vision of the world and are more effective not only professionals but citizens of the world. And we feel that it is very important for our young people to do that, not as a—as a kind of a luxury, or anything like that, but as an integral part of their development as professionals. And so we plan on being even more keen on affecting legislation that will provide more resources for our institutions and international programming, and ourselves as an association being much more engaged in getting more international institutions to affiliate with us to promote that mobility, that experience, independent of whether the government decides to invest or not. FASKIANOS: Wonderful. Thank you very much. Antonio Flores, this has been really a great discussion. And thanks to everybody for their terrific questions and comments. We really appreciate it. HACU is lucky to have you. We're fortunate to have you leading this great association. As I mentioned, we will send out a link to this webinar, also some of the resources you mentioned, email addresses and the like. And I'm sure everybody knows it, but it's worth repeating, the HACU website, HACU.net. You can follow them on Twitter at @HACUnews. So go there. You can also follow us at @CFR_Academic. And please go to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for CFR's resources on international affairs and the like. So I hope you're all staying well. Dr. Flores, thank you again. And we look forward to your continuing involvement in this webinar series. The next invitation will be for December, and we will be sending that out under separate cover. FLORES: Thank you very much, Irina. Thank you, everyone. (END)

Scott Adams Show on Red State Talk Radio
111021 Podcast, Fauci and his Pentagon Bioweapons, Emerald Robinson, RINO institutions, Revoke Woke

Scott Adams Show on Red State Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 55:06


111021 Podcast, Fauci and his Pentagon Bioweapons, Emerald Robinson, RINO institutions, Revoke Woke

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast
E353 - MM - Should You Focus on Institutions or Accredited Investors?

Cash Flow Connections - Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 9:51


In this Monday Minutes episode, I provide my perspective on the age-old question… Should you focus on institutional investors, or accredited investors?  We've all thought about it!  Wouldn't it be nice to receive a $10MM check from ONE investor?  Maybe!... But those check sizes usually come with strings, as well as some significant implications about how your lifestyle design.  Click the link in the comments to hear my thoughts…  Interested in investing in ATMs? Check out our webinar.   Please note that investing in private placement securities entails a high degree of risk, including illiquidity of the investment and loss of principal. Please refer to the subscription agreement for a discussion of risk factors. Tired of scrambling for capital?  Check out our new FREE webinar -  How to Ensure You Never Scramble for Capital Again (The 3 Capital-Raising Secrets). Click Here to register. CFC Podcast Facebook Group

Bankless
91 - Brian Armstrong and The Future of Coinbase

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 98:56


Brian Armstrong is the Founder and CEO of Coinbase. As a pillar of innovation and adoption in crypto, Brian is playing a pivotal role in determining the kind of future we'll see in the space. The Crypto movement is a battle for hearts and minds, and Coinbase is fighting on the front lines. Building bridges between the legacy world and the Metaverse is a daunting task, but Brian has been a headstrong leader with a powerful vision. Coinbase finds itself in a position to maximize a user's choice for what they do with their assets. With new features on the way like their NFT platform, Coinbase is steadily opening the doors for composability, decentralization, and ultimately… sovereignty. ✨ EPISODE DEBRIEF ✨ https://shows.banklesshq.com/p/exclusive-debrief-brian-armstrong  ------

Culture Matters
Denominations & Institutions Part 1: Looking Back

Culture Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 51:08


This week is part one of a two-part episode exploring denominations and religious institutions in America. Specifically, we talk with Kyle Worley about the origins of denominations in America and how they inform our present religious and political climate. Kyle is a long-time friend of Culture Matters and is also a Pastor at Mosaic Church in Richardson, TX. as well as co-host and executive producer of the Knowing Faith podcast.

American Conservative University
Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions, Laura Ingraham and Andrew Klavan- Where have all the men gone?

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:35


Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions, Laura Ingraham and Andrew Klavan- Where have all the men gone?   Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions Laura Ingraham- Where have all the men gone? Andrew Klavan- Transphobia Is A Slur Used To SILENCE People   Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions The Deep Rot in the Institutional Conservative Movement Dinesh D'Souza Podcast https://youtu.be/pt89BAOxnh0 8,578 views Nov 3, 2021 Dinesh D'Souza 629K subscribers Newsmax White House correspondent Emerald Robinson joins Dinesh to discuss Project Lincoln, National Review, and the remaking of the Republican Right.  — Dinesh D'Souza is an author and filmmaker. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he was a senior domestic policy analyst in the Reagan administration. He also served as a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is the author of many bestselling books, including "Illiberal Education," "What's So Great About Christianity," "America: Imagine a World Without Her," "The Roots of Obama's Rage," "Death of a Nation," and "United States of Socialism." His documentary films "2016: Obama's America," "America," "Hillary's America," "Death of a Nation," and "Trump Card" are among the highest-grossing political documentaries of all time. He and his wife Debbie are also executive producers of the acclaimed feature film "Infidel." — Want to connect with Dinesh D'Souza online for more hard-hitting analysis of current events in America? Here's how: Get Dinesh unfiltered, uncensored and unchained on Locals: https://dinesh.locals.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dsouzadinesh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dineshdsouza Rumble: https://rumble.com/dineshdsouza Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dineshjdsouza Parler: https://parler.com/user/DineshDSouza GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/dineshdsouza Email: https://dineshdsouza.com/contact-us/ We would like to thank our advertisers for Today's podcast: http://www.mypillow.com​ http://www.birchgold.com​ https://www.expressvpn.com/dinesh https://www.relieffactor.com https://balanceofnature.com Send your audio or video questions at QuestionDinesh@gmail.com Please make them around 30 seconds so we can use it on the podcast! Trump Card DVD: http://salemnowstore.com/ Our movie Infidel https://www.infidel911.com Watch Danielle D'Souza Gill Counter Culture Show -click below: https://www.theepochtimes.com/anti-am... Articles: Debbie's articles in El American https://elamerican.com/author/debbie-... Latest : https://elamerican.com/crossing-over-... Movies https://www.trumpcardthemovie.com https://www.infidel911.com https://salemnow.com/no-safe-spaces/ Promo code DINESH FOR NO SAFE SPACES MOVIE ON SALEMNOW.COM https://watch.salemnow.com/products/w... https://watch.salemnow.com/products/c... PROMO Code Dinesh Songs Debbie D'Souza sings America The Beautiful music video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t03R3... Trump Card Original Soundtrack available on iTunes Danielle D'Souza Gill books The Choice: The Abortion Divide in America – Danielle D'Souza Gill https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... More of Dinesh D'Souza Books: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/what... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unit... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/deat... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/rona... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-...   Ingraham: Where have all the men gone? https://youtu.be/Jan2QRtEtkk 1,208,224 views Oct 30, 2021 Fox News 8.36M subscribers Laura Ingraham explains that America is quite lost #FoxNews #Ingraham Subscribe to Fox News! https://bit.ly/2vBUvAS Watch more Fox News Video: http://video.foxnews.com Watch Fox News Channel Live: http://www.foxnewsgo.com/ FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service delivering breaking news as well as political and business news. The number one network in cable, FNC has been the most-watched television news channel for 18 consecutive years. According to a 2020 Brand Keys Consumer Loyalty Engagement Index report, FOX News is the top brand in the country for morning and evening news coverage. A 2019 Suffolk University poll named FOX News as the most trusted source for television news or commentary, while a 2019 Brand Keys Emotion Engagement Analysis survey found that FOX News was the most trusted cable news brand. A 2017 Gallup/Knight Foundation survey also found that among Americans who could name an objective news source, FOX News was the top-cited outlet. Owned by FOX Corporation, FNC is available in nearly 90 million homes and dominates the cable news landscape, routinely notching the top ten programs in the genre. Watch full episodes of your favorite shows The Five: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Special Report with Bret Baier: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Fox News Primetime: https://video.foxnews.com/playlist/on... Tucker Carlson Tonight: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Hannity: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... The Ingraham Angle: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Fox News @ Night: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Follow Fox News on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoxNews/ Follow Fox News on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoxNews/   Transphobia Is A Slur Used To SILENCE People https://youtu.be/Uvpd0tEWHfY 6,916 views Nov 1, 2021 Andrew Klavan 303K subscribers Why do the powerful seek to undermine the individual and the human body at every turn? Watch the full episode here: https://bit.ly/2WScLnf Watch full episodes of The Andrew Klavan Show here: https://bit.ly/3kHz06I Take back the culture from the Hollywood elites. Get 25% off your Daily Wire membership with code DONOTCOMPLY: https://utm.io/udSDQ To listen to this episode, subscribe to The Andrew Klavan Show on Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2KM6HCG  Like this video? For more Andrew Klavan and Daily Wire content, subscribe to this channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyhE... the bell for notifications so you never miss a story! #AndrewKlavan #Chappelle #Transphobia #DailyWire LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos everyday. http://bit.ly/2QA8RbN

American Conservative University
Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions, Laura Ingraham and Andrew Klavan- Where have all the men gone?

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:35


Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions, Laura Ingraham and Andrew Klavan- Where have all the men gone?   Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions Laura Ingraham- Where have all the men gone? Andrew Klavan- Transphobia Is A Slur Used To SILENCE People   Dinesh D'Souza- Big Tech Buying off Conservative Institutions The Deep Rot in the Institutional Conservative Movement Dinesh D'Souza Podcast https://youtu.be/pt89BAOxnh0 8,578 views Nov 3, 2021 Dinesh D'Souza 629K subscribers Newsmax White House correspondent Emerald Robinson joins Dinesh to discuss Project Lincoln, National Review, and the remaking of the Republican Right.  — Dinesh D'Souza is an author and filmmaker. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he was a senior domestic policy analyst in the Reagan administration. He also served as a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is the author of many bestselling books, including "Illiberal Education," "What's So Great About Christianity," "America: Imagine a World Without Her," "The Roots of Obama's Rage," "Death of a Nation," and "United States of Socialism." His documentary films "2016: Obama's America," "America," "Hillary's America," "Death of a Nation," and "Trump Card" are among the highest-grossing political documentaries of all time. He and his wife Debbie are also executive producers of the acclaimed feature film "Infidel." — Want to connect with Dinesh D'Souza online for more hard-hitting analysis of current events in America? Here's how: Get Dinesh unfiltered, uncensored and unchained on Locals: https://dinesh.locals.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dsouzadinesh Twitter: https://twitter.com/dineshdsouza Rumble: https://rumble.com/dineshdsouza Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dineshjdsouza Parler: https://parler.com/user/DineshDSouza GETTR: https://gettr.com/user/dineshdsouza Email: https://dineshdsouza.com/contact-us/ We would like to thank our advertisers for Today's podcast: http://www.mypillow.com​ http://www.birchgold.com​ https://www.expressvpn.com/dinesh https://www.relieffactor.com https://balanceofnature.com Send your audio or video questions at QuestionDinesh@gmail.com Please make them around 30 seconds so we can use it on the podcast! Trump Card DVD: http://salemnowstore.com/ Our movie Infidel https://www.infidel911.com Watch Danielle D'Souza Gill Counter Culture Show -click below: https://www.theepochtimes.com/anti-am... Articles: Debbie's articles in El American https://elamerican.com/author/debbie-... Latest : https://elamerican.com/crossing-over-... Movies https://www.trumpcardthemovie.com https://www.infidel911.com https://salemnow.com/no-safe-spaces/ Promo code DINESH FOR NO SAFE SPACES MOVIE ON SALEMNOW.COM https://watch.salemnow.com/products/w... https://watch.salemnow.com/products/c... PROMO Code Dinesh Songs Debbie D'Souza sings America The Beautiful music video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t03R3... Trump Card Original Soundtrack available on iTunes Danielle D'Souza Gill books The Choice: The Abortion Divide in America – Danielle D'Souza Gill https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... More of Dinesh D'Souza Books: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/what... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amer... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/unit... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/deat... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/rona... https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-...   Ingraham: Where have all the men gone? https://youtu.be/Jan2QRtEtkk 1,208,224 views Oct 30, 2021 Fox News 8.36M subscribers Laura Ingraham explains that America is quite lost #FoxNews #Ingraham Subscribe to Fox News! https://bit.ly/2vBUvAS Watch more Fox News Video: http://video.foxnews.com Watch Fox News Channel Live: http://www.foxnewsgo.com/ FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service delivering breaking news as well as political and business news. The number one network in cable, FNC has been the most-watched television news channel for 18 consecutive years. According to a 2020 Brand Keys Consumer Loyalty Engagement Index report, FOX News is the top brand in the country for morning and evening news coverage. A 2019 Suffolk University poll named FOX News as the most trusted source for television news or commentary, while a 2019 Brand Keys Emotion Engagement Analysis survey found that FOX News was the most trusted cable news brand. A 2017 Gallup/Knight Foundation survey also found that among Americans who could name an objective news source, FOX News was the top-cited outlet. Owned by FOX Corporation, FNC is available in nearly 90 million homes and dominates the cable news landscape, routinely notching the top ten programs in the genre. Watch full episodes of your favorite shows The Five: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Special Report with Bret Baier: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Fox News Primetime: https://video.foxnews.com/playlist/on... Tucker Carlson Tonight: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Hannity: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... The Ingraham Angle: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Fox News @ Night: http://video.foxnews.com/playlist/lon... Follow Fox News on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FoxNews/ Follow Fox News on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoxNews/   Transphobia Is A Slur Used To SILENCE People https://youtu.be/Uvpd0tEWHfY 6,916 views Nov 1, 2021 Andrew Klavan 303K subscribers Why do the powerful seek to undermine the individual and the human body at every turn? Watch the full episode here: https://bit.ly/2WScLnf Watch full episodes of The Andrew Klavan Show here: https://bit.ly/3kHz06I Take back the culture from the Hollywood elites. Get 25% off your Daily Wire membership with code DONOTCOMPLY: https://utm.io/udSDQ To listen to this episode, subscribe to The Andrew Klavan Show on Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2KM6HCG  Like this video? For more Andrew Klavan and Daily Wire content, subscribe to this channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyhE... the bell for notifications so you never miss a story! #AndrewKlavan #Chappelle #Transphobia #DailyWire LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos everyday. http://bit.ly/2QA8RbN

Events from the Brookings Institution
Greater transparency for development finance institutions

Events from the Brookings Institution

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 83:05


Wednesday, Nov 03, 2021 10:00 AM EDT - 11:30 AM EDT Online only   Join the conversation on Twitter using #DFItransparency Development finance is critical to global development, including for the achievement of the sustainable development goals, low-income countries' recovery from the pandemic, and the $100 billion commitment for climate finance. But to know whether finance and development goals are being met—and to keep institutions on track—we need better information on financial flows and how they impact development. Despite the scale of financing by development finance institutions (DFIs), few share ​detailed information on their private sector portfolios. This makes it difficult to assess their development impact and to foster learning within this space. Greater transparency will lay the foundation for more informed decisionmaking, more accountability, and better allocation of resources. On November 3, the Center for Sustainable Development at Brookings hosted a virtual event to create space for DFIs, civil society organizations, and the private sector to engage with key issues on DFI transparency. As part of the event, Publish What You Fund launched the report “Advancing DFI Transparency – The rationale and roadmap for better impact, accountability, and markets.” A panel discussed recommendations for greater global disclosure and how donors can better engage with national stakeholders and improve the publication of their development financing. The event introduced a new DFI Transparency Tool.   Subscribe to Brookings Events on iTunes, send feedback email to events@brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. To learn more about upcoming events, visit our website. Brookings Events is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

Cultures monde
Hamas : l'impossible opération séduction

Cultures monde

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 58:04


durée : 00:58:04 - Cultures Monde - par : Florian Delorme - Mis au ban de la scène politique mondiale, le Hamas multiplie les appels du pied à l'opinion publique palestinienne, y compris en dehors de Gaza, pour se poser en principal défenseur de sa cause. - invités : Leïla Seurat Chercheuse associée au Centre de Recherches Sociologiques sur le Droit et les Institutions pénales (CESDIP) et à l'Observatoire des Mondes Arabes et Musulmans (OMAM); Sarah Daoud Doctorante au CERI de Sciences-Po; Marion Slitine Chercheuse EHESS/ Mucem au Centre Norbert Elias

Wake Up to Money
Follow the Money

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 52:25


Institutions representing $130 trillion or two fifths of the world's wealth have pledged to support net zero goals. Should the emphasis be on moving money away from polluting companies and into greener technology? Or should governments be getting tougher with the rules? Mark Syred talks to the boss of global construction firm Mace about what it's doing to be greener. As the cost of diesel soars to record highs, what do you do if your business depends on it? Mark talks to the boss of a Bognor based coach company. And after a rough 18 months, will relatives be spending more on the kids in their families this year? #WakeUpToMoney With Mark Syred

The Lakers Legacy Podcast
Ep. 379: Incremental Institutions (Carmelo Anthony Continues to Super-Nova, the Lakers Hit An Early Stride)

The Lakers Legacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 45:18


The Melo Mania just won't end. And whaddya know - the Lakers look a helluva lot better with the King! Outside of that, they're all slowly, as a team, starting to figure some things out! Outline: Carmelo Anthony: The Greatest Shooter In Lakers History? Some Crazy Melo 3pt Shooting Stats That Put Things Into Context What's Starting to Work for the Lakers? A Russell Westbrook Temperature Check & More! ... Intro/Outro Music Provided By: Hello Harry - "Forever" (Search His Page Up on SoundCloud for More #Litty Beats) ... Please also Rate & Review us 5-stars on the Apple Podcast App.Patreon: Patreon.com/TheLakersLegacyPodcast YouTube - Lakers Legacy Twitter - @LakersLegacyPod Instagram: @lakerslegacypod Listen & Subscribe to us on: Apple, Spotify, Anchor, Google Play, etc. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Money on the Left
Radical Heterodoxies & Parallel Institutions w/ Mat Forstater

Money on the Left

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 99:34


Mat Forstater joins Money on the Left to discuss the origins of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), the vicissitudes of heterodox economics, and the challenges of building alternative institutions in and beyond the academy. As one of the principal architects of MMT, as well as teacher and advisor to many of the more recognized MMT scholars and advocates today, Forstater is perhaps the best equipped heterodox economist to give us the details on the innovative assumptions and arguments that created the firmament for what we now know as Modern Monetary Theory. More importantly, how Forstater came to shape the project greatly defamiliarizes popular assumptions about MMT, which tend to reduce what is in truth a rich intellectual and political movement to a narrow and technocratic set of truisms and just-so stories. From experimental poetry and Black political economy to the problems of futurity and invention, Forstater's circuitous path reveals MMT's origins to be far more interdisciplinary and heterogeneous than it is often understood to be by opponents and advocates alike.Visit our Patreon page here: https://www.patreon.com/MoLsuperstructureMusic by Nahneen Kula: www.nahneenkula.comTranscriptThe following was transcribed by Richard Farrell and has been lightly edited for clarity.

Arik Korman
The Politics of a Darkening America

Arik Korman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 22:20


Keith Boykin, CNN political commentator, New York Times best-selling author, and a former White House aide to President Bill Clinton, discusses whether the end of white supremacy in the United States is inevitable as demographics shift, how we can agree on what's real and what's not, and who we are as a country. Keith's new book is Race Against Time: The Politics of a Darkening America.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The American Idea: How Should We Interpret the Constitution? with Donald Drakeman | Special Conversations (#13)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


In this episode of The American Idea, Jeff welcomes Donald Drakeman, Distinguished Research Professor at the University of Notre Dame and the Founding Chairman of the Advisory Council of the James Madison Program in Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University for a conversation how we should interpret the Constitution. Donald is a renowned constitutional scholar, […]

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare

Meet Our Guests: Dr. Arghavan Salles is a bariatric surgeon at Stanford University. She is a Special Advisor for DEI Programs for the Department of Medicine, and Senior Research Scholar at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research. She is also a keynote speaker, researcher, and writer, focusing on topics like gender bias, physician well-being, and COVID-19. Dr. Ariela Marshall is a hematologist and Director for Women's Thrombosis and Hemostasis at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Marshall's research has also touched on gender bias and physician work-life balance. Dr. Salles and Dr. Marshall were recently featured in The New York Times for their comments on the unique fertility challenges women physicians experience. In This Episode: Dr. Marshall and Dr. Salles share a candid conversation about physician fertility. Both wish they had been given more information about fertility earlier and been encouraged to think about what they wanted their family to look like. We discuss the demanding nature of medical training and the lasting effect it can have on the body. In our current system, juggling a full-time job, or training, as well as fertility treatments is physically, emotionally, and financially draining. Institutions need to change both policy and culture around fertility. Additionally, the focus is often on women, but men face fertility challenges as well, and should be part of the discussion. Before we are doctors, or any career title, we are people. Key Moments: The time commitment for an M.D. (3:22)  Think about family planning earlier (12:13) Fertility treatment experience (14:28)How medical training needs to change (19:31) Bringing men into the fertility conversation (30:23)

Off the Chain
#702 Bitcoin Will Protect Institutions From Economic Collapse w/ Greg Foss

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 37:43


Greg Foss is the CFO and Bitcoin Strategist at Validus Power Corp. He has spent over 30 years of his career in various credit markets, where he has managed hundreds of millions of dollars.   In this conversation, we discuss bitcoin, negative yielding bonds, institutional asset allocation, pricing energy in bitcoin, and why $2 million is Greg's big number.  ======================= My friends at Coin Cloud will give you $50 in FREE Bitcoin when you buy $200 or more at any of their 4,000+ machines. Use promo code POMP to get your free Bitcoin. For details or to find your nearest Coin Cloud machine, visit www.Coin.Cloud/Pomp Coin Cloud has been serving customers since 2014 and has established itself as the world's leading digital currency machine (DCM) operator. More than just a Bitcoin ATM, Coin Cloud machines make it easy to buy and sell Bitcoin and 30+ other digital assets with cash. To get your $50 in free Bitcoin, visit www.Coin.Cloud/Pomp ======================= Compass Mining is the world's first online marketplace for bitcoin mining hardware and hosting. Compass was founded with the goal of making it easy for everyone to mine bitcoin. Visit compassmining.io to start mining bitcoin today! ======================= AG1 by Athletic Greens, the category-leading superfood product, brings comprehensive and convenient daily nutrition to everybody. Keeping up with the research, knowing what to do, and taking a bunch of pills and capsules is hard on the stomach and hard to keep up with. To help each of us be at our best, they simplify the path to better nutrition by giving you the one thing with all the best things.                                                                                                   ONE scoop of AG1 contains 75 vitamins, minerals and whole food-sourced ingredients, including a multivitamin, multimineral, probiotic, greens superfood blend and more in one convenient daily serving. The special blend of high-quality, bioavailable ingredients in a scoop of AG1 work together to fill the nutritional gaps in your diet, support energy and focus, aid with gut health and digestion, and support a healthy immune system, - effectively replacing multiple products or pills with one healthy, delicious drink.                  To make it easy, Athletic Greens is going to give you an immune supporting FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase if you visit athleticgreens.com/pomp today. Again, simply visit athleticgreens.com/pomp to take control of your health and give AG1 a try. =======================

Legally Brief
Change Agent Dawn Massabni - Part 2: How A Mother Transformed Tragedy into Change

Legally Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 33:53


The Legally Brief Podcast Presents... "How to Make Our Institutions Work" Corporate change agents, disruptors, and survivors want institutions plagued by discrimination, harassment, sexual and political abuse to stop, listen and reform. Are institutions unable, unwilling or indifferent to change? Institutions are not dead lifeless brick and mortar structures.  At their heart, our judicial, corporate, educational and religious institutions are made of living breathing human beings.  So it goes without saying that identifying, correcting and halting institutional abuses benefits everyone. To bring about sustainable change we need a method or blueprint.  On this and future episodes, I discuss how using my "ACTIVE" method can change systems that abuse power and violate trust. Today, I continue my conversation with Change Agent Dawn Massabni who discusses how she transformed tragedy into change that benefits us all.  Sharing is a Good Thing!!! You know a parent, athlete or friend that can use the information in this episode, so go ahead, and social share the link... Don't forget to download this episode. Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast, Stitcher or your favorite platform. Tune into the Legally Brief Youtube channel. Visit jsaunderslawfirm.com for the free "Parent's Guide to Surviving Your Child's Abuse." Follow me on Instagram here. This podcast is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this podcast is legal advice, counsel or guidance. No offer, statement or representation has been made to serve as your attorney in any capacity.   No attorney-client relationship has been created. This information is general and may not be applicable to your particular circumstances. You must review your particular circumstances with a licensed attorney.   

So what you're saying is...
Future of the West: Should Traditionalists Try to Take Back Control of Institutions or Just Give Up?

So what you're saying is...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 35:52


Our guest on this week's #SWYSI is journalist Tim Stanley, author of the new book: Whatever Happened to Tradition: History, Belonging & The Future of the West. For Tim, the West feels lost. Brexit, Trump, the coronavirus: we hurtle from one crisis to another, lacking definition, terrified that our best days are behind us. As Tim explains to Peter Whittle, the central argument of his book is that we can only face the future with hope if we have a proper sense of tradition – political, social and religious. We ignore our past at our peril. The problem, Tim argues, is that the Western tradition is anti-tradition, that we have a habit of discarding old ways and old knowledge, leaving us uncertain how to act or, even, of who we really are. The good news, he argues, is that tradition can also be rebuilt. It's been done before. The process is fraught with danger, but the ultimate prize of rediscovering tradition is self-knowledge and freedom. To buy Tim's book, or for more information, see here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Whatever-Hap... --------------- SUBSCRIBE: If you are enjoying the show, please subscribe to our channel on YouTube (click the Subscribe Button underneath the video and then Click on the Bell icon next to it to make sure you Receive All Notifications) AUDIO: If you prefer Audio you can subscribe on itunes or Soundcloud. Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-923838732 itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/s... SUPPORT/DONATE: The NCF Channel is still very new and to continue to produce quality programming we need your support. Your donations will help ensure the channel not only continues but can grow into a major online platform challenging the cultural orthodoxies dominant in our institutions, public life and media. PAYPAL/ CARD PAYMENTS - ONE TIME & MONTHLY: You can donate in a variety of ways via our website: http://www.newcultureforum.org.uk/#do... It is set up to accept one time and monthly donations. ABOUT THE SHOW: So What You're Saying Is... (SWYSI) is a weekly discussion show with experts and significant figures from the political, cultural and academic worlds. The host is Peter Whittle (@PRWhittle), Founder & Director of The New Culture Forum, a Westminster-based think tank that seeks to challenge the cultural orthodoxies dominant in the media, academia, and British culture / society at large. JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Web: http://www.newcultureforum.org.uk F: https://www.facebook.com/NCultureForum/ Y: http://www.youtube.com/c/NewCultureForum T: http://www.twitter.com/NewCultureForum (@NewCultureForum)

Bankless
89 - Institutions are Bullish | Eric Peters

Bankless

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 107:34


Eric Peters is the Founder and CEO of One River Digital Asset Management. In this episode, he joins the Bankless Podcast to bring the perspective of a traditional hedge fund manager into a crypto context. Spending his career in the markets, his insights to the macro environment are vast and inform his investing decisions, and he sees crypto as a pathway to a renaissance – but also to a dystopia. Seeing a 'quantum' level change underway, Eric explores the bumpy road ahead with thoughtful views on generation gaps, income inequality, and the power of digital assets. Eric's approach is a pragmatic one, addressing the crypto revolution in realistic terms that makes these paradigm shifts feel simultaneously instant and drawn out. ✨ EPISODE DEBRIEF ✨ https://shows.banklesshq.com/p/exclusive-debrief-institutions-are  *****

Magic Internet Money
Cape Breton Bitcoin Culture

Magic Internet Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 147:36


Brad Mills invites fellow Cape Breton bitcoiners Steven Manley and Dominic onto the show to discuss early adoption of crypto and its relation to Cape Breton culture. Steven talks about his past involving early cryptography, Brad elaborates on the state and history of Cape Breton. Dominic talks about his history retiring from the military and retirement in Cape Breton. The group criticizes governments and their stances on Bitcoin and altcoins, as well as the problems facing not just Bitcoin, but the entire crypto space as regulators come to collect.Time Stamps00:00:18 - Introduction00:02:10 - The Post-Trust World00:08:25 - Show Start and Guest Intro00:15:04 - Getting into Bitcoin Early00:19:38 - The current state, Challenges facing Bitcoin00:27:51 - What is money and the violation of social contracts00:42:21 - Government relations with cryptocurrencies00:46:07 - Cape Breton culture00:52:06 - Bitcoin dominance, relation to altcoins and fiat00:59:28 - Questioning what money is and government control01:09:08 - Debt defaults and hyperinflation01:19:27 - Institutions and speculation, money wrapped up in assets01:26:01 - Factionalism in the cryptocurrency community01:32:37 - Bitcoin “a threat to the US dollar”, regulation and institutions01:42:30 - Trust and altcoin centralization, Bitcoin community vs Altcoin community01:55:27 - Jack Dorsey, the Twitter API, and relation to Bitcoin02:02:06 - Bitcoin not going away, life changes, institutional control of finance02:10:00 - Bitcoin and energy consumption02:15:40 - Updating away from equalization, Cape Breton modernizations02:24:03 - Social media plugs and closing remarksLinks to Mentions in the ShowThis Machine GreensMount GoxLightning NetworkIMF Concerned about CryptoizationSEC Court Case with CoinbaseCape Breton EconomicsShrinkflationBretton WoodsDefault on debt in LebanonFind Steven ManleySteven Manley TwitterFind Dominic RatelleDominic Ratelle TwitterFind Brad MillsBrad Mills TwitterMagic Internet Money TwitterMagic Internet Money FacebookMagic Internet Money Instagram

Off the Chain
#697 Institutions Are Coming To Bitcoin w/ Kevin O'Leary

Off the Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:14


Kevin O'Leary is a Canadian businessman, author, politician, and television personality. He is a Shark on ABC's hit show Shark Tank and has had numerous previous business successes, including when he sold The Learning Company to Mattel for $4.2 billion in 1999. In this conversation, we discuss bitcoin ETF, monetary policy, inflation, fixed income managers, international money interest, regulation, decentralized finance, and stablecoins.  ======================= Gemini is a leading regulated cryptocurrency exchange, wallet, and custodian that makes it simple and secure to buy, sell, store, and earn bitcoin, ether, and over 40 other cryptocurrencies. Offering industry-leading security, insurance and uptime, Gemini is the go-to trusted platform for beginner and sophisticated investors alike. Open a free account in under 3 minutes at gemini.com/pomp and get $20 of bitcoin after you trade $100 or more within 30 days. ======================= MiamiCoin is the first token to be released by CityCoins, a community-driven project built on Bitcoin. CityCoins aims to give people around the world a new way to support their favourite cities. The protocol has already generated over $7 million dollars in donations to the city of Miami and continues to grow every day. If you want to get involved Follow @minecitycoins on Twitter to stay up to date with the project. Visit chat.CityCoins.co to join the community discord and contribute to the movement.

Blunt Force Truth
Systemic Complacency, it's Time to Wake Up - an interview with Suzanne Gallagher

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 65:53


Today's show rundown: Pete Buttigieg says that the incredible economic policies of the Biden administration have kept us from the jaws, of the teeth if a recession. What a crock. Washington always has a one size fits all mentality. They have no credibility, because like with COVID, they will not count people that have had it, and how they are protected even better than a vaccinated person. One size fits all, is just unreasonable, totally and completely clueless. The Federal Government has three REAL purposes, to maintain a standing Army, Courts, law enforcement branch to protect the citizenry. Mark has come to the conclusion that he is part of 2 of the most hated minority groups in the country. It is now OK to HATE "these people who are abusing you"...being in the top 1% of earners. Also, as an unvaccinated person, Mark is not allowed to go to a restaurant in NYC or California. Lightfoot claims the Chicago police are not honoring the oath they swore, by NOT wanting to get the vaccine. This administration is just trying to divide us under the banner of unity. We are seeing State sponsored bigotry, against certain groups of Americans. We meet our guest Susanne Gallagher from Parents Rights and Education, who is trying to fight back against the Marxist situation with school boards now days. In Idaho in Coeur d'Alene Idaho, just recently where parents were invited, parents lined up. But the board scheduled the meeting on a Friday at 1PM. How many people did they really want to come. We need to stop systemic complacency, we need to pay attention. These people on the school boards have overplayed their hand, they have shown how little they think of Parents how dim they think they are. They don't think that anyone besides them knows anything about raising kids. The School Boards are now admitting that they are not Institutions of Learning, they are now Social Service organizations. Parent are waking up to the fact that when you drop your kids off at school, many of these places are not teaching your kids the same lessons that you would want them to teach. We have to stop this at the local public school levels. We need to elect people who WE want to represent us at the local school board level. The Left has become so drunk with power, thinking that they are untouchable, and boy, have they awoken a sleeping giant with this schools vs Parents issue. https://worldmission.cc/donate-humanitarianoutreach/ Give H2Max a try and let us know what you think: buyh2max.com Help us bring you the best content possible. Due to the left's boycotts of those who advertise with Conservatives, we have had a number of advertisers back-out to avoid possible backlash. Support the show and gain access to even more content at https://www.patreon.com/bftpodcast Don't forget to leave us a voicemail for the chance to have it played on a future episode. You can do so by clicking the link. https://bluntforcetruth.com/voicemail/ Also, check out the store on our website to get your own Blunt Force Truth gear. https://store.bluntforcetruth.com/

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Close Consideration: On Institutions – A Conversation With Yuval Levin

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


In the debut episode of Closer Consideration, Jay talks with Yuval Levin, the director of Social, Cultural, and Constitutional Studies at the American Enterprise Institute and the Editor-in-Chief of National Affairs. Yuval and Jay discuss institutions in the United States, their importance in society, why trust in them is so low and what people can […]

Words & Numbers
Episode 245: Should We Fund Children or Institutions?

Words & Numbers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:14


Corey DeAngelis, who has made himself the public gadfly of teachers unions, joins us to talk about how Americans' attitudes about funding public schools changed with covid. Get Your Copy of Cooperation and Coercion Now! http://www.cooperationandcoercion.com Show Your Support for Words & Numbers at Patreon https://www.patreon.com/wordsandnumbers Quick Hits https://www.bls.gov/ooh/occupation-finder.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/construction-and-building-inspectors.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/respiratory-therapists.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/diagnostic-medical-sonographers.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-hygienists.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/radiation-therapists.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/elevator-installers-and-repairers.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/airline-and-commercial-pilots.htm https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/air-traffic-controllers.htm https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-58878473 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qr_F_XQrukM Foolishness of the Week https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2021/oct/16/figures-of-babylon-oldest-drawing-of-a-ghost-found-in-british-museum-vault Join the Conversation Words & Numbers Backstage https://www.facebook.com/groups/130029457649243/ More James at Smoke & Storieshttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjILow4-ZJpBV-NnmSusZJ_vCuzKUJ4Ig Let Us Know What You Think mailto:wordsandnumberspodcast@gmail.com Antony Davies on Twitter https://twitter.com/antonydavies James R. Harrigan on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/JamesRHarrigan

The Cory Truax Show
EP275: Men, Video Games, and Time Management / What Does "Squid Game's" Popularity Mean? / Abuse Reckoning Is Coming for Several Institutions

The Cory Truax Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 50:10


On this Episode: -What we can learn from Squid Game's popularity. -Sexual abuse has already rocked many institutions. In the SBC and in public schools, it seems another reckoning is coming. -Demi Lovato is mentally ill. -Men managing their hobbies while still fulfilling their duties. -A Super dishonest NBC headline -MUCH more --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/corytruax/support

Legally Brief
Change Agent Dawn Massabni - Part 1: How A Mother Transformed Tragedy into Change

Legally Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:57


Legally Brief Presents... The Series: "How to Make Our Institutions Work" Corporate change agents, disruptors, and survivors want institutions plagued by discrimination, harassment, sexual and political abuse to stop, listen and reform. Are institutions unable, unwilling or indifferent to change? Institutions are not dead lifeless brick and mortar structures.  At their heart, our judicial, corporate, educational and religious institutions are made of living breathing human beings.  So it goes without saying that identifying, correcting and halting institutional abuses benefits everyone. Join me as Legally Brief begins a new series discussing "How to Make Our Institutions Work" for us. The Legally Brief series will show how using the "ACTIVE" method can change systems that abuse power and violate trust. In a two part episode, change agent Dawn Massabni tells you how she transformed tragedy into change that benefits us all.  Sharing is a Good Thing!!! You know a parent, athlete or friend that can use the information in this episode, so go ahead, and social share the link... Don't forget to download this episode. Subscribe to the show on Apple Podcast, Stitcher or your favorite platform. Tune into the Legally Brief Youtube channel. Visit jsaunderslawfirm.com for the free "Parent's Guide to Surviving Your Child's Abuse." Follow me on Instagram here. This podcast is for informational purposes only.  Nothing in this podcast is legal advice, counsel or guidance. No offer, statement or representation has been made to serve as your attorney in any capacity.   No attorney-client relationship has been created. This information is general and may not be applicable to your particular circumstances. You must review your particular circumstances with a licensed attorney.   

Critical Nonsense
145! Feelings About Institutions and Baby Names

Critical Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 58:48


What does it say about us that we have this love/hate relationships with institutions but never want to follow through disrupting them? And how do we all figure out the same rules for naming things at the exact same time? [29:29] This week, Jess and Aaron talk about Ozy, sparkling water, astrophysics, the current rules of naming, creating and erasing tethers, and Black names. They don't talk about what baby names nerf herders prefer. references Like Ra-i-ain NYT's DealBook: Balancing Honesty and Optimism in Silicon Valley The New York Times: Let Me Tell You What It Was Like to Work at Ozy Revisiting previous episodes of Critical Nonsense, including Episode 119 on institutions, Episode 103 on Joey wanting to fix things, and Episode 139 on sharing names. The Science of Sameness The Lindy effect A brief history of black names, from Perlie to Latasha Salon: What's up with black names, anyway? Insider: 'Distinctively Black names' still get fewer callbacks for job applications BBC: Does a baby's name affect its chances in life?

Hopkins Biotech Podcast
My PhD- Joe Varriale

Hopkins Biotech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 12:34


Joe is a fourth-year PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the Laboratory of Dr. J.N. and R.F. Siliciano. If you are a Hopkins Biotech Podcast follower,  you know Joe as the podcast co-director, producer and host. This time we have the pleasure to have him as a guest and to know more about his exciting career.His PhD thesis involves characterizing the reservoir of latently infected cells that render HIV infection a lifelong illness. In line with his Entrepreneurial mind set, Joe is a Fellow of the Commercialization Academy program at Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures (JHTV) and a Pro bono Consultant in the Johns Hopkins Graduate Consulting Club (JHGCC).Hosted by Jenna Glatzer and Gustavo Carrizo.We are looking for PhD students from Hopkins, as well as other Institutions in and outside the US!If you are interested  in being interviewed for My PhD please complete the following form and we will get in touch with you:MyPhD podcast application form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScNA8TVvuajm9PeNJT9J0KnOLhOWluCegECALe_XSEWFQBWSQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

Freedom Adventure Podcast
298 Experts and Personal Choice

Freedom Adventure Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 24:57


Art Carden says you can let experts advise you, but can't let them choose for you. An expert can get it wrong, even when they are right. Covid policy should be left to individual choice. Institutions and businesses can have different Covid policies. People adapt to new knowledge.

A Priest And A Rabbi
How are major institutions grappling with COVID--

A Priest And A Rabbi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:05


What has been the implications....are people giving or more reserved and cautious Guest: Rabbi Mellissa Zalkin Stollman--Major gifts Officer for the Union for Reform Judaism

Madison's Notes
The Capitulation of MIT: A Conversation with Dorian Abbot

Madison's Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:18


Dorian Abbot is an Associate Professor of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) had invited Abbot to deliver their prestigious Carlson Lecture, but rescinded the invitation after receiving complaints about an article Abbot had written for Newsweek, titled "The Diversity Problem on Campus." In response, Princeton University's James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions invited Abbot to speak at the James Madison Program. He'll do so live on Zoom on October 21st, at 4:30 PM ET. Abbot joins the podcast to discuss MIT's capitulation, academic freedom in the hard sciences, and more.   Register for Abbot's Lecture at the James Madison Program: https://jmp.princeton.edu/events/climate-and-potential-life-other-planets    The Diversity Problem on Campus: https://www.newsweek.com/diversity-problem-campus-opinion-1618419    Dorian Abbot for Bari Weiss' "Common Sense": https://bariweiss.substack.com/p/mit-abandons-its-mission-and-me     

Canary Cry News Talk
RESET RUMORS OF WARS

Canary Cry News Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 201:44


Canary Cry News Talk #399 - 10.08.2021 RESET, RUMORS OF WARS: Battle of Sci, Tech, Social, Pol, Econ, Militia, Edu, Spiritual - CCNT 399 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com EVERYTHING ELSE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel: Ravel Podcast Facelikethesun Resurrection YouTube channel Truther Dating experiment INTRO 1:15 Episode 400 prep Candace Owens says we are in WW3 [New Arms Race] Clip: Another Biden speech went really well FLIPPY 9:34 Robot arm that finds lost items, fuses data from cameras and antennae (MIT Edu)   CHINA 19:30 11 injured, US Nuke Submarine collides with “unknown object” South China Sea (DailyMail)   SPACE POPE REPTILIAN 25:37 Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race]   MONEY 35:01 NatWest, a bank in Britain, pleads guilty for money laundering (Reuters) Leak reveals Twitch Streamer earnings, millions (Fortune) Amazon secured $670 million in tax breaks, says watchdog (CBS NEWS) Note: Official, George Soros is trading Bitcoin (Yahoo) Note: Senator Cynthia Lummis reveals $100K purchase of Bitcoin (NBC) Moderna founders debut on Forbes' top 400 richest Americans (NY Post) Clip: Implications of “Little Guy” who front ran Institutions, Alex Machinsky Celsius Network CEO   I AM WACCINE 55:08 WHO backs first malaria waccine for children (CNN) Not mention on CNN: Gavi, leading the way (Global Fund) Sanofi says positive results from first high dose flu + C19 booster shot (Sanofi Press)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons 1:06:28 Clip: How surveillance advertising is tracking you   COVID 19/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:43:52 Clip: Dr. Leanna Wen, US should be more like Canada Clip: Trudeau introduces mandate, no more testing? Clip: Newfoundland presser for mandate…squirt squirt Clips: Alex Jones exposes video from 2019, Fauci planning pandemic marketing (New Rescue) Clip: Fauci, 1 and 2 Clip: LA passes mandate, people push back BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups 2:22:24   POLITICS 2:54:05 Abortion law on hold, Basil was right (CNN) Biden to sign bill to raise debt ceiling (The Hill) Kamala Harris to “Stop the Steal” (The Atlantic)   ADDITIONAL STORIES San Fransisco to list mask mandates on Oct. 15 (SF Chron) Elon Musk to move Tesla HQ to Texas (AP) 18 former NBA players arrested for defrauding health care system (NBC) Chimeric injections in CRISPR reduces tumors (BioRxiv) Facebook renews ambitions to connect world (Wired) What Biden needs to say about Surveillance Tech and Foreign Policy (Just Security) Clip: Ethics professor pushes back on mandates, get's fired Note: Study finds waccinated people more susceptible to variant than unwaxxed (MedRxiv) Clip: Klaus says Henry Kissinger influence, Rockefeller admits recruiting Kissinger Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race] Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Fact Check: Sweden “bans”…halts all Moderna SpikeVax (Newsweek) Man who killed pharmacist brother was enraged about waccine (USA Today) European Parliament opposes AI mass surveillance (PC Mag)   PRODUCERS ep. 399: Derek R**, Rachelle, Aaron J, Arnold W, Liz D, Veronica D, Juan A, Ethan N, Sean D, HeatheRuss, Morv, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Mark D, Dominick R, JC, Child of God, Sir Sammons the Knight of the Fishes, Malik, Scott K, Gail M, DrWhoDunDat, Brandt W, Runksmash, Ciara, Douglas P   TIMESTAMPS: Rachel C JINGLES: LearBag3000 ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N LivingTeaBill

Revelations Radio Network
RESET RUMORS OF WARS

Revelations Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Canary Cry News Talk #399 - 10.08.2021 RESET, RUMORS OF WARS: Battle of Sci, Tech, Social, Pol, Econ, Militia, Edu, Spiritual - CCNT 399 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com EVERYTHING ELSE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel: Ravel Podcast Facelikethesun Resurrection YouTube channel Truther Dating experiment INTRO 1:15 Episode 400 prep Candace Owens says we are in WW3 [New Arms Race] Clip: Another Biden speech went really well FLIPPY 9:34 Robot arm that finds lost items, fuses data from cameras and antennae (MIT Edu)   CHINA 19:30 11 injured, US Nuke Submarine collides with “unknown object” South China Sea (DailyMail)   SPACE POPE REPTILIAN 25:37 Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race]   MONEY 35:01 NatWest, a bank in Britain, pleads guilty for money laundering (Reuters) Leak reveals Twitch Streamer earnings, millions (Fortune) Amazon secured $670 million in tax breaks, says watchdog (CBS NEWS) Note: Official, George Soros is trading Bitcoin (Yahoo) Note: Senator Cynthia Lummis reveals $100K purchase of Bitcoin (NBC) Moderna founders debut on Forbes' top 400 richest Americans (NY Post) Clip: Implications of “Little Guy” who front ran Institutions, Alex Machinsky Celsius Network CEO   I AM WACCINE 55:08 WHO backs first malaria waccine for children (CNN) Not mention on CNN: Gavi, leading the way (Global Fund) Sanofi says positive results from first high dose flu + C19 booster shot (Sanofi Press)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons 1:06:28 Clip: How surveillance advertising is tracking you   COVID 19/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:43:52 Clip: Dr. Leanna Wen, US should be more like Canada Clip: Trudeau introduces mandate, no more testing? Clip: Newfoundland presser for mandate…squirt squirt Clips: Alex Jones exposes video from 2019, Fauci planning pandemic marketing (New Rescue) Clip: Fauci, 1 and 2 Clip: LA passes mandate, people push back BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups 2:22:24   POLITICS 2:54:05 Abortion law on hold, Basil was right (CNN) Biden to sign bill to raise debt ceiling (The Hill) Kamala Harris to “Stop the Steal” (The Atlantic)   ADDITIONAL STORIES San Fransisco to list mask mandates on Oct. 15 (SF Chron) Elon Musk to move Tesla HQ to Texas (AP) 18 former NBA players arrested for defrauding health care system (NBC) Chimeric injections in CRISPR reduces tumors (BioRxiv) Facebook renews ambitions to connect world (Wired) What Biden needs to say about Surveillance Tech and Foreign Policy (Just Security) Clip: Ethics professor pushes back on mandates, get's fired Note: Study finds waccinated people more susceptible to variant than unwaxxed (MedRxiv) Clip: Klaus says Henry Kissinger influence, Rockefeller admits recruiting Kissinger Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race] Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Fact Check: Sweden “bans”…halts all Moderna SpikeVax (Newsweek) Man who killed pharmacist brother was enraged about waccine (USA Today) European Parliament opposes AI mass surveillance (PC Mag)   PRODUCERS ep. 399: Derek R**, Rachelle, Aaron J, Arnold W, Liz D, Veronica D, Juan A, Ethan N, Sean D, HeatheRuss, Morv, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Mark D, Dominick R, JC, Child of God, Sir Sammons the Knight of the Fishes, Malik, Scott K, Gail M, DrWhoDunDat, Brandt W, Runksmash, Ciara, Douglas P   TIMESTAMPS: Rachel C JINGLES: LearBag3000 ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N LivingTeaBill

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Federalist Radio Hour: Diagnosing The Disease That Infects America's Institutions

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:13


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, David Azerrad, an assistant professor and research fellow at Hillsdale College’s Van Andel Graduate School of Government, joins Senior Editor Chris Bedford and Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how the post-structuralist left infected American institutions.

The Federalist Radio Hour
Diagnosing The Disease That Infects America's Institutions

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:13


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, David Azerrad, an assistant professor and research fellow at Hillsdale College’s Van Andel Graduate School of Government, joins Senior Editor Chris Bedford and Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss how the post-structuralist left infected American institutions.

The Veritas Forum
Resisting Bias & Reshaping Institutions | David French & Justin Giboney

The Veritas Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 54:49


Resisting Bias & Reshaping Institutions: A conversation about advancing racial justice in religious institutions, government, and higher education. A discussion between David French of The Dispatch and Justin Giboney of AND Campaign. This conversation was moderated by Stephanie Summers, CEO of The Center for Public Justice, and was hosted by the Veritas Forum at Cal Poly. • Please like, share, subscribe to, and review this podcast. Thank you.

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
Did Our Public Health Institutions Learn Anything From COVID? | Scott Gottlieb, MD

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 65:57


Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD joins us to review the mistakes, misrepresentations, and institutional barriers at the CDC and other public health institutions that hindered our response to the COVID-19 pandemic - along with the tactical steps we must take to defeat the next pandemic. We also discuss reforming the FDA approval process to allow medical innovation and why the drug price controls found in the Democrats' HR3 legislation will stop the next breakthrough drugs from emerging. Scott Gottlieb, MD, is the author of "Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic." He is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. From 2017 to 2019 he served as the 23rd commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Gottlieb is also a special partner with the venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates and serves on the boards of Pfizer, Illumina, Aetion, and Tempus. Follow him on Twitter at @ScottGottliebMD.