Podcasts about Community development

Communities taking collective action to solve common problems

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Best podcasts about Community development

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Latest podcast episodes about Community development

The Political Life
Should You Make the Move From In-House to a GR Firm? Saat Alety Makes the Leap and Joins "Fed Hall"

The Political Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 19:15


This week we welcome back friend of the podcast Saat Alety as he gives Jim an update on his recent move from Allstate to Fed Hall. Saat Alety is a Partner at Federal Hall Policy Advisors (Fed Hall), a leading bipartisan government affairs firm in Washington, D.C. Named to The Hill's Top Lobbyist list in 2021, Alety most recently led Allstate's advocacy efforts with Congress, the White House, and federal agencies, in addition to its public policy development at the federal, state, and local level. Alety previously served as Majority Staff Director of the Subcommittee on Housing, Transportation, and Community Development under U.S. Senator Tim Scott (R-SC), a senior member of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. As Sen. Scott's senior policy advisor on financial services issues, Alety led efforts that resulted in the enactment of legislation to grow consumer access to banking services, prevent synthetic identity theft, and modernize mortgage credit standards. Prior to his tenure as a Senate staffer, Alety spent three years as Communications Director to U.S. Representative Ed Royce (R-CA), Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee. While spokesperson, Alety was also a Legislative Assistant to Rep. Royce for his House Financial Services Committee portfolio. In addition to his Capitol Hill experience, Alety has held positions with the Financial Services Roundtable (now Bank Policy Institute), the leading trade association for the financial services industry, and the Romney 2012 presidential campaign. A native of Naperville, Illinois, Alety began his career in the office of U.S. Representative Judy Biggert (R-IL). He serves on the boards of directors/advisors for College to Congress, the National Network to End Domestic Violence, and the One Love Foundation. Alety is also an alumni advisor to the Congressional Asian Pacific American Staff Association and a recipient of its Jose M. Montano Jr. Award for "going above and beyond to sustain a pipeline of AAPI Hill staffers and leaders on the Hill." In 2022, Alety joined his undergraduate alma mater Loyola University Chicago as an adjunct professor in its political science department, teaching PLSC 238: Political Advocacy for the school's Washington program. He has also guest lectured for students at the University of Chicago, New York University, and American University. Help us grow! Leave us a rating and review - it's the best way to bring new listeners to the show. Don't forget to subscribe! Have a suggestion, or want to chat with Jim? Email him at Jim@ThePoliticalLife.net  Follow The Political Life on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter for weekly updates.

Conflict Managed
The Power of Persistence

Conflict Managed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 39:37 Transcription Available


You will fail. You will have difficult times. When hard times come your way, what will you do? Today on Conflict Managed, Randy Boyd, University of Tennessee President, encourages us to persevere in the face of hardship. He tells us the four things he has discovered successful businesses do, settling disputes with win/win/win in mind (you'll have to listen to find out what the extra win is!), and a great program, The Birthday Lunch and Listen, where people from across the organization are celebrated and listened to as well as creating an opportunity for employees to network with each other. Randy Boyd was appointed as the 26th president of the University of Tennessee System by the UT Board of Trustees March 27, 2020, following a 16-month period as interim president. Boyd founded Knoxville-based Radio Systems Corporation, a company that produces over 4,000 pet related products under the brand names PetSafe, Invisible Fence, ScoopFree and SportDOG. The company employs more than 1,400 people with offices in six countries around the world. Boyd Sports, LLC, owned by Randy and Jenny Boyd, owns the Greeneville Flyboys and Tennessee Smokies.  The company also owns the Johnson City Doughboys, Elizabethton River Riders and operates the Kingsport Axmen. Boyd also served the state of Tennessee in numerous roles, including serving as commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development and as the governor's special advisor on higher education where he was the architect for Tennessee Promise and Drive to 55. He is also the founder and chairman of the non-profit Tennessee Achieves. Randy and Jenny Boyd have dedicated their lives to giving back. In 2018, the couple formed the Boyd Foundation to further promote youth education, mental health, the arts and animal welfare. Among the Foundation's many philanthropic commitments is the Boyd Center for Business and Economic Research and the Anderson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation's Boyd Venture Challenge seed grant program for student entrepreneurs, both through the Haslam College of Business at UT Knoxville. Boyd is the first in his family to graduate from college. He earned a bachelor's degree in business with an emphasis on industrial management from UT Knoxville. He also earned a master's degree in liberal studies with a focus on foreign policy from the University of Oklahoma. The Boyds live in Knoxville and have two children and two grandchildren. You can find Randy Boyd online at utpresident@tennessee.edu. Conflict Managed is hosted by Merry Brown and produced by Third Party Workplace Conflict Restoration Services. Contact us at 3PConflictRestoration@gmail.com. Our music is courtesy of Dove Pilot.

Enrollment Insights Podcast
#56 - RJ Thompson and It's Time To Level Up Enrollment Marketing

Enrollment Insights Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 68:22


In this episode, you will hear from RJ Thompson, Director of Digital Marketing in the Katz Graduate School of Business and College of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh. Before joining Pitt, he was a tenured Assistant Professor of Graphic and Interactive Design in the Department of Art at Youngstown State University, and before that he also taught at Carnegie Mellon University, La Roche University, and Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and he continues to teach at Point Park University and the Community College of Alleghany County. He is also a National Endowment for the Arts “Our Town” grant recipient, a “Best of Marketing Award” from the Ohio Economic Development Association winner for his work with rebranding Youngstown Ohio, and was honored with the Ohio Governors Award in the Arts in Community Development, the state of Ohio's highest recognition in the arts. 0:00 - Introduction 1:37 - Reusing failure to capture success 6:35 - Putting on your student hat to build campaigns 7:48 - Starting campaigns with keywords and emotions 9:49 - Leading design thinking charrettes 10:45 - Even if you're not "student-facing" you should be engaging with students 12:43 - Digging into emotion-first marketing "Artists don't want to create art because they want to. Artists create art because they have to." 15:18 - How do you give students a "why": Why should they care, why should they take action, why are you different? 19:20 - "No one wants to go to college alone." 19:58 - Why you may not need, or want, to tell students to visit for programmatic recruitment 22:29 - Students aren't interested in online education, but what about online with dorms as living/learning space away from home? 23:43 - Professor Thompson teaches us about persuasion using self-concept 28:53 - Want to be a better marketer? Spend more time with students. 31:41 - Where best to use storytelling in comm flows 35:32 - Marketing continues after enrollment 38:15 - Let's frame budgets and digital spending differently 40:04 - Using proof points in marketing 44:56 - What happens when outcomes aren't defined in a program 46:47 - How does the comm flow change post-application and enrollment to make it more welcoming 49:11 - The "Helpers" in higher ed and what has kept RJ in education 54:18 - The overlap of marketing places and institutions 57:59 - RJ's 3 goals 59:26 - Where to invest resources to support students further, regardless of role 1:01:24 - A Ron Swanson appearance 1:02:26 - One thing marketers should stop doing 1:03:47 - It's time to level up - we're wired to learn so why do we need to advertise? 1:05:28 - Lean into ABCD - Asset-Based Community Development, your location and community 1:07:24 - Get in touch with RJ Show notes are available on the Enrollment Insights Blog at niche.bz/podcast. In the Enrollment Insights Podcast, you'll hear about novel solutions to problems, ways to make processes better for students, and the questions that spark internal reflection and end up changing entire processes.

Insight Faster
Peer Review Week 2022

Insight Faster

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 39:16


This year for Peer Review Week 2022 we were delighted to have an opportunity to sit down the Jayashree Rajagopalan (Senior Manager of Global Community Engagement for CACTUS) and Danielle Padula (Head of Marketing and Community Development at Scholastica), co-chairs of the Peer Review Week committee. In this fascinating and at-times meta conversation, Stefan Tochev and Unai Vicario ask questions about our guests, the state of peer review, and where things might be heading. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

BFM :: Morning Brief
More Resources Needed For Child Protection

BFM :: Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 10:06


The Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development recently disclosed that there is a shortage of child protection officers, with one officer currently handling 50 to 100 cases of child abuse and neglect, compared to the target ratio of one to 30 cases. We discuss the challenges in hiring more child protection officers and other policy measures to strengthen the response to child welfare issues with Ananti Rajasingam of Yayasan Chow Kit.

BFM :: General
More Resources Needed For Child Protection

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 10:06


The Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development recently disclosed that there is a shortage of child protection officers, with one officer currently handling 50 to 100 cases of child abuse and neglect, compared to the target ratio of one to 30 cases. We discuss the challenges in hiring more child protection officers and other policy measures to strengthen the response to child welfare issues with Ananti Rajasingam of Yayasan Chow Kit.

Exit Strategies Radio Show
Episode 52: P.A.S.T.O.R.S. Inc. on Affordable Housing and Community Development

Exit Strategies Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 28:10


“We have to get from behind the pulpit, get out into the neighborhoods, and start creating some opportunities, not just for the church to generate wealth, but for the individuals to be able to generate wealth.” This episode is connected to our upcoming event sponsored by PASTORS Inc., a non-profit organization that will be held on September 24, 2022; Saturday, at Cannon St. Arts Center, 134 Cannon St., formerly Zion Olivet Presbyterian Church. Let's hear it from our guest Fred “FA” Johnson II Esq., CEO of Charleston Redevelopment Corporation, development partner at PASTORS Inc., who cultivated more of a passion and desire to work even deeper in the trenches, to make affordable housing opportunities in the Charleston region. The Morning Event is the “Breakfast with P.A.S.T.O.R.S., Inc.” This will educate faith leaders about community development and affordable housing. This session is designed for church leaders in Charleston, North Charleston, and Charleston county who want to learn how to leverage their properties for development, create additional income streams for the church, promote affordable housing, and better serve their constituents. The Afternoon Event will be the “FREE HOMEBUYER WORKSHOP” and will be held from 12 pm to 2 pm with seating limited to 100 persons. It is intended for those who want to position themselves to qualify for financing and understand the process of home buying, especially for first-time home buyers. Lunch will be served along with $200 plus in gift card giveaways.

History Makers with Matt Prater
Thelma Dzwowa - 17-18 September 2022

History Makers with Matt Prater

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 24:36


Thelma Dzwowa is a young woman with a passion to see her generation impacted with biblical truth. Originally from Zimbabwe, she is currently working in the area of Community Development with the Brisbane Broncos. She has authored two books, 'The Warring Generation,' & 'Everything In Between ? A journey from Singleness to Marriage.' She also shares about her experience at the Battle Cry Prayer Event at Suncorp Stadium in 2022. Listen in to her story! Support the show: http://historymakersradio.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond The Venue with MG The Venue Specialist
Mindful Ways to Make an Impact 303 with James Varughese

Beyond The Venue with MG The Venue Specialist

Play Episode Play 55 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 59:46


This week we have another return guest from Season 2! I'm joined by James Varughese, a part of the Customer Experience team serving small businesses that use Intuit QuickBooks Payments products.Incorporating clips from the “podcast project”, James and I listen to the clips and carry on the conversation started by my former students Sierra & Celia who also care about leading with empathy and understanding their impact on a community.If you're looking to gain insight into self awareness as a leader and within community development, you're in the right place!Topics Include:Choosing a Major Based on Passions and Helping OthersWhat is Community Development?Effective Leadership within Community Development EffortsEmpathetic and Situational LeadershipApplying Classroom Knowledge to the Real WorldSustainability as it Relates to Food InsecurityThanks so much for listening, and enjoy the following episode Mindful Ways to Make an Impact 303 with James Varughese.Don't be late to class!About James: James Varughese (he/him) has built a successful career in both advertising and financial technology industries since moving to California from New York in 2011.He is currently part of the Fintech Customer Experience team at Intuit. One of his most important responsibilities is to understand V-O-C, or Voice of Customer, across multiple products and channels such as self-help, in-product feedback, app store, and when customers speak or chat with Intuit support experts. Analyzing data, creating insights, and telling data backed stories is how James delivers on the promise that QuickBooks has to it's customers to be the source of truth for their business and exceed expectations where & when it matters most. Outside of work James loves to spend time with his wife and two young children.Connect with James on Instagram, Facebook, and LinkedIn, as well as his website. Student Info:Celia Myerov (she/her) a recent Temple grad is currently working as a Program & Expansion Associate.Connect with Celia on Instagram and LinkedIn.***Connect with MG on Instagram and Facebook, too!Follow BTV on Instagram and Facebook for all updates and releases.A ByVesta Production.

Catholic Chicago
MISSION MATTERS -- Microfinance and Community Development In Uganda

Catholic Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 30:13


Megan interviews Deacon Don Grossnickle and Deacon Jerry Brennan of Our Lady of the Wayside Parish in Arlington Heights. They share the mission work of Microfinance Alliance Africa Projects Foundation. The MAAP Foundation works to lower maternal and infant mortality rates in Uganda through microfinance projects and collaboration with the local Catholic parishes and clinics in rural areas. In the extended interview, they continue the conversation to talk in more depth about how the MAAP Foundation works on the ground in Uganda and provides opportunities to develop the whole community.

History Makers Radio

Thelma Dzwowa is a young woman with a passion to see her generation impacted with biblical truth. Originally from Zimbabwe, she is currently working in the area of Community Development with the Brisbane Broncos. She has authored two books, "The Warring Generation," and "Everything In Between - A journey from Singleness to Marriage." She also shares about her experience at the Battle Cry Prayer Event at Suncorp Stadium in 2022. Listen in to her story!

The Official Do Good Better Podcast
Strengthening Vulnerable Neighborhoods: Omaha's inCOMMON Community Development | The Official Do Good Better Podcast #246

The Official Do Good Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 18:22


Today's 5-Star Guest is Rachel Bahl, Co-Executive Director of inCOMMON Community Development of Omaha, Nebraska.  inCOMMON alleviates poverty at a root level by uniting and strengthening vulnerable neighborhoodsConnect With inCOMMON Community Development: https://incommoncd.org/Donate To inCOMMON Community Development: https://shareomaha.org/search/nonprofits?search_api_views_fulltext=incommon&undefined=SearchSupport This Podcast! Make a quick and easy donation here:https://www.patreon.com/dogoodbetterSpecial THANK YOU to our sponsors:Donor Dock - The best CRM system for your small to medium sized nonprofit, hands down! Visit www.DonorDock.com and use the Promo Code DOGOODBETTER for a FREE month!One Cause - The most intuitive event and online fundraising software available! Visit www.OneCause.com to help make your busy event-planning life less stressful and more successful!Brady Martz - The Nonprofit Audit Specialists! Visit www.BradyMartz.com to connect with folks to make your fiscal life a heckuvalot easier!iTunes: https://apple.co/3a3XenfSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2PlqRXsYouTube: https://bit.ly/3kaWYanTunein: http://tun.in/pjIVtStitcher: https://bit.ly/3i8jfDRFollow On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoodBetterPodcast/Follow On Twitter: @consulting_do #fundraising #fundraiser #charity #nonprofit #donate#dogood #dogoodBETTER #fargo #fundraisingdadAbout Host Patrick Kirby:Email: Patrick@dogoodbetterconsulting.comLinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fundraisingdad/Want more great advice? Buy Patrick's book! Now also available as an e-book!Fundraise Awesomer! A Practical Guide to Staying Sane While Doing GoodAvailable through Amazon Here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1072070359

BFM :: General
Today On Twitter: The Problem With Rina Harun's Latest Video

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 12:53


Datuk Seri Rina Harun, Minister of Women, Family and Community Development put up a video on Tiktok, featuring Rosyam Nor that has been roundly criticised. We get into it.msyaraafiq, Shutterstock

No Straight Path
Law, Tech & Content Creation with Alex Su

No Straight Path

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 30:36


This week, on No Straight Path, we are joined by the Head of Community Development at Ironclad, Alex Su (otherwise known as the LegalTechBro on TikTok), who has been taking the legal content creation world by storm! As a former attorney who now works at the cutting edge of legal technologies, Alex uses humor to make some pretty serious points about what it's like to practice law and highlights some of the biggest issues facing the legal profession, from mental health to overwork, burnout, and more. Alex's journey is not without its unexpected twists and turns and, in today's episode, we dig into a number of No Straight Path topics, including major setbacks, highlights, and lessons learned. You'll discover what drew Alex to the legal profession in the first place, how he realized that he was on the wrong path, and how he uses the lighthearted medium of social media to engage with a typically earnest legal audience. One thing that stands out about this interview is the key role that personal storytelling has played in Alex's success and how you can rethink your definition of success by focusing on doing what you find meaningful. For some valuable (and hilarious) insights from an exceptional leader at the intersection of law, technology, and new media, make sure not to miss today's conversation with Alex Su! Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: No Straight Path Podcast Alex Su Alex Su on LinkedIn Alex Su on Twitter Alex Su on TikTok Alex Su on Instagram IronClad Ashley Menzies Babatunde Ashley Menzies Babatunde on Instagram

The Embedded Church Podcast
Art and the Church

The Embedded Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 54:12


In this episode, Sara Joy and Eric talk with Pastor Gabe Coyle about the fruition of Four Chapter Gallery, an art space developed, curated, and managed by Christ Community Church in downtown Kansas City. As an artist himself, Gabe discusses how his passions and dreams have taken on new shape by planting a church with the intention of connecting with the local arts community. The Four Chapter Gallery was born in 2013 from both the passion of church staff and the neighborhood request to see gallery space as part of the church development. Using the biblical framework of four chapters (movements): creation, fall, redemption, and restoration, the Four Chapter Gallery seeks to bring flourishing to the local arts community by offering beautiful gallery space and valuable support in promoting the work of the artist and treating each artist with care and dignity. Additionally, Christ Community Church has chosen to make the art gallery a significant budget line item so that everything is funded by the church, which provides the flexibility to not take a percentage from the artists. The gallery has gained a respected reputation among artists and their shows are currently booked out through January 2024. The Four Chapter Gallery hosts concept-based art exhibitions that engage culturally relevant themes and ideas. They have three core values when it comes to the kind of work they desire to present in their space. These values are:Art with ideas - artwork that has been created around particular themes, ideas, or research.The work of emerging artists - they has a special desire to boost emerging artists.Art that creates generative conversation - they love exhibiting work that presses into issues relevant to the culture, city, and neighborhood in a generative way. Eric and Sara Joy also speak with two field guides who provide more insight into the value and characteristics of good gallery space and programming for art and the ways that churches have engaged art throughout history. Sandra Bowden, an artist and curator, discusses the value of gallery space and programming that supports the artist and provides thoughtful, educational connections with the art to steward a viewer's experience with the art itself. David Taylor from Fuller Theological Seminary provides the historical framework on the connections between art and the church, highlighting various movements in history and within specific theological traditions that have come to shape the way churches engage with art. Episode ContributorsGabe Coyle is the Campus Pastor of Christ Community Church in downtown Kansas City, MO. Sandra Bowden is a visual artist based in Chatham, MA. She has been interpreting Scripture and her own spiritual walk through mixed media for more than forty years. She has been acclaimed as one of the most unique, impressive and inspiring Christian artists in America. Bowden's work has been featured in books, magazines and gallery shows across the United States, Canada, Italy and Jerusalem. She is co-author of Seeing the Unseen: Launching and Managing a Church Gallery.David Taylor is Associate Professor of Theology and Culture at Fuller Theological Seminary. Prior to his appointment at Fuller, Dr. Taylor served as a pastor for ten years in Austin, Texas. Taylor serves on the advisory board for Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts as well as IVP Academic's series, “Studies in Theology and the Arts” and has served as board member of Christians In the Visual Arts (CIVA). He is the author of Glimpses of the New Creation: Worship and the Formative Power of the Arts  and The Theater of God's Glory: Calvin, Creation and the Liturgical Arts. He is editor of For the Beauty of the Church: Casting a Vision for the Arts.Access more Show Notes with pictures and resources related to this episode. Sign up for the free online Community Forum on August 23, 2022 to discuss this episode with Eric, Sara Joy, and Chris and other podcast listeners. Register today!More information about this podcast and helpful church and urbanism resources can be found on The Embedded Church website.Related ResourcesChrist Community Church - Downtown KCFour Chapter GalleryChristian Community Development Association (CCDA)Christians in the Visual Arts (CIVA)Agents of Flourishing by Amy ShermanSeeing the Unseen: Launching and Managing a Church Gallery by Sandra Bowden and Marianne LettieriShow CreditsHosted and Produced by Eric O. Jacobsen and Sara Joy ProppeEdited by Adam Higgins | Odd Dad Out Voice ProductionsTheme Music by Jacob ShafferArtwork by Lance Kagey | Rotator Creative

Elephant Stories
Special Episode: CEO Circle

Elephant Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 45:24


What happens when people stop being polite … and start getting real?The CEO Circle hosted the Community Development for Liberation conference to bring together experts from multiple academic and professional backgrounds to focus on one issue: community development. Six of those experts share their insights and experiences with me. In order of appearanceNelson Colon, President & CEO of the Puerto Rico Community Foundation Tony Pickett, CEO of the Grounded Solutions Network Michael McAfee, President and CEO of PolicyLink Jeremy Moore, Director, Community Health Programs, Spectrum HealthJanelle Williams, leader in community economic developmentAkilah Watkins, founder of the CEO Circle Explore Topics in This Episode:Season 1: Dr. Akilah WatkinsIn Loiza the Fight for Property Rights Has a Long HistoryShelterforce: Getting Competitive Health Care Systems to Work Together For the Community Find us at:Podcast URL: Elephant StoriesTwitter: @StoriesElephantEmail: twestbrook@elephant-stories.com 

BFM :: General
Difference Between Child Porn & Children Consuming Porn

BFM :: General

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 22:57


Recently, Datuk Seri Rina Mohd Harun, who's the Minister of Women, Family and Community Development, gave a speech discussing the sexual exploitation of children online. However, she received tremendous backlash from the public on social media because she conflated child pornography with children consuming porn, which are two completely separate issues altogether. We unpack with Karen Lai of the Women's Centre for Change (WCC). Image credit: Shutterstock

BFM :: Live & Learn
Difference Between Child Porn & Children Consuming Porn

BFM :: Live & Learn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 22:57


Recently, Datuk Seri Rina Mohd Harun, who's the Minister of Women, Family and Community Development, gave a speech discussing the sexual exploitation of children online. However, she received tremendous backlash from the public on social media because she conflated child pornography with children consuming porn, which are two completely separate issues altogether. We unpack with Karen Lai of the Women's Centre for Change (WCC). Image credit: Shutterstock

She's WILD
How I Create Lifestyle Programs Around Making Memories and Curating Traditions, with Monaca Onstad, President/CEO Onplace

She's WILD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 35:39


Today's guest is Monaca Onstad, the President and CEO of Onplace. Monaca is a nationally recognized community relations and lifestyle executive with a passion for building community in the residential and commercial real estate market. She has more than 20 years of sales and operations experience in the real estate industry with the last several years focused on driving home sales and leasing efforts through placemaking, community relations, and lifestyle programming. Monica has been recognized as the best lifestyle director in the U.S. in 2018 by the National Association of Homebuilders Sales and Marketing Council. She was ranked among the top 4 lifestyle directors in the country in 2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022.In today's episode, Monaca and I chat about lifestyle development and how she has seen a shift in priorities of not only the resident's needs but also the way developers think about starting a new project. Monaca dives into some of the challenges she faced in community management during the pandemic and how she used the resilience she learned from working on a farm to pivot and make the most out of the situation. Monaca is an inspiration and I am so excited to share her wisdom with you!Memorable Moments:5:07- I learned growing up about what true community really is and how we step up for one another when times are hard, but also we celebrate each other when times are good.13:28- I'm there to help increase the ROI for my client. And while we want to put them in the best marketing position possible, we also have to make sure that it's the right size, and that we are doing things that help from a long-term standpoint, the operation piece of how the lifestyle program is going to operate.15:10- To me, lifestyle is not just about events and parties and that type of thing; it's about building a true community. And I think that crosses between commercial and residential, how do you connect those local businesses to those residents, and vice versa?22:50- I think working on a farm taught me so much about how to pivot, perseverance, and just respect for farmers on what they go through. I mean, understanding how they have this connection with the land is so important, because they don't get the credit or the pay that probably most of them deserve.Connect with Nancy:Instagram: https://instagram.com/nancysurakLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancysurak/Website: www.nancysurak.comConnect with Monica:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/onplacelifestyle/https://www.instagram.com/monacaonstad/LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/monacaonstad/Website: https://www.onplace.life/Monaca's Podcast Recommendation:The Moth Podcast https://themoth.org/podcastSound production by:Luke Surak, Surak Productions: surakproductions@gmail.com

Novogradac
Sept. 6, 2022: How Qualified Active Low-Income Community Businesses Can Attract NMTC Financing

Novogradac

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022


The new markets tax credit (NMTC) incentive provides $5 billion a year in allocation authority to community development entities (CDEs) to support businesses in low-income communities or those that support low-income people. As a qualified active low-income community business (QALICB), there are standards to meet and competition with which to contend to receive the financing. In this week's podcast, the 750th of Tax Credit Tuesday and the first of a three-part NMTC series, Michael Novogradac, CPA, and Novogradac partner Nicolo Pinoli, CPA, discuss the standards and provide tips for businesses to be more competitive to receive such financing. They examine the big picture of the incentive and go over the qualifications to be a QALICB before looking at the amount of financing available and the competition to receive NMTC financing. After they, they examine what businesses should consider at the start of transaction in which they'd like to receive NMTC financing, share key points in the timeline and discuss at what CDEs are looking for when they decide which businesses in which to invest.

Breaking Down Barriers
Rural Community Development with Tina Metzer

Breaking Down Barriers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 32:48


From non-profits to the private sector, Ms. Metzer possesses an array of skills and experiences in project management and ecosystem development. In addition, Ms. Metzer is a self-motivated entrepreneur and works passionately to develop rural opportunities in Appalachia and across the country. Ms. Metzer currently serves as the Vice-President and Co-founder of the National Center for Resource Development, helping mission-driven organizations increase their impact. Ms. Metzer's primary focus at NCRD is on rural – including identification and development of rural opportunities. Ms. Metzer has managed a variety of initiatives with a focus in Broadband, Entrepreneurship, Agriculture, Environmental Industry and Creative Ecosystem Development across the United States as well as Global entrepreneurship programs.  In this episode, Tina Metzer joins host David Ponraj to discuss rural community development, entrepreneurship programs, and best practices on supporting rural communities in a collaborative way. Tina also shares her journey to supporting rural communities and creating a greater impact. Learn more about the National Center for Resource Development at: https://www.resourcedev.org/ (www.resourcedev.org/)  Learn more and register for RuralRISE at: https://www.ruralrise.org/ (www.ruralrise.org/)

The Raygacy Show
Ep 127: How To Network Like A Rainmaker W/ Richard Giam

The Raygacy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 52:43


As we all know, Science has shown the most successful people are often also those who rely heavily on the power of networking. Ultimately, pursuing opportunities to connect with industry leaders or professionals with varying interests and perspectives is critical to your own career growth. Like Diane Helbig famously said “Networking is an investment in your business. It takes time and when done correctly can yield great results for years to come." In this episode, we've invited an amazing Rainmaker. His name's non-other than Richard Giam. Richard is an award-winning entrepreneurial fundraiser with over 22 years of proven track record in business development, sales, marketing communications, and fundraising. He has spearheaded numerous successful fundraising and marketing campaigns for various organizations in Singapore. He works closely with family offices, business owners, funds, investors, and high-net-worth individuals on various projects. He has been recognized as the Winner of the Best Personal Brand Award 2017 and is the author of ‘Fundraising Among the Giants - How to attract High Net Worth Individuals and Major Donors for Good'. During his 18 years of corporate life, Richard has excelled in organizations such as MediaCorp, Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports, National Council of Social Service, Nanyang Technological University, and Singapore Management University. He is currently the co-founder of Rainmakerz Pte Ltd where they create a business and social networking platform for like-minded individuals based on values. Their aim is to be Asia's leading values-driven social and business community. In this episode, Richard will be sharing: 1) How networking has played a role in his success. 2) The mistakes that most people make when they are networking. 3) His best tips for networking and building genuine connections in business. Learn more about Richard Giam: Website: https://www.wearerainmaker.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/richardgiam/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/richard.giam.5 Join The Tribe of Raygacy: https://t.me/theraygacyshowfamily For those of you who enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews! Thank you! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theraygacyshow/message

Crypto Business
Community Development With Token-Gating

Crypto Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 47:01 Very Popular


Want to build a strong community around a product or brand? Wondering how to use NFTs to manage access to your community? To discover how NFTs and other tokens can help you develop and gate active, loyal, and engaged communities, to I interview Anjali Young.Guest: Anjali Young | Show Notes: socialmediaexaminer.com/c34Review our show on Apple Podcasts.Disclaimer: The information provided in the Crypto Business Podcast is provided solely for educational purposes and does not constitute any advice, including but not limited to, investment advice, trading advice or financial advice, and you should not treat any of the show's content as such. Read the full disclaimer.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

IEDA In Your Ear
Concrete Lions?

IEDA In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 44:59


What do concrete lions and a painting of Wendell Willkie have to do with economic development?  A lot, if you are in Rushville, Indiana.  Brian Sheehan, Director of Special Projects and Community Development for the City of Rushville, and Miah Michaelsen, Executive Director for the Indiana Arts Commission talk on this podcast about how ‘the arts' have helped to leverage millions of dollars of new investment in Rushville and how the Indiana Arts Commission can help your community.

Coming Clean Podcast
Mentors, Personal Growth, and Networking with April Monterrosa - CEO/Editor-Chief, Ep #135

Coming Clean Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 46:08


I am excited for you to hear from today's guest because she has such an interesting resume and is making a big impact in her local community. She will be featured in our upcoming Latin Talks event and I hope you come hear her speak in person.April Monterrosa is a San Antonio, Texas native, an entrepreneur, a published author, and the CEO/Editor in Chief of Live From The Southside, the first Latina-owned publication in South side San Antonio.She is listed as an influential Latina in San Antonio by KSAT12 News, and was honored by the 87th Texas Legislature for her achievements as a civic leader and community advocate.April has a passion for giving back to the community and serves as a board member of the San Antonio Water System's Community Experience Committee, of the Palo Alto College Cosmetology Committee, San Antonio District 4 Small Business Committee, and a board member of Brooks Give Back and Mitchell Lake Audubon Center nonprofits. April also serves as the Director of Community Development for The Pink Berets and the media sponsor for Fin Addict Angler Foundation.You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in...How April's wild youth and teenage years helped define what she is today (3:21)How to transition from corporate America to entrepreneurship (9:42)The things that changed from her parents generation to hers (16:30)Why knowing your own ambition, drive and capabilities is essential (23:17)How action works hand in hand with faith (32:41)Connect with AprilTheir websiteOn InstagramOn TwitterOn LinkedinOn FacebookOn YouTubeConnect With Peter O. Estévezwww.peteroestevezshow.com Follow on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/PeterOEstevezShow/Follow Peter O. Estevéz Show on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/peteroestevezshow/Follow Peter on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/peteroestevez/

Education Talk Radio
CONNECTING EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN RURAL AMERICA

Education Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 40:00


CONNECTING  EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN RURAL AMERICA Rise Higher is a new organization created by veteran educators Dr. Dessie Bowling and Dr. Jeff Hawkins , both longtime innovators in Eastern Kentucky's education world  *************** Everything we do is linked at the home website of The American Consortium for Equity in Education  at ace-ed.org: 1.Teacher-Retention.com and Teaching Reset Professional Development 2. SELtoday.org 3The Excellence in Equity Awards Program 4.Our online journal 'Equity& Access PreK12 5.the last two years of Education Talk Radio podcasts

The Atlanta Story
Episode 8 | Shannon Heath Longino

The Atlanta Story

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 51:14


The Atlanta Story podcast features meaningful stories of Atlanta's builders, creators, and entrepreneurs. In this episode Jon Birdsong sits down with Shannon Heath Longino, Senior Vice President at Truist Bank where she works on affordable housing initiatives. Shannon was raised by her grandmother, Eva Davis, in the storied East Lake Meadows neighborhood. Through community organization, Shannon was on the front line of transitioning a neighborhood towards greater economic mobility, enhanced resources and infrastructure, and access to education.    In today's interview, Shannon shares stories from East Lake's transformation, lessons and values she learned from her grandmother, her perspective on affordable housing, education, and more.   The Atlanta Story is put together by the folks at Atlanta Ventures -- and we can't wait to share some of the personalities behind the brand. Atlanta Ventures invests in entrepreneurs through community, content, and capital -- most notably through our Studio with companies like Greenzie and Intown Golf Club. We believe the best entrepreneurs learn from other great artists in different fields.   In this episode, we discuss… Shannon describes her experience being born and raised in Atlanta. (1:33) What are some of the grassroots community organizing efforts that you saw work in East lake meadows? (3:10) Could you give an example of your grandmother organizing in the community? (7:52) The neighborhood of East Lake Meadows had a revitalization. Would you walk us through that experience? (9:18) Transitioning to Shannon's story, what were some of the obstacles she took from East Lake Meadows to the military? (13:46) Shannon discussed the vote to move forwards with the revitalization of East Lake and other measures. (21:18)  Do you think that this revitalization is repeatable and scalable across the country? (24:02) Fast forwarding to today, Shannon is involved in charter schools. The opportunities given to people from this is a generational changing moment. Shannon discusses the benefits that this education gives. (29:48) Shannon shares insight into the impact that Tour Championship has in Atlanta. (36:18) Who do the benefits of Tour go to? (38:35) It's very clear that you are passionate about stewarding your grandmother's purpose and mission. How do you take this into Truist every day? (40:33) How Truist helps outside of Georgia (41:59) Affordable housing is a hot topic right now in Atlanta. What would be your council to the leadership today on Affordable housing? (43:30) Why Atlanta and what has Atlanta done for you? (48:40)   How you can get involved:  Visit atlantaventures.com/studio if you're interested in learning more about Atlanta Ventures and the Studio.    Where you can find us: Website: www.atlstory.com Twitter: @theatlantastory Instagram: @theatlantastory YouTube: Here Subscribe to the newsletter here.

Crain's Daily Gist
08/23/22: Get to know some of Crain's Notable leaders

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 20:19 Very Popular


Crain's contributor Lisa Bertagnoli talks with host Amy Guth Crain's list of Notable Leaders in Community Development and about how the leaders who made the list work in a variety of roles and organizations, serving various populations throughout the city. Plus: Chicago Monuments Project panel says Columbus statues should stay in storage; Indiana reportedly eyed for GM and LG battery plant; Obama Foundation fundraising takes a dip; and calling disruptions to the air travel industry unacceptable, Buttigieg urges airlines to buy meals for delayed passengers.

Lake Forest Illinois
What's a Berm? Do you need Lake Forest Illinois Real Estate Advice?

Lake Forest Illinois

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 60:27


Pete Jansons and Skoo Walker discuss the Last Lake Forest Illinois Planning Commission meeting led by Catherine Czerniak Director of Community Development for Lake Forest Illinois. The issue at hand was a resident wanted to put a "Bern" in to their property and a neighbor two houses down questioned it as it may direct more water on their property. A listener sent in a question asking where most of the flooding happens in Lake Forest Illinois. The listener is thinking of moving into Lake Forest Illinois but is wary because they cannot get a straight answer to this question Listener Monica invites Pete Jansons to her house to discuss questionable books (in her opinion) at the library --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lakeforestpodcast/support

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Joe Gruber, Vice President Downriver Delta Community Development Corp. and Wyandotte DDA

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 11:02


Michigan's Big Show
* Joe Gruber, Vice President Downriver Delta Community Development Corp. and Wyandotte DDA

Michigan's Big Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 11:02


SGF Insider
Plugged In - Learning the Impact of Neighboring

SGF Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 44:56


Join us for a conversation with David Burton, County Engagement Specialist in Community Development at the University of Missouri Extension. Tune in as we talk about being an engaged neighbor and learn what we can do to make an impact right in our backyard.

Dear Midlife...
Reengineering Your Identity with Lucas Lowe

Dear Midlife...

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 47:07


Today we welcome to the podcast Lucas Lowe who is a partner, dad, boss, Life Coach and CEO of Dorado Consulting Group.   Lucas shares with us his wide range of experiences and expertise that include: Aviation Maintenance, Management, Team Building, Sober Living, Bicycles, Vanlife, Progress and Productivity, Teaching/Training/Coaching, Real Estate Investing, as well as Housing and Community Development, AND at the same time he reminds us that we are so much more than our careers and skill sets.   Lucas has survived drug and alcohol addiction, facing felony drug charges, the loss of a lifetime career in the aviation industry (due to no fault of his own) and nearly losing his marriage. It was a fall to his rock bottom in which Lucas realized that he was in a life or death situation and wanted to choose life. Perhaps you've been there too? Maybe not the proverbial "rock bottom" an addict experiences. But, I guarantee each of you out there in our audience have felt this way at some point in your life. You look at yourself and don't like who you've become. You feel stuck and know you need to make a shift..but how?   Lucas is a Certified NLP practitioner and Life Coach who will share with us his journey as he overcame each challenge. He provides critical tools that will help you reevaluate your traumas in a new light so you can overcome them. He'll recommend ways in which you can realign with who you are at your core (not in the way others conveniently categorize you) to find true identity and inner peace.   In this episode, Lucas shares with us the following lessons"   People are so much more complex that what you see at face value Be open minded to take as much advice and wisdom from others who have walked the path before you as possible. Look to the personas and identity of others you admire to fill the space until you form your own identity of self Revisit your identity every couple of years and keep it detached from the external ideals that have traditionally defined us (such as jobs or skill sets) Write down your stories and get them out of your head. When you do, you can reframe old narratives and look at them in a new way. Keep a journal focused on ESP…Effort, Success and Progress. Document one thing you put extra effort into, one success and one thing in which you made progress each day.   Please leave us a review and kindly let us know what you enjoy about this podcast. We feel so strongly about the message we are putting out into the world…that the midlife identity "crisis" doesn't have to be a crisis. We hope these messages are resonating with you! Let us know how!   You can find Lucas at:   Email: Downlowiss@gmail.com IG | @lowielowe Lucas Lowe on Facebook  

cityCURRENT Radio Show
Nashville Radio Show: Community Development Center

cityCURRENT Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 15:10


Host Jeremy C. Park talks with Anita Teague, Executive Director of the Community Development Center (also known as the Child Development Center), who shares some of the 50 year history and impact for the nonprofit organization, and highlights their mission and efforts to provide supports and services to children, families, and individuals with disabilities while addressing the health and well-being of all people in the communities they serve across Middle Tennessee. During the interview, Anita talks about their different programs, including Early Intervention (Child Development Center), Children's Center for Autism, Family Support, Employment Services, Independent Support Coordination, and Senior Equipment Loan. She spotlights her team and their compassion and expertise, and then talks about how the community can get involved, like with their 31st Annual Pencil Country Classic Golf Tournament being held on Monday, September 19, 2022.Mission:  Provding supports and services to children, families, and individuals with disabilities while addressing the health and well-being of all persons in the communities in which we serve.Website:                https://cdctn.org/ Facebook:             https://www.facebook.com/CommunityDevelopmentCenter

Celebrating Powerhouse Women
Jasmine Billings, Community Development Manager for the City of Lawrenceville

Celebrating Powerhouse Women

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


Celebrating Powerhouse Women salutes and recognizes women who are making an impact, whether it's in business, philanthropy, public service, or elsewhere. Jasmine Billings/Community Development Manager for the City of Lawrenceville Jasmine Billings is a vibrant, intentional community builder, passionate about growth in the community through building relationships, developing partnerships, supporting youth advocacy, and strategic civic […] The post Jasmine Billings, Community Development Manager for the City of Lawrenceville appeared first on Business RadioX ®.

Friends For Life — LCMS Life Ministry
34. Serving the Younger Generation: An End Goals Crossover | Rev. Mark Kiessling & Julianna Shults, DCE

Friends For Life — LCMS Life Ministry

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 46:05


Join us for a special crossover episode with Friends for Life and End Goals! Steph is joined by End Goals' hosts, Rev. Mark Kiessling & DCE Julianna Shults to talk about the importance of intergenerational relationships, particularly with older generations honoring and serving the younger generation. How do we care for the pre-teens, teens, and young adults in our church? Get answers and practical tools for serving by listening in! Learn more about LCMS Youth Ministry at lcms.org/youth and find the End Goals Podcast at .kfuo.org/endgoals. Bios: Rev. Mark R. Kiessling serves as the director of LCMS Youth Ministry. In that role, he supports the leadership, service, resourcing, and networking functions of LCMS Youth Ministry. Kiessling graduated from Concordia Seminary, St. Louis and holds a bachelor's degree in business administration from Concordia University, Portland. Kiessling is married to Beth, who teaches Preschool at Christ Community Lutheran School in Kirkwood, Mo. Julianna Shults is a DCE serving as Program Manager of Resources and Leadership for LCMS Youth Ministry. With a BA in Psychology and a Masters in Community Development, she has served congregations in Florida and Chicago. Julianna has a passion for helping young people share the Gospel through leadership and service. She co-hosts the podcast End Goals, co-authored Relationships Count and contributed to Words of Strength and Promise both by CPH. Learn about LCMS Life Ministry at lcms.org/life, and email us at friendsforlife@lcms.org. Not all the views expressed are necessarily those of the LCMS; please discuss any questions with your pastor. We believe that God is the author and sustainer of all life. We also know it can be hard to speak about the intrinsic value of that life when it feels like the world is trying to drown us out. 

Business RadioX ® Network
Jasmine Billings, Community Development Manager for the City of Lawrenceville

Business RadioX ® Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022


Celebrating Powerhouse Women salutes and recognizes women who are making an impact, whether it's in business, philanthropy, public service, or elsewhere. Jasmine Billings/Community Development Manager for the City of Lawrenceville Jasmine Billings is a vibrant, intentional community builder, passionate about growth in the community through building relationships, developing partnerships, supporting youth advocacy, and strategic civic […]

Five & Thrive
August 11th's Weekly Rundown

Five & Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 5:01


Event on the Calendar:  This week's Event to put on your calendar is the Dell for Startups Pitch Event. Look I know there is a lot of startup theater out there with pitch events nearly every week. This one is a touch different because they are handing out a very real prize and that is $15k in Dell Rewards for the best 3 minute pitch. I wondered what Dell Rewards were so I put a link in the show notes to a more detailed description but you get $15k into select products and services without any catch. If you've got a dialed in Pitch, which I know several listeners do because they go to Friday's Pitch Practice with Jacey Lucus, put August 25th on your cal from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. at the Atlanta Tech Village. A few minutes on stage could yield some sweet hardware.    Quiet Giant: This week's quiet giant is called Neighborly Software. Co-founders, Jason and Chris, of Neighborly Software have built a tremendous bootstrapped business with software designed for Housing, Economic, and Community Development program management. In the vicissitudes of political climates, Neighborly Software provides backbone sturdy software for municipalities, cities, counties, and states to manage and allocate community resources in a paper-less, secure, and efficient solution. They just posted #72 on Inc 5000's fastest growing companies so you know they are hiring. This week's Quiet Giant may not be so quiet any more.  Blog of the Week: This week's blog of the week comes from the Godfather of SaaS himself Jason Lemkin who is gearing up for his major conference, SaaStr next month. The blog title is like a Dear Abbey but instead it's a Dear SaaStr and the question is: Is a big market really better than a niche market? The answer is always yes but with a few caveats. First, one may think if it's a small market, that's better because there will be less competition and while that's true, you're have 12-16 hours a day to work on a business and so you might as well be working on one in a massive market as that will be a key defining factor or growth and success. Let's get to the caveats. First, small markets can grow into large markets. I touched on this in last week's episode in our “Market Ready for a Startup” segment. Pick a niche to get rich is true, but if you can get niche but a rapidly growing market, bingo. The article's other two buts include that small markets don't always mean there is less competition. And lastly, most entrepreneurs start in a small segment of a large market. Overall, study the market and trends just as much if not more than anything else before committing.  Product of the Week: Hazlnut - this company is out of Jacksonville, Florida is making a major evolution in their products and services as they navigate the ever-changing demands of restaurants. While their core product of providing beautiful and dynamic mobile experiences for food franchises continues to grow, they've discovered through customer feedback, that the unanswered phone order is a major area of opportunity for many restaurants to drive additional revenue. Approximately 30% of calls into restaurants don't get answered. Enter HazlVoiceLite. If a restaurant doesn't pick up the phone, there is an option to have the menu texted to the consumer to limit the number of missed orders. HazlVoice Pro is in the works which will include automated phone ordering all through voice, but for now check out Hazlnut and their rapidly growing suite of products in the restaurant industry. Shout out to co-founders Dick and Steven for driving stellar innovation. Raise a Glass: Ben Chestnut announced this week he is stepping down as CEO of Mailchimp after founding the company 21 years ago and recently selling it for $12B. For me and several other Atlantans, I've been fortunate enough to attend fascinating talks they've held over the years, use their product, and watched and respected how they built and scaled their way with their rules, on their time frame. Congratulations Ben! What a legacy and excited for what's ahead!  Annnnd, that's 5 minutes. Thank you for listening to Five and Thrive. We provide 5 minutes of quality information, so you can thrive in the upcoming week. Please subscribe to the show and spread the good word!  Resources discussed in this episode:   Event on the Calendar: Dell for Startups Dell rewards program Blog of the Week Big Markets vs Niche Markets Quiet Giant Neighborly Software   Product of the Week: Hazlnut Story  Raise a Glass: Mailchimp

Screaming in the Cloud
Creating Conversations on TikTok with Alex Su

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 33:46


About AlexAlex Su is a lawyer who's currently the Head of Community Development at Ironclad, the #1 contract lifecycle management technology company that's backed by Accel, Sequoia, Y Combinator, and other leading investors. Prior to joining Ironclad, Alex sold cloud software to legal departments and law firms on behalf of early stage startups. Alex maintains an active presence on social media, with over 180,000 followers across Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and TikTok. Links Referenced: Ironclad: https://ironcladapp.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexander-su/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyitsalexsu Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyitsalexsu/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@legaltechbro TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been off the beaten path from the traditional people building things in cloud by the sweat of their brow and the snark on their Twitters. I'm joined today by Alex Su, who's the Head of Community Development at Ironclad, and also relatively well-renowned on the TikToks, as the kids say. Alex, thank you for joining me.Alex: Thank you so much for having me on the show.Corey: It's always been an interesting experience because I joined TikTok about six months or so ago, due to an escalatingly poor series of life choices that continue to fail me, and I have never felt older in my life. But your videos consistently tend to show up there. You are @legaltechbro, which sounds like wow, I hate all of those things, and yet your content is on fire.How long have you been doing the public dance thing, for lack of a better term? I don't even know what they call it. I know how to talk about Twitter. I know how to talk about LinkedIn—sad. LinkedIn is sad—but TikTok is still something I'm trying to wrap my ancient brain around.Alex: Yeah, I felt out of place when I first made my first TikTok. And by the way, I'm known for making funny skits. I have actually never danced. I've always wanted to, but I don't think I have that… that talent. I started posting TikToks in, I will call it—let's call it the fall of 2020. So, after the pandemic.Before that, I had been posting consistently on LinkedIn for, gosh, ever since 2016, when I got into legal tech. And during the pandemic, I tried a bunch of different things including making funny skits. I'd seen something somewhere online if somebody's making fun of the doctor life. And so, I thought, hey, I could do that for legal too. And so, I made one with iMovie. You know, I recorded it on Zoom.And then people started telling me, “Hey, you should get on this thing called TikTok.” And so, I resisted it for a while because I was like, “This is not for me.” But at some point, I said, “I'll try this out. The editing seems pretty easy.” So, I made a couple of videos poking fun at the life of a law firm lawyer or a lawyer working for a corporate legal department.And on my fourth video, I went massively viral. Like, unexpected went viral, like, millions of—I think two million or so views. And I found myself with a following. So, I thought, “Hey, I guess this is what I'm doing now.” And so, it's been, I don't know, a year-and-a-half since then, and I've been continuously posting these skits.Corey: It's like they say the worst thing can happen when you go into a casino and play for the first time is you win.Alex: [laugh].Corey: You get that dopamine hit, and suddenly, well now, guess what you're doing for the rest of your life? There you go. It sounds like it worked out for you in a lot of fun ways. Your skits about big law of life definitely track. My wife used to work in that space, and we didn't meet till she was leaving that job because who has time to date in those environments?But I distinctly remember one of our early dates, we went out to meet a bunch of her soon-to-be-former coworkers at something like eight or nine o'clock in Los Angeles on a Friday night. And at the end of it, we went back to one of our places, and they went back to work. Because that is the lifestyle, apparently, of being in big law. I don't have the baseline prerequisites to get into law school, to let alone get the JD and then go to work in big law, and looking at that lifestyle, it's, “Yeah, you know, I don't think that's for me.” Of course, I say that, and then three days later, I was doing a middle of the night wake up because the pager went off.Like, “Oh, are you a doctor?” And the pager is like, “Holy shit. This SSL certificate expires in 30 days.” It's, yeah. Again, life has been fun, but it's always been one of those things that was sort of, I guess, held in awe. And you're putting a very human face on it.Alex: Yeah. You know, I never expected to be in big law either, Corey. Like, I was never good at school, but as I got older, I found a way to talk my way into, like, a good school. I hustled my way into a job at a firm that I never imagined I could get a job at. But once I got in, that's when I was like, “Okay, I don't feel like I fit in.”And so, I struggled but I still you know grinded it out. I stayed at the job for a couple of years. And I left because I was like, “This is not right for me.” But I never imagined that all of those experiences in big law ended up being the source material for my content, like, eight years after I'd left. So, I'm very thankful that I had that experience even if it wasn't a good fit for me. [laugh].Corey: And on some level, it feels like, “Where do you get your material from?” It's, “Oh, the terrible things that happened to me. Why do you ask?”Alex: That's basically it. And people ask me, they say, you know, “You haven't worked in that environment for eight years. It's probably different now, right?” Well, no. You know, the legal industry is not like the tech industry. Like, things move very slowly there.The jokes that made people laugh back then, you know, 10 years ago, even 20 years ago, people still laugh at today because it's the same way things have always worked. So, again, I'm very thankful that that's been the case. And, you know, I feel like, the reason why my content is popular is because a lot of people can resonate with it. Things that a lot of people don't really talk about publicly, about the lifestyle, the culture, how things work in a large firm, but I make jokes about it, so people feel comfortable laughing about it, or commenting and sharing.Corey: I want to get into that a little bit because when you start seeing someone pop up again and again and again on TikTok, you're one of those, “Okay, I should stalk this person and figure out what the hell their story is.” And I didn't have to look very far in your case because you're very transparent about it. You're the head of community development at a company called Ironclad, and that one threw me for a little bit of a loop. So, let's start with the easy question, I suppose. What is Ironclad?Alex: We're a digital contracting technology that helps accelerate business contracts. Companies deal with contracts of all types; a lot of times it gets bogged down in legal review. We just help with that process to make that process move faster. And I never expected I'd be in this space. You know, I always thought I was going to be a trial lawyer.But I left that world, you know, maybe six years ago to go into the legal technology space, and I quickly saw that contracts was kind of a growing challenge, contracting, whether it's for sales or for procurement. So, I found myself as a salesperson in legal tech selling, first e-discovery software, and then contracting software. And then I found my way to Ironclad as part of the community team, really to talk about how we can help, but also speaking up about the challenges of the legal profession, of working at a law firm or at a legal department. So, I feel like it's all been the culmination of all my experiences, both in law and technology.Corey: In the world in which I've worked, half of my consulting work has been helping our clients negotiate their large-scale AWS contracts and the other half is architectural nonsense of, “Hey, if you make these small changes, that cuts your bill in half. Maybe consider doing them.” But something that I've learned that is almost an industry-wide and universal truism, is that you want to keep the salespeople and the lawyers relatively separate just due to the absolute polar opposites of incentives. Salespeople are incentivized to sell anything that holds still long enough or they can outrun, whereas lawyers are incentivized to protect the company from risk. No, is the easy answer and everything else is risk that has to be managed. You are one of those very rare folks who has operated successfully and well by blending the two. How the hell did that happen?Alex: I'm not sure to this day how it happened. But I think part of the reason why I left law in the first place was because I don't think I fit in. I think there's a lot of good about having a law degree and being part of the legal profession, but I just wanted to be around people, I wanted to work with people, I didn't want to always worry about things. And so, that led me to technology sales, which took me to the other extreme. And so, you know, I carried a sales quota for five years and that was such an interesting experience to see where—to both sell technology, but also to see where legal fit into that process.And so, I think by having the legal training, but also having been part of a sales team, that's given me appreciation for what both teams do. And I think they're often at tension with one another, but they're both there to serve the greater goals of the company, whether it's to generate revenue or protect against risk.Corey: I think that there's also a certain affinity that you may have—I'm just spitballing wildly—one of the things that sales folks and attorneys tend to have in common is that in the public imagination, as those roles are not, shall we call it, universally beloved. There tend to be a fair number of well, jokes, in which case, both sides of that tend to be on the receiving end. I mean, at some level, all you have to do is become an IRS auditor and you've got the holy trifecta working for you.Alex: [laugh]. I don't know why I gravitated to these professions, but I do think that it's partly because both of these roles hold a significant amount of power. And if you look at just contracting in general, a salesperson at a company, they're really the driver of the sales process. Like, if there's no sale to be made, there's no contract. On the flip side, the law person, the lawyer, knows everything about what's inside of the contract.They understand the legal terms, the jargon, and so they hold an immense amount of power over advising people on what's going to happen. And so, I think sometimes, salespeople and legal people take it too far and either spend too much time reviewing a contract and lording it over the business folks, or maybe the salesperson is too blase about getting a deal done and maybe bypasses legal and doesn't go through the right processes. By the way, Corey, these are jokes that I make in my TikToks all the time and they always go viral because it's so relatable to people. But yeah, that's probably why people always make jokes about lawyers and salespeople. There's probably some element of ridiculing people with a significant amount of power within a company to determine these transactions.Corey: Do you find that you have a better affinity for the folks doing contract work on the seller side or the buyer side? Something they don't tell you when you run companies is, yeah, you're going to spend a lot of time working on contracts, not just when selling things, but also when buying things and going back and forth. Aspects of what you're talking about so far in this conversation have resonated, I guess, with both sides of that for me. What do you have the affinity for?Alex: I think on the sales side, just because of my experience, you know, I think when you go through a transaction and you're trying to convince someone to doing something, and this is probably why I wanted to go to law school in the first place. Like I watched those movies, right? I watched A Few Good Men and I thought I'd be standing up in court convincing a jury of something. Little did I know that that sort of interest [crosstalk 00:10:55]—Corey: Like, Perry Mason breakthrough moment.Alex: That moment where—the gotcha moment, right? I found that in sales. And so, it was really a thrill to be able to, like, talk to someone, listen to them, and then kind of convince them that, based on what challenges they're facing, for them to buy some technology. I love that. And I think that was again, tied to why I went to law school in the first place.I didn't even know sales was a possible profession because I grew up in an immigrant community that was like, you just go to school, and that'll lead to your career. But there's a lot of different careers that are super interesting that don't require formal schooling, or at least the seven years of schooling you need for law. So, I always identify with the sales side. And maybe that's just how I am, but obviously, the folks who deal with the buy side, it's a pretty important job, too.Corey: There's a lot of surprise when I start talking to folks in the engineering world. First, they're in for a rough awakening at times when they learn exactly how much qualified enterprise salespeople can make. But also because being a lawyer without, you know, the appropriate credentials to tie into that, you're going to have a bad time. There are regulatory requirements imposed on lawyers, whereas to be a salesperson, forget the law degree, forget the bachelor's, forget the high school diploma, all you really need to be able to do from an academic credential standpoint is show up.The rest of it is, can you actually sell? Can you have the conversations that convince people to see the outcome that benefits everyone? And I don't know what that it's possible, or advised necessarily, to be able to find a way to teach that in some formalized way. It almost feels like folks either have that spark or they don't. Do you think it's one of those things that can be taught? Do you think it's something that people have to have a pre-existing affinity for?Alex: It's both, right, because part of it is some people will just—they don't have the personality to really sell. It's also like their interest; they don't want to do that. But what I found that's interesting is that what I thought would make a good salesperson didn't end up being true when I looked at the most effective sellers. Like, in my head, I thought, “Oh, this is somebody who's very boisterous, very extroverted,” but I found that in my experience in B2B SaaS that the most effective sellers are very, very much active listeners. They're not the people showing up and talking at you. They are asking you about your day-to-day asking about processes, understanding the context of your situation, before making a small suggestion about what you might want to do.I was very impressed the first time I saw one of these enterprise sellers who was just so good at that. Like, I saw him, and he looked nothing like what I imagined an effective sales guy to look like. And he was really kind and he just, kind of, just talked to me, like, I was a human being, and listened to my answers. So, I do think that there is some element of nature, your talent when it comes to that, but it can also be trained because I think a lot of folks who have sales talent, they don't realize that they could be good at it. They think that they've got to be this extroverted, happy hour, partying, storyteller, where —Corey: The Type A personality that interrupts people as they're having the conversation.Alex: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Yeah.Alex: So anyways, I think that's why it's a mix of both.Corey: The conversations that I've learned the most from when I'm talking to prospects and clients have been when I asked the quote-unquote, dumb question that I already know the answer to, and then I shut up and I listen. And wow, I did not expect that answer. And when you dig a little further, you realize there's nuance that—at least in my case—that I've completely missed to the entire problem space. I think that is really one of the key differentiators to my mind, that separate people who are good at this role from folks who just misunderstand what the role is based upon mass media, or in other cases—same problem with lawyers—the worst examples, in some cases, of the profession. The pushy used car salesperson or the lawyer they see advertising on the back of a bus for personal injury cases. The world is far more nuanced than that.Alex: Absolutely. And I think you hit the nail on the head when you said, you know, you ask those questions and let them talk. Because that's an entire process within the sales process. It's called discovery, and you're really asking questions to understand the person's situation. More broadly, though, I think pitching at people doesn't seem to work as well as understanding the situation.And you know, I've kind of done that with my content, my TikToks because, you know, if you look at LinkedIn, a lot of people in our space, they're always prescribing solutions, giving advice, posting content about teaching people things. I don't do that. As a marketer, what I do is I talk about the problems and create discussions. So, I'll create a funny video—Corey: I think you're teaching a whole generation that maybe law school isn't what they want to be doing, after all there is that.Alex: There is that. There is that. It's a mix of things. But one of the things I think I focus on is talking about the challenges of working with a sales team if you're an in-house lawyer. And I don't prescribe technology, I don't prescribe Ironclad, I don't say this is what you need to do, but by having people talk about it, they realize, right—and I think this is why the videos are popular—as opposed to me coming out and saying, “I think you need technology because of XYZ.” I think, like, facilitating the conversation of the problem space, that leads people to naturally say, “Hey, I might need something. What do you guys do, by the way?”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: It sounds ridiculous for me to say that, “Oh, here's my entire business strategy: step one, I shitpost on the internet about cloud computing; step two, magic happens here; and step three people reach out to talk about their AWS bills.” But it's also true. Is that the pattern that you go through: step one, shitpost on TikTok; step two, magic happens here; and step three people reach out asking to learn more about what your company does? Or is there more nuance to do it?Alex: I'm still figuring out this whole thing myself, but I will say shitposting is incredibly effective. Because I'm active on Twitter. Twitter is where I start my shitposts. TikTok, I also shitpost, but in video format, I think the number one thing to do is figure out what resonates with people, whether it's the whole contracting thing or if it's frustrations about law school. Once you create something that's compelling, the conversation gets going and you start learning about what people are thinking.And I think that what I'm trying to figure out is how that can lead to a deeper conversation that can lead to a business transaction or lead to a sale. I haven't figured it out, right, but I didn't know that when I started creating content that spoke to people when I was a quota-carrying salesperson, people reached out to me for demo requests, for sales conversations. There is something that is happening in this quote-unquote, “Dark funnel,” that I'm sure you're very familiar with. There's something that's happening that I'm trying to understand, and I'm starting to see.Corey: This is probably a good thing to the zero in on a bit because to most people's understanding of the sales process, it would seem that you going out and making something of a sensation out of yourself on the internet, well what are you doing that for? That's not sales work? How is that sales? That's just basically getting distracted and going to do something fun. Shouldn't you be picking up the phone and cold calling people or mass-emailing folks who don't want to hear from you because you trick them into having a badge scanned somewhere? I don't necessarily think that is accurate. How do you see the interplay of what you do and sales?Alex: When you're selling something like makeup or clothing, it's a pretty transactional process. You create a video; people will buy, right? That's B2C. In B2B, it's a much more complex processes. There's so many touchpoints. The start of a sales conversation and when they actually buy may take six months, 12 months, years. And so, there's got to be a lot of touch points in between.I remember when I was starting out in my content journey, I had this veteran enterprise sales leader, like, your classic, like, CRO. He said to me, “Hey, Alex, your content's very funny, but shouldn't you be making cold calls and emails? Like, why are you spending your time doing this?” And I said, “Hey, listen, do you notice that I'm actually sourcing more outbound sales calls than any other sales rep? Like, have you noticed that?”And he's like, “Actually, yeah, I did notice that. You know, how are you doing it?” And I was like, “Do you not see that these two are tied? These are not people I just started calling. They are people who have seen my content over time. And this is how it works.”And so, I think that the B2B world is starting to wise up to this. I think, for example, Ironclad is leading the way on creating a community team to create those conversations, but plenty of B2B companies are doing the same thing. And so, I think by inserting themselves in a conversation—a two-way conversation—during that process, that's become incredibly effective, far more so than, like, cold-calling a lawyer or a developer who doesn't want to be bothered by some pushy salesperson.Corey: Busy, expensive professionals generally don't want to spend all their time doing that. The cold outreach emails that drive me nuts are, “Hey, can we talk for half an hour?” Yeah, I don't tend to think in terms of billable hours because that's not how I do anything that I do, but there is an internal rate that I used to benchmark and it's what you want me just reach into my pocket and give you how much money for a random opportunity to pitch me on something that you haven't even qualified whether I need or not? It's like, asking people for time is worse, in some ways, than asking for money because they can always make more money, but no one can make more time.Alex: Right, right. That's absolutely right.Corey: It's the lack of awareness of understanding the needs and motivations of your target market. One thing that I found that really aided me back when I was working for other folks was trying to find a company or a management structure that understood and appreciated this. Easy example, when I was setting out as an independent consultant after a few months I'd been doing this and people started to hear about me. But you know, it turns out that there are challenges to running a business that are not recommended for most people. And I debated, do I take a job somewhere else?So, I interviewed at a few places, and I was talking to one company that's active in the cloud costing space at the time and they wanted me to come aboard. But discussions broke down because they thought I was, quote, “More interested in thought leadership than I was and actually fixing the bills themselves.” And looking at this now, four years later or so, yeah, they were right. And amazing how that whole thing played out, but that the lack of vision around, there's an opportunity here, if we can chase it, at least in the places I was at, was relatively hard to come by. Did you luck out in finding a role that works for you in this way or did you basically have to forge it for yourself from the sweat of your brow and the strength of your TikTok account?Alex: It was uphill at first, but eventually, I got lucky. And you know, part of it was engineered luck. And I'll explain what I mean. When I first started out doing this, I didn't expect this to lead to any jobs. I just thought it would support my sales career.Over time, as the content got more popular, I never wanted to do anything else because I was like, I don't want to be a marketer. I'm not a—I don't know anything about demand gen. All I know is how to make funny videos that get people talking. The interesting that happened was that these videos created this awareness, this energy in our space, in the legal space. And it wasn't long before Ironclad found me.And you know, Ironclad has always been big on community, has always done things like—like, our CEO, our founder, he said that he used to host these dinners, never talking about Ironclad, but just kind of talking about law school and law with potential clients. And it would lead to business. Like, it's almost the same concept of, like, not pushing sales on people. And so, Ironclad has always had that in its DNA. And one of our investors, our board members, Jessica Lee from Sequoia, she is a huge believer in community.I mean, she was the CEO of another company that leveraged community, and so there's this community element all throughout the DNA of Ironclad. Now, had I not put myself out there with this content, I may not have been discovered by Ironclad. But they saw me, they found me, and they said, “We don't think about these things like many other companies. We really want to invest in this function.” And so, it's almost like when you put yourself out there, yes, sometimes some people will say, “What are you doing? Like, this makes no sense. Like, stop doing that.” But there's going to be some true believers who come out and seek you out and find you.And that's been my experience here, like, at Ironclad. Like, people were like, “When you go there, are they going to censor you? Is your content going to be less edgy?” No. Like, they pulled me aside multiple times and said, “Keep being yourself. This is what we want.” And I think that is so special and unique. And part of it is very much lucky, but it's also when you put yourself out there kind of in a big way, like-minded people will seek you out as well.Corey: I take the position that part of marketing, part of the core of marketing, is you've got to have an opinion. But as soon as you have an opinion, people are going to disagree with you. They're going to, effectively, forget the human on the other side of it and start taking you for a drag on social media and whatnot. So, the default reaction a lot of people have is oh, I shouldn't venture opinions forward.No. People are always going to dislike you for something and you may as well have it be for who you are and what you want to be doing rather than who you're pretending to be. That's always been my approach. For me, the failure mode was not someone on Twitter is going to get mad about what I wrote. No one's going to read it. That's the failure mode. And the way to avoid that is make it interesting.Alex: That is a hundred percent relatable to me because I think when I was younger, I was scared. I did worry that I would get in trouble for what I posted. But I realized these people I was worried about, they weren't going to help me anyways. These are not people who are going to seek me out and help me but then say, “Oh, I saw your content, so now I can't help you.” They were not going to help me anyways.But by being authentic to myself and putting things out there, I attracted my own tribe of people who have helped me, right? A lot of my early results from content came not because I reached my target customers; it was because somebody resonated with what I put out there and they carried my message and said, “Hey, you should talk to Alex.” Something special happens when you kind of put yourself out there and say an opinion or share a perspective that not everyone agrees with because that tribe you build ends up helping you a lot. And meanwhile, these other people that might not like it, they probably weren't going to help you either.Corey: I maintain that one of the most valuable commodities in the universe is attention. And so, often there's so much information overload that's competing for our attention every minute of every day that trying to blend in with the rest of it feels like the exact wrong approach. I'm not a large company here. I don't have a full marketing department to wind up doing ad buys, and complicated campaigns, and train a team of attacking interns to wind up tackling people to scan their badges at conferences. I've got to work with what I've got.So, the goal I've always had is trigger the Rolodex moment where someone hears about a problem in the AWS billing space—ideally—and, “Oh, my God, you need to talk to Corey about that.” And it worked, for better or worse. And a lot of it was getting lucky, let's be very clear here, and people doing me favors that they had no reason to do and I'll never be able to repay. But being able to be in that space really is what made the difference. Now, the downside, of course, when you start doing that is, how do you go back to what happened before?If you decide okay, well, it's been a fun run for you and Ironclad. And yeah, TikTok. Turns out that is, in fact, for kids; time to go somewhere else. Like, I don't know that you would fit into your old type of job.Alex: Yeah. No, I wouldn't. But very early on, I realized, I said, “If I'm going to find meaningful work, it's okay to be wrong.” And when I went to big law, I realized this is not right for me. That's okay. I'm just not going to get another big law job.And so, when people ask me, “Hey, now that you've put yourself out there, you probably can't get a job at a big firm anymore.” And that's okay to me because I wasn't going to go back anyways. But what I have found, Corey, is that there's this other universe of people, whether it's a entrepreneur, smaller businesses, technology companies, they would be interested in working with me. And so, by being myself, I may have blocked out a certain level of opportunities or a safety net, but now I'm kind of in this other world where I feel very confident that I won't have trouble finding a job. So, I feel very lucky to have that, but that's why I also don't worry about the possibility of not going back.Corey: Yeah, I've never had to think about the idea of, well, what if I go have to get a job again? Because at that point, it means well, it's time to let every one at the company who is depending on the go, and that's the bigger obstacle because, let's be honest, I'm a white guy in tech, and I look like it. My failure mode is basically a board seat and a book deal because of inherent bias in the system.Alex: [laugh]. Oh, my god.Corey: That's the outcome that, for me personally, I will be just fine. It's the other people took a chance on me. I'm terrified of letting them down. So far, knock on wood, I haven't said anything too offensive in public is going to wind up there. That's also not generally my style.But it is the… it is something that has weighed on me that has kept me from I guess, thinking about what would my next job be? I'm convinced this is the last job I'll ever have, if for no other reason that I've made myself utterly unemployable.Alex: [laugh]. Well, I think many of us aspire to find that perfect intersection of what you love doing and what pays the bills. Sounds like you've found it, I really do feel like I found it, too. I never imagined I'd be doing what I do now. Which is also sometimes hard to describe.I'm not making TikToks for a living; I'm just on the community team, doing events—I'm getting to work with people. I'm basically doing the things that I wanted to do that led me to quit that job many years ago, that big law job many years ago. So, I feel very blessed and for anybody who's, like, looking for that type of path, I do think that at some point, you do need to kind of shed the safety nets because if you always hang on to the safety nets, whether it's a big tech job or a big law job, there's going to be elements of that that don't fit in with your personality, and you're never going to be able to find that if you kind of stay there. But if you venture out—and, you know, I admire you for what you've done; it sounds like you're very successful at what you do and get to do what you love every day—I think great things can happen.Corey: Yeah, I get to insult Amazon for a living. It's what I love. It's what I would do if I weren't being paid. So, here we are. Yeah—Alex: [laugh].Corey: I have no sense of self-preservation. It's kind of awesome.Alex: I love it.Corey: But you're right. It's… there's something to be said for finding the thing that winds up resonating with you and what you want to be doing.Alex: It really does. And you know, I think when I first made the move to technology, to sales, there was no career path. I thought I would—maybe I thought I might be a VP of Sales. But the thing is, when you put yourself out there, the opportunities that show up might not be the ones that you had always seen from the beginning. Like if you ask a lawyer, like, “What can I do if I don't practice law?” They're going to give you these generic answers. “Work here. Work there. Work for that company. I've seen a lot of people do this.”But once you put yourself out there in the wilderness, these opportunities arise. And I've been very lucky. I mean, I never imagined I'd be a TikTokker. And by the way, I also make memes on Twitter. Couldn't imagine I'd be doing that either. I learned, like, Mematic, these tools. Like, you know, like, I'm immersed in this internet culture now.Corey: It is bizarre to me and I never saw it coming either. For better or worse, though, here we are, stuck at it.Alex: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for taking so much time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about what you're up to and follow along for the laughs, if nothing else, where's the best place for them to find you?Alex: The best way to find me is on LinkedIn; just look up Alex Su. But I'm around and on lots of social media platforms. You can find me on Twitter, on Instagram, and on TikTok, although I might be a little bit embarrassed of what I put on TikTok. I put some crazy gnarly stuff out there. But yeah, LinkedIn is probably the best place to find me.Corey: And we will put links to all of it in the show notes, and let people wind up making their own decisions. Thanks so much for your time, Alex. I really appreciate it.Alex: Corey, thank you so much for having me. This was so much fun.Corey: Alex Su, Head of Community Development at Ironclad. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insipid comment talking about how unprofessional everything we talked about is that you will not be able to post for the next six months because it'll be hung up in legal review.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

1080 KYMN Radio - Northfield Minnesota
Mayor Rhonda Pownell and Jake Reilley discuss Northfield community development projects

1080 KYMN Radio - Northfield Minnesota

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022


Northfield Mayor Rhonda Pownell introduces new Community Development Director Jake Reilley and they discuss projects including the Kraewood development, Viking Terrace, housing, Archer House property, and more.

ESG Decoded
Courtney Taylor Shares Best Practices for Businesses Investing in Sustainable Community Solutions

ESG Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 32:27


The ‘S' in ESG relates to the people elements impacting organizations. This includes employee relations, organizational health, people culture, DEI, and community outreach. In this episode, Yvonne Harris talks with Courtney Taylor, Senior Vice President of Community Development for Veritex Community Bank. Courtney is a Community Relations Powerhouse and Philanthropic Leader serving on several volunteer boards. At Veritex, Courtney develops relationships on behalf of the bank to achieve continuous improvement to the ongoing success of the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) program, evaluates community development needs, and administers the bank's volunteer program, which consists of recruiting volunteers to participate in community partner initiatives, track volunteer hours, and recruit bank employees to participate on local nonprofit boards. Courtney holds degrees from the University of Texas at San Antonio and Texas Woman's University. Listen as Yvonne and Courtney discuss what Veritex considers when developing its community outreach strategic plan, why it is important to continue to invest in financial literacy, and how the Women in Business program is supporting women business owners in unique ways. Make sure to subscribe to ESG Decoded on your favorite streaming platforms and our new YouTube Channel so that you're notified of our vodcast episodes! Don't forget to connect with us on our social media channels. Enjoy this episode! Interested in being a guest on the podcast? For consideration and scheduling, please fill out this form.

Kerry Today
The EU and Me - This is Ireland: Episode 2 - Thursday, July 28th 2022

Kerry Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022


For this month’s EU and Me series Treasa was joined by Brigid Quilligan, project manager Kerry Travellers Health and Community Development; Carmel Walsh, senior youth officer for Léargas; Tom Matthew, board member at the European Youth Forum and Barry Scannell, Solicitor at William Fry LLP, and Member of the Law Society’s Intellectual Property and Data Protection Law Committee:

Drive With NAR
Community Development

Drive With NAR

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 25:51


People in countless communities across the country need help every day, and REALTORS® are stepping up to fill the void. Whether it's providing holiday meals to neighbors or giving a local high school band new instruments, REALTORS® are showing up for their communities. We spoke to two community development advocates, Maria Landmesser, managing broker of the RE/MAX Concepts office in Ankeny, Iowa, and Ryan Gable, CEO of StartingPoint Realty in Palatine, Ill., about how they got started in philanthropy, how others can get involved, and why giving back can be good for business.

Jesup Group Podcast
The Community Development Institute (CDI) with Shelby Fiegel Episode 21

Jesup Group Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 50:34


This podcast episode features Shelby Fiegel, Director of the Community Development Institute (CDI) at the University of Central Arkansas.  The Jesup Group focuses on entrepreneurship, community development, and growing digital economies in rural southwest Missouri. While most of our podcasts feature entrepreneurs, this episode is focused on how CDI is creating stronger, more vibrant communities through an intentional program that brings people who love their communities together to share ideas, plan, and network.  Learn more about the mission of CDI, who can participate (anyone who loves their community), and how communities have been transformed by those who participate in CDI.  Resource Links Grumpy Rabbit University of Central Arkansas CDI Ted Abernathy and Economic Leadership John Carroll and City Leadership Strong Towns City and Town Magazine

The Confluence
Despite concerns of a recession, local businesses are experiencing steady demand for goods, services

The Confluence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 22:30


On today's episode of The Confluence: We look at the results of a recent survey on the regional businesses economic outlook for remainder of the year; the state Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of Pennsylvania's mail-in-voting law, Act 77; and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright August Wilson's Pittsburgh home is opening to the public. Today's guests include: Vera Krekanova, chief research officer with the Allegheny Conference on Community Development; Stephen Caruso, Capitol reporter for Spotlight PA; and Chris Rawson, board member of the August Wilson House.

Peace Catalyst Podcast
Steve Hackman - Peacebuilding in Hong Kong

Peace Catalyst Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 54:07


Steve is a Hong Kong-based travel writer, educator, and speaker who has been the Head of Christian and Community Development at Yew Chung Education Foundation for more than a decade. Steve is an experienced adventurer, having completed numerous cross-country journeys including the 500 mile Camino de Santiago in Spain and the 1100 mile Via Francigena from England to Rome. He hosts the Beyond The Pale podcast, which explores living life and spiritual faith through the lens of pilgrimage.  LINKS: Beyond the Pale podcast Yew Chung Education Foundation Seeds of Hope program   Support the podcast: https://www.peacecatalyst.org/peacemaking-podcast Edited by Nicole Gibson Music: Soulmates by Yigit Atilla

Transfer Nation Podcast
Transfer Students Experience Doing Undergraduate Research

Transfer Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 43:57


In this episode, Judith Brauer with NISTS, interviews Tiara Freeman and Tsionah Novick. They discuss their experience with undergraduate research as transfer students as well as the findings from their research project, “Developing Community Interventions within Predominately White Institutions (PWI) Advising Departments for Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) Transfer Students.” Tiara Freeman | LinkedIn | InstagramTiara is a graduate of Portland State where she earned her B.S. in psychology with a concentration in neuroscience. She is a student co-investigator for a community psychology action research project that assessed how academic advising practices can act as important touch points for establishing BIPOC transfer students' sense of belonging while transitioning to a new university. Tiara is also a volunteer researcher within the Daily Affect, Drinking and Interpersonal Context Health Lab where she is interested in how environmental features may contribute to drinking and other health-related outcomes. She also volunteers for the NW Noggin Neuroscience Outreach Program. Her personal research interests include the restorative benefits of nature, burnout and technology, as well as intervention work designed to treat substance abuse. Tsionah Novick | LinkedIn | InstagramTsionah is a Portland Community College transfer student who completed her B.S. in Psychology and Social Science with a certificate in Community Psychology at Portland State University. Tsionah is also a first-generation and returning student. In addition to being a co-investigator for the Student Partners for Anti-Racist Advising, Tsionah is a Research Assistant in the Stigma, Resilience, Inequality, Identity, & Diversity (StRIID) Lab at PSU. Tsionah was recently admitted to the Community Development and Action M.Ed. program at Vanderbilt's Peabody College where she will be attending in 2023. Tsionah's research interests include the intersections of gender, religion, and wellness using qualitative research methods.Resources MentionedTiara and Tsionah's NISTS conference presentation “Developing Community Interventions within Predominately White Institutions (PWI) Advising Departments for Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) Transfer Students”Student Partners for Anti-Racist Advising (SPARA) WebsiteAdvisor Checklist for BIPOC Transfer Student Support #NISTS #TransferPride #TransferSuccess #TransferResearch #TransferAdvocacy  #TransferChampion #TNTalks #TransferNationKeep talking with Transfer NationIG: @WeAreTransferNationTikTok: @TransferNationTwitter: @TransferPrideFB Group: Transfer NationEmail: WeAreTransferNation@gmail.comTalk soon!Show CreditsHost | Judith BrauerGuest | Tiara Freeman, Tsionah NovickProducers | Sam Kaplan, Brandon RodríguezSound Editing | Abraham Urias

Dot Dot Dot: The NINE dot ARTS Podcast
Social Change in the Built Environment With Rico Quirindongo

Dot Dot Dot: The NINE dot ARTS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 35:22


Rico Quirindongo, Director of Seattle's Office of Planning and Community Development, addresses the importance of civic engagement in real estate development, emphasizing the value of financial and cultural capital to create meaningful places made by and for the local community. For show notes and more info: https://ninedotarts.com/podcast-social-change-in-the-built-environment/

Summarily - A Podcast for Busy Lawyers

Alex Su is one of the funniest creators on LinkedIn (LinkedIn said so!).  Oh yeah, he is also Head of Community Development at Ironclad, a columnist for Above the Law, a former federal law clerk, and a former associate at Sullivan & Cromwell (fancy!). Alex joins me to chat about his recent social media series (The Harvard Kid), the problems with BigLaw, legal tech, and more.You can follow Alex and his hilarious hijinks on Twitter and Instagram (@heyitsalexsu), and on TikTok (@legaltechbro). Listen.  Subscribe.  Share. 

NEXT NORMAL: Re-imagining Capitalism for Our Future
Shifting the System: Incorporating a Holistic, Community-Driven Approach to Development with Solomé Lemma

NEXT NORMAL: Re-imagining Capitalism for Our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:06


For Episode 14 of the Next Normal Podcast, Amit Bouri is joined by Solomé Lemma, executive director of Thousand Currents, to discuss how to build long-lasting, community-led initiatives to improve and “shift” the current socioeconomic system.Drawing on experiences with partners, Solomé illustrates how trusting leaders who are doing the work and trusting their communities are key to building an enabling environment that leads to transformational change. By moving focus from the result to the process, funders and investors allow organizations to think and build with an eye to the long-term.