Podcast appearances and mentions of Klaus Schwab

  • 580PODCASTS
  • 1,154EPISODES
  • 59mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 6, 2022LATEST
Klaus Schwab

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Klaus Schwab

Show all podcasts related to klaus schwab

Latest podcast episodes about Klaus Schwab

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
The Global Cabal of Elitists Want to Control Your Destiny

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 58:17


The Prism of America's Education with Host Karen Schoen – The global cabal of elitists met and decided that they had a plan where the elite would control the world in the image they choose. World Economic Forum chair Klaus Schwab declared on Chinese state TV: 'China is a model for many nations.' Is that what you want?

World Alternative Media
CHINESE WORLD ORDER! - Global Economic COLLAPSE Will Move Us Into The GREAT RESET!

World Alternative Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 29:57


GET HEIRLOOM SEEDS & NON GMO SURVIVAL FOOD HERE: https://heavensharvest.com/ USE Code WAM to get FREE shipping in the United States! BUY GOLD & SILVER HERE: https://kirkelliottphd.com/wam/ GET YOUR APRICOT SEEDS at the life-saving Richardson Nutritional Center HERE: https://rncstore.com/r?id=bg8qc1 BUY A TOWER GARDEN AND SAVE MONEY HERE: https://shareasale.com/r.cfm?b=580941&u=3368756&m=52284&urllink=&afftrack= GET VITAMINS AND SUPPLEMENTS FROM DR. ZELENKO HERE: https://zstacklife.com/?ref=WAM LION ENERGY: Never Run Out Of Power! PREPARE NOW! https://rdm.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=223&aff_id=1682 Josh Sigurdson reports on the controlled collapse of the global economy as China makes massive moves to stockpile gold against the dollar and build up BRICS alongside potentially Saudi Arabia and other new allies. The death nail in the coffin of the dollar is being hammered and it's all by design. It's the collapse of one empire to build up a new world empire based in technocracy which was planned long ago. In this video, we go into the latest news on the growth of BRICS and the purpose of the collapse which is to get us into the Great Reset which Klaus Schwab himself acknowledges is based on the Chinese tyrannical system. There are already carbon credits being integrated in bank accounts worldwide. This is not a drill. Stay tuned for more from WAM! GET TIM'S FREE Portfolio Review HERE: https://bit.ly/redpilladvisor And become a client of Tim's at https://www.TheLibertyAdvisor.com STOCK UP ON STOREABLE FOODS HERE: http://wamsurvival.com/ OUR GOGETFUNDING CAMPAIGN: https://gogetfunding.com/help-keep-wam-alive/ OUR PODBEAN CHANNEL: https://worldaltmedia.podbean.com/ Or SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/5JWtlXypfL8iR8gGMg9MME Find us on Vigilante TV HERE: https://vigilante.tv/c/world_alternative_media/videos?s=1 FIND US on Rokfin HERE: https://rokfin.com/worldalternativemedia FIND US on Gettr HERE: https://www.gettr.com/user/worldaltmedia Follow us on Parler HERE: https://parler.com/Joshfsigurdson See our EPICFUNDME HERE: https://epicfundme.com/251-world-alternative-media JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER HERE: https://www.iambanned.com/ JOIN our Telegram Group HERE: https://t.me/worldalternativemedia JOIN US On BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/gzFCj8AuSWgp/ JOIN US On Flote: https://flote.app/JoshSigurdson JOIN US on Rumble Here: https://rumble.com/c/c-312314 FIND WAM MERCHANDISE HERE: https://teespring.com/stores/world-alternative-media FIND OUR CoinTree page here: https://cointr.ee/joshsigurdson JOIN US on SubscribeStar here: https://www.subscribestar.com/world-alternative-media We will soon be doing subscriber only content! Follow us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/WorldAltMedia Help keep independent media alive! Pledge here! Just a dollar a month can help us alive! https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2652072&ty=h&u=2652072 BITCOIN ADDRESS: 18d1WEnYYhBRgZVbeyLr6UfiJhrQygcgNU World Alternative Media 2022

The Hannah Miller Show
Big Government Brings Big Problems

The Hannah Miller Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 20:30


 Hannah starts the show covering the dust up that happened this week between the Biden administration, Congress, and Twitter owner Elon Musk. In the not so distant past, Republicans also called for Congress to get involved with tech companies, should they? Hannah then discusses comments made by WEF founder Klaus Schwab regarding how "tremendous" Communist China is and how that regime is a "role model" for other countries. How is China a role model? Hannah provides a few recent examples that Schwab may be referring to. Lastly, Hannah covers 11 points regarding the Sam Bankman-Fried and FTX story. Within those 11 points, she provides a brief backstory, the political implications, and what she foresees happening as a result. https://www.thehannahmillershow.com/podcasts/https://bobslone.com/contact/bob@bobslone.com

Endtime Ministries | End of the Age | Irvin Baxter

Destroying the United States… But Why? Elites are working to weaken America so she can no longer impede their evil plans. America is experiencing a red wave, just not the one we were expecting. Build Back Better. Respect For Marriage Act. Klaus Schwab's Great Reset. And ESG investing… Not in Florida! All prophetic headlines and we will analyze each one while taking your calls on this open-line edition of End of the Age!

The Slippery Slope
Klaus Schwab Applauds China while Demonstrator is Disappeared

The Slippery Slope

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 9:20


Klaus Schwab founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum commended China's "achievements," and suggested the nation could be a "role model" for others around the world. Meanwhile Demonstrator who led crowds calling for end of Xi Jinping and China's Communist Party not been seen Obviously, nothing to see and nothing wrong in China according to Klaus Schwab. He is very much a glass half full kind of guy. We can all overlook human rights violations, imprisonment of the Uighur population, welding doors closed on apartment blocks and building camps to hold tens of thousands of people. China is a nation to be celebrated, according to the man who wants to destroy the global economy so he can bring about his dystopian future where you will own nothing yet be happy. This is just my opinion. PS: If you enjoy my content, I will think of you while drinking my coffee. – Buy Me a Coffee The Slippery Slope Spotify J Fallon Apple Music J Fallon Spotify J Fallon YouTube The Slippery Slope Apple Podcasts The Slippery Slope YouTube The Slippery Slope Stitcher --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jason-fallon/message

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
Russia Talks Nuclear War While AJ and Ye Talk Nonsense

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 74:57


Today on TruNews, Rick Wiles comments on the remarks by Kanye ‘Ye' West's appearance on the Alex Jones Show, wherein the performance artist praises Hitler and the Nazis. Meanwhile, Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov warns the West of the rapid escalation of nuclear war. In our final segment, Klaus Schwab lays out the plans for his Great Narrative: Global collaboration. Rick Wiles, Doc Burkhart. Airdate 12/1/22A hilarious gift idea for Christmas 2022! Order your Fauci Elf! https://tru.news/faucielfIt's the Final Day! The day when Jesus Christ bursts into our dimension of time, space, and matter. You can order the second edition of Rick's book, Final Day. https://www.rickwiles.com/final-dayYou can partner with us by visiting TruNews.com/donate or by calling 1-800-576-2116 or by mail at PO Box 690069 Vero Beach, FL 32969.

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik
The Same Villains That Have Hijacked the GOP are also Taking Over the Evangelical Church

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 35:34


Just like the GOP, many Christian pastors, like Al Mohler, Russell Moore, Beth Moore and John Piper, claim to be conservative, all while sounding more like AOC sycophants than anything resembling conservatism. How did these historically conservative evangelical leaders all of a sudden start spouting off Bernie Sanders talking points?All roads lead back to The Great Reset, Klaus Schwab and George Soros. Christopher Prosch, a political consultant for Felix Strategies, explained that the same money that is corrupting Republican political leaders is also being thrown at pastors and Christian organizations to change their messaging.I highly encourage you to watch the Enemies Within The Church documentary. Whether you are a Christian or not, you will understand the evil strategies at play and the importance for the church to remain strong is America is going to withstand this attack from within. You can watch the movie at https://enemieswithinthechurch.com.Freedom First Coffee just launched Christmas flavors: White Chocolate, Cinnamon and Peppermint Mocha. Order our fired-roasted gourmet coffee today using code JEFF for MASSIVE discounts at https://freedomfirstcoffee.com.

American Conservative University
Eric Metaxas. Larry Taunton Series on Klaus Schwab and Voter Fraud.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 79:14


Eric Metaxas. Larry Taunton Series on Klaus Schwab and Voter Fraud.  Nov 22 2022   Larry Taunton has just completed an eye-opening four-part series for the Daily Wire about Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.   Larry Taunton - Part 2  Nov 25 2022  Larry Taunton continues revealing what he's learned about Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum, plus unravels more of the mysteries and hanky-panky surrounding voter fraud.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.   The Eric Metaxas Show- https://metaxastalk.com/podcasts/

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The Twitter is really hitting the fan!

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am a man on a mission to make this nation better—and yes I am proud to say I believe in America First—   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— The facts continue to tumble out that Covid is a disease of the old—and the fat—and look you may not like it—BUT that is the truth—suck it up Buttercup—that is the bottom line—   TWO— The jobs report came in far weaker than expected with only about 125,000 jobs added last month—and yet the Biden Administration says the economy is doing great and there is no chance of recession—   THREE— The Twitter is really hitting the fan! I mean—why are so many people lining up and taking shots at Elon Musk—I mean afterall—he is one of the people doing everything he can to put clean vehicles on the road—   BUT now that he has bought Twitter and it openly advocating for Free Speech—the leftist Mob is turning its hateful attention to Musk and making all kinds of ugly allegations—   BUT it is Musk who dropped the Big Bomb on their collective heads Wednesday—when he admitted—that he has the proof that Twitter was directly involved in manipulating elections—and we also learned from the former head of security that they intentionally buried the Hunter Biden story in October of 2020—and it all protected then candidate Joe Biden—   The Musk revelation that Twitter has quote ‘interfered in elections' comes as no real surprise to anyone who has even paid a small amount of attention to the social media world—the shocking part is that he put it out there himself on a Tweet for all to see—   A Twitter user captured the attention of the world's richest man by Tweeting this in response to a story by Reuters—‘Twitter has shown itself to be not safe for the past 10 years and has lost users trust. The past team of ‘trust and safety is a disgrace- so it doesn't have any right to judge what is being done now. They had a chance- but they sold their souls to a corporation'.   Musk responded a short time later with “Exactly, The obvious reality as long time users know is that Twitter has failed in trust and safety for a very long time—and has interfered in elections'.   And that really made Twitter hit the fan!   Musk didn't elaborate—but considering he now has access to everything—including internal documents it makes you wonder what is coming next—he added Twitter 2.0 will be far more effective transparent and even handed”   Well I am not sure I could point to the most unhinged of all of those on the left that hate Free Speech—but I think this one sums it up pretty well to get started—   The idea that social media could control a narrative—Oh My God! How could we allow that? Well of course—Liz and her band of socialists and globalists didn't give two Twits about any of that stuff—UNTIL Free Speech was actually free again—and everyone was able to weigh in equally—   I mean the nerve of this guy Musk—to think he could place the importance of Free Speech ahead of the agenda of the Democrat Party and the rest of the Globalists—and devoted followers of the World Economic Forum and Klaus Schwab—seriously—this Musk guy has some nerve—there outta be a law!   And the attacks on Musk are in fact a global phenomenon—its not limited to the United States—   I mean if President Zelenskyy is angry then by God we, the American taxpayers should at a minimum send him another several billion dollars to pilfer and make himself feel better—I mean what if Musk exposes him as a fraud?   Yeah—Elon Musk is a dangerous man because he may allow people to be heard that could possibly upset people that don't want to hear those things—that's outrageous! Not the free speech part—just the part that people want censorship in America at all—   And of course Joe's team has been taking its shots at Twitter and Musk too—   And where does it all come from—well I like to give you some clues—this is certainly one to consider—  

Hearts of Oak Podcast
Clay Clark - ReAwaken America Tour: Reclaiming the Heart and Soul of American Freedom

Hearts of Oak Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 29:06


Clay Clark has been at the forefront of the ReAwaken America tour that has spread across the US over the past 18 months. His background is in business and he has been able to use all he has learnt to spearhead this new message of hope and positivity in over 20 American cities and counting. Change is possible when people stand up and be the resistance to evil and the voice of hope for a better tomorrow. We don't have to accept the Covid tyranny or the destruction of our education system or the latest system of control, The Reawaken America tour is showing that there are millions of patriotic Americans who are willing to stand up and be counted. Clay Clark is a father of five kids, the organizer, emcee and host of the General Flynn ReAwaken America Tour, the former “U.S. SBA Entrepreneur of the Year” for the State of Oklahoma, a member of the Forbes Business Coach Council, an Amazon best-selling author, the founder of several multi-million dollar companies and the host of the Thrivetime Show podcast which has been number one overall on the iTunes business podcast charts 6 times! The 'ReAwaken America Tour' and 'Time To Free America' aims to expose “The COVID-19 / Great Reset” agenda being pushed by Bill Gates, Klaus Schwab, George Soros, China, and other elite globalists that hate God and America. The ReAwaken America Tour exists to expose the election fraud, medical fraud, religious fraud, monetary fraud and mainstream media fraud that has been used to push the “COVID-19 Great Reset Agenda.” Their call to action is to get people back to God because they believe that true repentance and salvation is needed to save America. Find Clay at..... Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheClayClark?s=20&t=V6OoZyY3dO0ek1Wm8ghDAA Website: https://timetofreeamerica.com/ Podcast: https://www.thrivetimeshow.com/reawaken-america-tour/ Interview recorded 29.11.22 *Special thanks to Bosch Fawstin for recording our intro/outro on this podcast. Check out his art https://theboschfawstinstore.blogspot.com/ and follow him on GETTR https://gettr.com/user/BoschFawstin To sign up for our weekly email, find our social media, podcasts, video, livestreaming platforms and more go to https://heartsofoak.org/connect/

World Alternative Media
KLAUS SCHWAB: GOD IS DEAD - Evil Technocrats Worship Satan & Want Us SACRIFICED

World Alternative Media

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 30:16


GET HEIRLOOM SEEDS & NON GMO SURVIVAL FOOD HERE: https://heavensharvest.com/ USE Code WAM to get FREE shipping in the United States! BUY GOLD & SILVER HERE: https://kirkelliottphd.com/wam/ GET YOUR APRICOT SEEDS at the life-saving Richardson Nutritional Center HERE: https://rncstore.com/r?id=bg8qc1 BUY A TOWER GARDEN AND SAVE MONEY HERE: https://shareasale.com/r.cfm?b=580941&u=3368756&m=52284&urllink=&afftrack= GET VITAMINS AND SUPPLEMENTS FROM DR. ZELENKO HERE: https://zstacklife.com/?ref=WAM LION ENERGY: Never Run Out Of Power! PREPARE NOW! https://rdm.go2cloud.org/aff_c?offer_id=223&aff_id=1682 Josh Sigurdson reports on the evil of Klaus Schwab and Yuval Noah Harari as they attempt to sacrifice humanity to Moloch in a move that can only be compared to the building of the Tower Of Babel. Klaus Schwab says God is dead, that Jesus is "fake news" and that he wishes to make humans essentially droning robots to "replace God." This evil technocrat who works with countless elitist pedophiles is helping to desensitize humanity, mainly children while utilizing convenience to bring in tyranny. We have precious little time left to fight back. From Balenciaga to Hollywood and industry pedophiles. From anti-Christian propaganda to the destruction of bodily autonomy. We have to fight back. Stay tuned for more from WAM! GET TICKETS To Mariposa Freedom Fest and USE CODE WAM to save money HERE: https://www.mariposafreedomfest.com/ GET TIM'S FREE Portfolio Review HERE: https://bit.ly/redpilladvisor And become a client of Tim's at https://www.TheLibertyAdvisor.com STOCK UP ON STOREABLE FOODS HERE: http://wamsurvival.com/ OUR GOGETFUNDING CAMPAIGN: https://gogetfunding.com/help-keep-wam-alive/ OUR PODBEAN CHANNEL: https://worldaltmedia.podbean.com/ Or SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/5JWtlXypfL8iR8gGMg9MME Find us on Vigilante TV HERE: https://vigilante.tv/c/world_alternative_media/videos?s=1 FIND US on Rokfin HERE: https://rokfin.com/worldalternativemedia FIND US on Gettr HERE: https://www.gettr.com/user/worldaltmedia Follow us on Parler HERE: https://parler.com/Joshfsigurdson See our EPICFUNDME HERE: https://epicfundme.com/251-world-alternative-media JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER HERE: https://www.iambanned.com/ JOIN our Telegram Group HERE: https://t.me/worldalternativemedia JOIN US On BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/gzFCj8AuSWgp/ JOIN US On Flote: https://flote.app/JoshSigurdson JOIN US on Rumble Here: https://rumble.com/c/c-312314 FIND WAM MERCHANDISE HERE: https://teespring.com/stores/world-alternative-media FIND OUR CoinTree page here: https://cointr.ee/joshsigurdson JOIN US on SubscribeStar here: https://www.subscribestar.com/world-alternative-media We will soon be doing subscriber only content! Follow us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/WorldAltMedia Help keep independent media alive! Pledge here! Just a dollar a month can help us alive! https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2652072&ty=h&u=2652072 BITCOIN ADDRESS: 18d1WEnYYhBRgZVbeyLr6UfiJhrQygcgNU World Alternative Media 2022

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 104: A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence with Johan Stahre

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 44:01


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is "A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence." Our guest is Johan Stahre (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jstahre/), Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University in Sweden. In this conversation, we talk about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved, the contemporary notion of operator 4.0, Scandinavian worker independence, shop floor innovation at Volvo, factories of the future, modern production systems, robots, and cobots in manufacturing. If you like this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you like this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean with Professor Torbjørn Netland from ETH Zürich (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/84). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Human-centered automation is the only kind of automation that we should be thinking about, and this is becoming more and more clear. Operators are fiercely independent, and so should they be. This is the only way they can spot problems on the shop floor, by combining human skills with automation in new ways augmenting workers. It seems the workforce does not so much need engagement as they need enablement. Fix that, and a lot can happen. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is A Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence. Our guest is Johan Stahre, Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University in Sweden. In this conversation, we talk about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved, the contemporary notion of operator 4.0, Scandinavian worker independence, shop floor innovation at Volvo, factories of the future, modern production systems, robots, and cobots in manufacturing. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Johan, Welcome. How are you? JOHAN: I'm fine, thank you, Trond. It's really nice to see you. TROND: Yeah, likewise. JOHAN: Fellow Nordic person. TROND: Fellow Nordic person. And I apologize for this very American greeting, you know, how are you? As you know, I'm from the Nordic region. I actually mean it, [laughs] you know, it was a question. So I do wonder. [laughs] JOHAN: I'm actually fine. It's just ending the vacation, so I'm a little bit sad about that because everyone...but it's a very nice time now because the rest of the world seems to be on vacation, so you can get a lot of work done. TROND: I concur; that is a wonderful time. Johan, I wanted to just briefly talk about your exciting background. You are an engineer, a mechanical engineer from Sweden. And you had your initial degree from Linköping University. Then you went on to do your Ph.D. a while back in manufacturing automation, and this was at Chalmers, the University in Sweden. And that's where you have done your career in manufacturing research. You are, I think, the first Scandinavian researcher certainly stationed currently in Sweden that we've had on the podcast. So I'm kind of curious, what is manufacturing like in Scandinavia? And what is it that fascinated you about this topic so that you have moved so deeply into it? JOHAN: Manufacturing in Sweden is the core; it's the backbone of our country in a sense. We have statistically too many large manufacturing companies in Sweden as compared to, I mean, we're only 10 million people, but we have like 10, 12 pretty large companies in the manufacturing area in automotive but also in electronics like Ericsson, you have Volvo, we have SKF. We have a lot of big companies. Sweden has an industrial structure that we have several small companies and a couple of large companies, not so many in the middle section there. This happened, actually, in the 1800s somewhere. There was a big growth of big companies, and there was a lot of effort from the government to support this, and that has been continued. So the Swedish government has supported the growth of industry in Sweden, and therefore we have a very strong industry and also quite good digital growth and maturity. TROND: So the Scandinavian background to me when I was there, I remember that one of the things that at least Scandinavian researchers think is distinct about Scandinavia is worker independence. And it's something that I kind of wanted to just tease out a little bit in the beginning of this podcast. Am I wrong in this, or is there something distinct about the relationship between, I guess, workers and managers in Scandinavia, particularly? One speaks about the Scandinavian model. Can you outline a little bit what that means in manufacturing if it still exists? It's an open question. JOHAN: From my perspective, Sweden usually ranks very high in innovation, also when it comes to international rankings. And I think some of that has to do with the openness and the freedom of thinking in a sense and not so hierarchical, more consensus-oriented, ability to test and check and experiment at work without getting repercussions from top management. And it is much easier. In fact, if you are at one department in a manufacturing company or in university as such and you want to collaborate with another colleague across the aisle, if you have a two hierarchical system, you need to go three levels up in order to be able to do that. But here, I think it's easier to just walk across the aisle to have this collaboration and establish a cooperative environment. I think that that's part of the reason. Also, we're not so many; I mean, I think historically, we needed to do a lot of things ourselves in Sweden. We were a country up north with not so many people, and we have harsh environments, and I think it's the same as Norway. I mean, you need to be self-sustainable in that sense, and that creates, I think, environmental collaboration. TROND: We'll go more deeply into your research on manufacturing and to what extent a question I asked here matters to that. But do you have a sense just at the outset here that this type of worker and operators sort of independence, relative independence, perhaps compared to other regions, is it changing at all? Or is this kind of a feature that is a staple of Scandinavian culture and will be hard to change both for good and for bad? JOHAN: I think that as everything...digitalization has sort of erased a lot of the cultural differences across the world in that sense. Because when I was a student, there was not this expressed digital environment, of course. The information environment was less complex. But I think now all the young people, as well as my mother, does her banking...she's 90, but she does her banking on her iPad; I mean, it's very well-spread. And I think that we are all moving towards a similar culture, and the technology is spreading so quick. So you cannot really have cultural differences in that sense. But I think that's still the way that we're using this. And I think that the collaborative sense I think that that is still there. The reason why Sweden is comparatively innovative still is that we still maintain our culture and use the technology to augment that capability. TROND: So, Johan, we'll talk about a bunch of your experiences because you obviously are based in Sweden. And because of Sweden's industrial situation, you have some examples, you know, Volvo, a world-famous company obviously, and also famous for its management practices, and its factory practices, we'll get into that. But you've also worked, and you're advising entities such as the World Economic Forum, and you are active on the European stage with the European Institute of Technology. Your activity clearly goes way, way beyond these borders. But why don't we maybe start with some of these Scandinavian experiences and research projects that you've done maybe with Volvo? What is it with Volvo that captured people's attention early on? And what sort of experience and research have you done with Volvo? JOHAN: I think that Volvo is very innovative, and Volvo today is two types of companies; one is the car company that has now gone fully electric. It was introduced at the stock market, most recently owned by a Chinese company, and before that, it was owned by Ford, and before that, it was also public. But you also have the other part, which is the Volvo Group, which is looking at trucks, and boats, and things like that. And they both share a high level of innovation, ambition, innovation, and power, I think, using the experiences already from the '60s, where you had a lot of freedom as an employee. And also very good collaboration with the union in investments and in all the changes in the company I think that has been very beneficial. And it's made them...what is now Volvo Cars was very, very early, for example, with digital twins. They were experimenting with digital twins already in the 1990s. And we work together with Volvo but also with SKF, which is a roller-bearing company here to look at how we can support frontline workers and augment their capabilities because they're very skilled and they're very experienced. But sometimes you need to have sensor input, and you need to have structures, and rules, and procedures, and instructions. So we worked quite early with them already, maybe in 2009, 2010, to see how can we transform their work situation, provide them with work instructions through wearable devices. It was very popular at that time. MIT was experimenting with cyborgs. And the people that were...I think it was Thad Starner; he was trying to put on a lot of computer equipment. Then he went through the security at the airport and had some problems there. But that's not the case for the operators. But it was a little bit too early, I think. We tried to experiment with some of the maintenance people at Volvo cars. And they were very interested in the technology, but the use for it was a little bit obscure. And this was at the time when you had the mobile connectivity was 9,600 kilobits through a mobile phone or in the modem, so Wi-Fi more or less did not exist. And the equipment: the batteries weighed two kilos, and the computer weighed one kilo. And then you had a headset that looked like you came from deployment in a war zone. So it was a little bit...it looked a little bit too spacy for them to be actually applicable. And then some 10 years later, we actually did a similar experiment with SKF, the roller bearing company where we deployed the first iPod touch, I think they were called. That was right before the iPhone. I think it was an experiment by Steve Jobs to see how can we create what then became the iPhone screen. And we put that on the arms of the operators and tried to see how can we give them an overview of the process situation. So they were constantly aware, and they were quite happy about this. And then, we wanted to finish the experiment. The operators actually said, "Well, we don't want to give the equipment back." And then we said, "Well, we need to have it back. Of course, you can use the software." So they brought their own phones, and they downloaded the software. And they're still using it, actually, not on their own phones anymore. But they use this kind of software that we developed at that time together with them. So that was quite interesting. TROND: That's fascinating. Extrapolating from some of these early experiences up until now, I wanted to just ask you this from a research perspective, but also, I guess, from a management perspective. So you work on production systems. What is really the goal here, or what has the objective been early on? You talked about these early MIT experiments. And I know control systems is a very old area of research. And from what I understand, in the early days, the use cases weren't just factories; they were also on spacecraft and things. But to your point, especially earlier, we were working with very, very different technology interfaces. But now, obviously, we are starting to roll out 5G, which gives a whole other type of richness. But does it really matter how rich the technology interface is? Or does it matter more what the objective is with these various types of augmentations that have been attempted really throughout the decades? Can you just give us a little sense of what researchers and yourself what you were trying to augment and how that depends or doesn't depend on the quality of technology? JOHAN: First, we need to realize that the manufacturing industry has always been a very, very early adopter. The first computers were used for war simulations and for making propellers for submarines to see how you can program the milling machines. This was in the 1950s. And the industrial robots in the '60s in the '70s were also very early applications of digitalization. Before anything else had computers, the manufacturing industry was using it, and that's still the case. That might surprise some people. When they walk out into a shop floor, they see no computers around because all the computers are built into the machines already. What is still missing is the link, perhaps to the people. So they are still using the screens. And they are the ones...people are the key components of handling complex and unforeseeable situations. So you need to provide them, I think...to be really productive, you need to provide the frontline staff with the equipment for them to avoid and to foresee and to handle unforeseen situations because that's what differs between the man and machine or a human and the machine. People are much more apt to solve a complex situation that was not programmed before. That's the augmentation part here; how can we augment the human capabilities? And people talk about augmented reality; I mean, I don't think it's the reality that needs to be augmented; it's the human to be handling the reality that needs to be augmented. TROND: Johan, this is so fascinating because, first of all, it's quite easy to dismiss manufacturing a little bit these days because, to the untrained eye, all the excitement is in the consumer space because that's where the new devices get released, and that's, obviously, where all the attention is these days unless you obviously are in manufacturing. But can you bring us back to those early days of computing when a lot of the use cases for computing were first explored with manufacturing? So you talked about MIT, and back at MIT and at Stanford, all the way back to the '60s, they were exploring this new and fascinating field of even artificial intelligence, but before that, just regular control systems, electronic interfaces. What fork in the road would you say happened there? Because clearly, the fascination has been with digitalizing everything and software kind of one for 30 years, but in manufacturing, it's more complicated. You say people, so it's people, and then it's kind of these production systems that you research. That's not the same as the use case of an individual with their phone, and they're sort of talking to people. There are many, many more variables in play here. What is the real difference? JOHAN: Last year actually the European Commission put forth industry 5.0, which should be the follower after industry 4.0. And they based that on three main challenges. One is sustainability, one is resilience, and the various kinds of resilience towards the shock of the war but also by climate, et cetera. And the third one is actually human-centeredness to see how can we really fully deploy human capabilities in a society and also in industry, of course. I think what you're referring to is the two guys at Stanford in the '60s; one was John McCarthy. He was the inventor of the artificial intelligence concept. His aim then was to replace human work. That was the ambition with the artificial intelligence because human work is not as productive as computing work, but it still has some drawbacks. But in the same place not so far away, in another department at Stanford, was a guy called Douglas Engelbart. And he was actually the father of...he called it intelligence augmentation. So it was AI and IA at that time. But his ambition was to augment human work to see how can you have this. And he was the one that invented hypertext and the mouse. And he put up the first hypermedia set in Silicon Valley. So this was a guy that inspired companies like Apple, and Xerox PARC, those kinds of institutions that had a huge bearing. There was a book by a research colleague at Oxford. He was comparing that over time, from the early industrial days and then forward, technology that replaces people always has more complications when introduced and scaled than technology that augments people. If you look at the acceptance and the adoption of the iPhone, that took months, or weeks, or whatever, seconds for some people, for me, for example. If you look at what happened in the industrial revolutions in the 1800s and the 1700s, you had a lot of upheaval, and already in the 1960s...I'm starting to sound like a university professor. But in '96, in the U.S., there was a Senate hearing about is automation taking the jobs from people or not? And the conclusion was that it is not, it is actually creating companies that then employ more people because of the productivity gains and the innovation gains. And you allow people to use the automation as augmentation, not only cognitive augmentation. We think a lot about augmentation as something that you do with your eyes and your brain. But robots are also augmenting people. It lifts heavy objects like cars or big containers, whatever. That's the kind of augmentation that maybe you don't consider when you look at it from an artificial or an augmented reality perspective. TROND: Well, so many things to pick up here. But the variety of meanings of augmentation are kind of astounding, aren't they? And you've written about this operator 4.0 several times. There's obviously cognitive augmentation, and then there's physical augmentation. Are there other types of augmentation that you can speak of? JOHAN: I really can't think of any. TROND: But those are the main ones. So it's either kind of your mentality or sort of your knowledge. So the work instruction parts go to the skills-based, I guess, augmentation, which perhaps is an additional one. Or I'm just thinking if manufacturing wants to make progress in these things, it would perhaps make sense to really verify what workers at any moment actually themselves express that they need. And I guess that's what I was fishing for a little bit here in this history of all of this, whether the technology developers at all moments really have a clear idea of what it is that the workers are saying themselves they're missing or that they obviously are missing. Because automation and augmentation, I mean, do you find them diametrically opposed, or are they merely complementary when it works well? JOHAN: I mean, automation traditionally has been the way to scale, and, I mean, in the beginning, you want to see what the machine is doing, right? And then you really don't want to see it. You just want it to work. So it's really helping you to scale up your work. And in that sense, automation, like collaborative robots, for example, which people are talking about robots, are something that is replacing jobs, but if you look at it, it is a very small portion of statistics. In Singapore, which is the highest user of robots installed, there were 950 maybe robots per 10,000 employees. And the average in the Americas is 100 robots per 10,000 employees, and that's not really a lot. And so there is plenty of space for robots to be the tools for people. So if you don't treat them as something that will replace you but something that will actually augment you, I think it would be much easier. What could happen, though, and I think that is maybe part of your question, is that, well, these tools are becoming so complex that you cannot use them unless you increase your skill. How do you do that? Because no company would like to end up in a situation where the tools that you have bought and invested a lot of money in are too complex for your employees to use. That's a lost investment. It's like you're building a big factory out in a very remote place, and you don't have enough electric power to run it. You don't want to end up in that situation. Like you expressed, I think that maybe what's missing and what's trending right now is that the upskilling of the workforce is becoming extremely important. TROND: And how do you do that, Johan? Because there's obviously...there's now an increased attention on upskilling. But that doesn't mean that everyone has the solution for it. And employers are always asking for other people to pay for it, for example, governments, or the initiative of the worker, perhaps. It seems like Europe has taken this challenge head-on. Germany, at least, is recognized as a leader in workforce training. The U.S. is a latecomer to the game from that perspective. But it typically shows up in a big way. So something is going to happen here in the U.S. when it comes to workforce training. What is the approach? I mean, there seems to be two approaches to me; one is to simplify the technology, so you need less training. And the other would be obviously an enormous reskilling effort that either is organized, perhaps ideally in the workplace itself, so it's not removed from the tasks. Or some enormous schooling effort that is highly efficient and perhaps online. What do you think are the winning approaches to re-skilling that entire manufacturing workforce continuously? Because it's not like you have to rescale them once, you have to rescale them every time. JOHAN: Well, I can only guess. I think that you need to do all of these, all of the above. One complicating factor is the demographics of, especially Japan; of course, we know that from a long time that, they have an aging population. But Europe is now becoming the new Japan in that sense. We have a very big problem in terms of aging populations, especially countries like Italy and perhaps Germany but also in northern countries. And we don't have perhaps...there's a lot of discussion on immigration right now. But actually, the workforce would need a lot of immigration to be able to respond to the needs of our industry in the forthcoming situation. I think that China is maybe 4 or 5 years behind Europe, and the U.S. is maybe 10-12 years behind Europe as well. So that will happen...the only non-affected regions right now are India and Africa. And that means that the European, and Chinese, and U.S. industries will have to compete with a rather young population in Africa and India. And so that will become over time, but it is a long time, so that means that it's not always on the political agenda. Things that take a long time are usually not the things that you speak about when you have election times that we have in Sweden right now. It's mostly what's on the table. So I think that how to do that is really complex. We had some collaboration within the World Economic Forum. It is a fantastic organization because it spans the whole globe. So that means that the information comes from different parts of the world, and you can see different aspects of this. And a country that has done a lot about this is Singapore, very good experiments, very nice projects, initiatives regarding upskilling. And Europe is now launching an innovation program where they want to go deeper into deep tech to try to...the commissioner for research and education in June launched a big initiative around innovation and how that can be supported by deep technology. So we'll see what comes out of that. It'll be very, very interesting to see. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com, and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: Speaking about the World Economic Forum for a minute, Johan, you have been part of this group project called the Augmented Workforce Initiative. You told me when we spoke earlier that, in your opinion, this initiative couldn't have existed even just five years ago. Can you explain what you mean by that? Because augmentation, the way that you've been speaking about it now, is a perspective that was nascent, even in the early days of computing and manufacturing control systems. Yet, it seems to have disappeared a little bit, at least from the top end of the political and research agenda. Yet here we are and you said this initiative couldn't have existed five years ago. Can you explain what you meant by that? JOHAN: That is a very, very nice initiative by the World Economic Forum, and it's run by the forum and Cambridge University, who has a very, very good group on this and some very nice people. And I'm honored to be part of that group together with my colleague from Mexico, David Romero. You may know him as well. And I think that what they're looking at is the increased understanding. And that was actually one of the sessions at this World Economic Forum, you know, the Davos days that were run this year. And it was actually part of those days as a theme about how to engage, and how to support, and to augment the workforce, which has never happened before on that level. So it's really, really high on the agenda. The Forum has been running previous projects also on the future of work and how the demographic situation is affecting or how the skill situation is affecting the companies. They have come up with suggestions that more or less half the workforce needs to be upskilled within the next couple of years. And that's a huge undertaking. TROND: The novelty here is that the world's elite managers, I guess, who are represented at the World Economic Forum are increasingly aware of the complexity of workforce issues generally, and then specifically of upskilling, and maybe even upskilling in this very specific meaning of augmenting a worker which, I guess to my mind, is a little bit different from just generally speaking about robotic automation and hammering these efficiency points. But obviously, it's a much more challenging debate because it's one thing to find a budget for an automation effort and introduce a lot of computers or introduce a lot of whatever technology, usually hardware, but what we're talking about here is a lot more challenging because you need to tailor it to these workers. And there are many workers, obviously, so it's a complicated phenomenon. How is that going? What would you say are some of the findings of the Augmented Workforce Initiative? JOHAN: I think that companies like Tulip, companies like Black & Decker, and others have a lot of good use cases actually already, which may or may not before have been labeled augmentation. It might have been labeled as operator support, or decision-making support, or things like that, or upskilling. But I think that the findings are that there is a lot out there, but it's not emphasized as something that is really important for the company's survival in that sense. TROND: It wasn't so glorified before. A lot of the decision support systems were viewed as lower-level systems that were just kind of more like HR systems or just tinkering with necessary stuff that people had to know kind of a thing. And so you're saying it's been elevated now, yeah, as having a much more essential impact on the quality of work. JOHAN: It has a leveraging impact for the whole company, I would say, but that's also part of this industry 4.0 approach. And you have the hierarchical integration of companies where the CEO should be aware of what's going on on the shop floor and vice versa, as well as the horizontal integration where you have the companies up and down the supply chain and value chain knowing what's going on early. And that is really something that maybe stopped at mid-management level before, but now it needs to be distributed out to the places where the complexity is higher, and that's the frontline workers. Maybe...now I'm guessing, but I think that also the understanding that the investments done by this company in complex manufacturing equipment could be at risk if you don't have the right skills to use them is now penetrating, I think, a lot of the companies. In Europe, in 2019 or something like that, there were almost 30 million people employed in the manufacturing industry. And if you look at the number of...if you say that half of these need to be upskilled somehow over a period of three years...and I actually made a mock calculation that the re-skilling need for in-person months in Europe if we were to fulfill this is 50 million person-months, 50 million person-months, just the time for the people to participate in these trainings. So that's a huge undertaking. And I think that that scares companies as well as governments because just imagine taking 50 million person-months out of productivity or the production equation. But the alternative might be worse. If you lose your capability to use your equipment, that might even be worse. TROND: Wow, these are daunting things. I guess that brings me to the last section here and some thoughts from you on the future outlook. When it comes to technology and these tools for human augmentation, what are the timelines for, well, either making the improvements or, as you said, not losing competitiveness because of this skills crisis? What are we looking at here? Is there some imminent challenge and opportunity? Or is this going to play out over 25 years? JOHAN: I think that in 25 years, the demographic situations will have changed again, so I assume that they will look different. But right now, we have a problem with an aging population. And we have a lot of people going into retirement. A lot of knowledge will disappear unless we can store it somehow. A lot of people will not go into industry. I mean, when I talk to colleagues, they say, "Well, we need to make the manufacturing industry more sexy. It should be cleaner, or it should be nicer because young people don't go to industry." But if I go to the healthcare section, they will say the same thing, "Oh, we need to make it much better because people are not applying for these educations." TROND: [laughs] Where are people applying, the tech companies? JOHAN: No, that's the problem. They don't exist. They were never born. TROND: [laughs] Right. JOHAN: So the demographic bomb is that they are actually not there. So you cannot rely on employing young people because they are not existing in Europe and soon not in the U.S. to the extent that they were before. So therefore, you need to focus on the older people. So you need to re-upskill not only the middle-aged people but the people in their 50s and even in their 60s. That adds to the complexity. In the next 5 to 10 years, there will be a lot of discussions on how to fill the missing places in industry to remain competitive. I also think that you can see the augmentation here as a fantastic tool together with the upskilling because upskilling the new skills together with the augmented tools like collaborative robots, like cognitive support, like whatever you can put in an iPhone, or whatever phone, or tool, or watch, or whatever, you can add the capability to make decisions. And that's the augmentation you will see. And you will see a lot of digital twins try to foresee problems. You will see a lot of transversal technologies going from different high-tech industry into manufacturing industry to support especially the frontline people and to enable their innovation capabilities. TROND: Johan, you said earlier that the complexity is higher at the level of frontline workers. Did you mean that, basically, the complexity of frontline work of itself at an individual level is also underestimated? Or were you simply saying that because there are so many frontline workers and the various situations of various types of frontline workers is so different that it's obviously an underappreciated management challenge? Or were you truly saying that frontline work in and of itself is either complicated or becoming more complex? JOHAN: If a task was not automated, it is inherently complex. So you couldn't automate it, right? TROND: Right. JOHAN: Because if you can teach a robot or whatever to do tasks, then it's not difficult, and you can foresee the results. There was a lady called Lisanne Bainbridge. She put out The Paradox of Automation that the more you automate, the more dependent you become on the few people that are still there to handle the situations that are so complex that you could not foresee them. So everything that is programmed is programmed by a programmer, and the programmer tries to foresee every foreseeable situation, and to that extent, the robots and the automation works. But if these situations go out of hand, if they're too complex, and something happens, then there is no robot that can fix that. Unfortunately, AI is not there yet. TROND: Well, you said, "Unfortunately, AI is not there yet," but I would also conjecture that, fortunately, AI is not there yet because you're pointing to something missing, I think. And a lot of the AI debate is starting to come back now. And it was there in the '60s because people realized that for lots of different reasons, to have a human oversight over robotic processes is actually a good thing. And you talked to me earlier about the experiments with imagining a trip to Mars and having to execute robotic actions on Mars in a control system environment where you actually had to foresee the action and plan; it was always a supervised type of situation. So the supervisory control concept has been there from the beginning of computing. If you were to think of a future where AI actually does get more advanced, and a lot of people feel like that's imminent, maybe you and I don't, but in any case, let's imagine that it does become more advanced and becomes sort of a challenge, how do we maintain human control over those kinds of decisions? I mean, there are researchers that have imagined, you know, famously in Superintelligence, Bostrom imagines this paperclip factory that goes amok and starts to optimize for producing paperclips, and everyone is suddenly producing, you know, and the machine then just reallocates resources to this enormously ridiculous task of producing only paper clips. It's a very memorable example. But a lot of people feel that AI could soon or at some point reach that level. How do we, as a failsafe, avoid that that becomes an issue? Or do you see it as such a far-fetched topic in manufacturing that it would be decades, if not centuries, away? JOHAN: I think that AI has been seasonal if you allow the expression. There's talk about these AI winters every now and then, and they tend to come every 10 or 15 years, and that matches two Ph.D. lifetimes, Ph.D. development. I mean, people tend to forget the problems, and then they tend to use these Gartner curves. If you look at the Gartner curve, you have the expectation part. I'm not being arrogant towards the AI research. I think that AI is fantastic, but it should be seen, from my perspective, as what it is, as an advanced form of automation that can be used as an augmentation tool. I think it was Kasparov that started to collaborate with a chess computer maker or developer, and they won every tournament because the combination of the human and the chess computer was astounding. And now I think there are even competitions with chess computers plus chess experts comes with them. There was, I think, in the 1800s, there was a traveling exhibitionist where they had the Mechanical Turk, I think it was called. It was a chess player that was competing then against the people in the audience. And actually, inside this box, there was a small human that was making all the chess moves. And they were beating all the chess champions. So there was a man inside this. I think that there is still a man inside a lot of the automation. TROND: A man and a woman. I wanted to just lastly end on a more positive note because you told me earlier that you are more optimistic now than ten years ago on behalf of your industry that you've researched for so many years. Why is that? JOHAN: I think that the technology, I mean, I'm a techno-optimist. And I think that we have also the full scale, the full attention from the ICT industry on various industrial processes right now. It was a lot of service-oriented. And I think that that is playing out now in the platform wars, the different services, but these different services are actually making a lot of good in the manufacturing and the tougher industries. And so, there is a bigger focus now on creating CO2-less steel. And there's an exploration of different industries that are going across; you look at the electrification of vehicles which is cutting across several sectors in the industry, automotive industry, electronics industry. And I think that the problems in industry are becoming so complex. So the ICT attention is on industry now more than perhaps on consumers, as it were, and I think that that's promising. I see companies like Ericsson promoting 5G. I see companies doing the Amazon Web Services and such companies looking at services that are useful for industry. And that's also augmenting the people's capability in that sense, so that's why I'm so positive. I see all the sensors coming. I see all the computing power coming into the hands of the frontline operators. And I see also the use for the upskilling and the skilling technologies that are emerging. How do you do that? What they do in Matrix when the leading lady downloads the instructions for the helicopter or motorcycle or whatever it is. But how do you do that in real life? How do you prepare for something that's coming in the next few minutes? That is something that people are now looking at using technologies, augmenting technologies, digital twins, and things like that in a completely different way than they were five years ago. TROND: Wow. So these are exciting moments for learning in manufacturing with perhaps wide-ranging consequences if we succeed. Johan, I thank you so much for these reflections. You've spent a career investigating production systems, and manufacturing, and workers. And these are very rich debates. And it seems like they're not over, Johan. So, hopefully, we'll have you back when something happens. And we'll have you comment on some developments. Thank you very much. JOHAN: Thank you, Trond. Thank you for a very interesting discussion. You always learn a lot by being asked a lot of questions, so thank you so much for this learning experience. Thank you. TROND: You're very gracious. Thank you, Johan. You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was a Scandinavian Perspective on Industrial Operator Independence. Our guest was Johan Stahre, Professor and Chair of Production Systems at Chalmers University of Sweden. In this conversation, we talked about how the field of human-centered automation has evolved. My takeaway is that human-centered automation is the only kind of automation that we should be thinking about, and this is becoming more and more clear. Operators are fiercely independent, and so should they be. This is the only way they can spot problems on the shop floor, by combining human skills with automation in new ways augmenting workers. It seems the workforce does not so much need engagement as they need enablement. Fix that, and a lot can happen. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean with Professor Torbjørn Netland from ETH Zürich. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes and if so, do let us know by messaging us. We would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects people, machines, devices, and systems in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially about where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Johan Stahre.

The Rebel Capitalist Show
News: Klaus Schwab Reveals His True Intentions In TELL ALL Interview

The Rebel Capitalist Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 17:11


Check out my private, online investment community (Rebel Capitalist Pro) with Chris MacIntosh, Lyn Alden and many more for $1!! click here https://georgegammon.com/pro

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik
Clay Clark: The Covid Bioweapon Injections are Leading to Mass Demonic Possession

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 30:20


Clay Clark joined this episode of The Jeff Dornik Show to discuss how current events are playing into the Globalist Cabal's ushering in The Great Reset. As we played some clips from Klaus Schwab, Elon Musk, Alex Jones and more, a trend began to appear that is clearly darker and more sinister than even the most conspiratorial realize.SPONSORS:Freedom First Coffee now has Christmas flavors… AND they've extended their Cyber Monday pricing to last all week! Use code JEFF to only pay $17.76 per bag, the most patriotic price for a Cup of Freedom. https://freedomfirstcoffee.comJoe Biden's regime is intentionally tanking the US dollar and economy for their own sinister purposes. It's time to hedge against inflation by buying gold and precious metals. Reach out to Our Gold Guy and let him know that Jeff Dornik sent you. https://ourgoldguy.com

Market Disruptors
The Fed Has Their Own Plan For Great Reset | Tom Luongo

Market Disruptors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 62:29


The Fed has its own plan for the Great Reset!  I am joined by a returning guest and geopolitical strategist Tom Luongo from the Gold Goats 'n Guns Podcast to discuss the World Economic Forum (WEF) and Klaus Schwab, the ECB, and their plan for the Great Reset.  Tom Luongo argues that the Federal Reserve has plans to fight back against that by enforcing its own Great Reset by breaking the Eurobond market.  We also discuss what's happening in local politics and how the Treasury and Fed are fighting the geopolitical picture with Russia, Ukraine, and China. The latest with Germany and the Nord Stream pipeline and how this all plays out. We also go over the BRICS nations relating to gold and bitcoin and how the Fed inevitably wins and creates an entirely new financial system in the United States! Tom Luongo Twitter: @TFL1728 GOLD GOATS 'N GUNS Newsletter Link: tomluongo.meSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Slippery Slope
Klaus Schwab says to Expect a Loss of Income as He Restructures the Global Economy

The Slippery Slope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 15:16


Klaus Schwab says to Expect a Loss of Income as He Restructures the Global Economy The Slippery Slope YouTube This is just my opinion. PS: If you enjoy my content, I will think of you while drinking my coffee. – Buy Me a Coffee The Slippery Slope Spotify J Fallon Apple Music J Fallon Spotify J Fallon YouTube The Slippery Slope Apple Podcasts The Slippery Slope YouTube The Slippery Slope Stitcher --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jason-fallon/message

The Living Source Podcast
Transhumanism Agenda, The 4th Industrial Revolution, & A New World Order - Part 2

The Living Source Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 54:07


"You will own nothing, and you will be happy." - Klaus Schwab,  Founder of The World Economic ForumThis topic is a MUST LISTEN. Share this episode, subscribe, and follow us on social media@thelivingsourcepodcast

The Charlie James Show Podcast
“Elon isn't Backing Down” “Board Games with Charlie and T2” “Klaus Schwab's Appraisal of China” “America Wins The World Cup”

The Charlie James Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 34:13


Charlie talks about the left's reaction to Elon Musk's recent moves with his Twitter Company. Charlie reports a story of a man who pulled a gun in the middle of a Monopoly game over the recent Holiday. Charlie and T2 discuss board games they like to play. Charlie discusses Klaus Schwab, the World Economic Forum and the agenda of the Elite.

The Charlie James Show Podcast
Upgrading Homosapiens with T2 and Charlie

The Charlie James Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 9:06


Charlie discuss Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum. He talks about their plans how they are trying to play God.

Talk, Tales and Trivia
Evil Is At Your Doorstep - Don't Let It In - Listen NOW!

Talk, Tales and Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 25:22


This episode picks up where the last one left off. I am talking about the World Economic Forum and "The Great Reset". What a concept.  What do you get when you put a whole bunch of unelected elites, unelected bureaucrats, and high-end globalists in one place? Mayhem, chaos, destruction, and pure evil.  In this episode, I continue talking about the World Economic Forum and its baby, "The Great Reset". What is that, you ask? Well, it's not good... a matter of fact it's pretty bad and unfortunately, we will have to listen to those that are not in government that is making the rules for us to live by. Inflation, food shortages, skyrocketing gas prices, farmers losing their land, the southern border being out of control with migrants, unbelievably taking away our first amendment rights, economic troubles, high unemployment, critical race theory being taught in schools, transgender mutilation of minors, and more are at stake. The far-left administration, including Biden, is going down a terrible path leading mostly middle-class Americans (and western countries) to despair and destruction all in the name of the "New World Order" and a one-party system of communism and global domination using China as an example. What a mess. Where will this end? I have a sick feeling it won't be good. Share this episode and let others know about what is happening. Go to the Truth Detective YouTube page:  https://www.youtube.com/@truthdetectivewithstephanielee/  http://truthdetectivepodcast.com  Email me: truthdetectivepodcast@gmail.com  Links for this episode (more to come): WEF / Klaus Schwab "Covid-19: The Great Reset" book launch (video): https://youtu.be/VHRkkeecg7c  Leaked Video: CNN - Charlie Chester: Climate change will be the next big "pandemic" (video): https://youtu.be/fkXsOes3CnM   George Soros Chief Mission: https://humansbefree.com/2022/09/george-soros-chief-mission-is-the-downfall-of-america.html  Joe Biden ends discussion over climate change debate (video): https://youtu.be/Gurc6C0QDU4  Prince Charles says the pandemic is a chance to"think big and act now" (video): https://youtu.be/BucTwPegW5k  The Hill - Rising w/ Kim Iverson - Digital ID (video): https://youtu.be/9cqC-Ha9yrA  The Prophetic Daily - Multiple articles on The WEF, The Great Reset, and Klaus Schwab: https://thepropheticdaily.com/exposed-klaus-schwabs-school-for-covid-dictators-plan-for-great-reset/  Western Journal - Klaus Schwab Reveals Who He Really Is as He Introduces New 'Role Model' For Countries: https://www.westernjournal.com/klaus-schwab-reveals-really-introduces-new-role-model-countries/  What is the Great Reset w/ Victor Davis Hanson (video): https://youtu.be/ovAILpxKFvo  World Economic Forum / Great Reset Page: https://www.weforum.org/great-reset  WEF - What is the great reset? (video): https://youtu.be/uPYx12xJFUQ  Books for your reading entertainment: From amazon: Covid-19: The Great Reset by Klaus Schwab and Thierry Malleret https://youtu.be/VHRkkeecg7c  From amazon: "The Great Narrative For a Better Future" by Klaus Schwab and Thierry Malleret  From amazon: "Inconvenient Facts - The Science that Al Gore doesn't want you to know" by Gregory Wrightstone https://amzn.to/3OLGBke  IF YOU LIKE THE CONTENT HERE AT TRUTH DETECTIVE, YOU CAN MAKE A DONATION OF ANY AMOUNT! Cash App @DetectiveStephanie Venmo @DetectiveStephanie Also...If you wish to have the inside scoop... You can get early access to Truth Detective audio and video content, bonus behind-the-scenes video content, and "Research-with-me" video content. Become a supporter and be a potential expert (you must put in the hours) in all things "detective". You will watch as a researcher gets the fact-based evidence needed to solve the mysteries surrounding the world we now live in. BECOME A MONTHLY SUPPORTER FOR THE SUGGESTED PRICE OF $3 A MONTH...OR MAKE A DONATION OF ANY AMOUNT! Remember, you get: • Early access to audio and video content • Bonus behind-the-scenes video content  • "Research-with-me" video content Be in "The research room" with Stephanie. glow.fm/truthdetective

Vincent Rhodes Live
Their Plan Is Failing

Vincent Rhodes Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 31:04


Klaus Schwab, the self-appointed leader of the world, will have to wait for his plans to pleasure himself off of the victims of his lockdowns because his plans are not going so well. In a recent interview, he stated that Globalization has failed. Perhaps this is meant to signal the beginning of the end. But, certainly not for us Christians who believe in the eternal faithfulness of our God. God will not allow anyone to override his plans. God promises that the wicked will soon be cut off (Psalms 37:11). Could it be that God will limit the plans of this evil? --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/vincent-rhodes4/message

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn
Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn - November 27, 2022 - HR 2

Backbone Radio with Matt Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 39:01


Boomers v. Stickers. Time to move out of Blue Colorado? Or Blue America itself? We're not going anywhere, but we do know people who are leaving. Thought we'd sound out the current moods with callers, with reference to the archetypes of Wallace Stegner and Wendell Berry. Meanwhile, describing the reasons for MAGA 2024. Now more than ever. The multicultural, multiracial working middle class. No Globalism. The proven leadership of Donald Trump. Detailing the deficiencies of Ron DeSantis, including his strange new softness on Communist China. Right after the big Ken Griffin donations? WEF villain Klaus Schwab says China has become a "role model" and "a very attractive model" for many other countries of the world. Say What? We point out the massive protests that have broken out across China after a grisly fire in Urumqi killed dozens who were locked inside their apartments by the CCP. Very bad scene, but Klaus approves? Plus, our own compensatory Morrissey Concert after the rock star canceled his Denver show earlier this week. With Great Listener Calls.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Regular Joe Show
RJS - 11/28/22 Segment 8

The Regular Joe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 4:47


Klaus Schwab wants to give you the same treatment as the people of China.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A StoneWall's Perspective Podcast
They Want To Control You - With Clay Clark!

A StoneWall's Perspective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 30:49


In this episode of A Stonewall's Perspective Podcast, Alex interviews entrepreneur and author, Clay Clark! Alex and Clay discussed the fact that 2020 was a massive scam about control for the government, how the World Economic Forum wants to control YOU, and how people like Klaus Schwab and Yuval Noah Harari want to change you. Sadly, many people have fallen for this scam and blindly followed these people. It is time for us to realize the truth, stand up for the truth, and never get steamrolled as we did ever again! There is a time to stand up and that time is now! Never let them control you! COVID-19 was one of the many scams of 2020, and it still goes on to this day. Many people are blindly believing what they are being told by the news media, and it needs to come to end. You can find this information at http://timetofreeamerica.com. America needs to wake up. In the book of Revelation, John warns us about the number 666. It seems as if many things in pop culture and in political realms refer to this number, which is the number of the beast. The patent for the vaccine is 666, build back better is 666, and many more. The devil has a plan for the United States, but Christians have the Word of God and the living hope, which is Christ Jesus!  Many of the people who are very influential are Luciferians. Never trust them! Bill Gates, in particular, has a spiritual advisor by the name of Marina Abramovic, who is extremely satanic. Before Jeffrey Epstein passed away, on his island he had a temple. The high-up elitists Are Satanic worshipers. People need to wake up and realize what we are dealing with on a day-to-day basis. We are living in a modern-day holy war yet people are blind to it.  There are many more topics that Clay Clark and Alex Stone discuss but you will have to listen to the podcast to hear what they discuss in full! We hope you enjoy this episode.Go to MyPillow.com/stonewall for a discount of UP TO 66% off your order!

CrossroadsET
WEF Says China a Model in ‘Systematic Transformation of the World'; CCP Builds Massive COVID Camps

CrossroadsET

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 92:41


Klaus Schwab, head of the World Economic Forum, recently spoke on Chinese state media where he proclaimed that the Chinese regime is a role model in the “systematic transformation of the world.” This follows an agreement signed by world representatives at the G20 Summit in Bali that is heavily modeled around the 17 sustainable development goals from the United Nations' Agenda 2030 platform with which the WEF is a strategic partner. Meanwhile, massive protests are sweeping across China against the ruling communist regime's “zero-COVID” policy. This happens as the regime is finishing construction of a massive detention camp allegedly to house people infected with COVID-19. However, given how the CCP has used its QR health pass system to mass arrest protesters, it's likely the camps will be used to detain political prisoners. In this live Q&A with Crossroads host Joshua Philipp we'll discuss these stories and others, and answer questions from the audience. ⭕️ Stay up-to-date with Josh with the Crossroads NEWSLETTER

The Glenn Beck Program
Why China's Protests Are BIGGER than Tiananmen Square | 11/28/22

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 126:59


Glenn explains why the citizens of China are protesting not only COVID lockdowns but also slavery. Apple seems to be playing defense for the Chinese regime by disabling the AirDrop feature in the country. The central bank rolled out its digital currency over the holiday, and Glenn breaks down how it works. Glenn and Pat explain how the digital dollar will affect your freedom. As President Biden struggles to keep a possible rail strike from happening, the WEF's Klaus Schwab recently praised China's communist practices. Canada is attempting to make suicide a viable solution for many of life's problems. Glenn and Pat discuss some of the most evil stories that dropped over the Thanksgiving break, including an expose from a sex worker and a statement so sacrilegious that Glenn can't bring himself to discuss it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Glenn Beck Program
Best of the Program | 11/28/22

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 46:56


The central bank rolled out its digital currency over the holiday, and Glenn breaks down how it works. The WEF's Klaus Schwab recently praised China's communist practices. Canada is attempting to make suicide a viable solution for many of life's problems. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rubin Report
Justin Trudeau's Embarrassing Must-See 'Drag Race' Appearance | Direct Message | Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 45:05


Dave Rubin of “The Rubin Report” talks about Justin Trudeau's embarrassing appearance on "Canada's Drag Race"; Trudeau explaining why he ignored the demands of the freedom convoy protests; Dr. Fauci telling "Face the Nation's" Margaret Brennan that there may be more COVID school closings this winter; Dr. Ashish Jha continuing to push the myth that the unvaccinated are still a problem; Dr. Fauci admitting to "Meet the Press" Chuck Todd that even he is baffled by China's zero COVID policy; the escalation of protests in China against Xi Jinping and China's zero COVID policy; Klaus Schwab of the World Economic Forum explicitly saying the China is the model for people around the world to follow; former CIA case officer Robert Baer explaining why Elon Musk's changes to Twitter will only assist Vladimir Putin's propaganda war; the reaction of Black Twitter to Elon Musk; how the new CNN CEO Chris Licht might abandon his plans for a more centrist CNN; Russell Brand and Jordan Peterson finding common ground on who the real enemies are; Elon Musk and AOC making amends and falling in love; and much more. ---------- Today's Sponsors: Tommy John - Using breathable, lightweight fabric with FOUR TIMES the stretch of competing brands, you need to try Tommy John Underwear. PLUS, you can get 33% OFF EVERYTHING AND GET FREE SHIPPING DURING THE CYBER MONDAY SALE! Go to https://tommyjohn.com/rubin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
EPISODE 327: THE WHITE PAPER REVOLUTION

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 26:10


On today's can't miss edition of Human Events Daily, Jack Posobiec dives into the historic White Paper Revolution raging in China. On the heels of a tragic fire in Xinjiang, where 10 quarantined people died after being locked into an apartment building due to the CCP's Zero Covid Policy, the citizens have taken to the streets in massive protests! Not since Tiananmen Square has the world seen such rebellion from the citizens against the Red Dragon. What do Klaus Schwab and Anthony Fauci have to say about the CCP's pandemic strategy? Find out all the answers, no static, just truth on today's HUMAN EVENTS DAILY! Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec Go to www.itargetpro.com to get 10% off and free shipping with offer code POSO

Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.
Colorado Suspect Mx. Anderson Aldrich ; WEF's Klaus Schwab on China; Arizona Lawsuit Updates

Watching the Watchers with Robert Gruler Esq.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 79:41


Mx. Anderson Lee Aldrich appeared in Court and defense lawyers sprung into action. We review the latest from the docket and defense attorney filings.#ClubQ #Colorado #CriminalDefenseWorld Economic Forum leader Klaus Schwab explains why China is a good role model for the world. Meanwhile, videos show widespread protests across the country in response to new pandemic lockdowns. In the United States, Biden responds to recent shootings by promising to work on banning more guns.#WEF #KlausSchwab #ChinaArizona Attorney Generals' office sends a letter to Maricopa County asking them about election problems. Attorney General Candidate Abe Hamadeh files a lawsuit along with Kari Lake.#Arizona #KariLake #AbeHamadehMEMBERS-ONLY: https://watchingthewatchers.locals.comGET GOLD: https://www.robertlikesgold.comSURVIVAL (CODE: ROBERT): https://4patriots.comAZ CRIMINAL DEFENSE: https://www.rrlawaz.comCONNECT: https://linktr.ee/robertgouveia#ClubQ #WEF #Arizona

ETDPODCAST
Nr. 3778 „China für viele Nationen ein Vorbild“ – WEF-Gründer Schwab im Regime-TV: „Beste Köpfe“ für „systemische Transformation der Welt“ gewinnen

ETDPODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022


Am Rande des APEC-CEO-Gipfels in Thailand gab WEF-Gründer Klaus Schwab dem chinesischen TV ein Interview. Darin fand er lobende Worte über das KP-Regime. Web: https://www.epochtimes.de Probeabo der Epoch Times Wochenzeitung: https://bit.ly/EpochProbeabo Twitter: https://twitter.com/EpochTimesDE YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC81ACRSbWNgmnVSK6M1p_Ug Telegram: https://t.me/epochtimesde Gettr: https://gettr.com/user/epochtimesde Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EpochTimesWelt/ Unseren Podcast finden Sie unter anderem auch hier: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/at/podcast/etdpodcast/id1496589910 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/277zmVduHgYooQyFIxPH97 Unterstützen Sie unabhängigen Journalismus: Per Paypal: http://bit.ly/SpendenEpochTimesDeutsch Per Banküberweisung (Epoch Times Europe GmbH, IBAN: DE 2110 0700 2405 2550 5400, BIC/SWIFT: DEUTDEDBBER, Verwendungszweck: Spenden) Vielen Dank! (c) 2022 Epoch Times

Shaun Attwood's True Crime Podcast
Klaus Schwab, FTX, Chris Hansen, Marilyn Manson, Aliens: Attwood Unleashed 82

Shaun Attwood's True Crime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 148:02


Attwood Unleashed is a weekly thought-provoking multi-hour broadcast with an eclectic range of guests produced by Ash Meikle.  Order of guests:  Chris Hansen of To Catch a Predator  Marilyn Manson vs. Evan Rachel Wood: Colonel Kurtz  Klaus Schwab: Charlie Robinson  UFO's, Secret Tech & Government Cover-ups: Micah Hanks 

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Daily Review With Clay and Buck - Nov 25 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 59:45


Buck shares President Biden's phone call fail on the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Buck relates the story of his brother's flight home from hell. Buck discusses the problems China is having with their Covid zero policy & the lockdowns- and yet globalists like Klaus Schwab still praise their system. Elon Musk is unleashing the beast on Twitter.Follow Clay & Buck on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/clayandbuckSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Eric Metaxas Show
Larry Taunton - Part 2

The Eric Metaxas Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 45:59


Larry Taunton continues revealing what he's learned about Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum, plus unravels more of the mysteries and hanky-panky surrounding voter fraud.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H2 - Nov 25 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 37:33


Buck details his brother's terrible holiday travel experience: ringside in-air seat to a violent fight that caused an early, unwanted landing. Chinese communists still locked down with covid. World Economic Forum founder and chairman Klaus Schwab says China is a "role model for many countries." Buck continues to take your AMA calls.Follow Clay & Buck on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/clayandbuckSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
EPISODE 325: BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL - POSO SPEECH AT OHIO STATE

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 33:48


Happy Black Friday from all of us at the Human Events Team! We hope you enjoyed your Thanksgiving and are spending time with your family, friends, and loved ones. Jack wanted to bring you a SPECIAL recording from a speech he gave to Ohio State University, focusing on ideas such as the Fourth Turning, World War 3, Klaus Schwab, the Great Reset AND MORE. Plus, hear Jack answer a Q&A with O.S.U students! All this and more on today's Black Friday Special of Human Events Daily! Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec Go to www.goodranchers.com/poso to get $30 off your order and free express shipping with code POSO

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB PROPHECY NEWS PODCAST: What You Need To Know About Digital Smart Cities

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 90:07


On this episode of the NTEB Prophecy News Podcast, we are trying together a number of topics we've been discussing over the last year. Topics like the futuristic cites of NEOM, digital identity, the UN 2030 Agenda, the Metaverse and of course, your smart phone. The umbrella term for most of this is something called the Internet of Things, and we've played some great clips from Klaus Schwab tying this into the Great Reset and the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Take all these topics, we'll call them experiments, put them into a laboratory, we'll call that the pandemic, try them all out on the global population for the past 984 Days of 15 Days To Flatten the Curve, and that brings you to today where you are reading this article. On this episode of the Prophecy News Podcast, we are not showing you what's coming, we are showing you what's here. The future has already arrived, and is assembling itself so quickly that much of it just bounces off our already overloaded brains, and we either fail to discern what's happening, or have become jaded to it an have stopped caring. Let me give you a good example of what I mean. Ten years ago, everyone online was up in arms over the proposed national database, remember everyone getting all excited about that? Well, as it turns out the national database arrived, look at your drivers license. See that gold star in the corner? You are in the national database, and didn't even know it. The expression '23 skidoo' is an American slang phrase generally referring to ‘leaving quickly, being forced to leave quickly by someone else'. 2023 is shaping up to be a barn burner. 23 Skidoo!

Contra Radio Network
The Survival Preppers with Duff & Dale | The Blabbercast 62: Aliens, Poland & Klaus Schwab

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 71:14


In our Blabbercast Live shows, we take a walk around the edges of prepping and discuss current events, random news, and anything that might affect us in the future.

The Victor Davis Hanson Show
The Culture of Wealth and a Selma Thanksgiving

The Victor Davis Hanson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 69:33


Join Victor Davis Hanson and cohost Jack Fowler for talk about Thanksgiving in Selma. First, they explore the recent case of Samuel Bankman-Fried and Klaus Schwab's remarks at the World Economic Forum.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
EPISODE 323: MAGA BLOOD LIBEL

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 25:24


Mainstream media is rushing to cover their tracks after violently MISGENDERING the shooter from Colorado, and Poso has receipts. PLUS, as the fallout from FTX continues to grow, it's starting to seem as though Sam Bankman-Fried was set up to be the fall guy ALL ALONG. And finally, new footage of Klaus Schwab shows how he TRULY looks towards China, and what that means for you. All this and more on today's episode of Human Events Daily! Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec To get $500 of free silver on a qualifying purchase go to  https://allegiancegold.com/POSO/ with code POSO  

Drew Berquist Live
The DC Uniparty Continues To Grow Stronger, Plague The Country | Kari Lake ”Loses” in AZ | Ep 486

Drew Berquist Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 65:10


Joe Biden was hanging with super villain Klaus Schwab and Justin Trudeau, but got too tired and had to skip dinner, Kari Lake was handed a "loss" in Arizona in an absurd election, the GOP continues to fail conservatives and will Trump announce a 2024 presidential run today from Mar a Lago? LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new content every day. RUMBLE: See the full LIVE show on Rumble. Subscribe, Watch and Engage at https://rumble.com/DrewBerquist LOCALS: Get Booze & Banter and Exclusive Content at https://DrewBerquist.Locals.com SUPPORT THE SHOW: Love Common Sense And Want To Keep Free Speech Alive? Support the Show. https://www.drewberquist.com/support/ SHOW SPONSORS AND AUDIENCE DISCOUNTS Field of Greens - Give your healthy a habits a boost! https://FieldofGreens.com and use promo code DREW to save! GoldCo - Get your FREE GOLD & SILVER IRA KIT to discover the secret to protecting your retirement savings from Biden, his new taxes & inflation. http://drewlovesgold.com/ Mammoth Nation - Shop Conservative and push back against the woke left. Become a member at https://mammothnation.com/ and use promo code DREW to save 30% on your membership. Red Beach Nation - Whether you live at the beach, are traveling to one or just want to imagine yourself there…Red Beach's comfy patriotic apparel is sure to lift your spirits. Use promo code DREW and save 10% at https://RedBeachNation.com My Patriot Supply - Every family should have at least one three-month supply of food per person. Go to www.SurviveWithDrew.com to SAVE $150 and get FREE SHIPPING on your 3-Month Food Kits. My Pillow - Get the best night's sleep of your life and save! Use Promo Code DREW to save up to 66% off your purchase at https://MyPillow.com The Root Brands-Get rid of heavy metals and toxins in your body! Purchase Clean Slate and other Root Brands products here: https://therootbrands.com/shop/drewberquist Aura - The New Standard in Digital Security Honest Pricing. Serious Protection. Help When You Need It. Visit Aura.com/DREWBERQUIST and Save 40% LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new content every day. RUMBLE: See the full LIVE show on Rumble. Subscribe, Watch and Engage at https://rumble.com/DrewBerquist LOCALS: Get Booze & Banter and Exclusive Content at https://DrewBerquist.Locals.com SUPPORT THE SHOW: Love Common Sense And Want To Keep Free Speech Alive? Support the Show. https://www.drewberquist.com/support/ SHOW SPONSORS AND AUDIENCE DISCOUNTS GoldCo - Get your FREE GOLD & SILVER IRA KIT to discover the secret to protecting your retirement savings from Biden, his new taxes & inflation. http://drewlovesgold.com/ Mammoth Nation - Shop Conservative and push back against the woke left. Become a member at https://mammothnation.com/ and use promo code DREW to save 30% on your membership. Red Beach Nation - Whether you live at the beach, are traveling to one or just want to imagine yourself there…Red Beach's comfy patriotic apparel is sure to lift your spirits. Use promo code DREW and save 10% at https://RedBeachNation.com My Patriot Supply - Every family should have at least one three-month supply of food per person. Go to www.SurviveWithDrew.com to SAVE $150 and get FREE SHIPPING on your 3-Month Food Kits. My Pillow - Get the best night's sleep of your life and save! Use Promo Code DREW to save up to 66% off your purchase at https://MyPillow.com The Root Brands-Get rid of heavy metals and toxins in your body! Purchase Clean Slate and other Root Brands products here: https://therootbrands.com/shop/drewberquist Aura - The New Standard in Digital Security Honest Pricing. Serious Protection. Help When You Need It. Visit Aura.com/DREWBERQUIST and Save 40%

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 103: Human-First AI with Christopher Nguyen

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 42:30


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Human-First AI. Our guest is Christopher Nguyen (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ctnguyen/), CEO, and Co-Founder of Aitomatic (https://www.aitomatic.com/). In this conversation, we talk about the why and the how of human-first AI because it seems that digital AI is one thing, but physical AI is a whole other ballgame in terms of finding enough high-quality data to label the data correctly. The fix is to use AI to augment existing workflows. We talk about fishermen at Furuno, human operators in battery factories at Panasonic, and energy optimization at Westinghouse. If you like this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you like this episode, you might also like Episode 80: The Augmenting Power of Operational Data, with Tulip's CTO, Rony Kubat (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/80). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Physical AI is much more interesting of a challenge than pure digital AI. Imagine making true improvements to the way workers accomplish their work, helping them be better, faster, and more accurate. This is the way technology is supposed to work, augmenting humans, not replacing them. In manufacturing, we need all the human workers we can find. As for what happens after the year 2100, I agree that we may have to model what that looks like. But AIs might be even more deeply embedded in the process, that's for sure. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations in industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Human-First AI. Our guest is Christopher Nguyen, CEO, and Co-Founder of Aitomatic. In this conversation, we talk about the why and the how of human-first AI because it seems that digital AI is one thing, but physical AI is a whole other ballgame in terms of finding enough high-quality data to label the data correctly. The fix is to use AI to augment existing workflows. We talk about fishermen at Furuno, human operators in battery factories at Panasonic, and energy optimization at Westinghouse. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and for shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Christopher, how are you? And welcome. CHRISTOPHER: Hi, Trond. How are you? TROND: I'm doing great. I thought we would jump into a pretty important subject here on human-first AI, which seems like a juxtaposition of two contradictory terms, but it might be one of the most important types of conversations that we are having these days. I wanted to introduce you quickly before we jump into this. So here's what I've understood, and you correct me if I'm wrong, but you are originally from Vietnam. This is back in the late '70s that you then arrived in the U.S. and have spent many years in Silicon Valley mostly. Berkeley, undergrad engineering, computer science, and then Stanford Ph.D. in electrical engineering. You're a sort of a combination, I guess, of a hacker, professor, builder. Fairly typical up until this point of a very successful, accomplished sort of Silicon Valley immigrant entrepreneur, I would say, and technologist. And then I guess Google Apps is something to point out. You were one of the first engineering directors and were part of Gmail, and Calendar, and a bunch of different apps there. But now you are the CEO and co-founder of Aitomatic. What we are here to talk about is, I guess, what you have learned even in just the last five years, which I'm thrilled to hear about. But let me ask you this first, what is the most formational and formative experience that you've had in these years? So obviously, immigrant background and then a lot of years in Silicon Valley, what does that give us? CHRISTOPHER: I guess I can draw from a lot of events. I've always had mentors. I can point out phases of my life and one particular name that was my mentor. But I guess in my formative years, I was kind of unlucky to be a refugee but then lucky to then end up in Silicon Valley at the very beginning of the PC revolution. And my first PC was a TI-99/4A that basically the whole household could afford. And I picked it up, and I have not stopped hacking ever since. So I've been at this for a very long time. TROND: So you've been at this, which is good because actually, good hacking turns out takes a while. But there's more than that, right? So the story of the last five years that's interesting to me because a lot of people learn or at least think they learn most things early. And you're saying you have learned some really fundamental things in the last five years. And this has to do with Silicon Valley and its potential blindness to certain things. Can you line that up for us? What is it that Silicon Valley does really well, and what is it that you have discovered that might be an opportunity to improve upon? CHRISTOPHER: Well, I learn new things every four or five years. I actually like to say that every four or five years, I look back, and I say, "I was so stupid five years ago." [laughs] So that's been the case. TROND: That's a very humbling but perhaps a very smart knowledge acquisition strategy, right? CHRISTOPHER: Yeah. And in the most recent five years...so before co-founding Aitomatic, which is my latest project and really with the same team...and I can talk a lot more about that. We've worked with each other for about ten years now. But in the intervening time, there's a four-and-a-half-year block when we were part of Panasonic. So we had a company called Arimo that was acquired by Panasonic for our machine learning AI skills and software. And I would say if you look at my entire history, even though I did start with my degree in semiconductor all the way down to device physics and Intel and so on, but in terms of a professional working career, that was the first time we actually faced the physical world as a Silicon Valley team. And anybody who's observed Silicon Valley in the last 15-20 years, certainly ten years, has seen a marked change in terms of the shift from hardware to software. And my friend Marc Andreessen likes to say, "Software is eating the world." If you look at education, you know, the degrees people are getting, it has shifted entirely from engineering all the way to computer science. And the punch line, I guess, the observation is that we Silicon Valley people do not get physical. We don't understand the manufacturing world. We don't know how to do HVAC and so on. And so when we build software, we tend to go for the digital stuff. TROND: Christopher, it's almost surprising given the initial thrust of Silicon Valley was, of course, hardware. So it's not surprising to me, I guess because I've been observing it as well. But it is striking more than surprising that a region goes through paradigms. CHRISTOPHER: Yeah. Yeah. And it's a global trend. It's the offshoring of low-end, shall we say, low-value manufacturing and so on. And we're discovering that we actually went a little too far. So we don't have the skill set, the expertise anymore. And it's become a geopolitical risk. TROND: Right. Well, a little bit too far, maybe, or not far enough. Or, I mean, tell us what it is that you're losing when you lose the hardware perspective, particularly in this day and age with the opportunities that we're about to talk about. CHRISTOPHER: Well, I can talk specifically about the things that touch my immediate spheres. Maybe you can think abstractly about the lack of tooling expertise and manufacturing know-how, and so on. But as part of Panasonic, the acquisition was all about taking a Silicon Valley team and injecting AI, machine learning across the enterprise. And so we were part of that global AI team reporting to the CTO office. And we found out very quickly that a lot of the software techniques, the machine learning, for example, when you think about people saying data is the fuel for machine learning and specifically labeled data, right? In the digital world, the Google place that I came from, it was very easy to launch a digital experiment and collect labels, decisions made by users. You can launch that in the morning, and by evening you're building examples. You can't do that in the physical world. Atoms move a lot more slowly. And so when you try to do something like predictive maintenance, you don't have enough failure examples to train machine learning models from. So all of the techniques, all of the algorithms that we say we developed from machine learning that seem to work so well, it turns out it worked so well because the problem space that we worked on has been entirely digital, and they all fail when it comes to manufacturing, the things that you can touch and feel, you know, cars that move and so on. TROND: I want to ask you this, Christopher, because the first company you helped co-found was, in fact, a contract manufacturer. Do you think that reflecting on this long career of yours and these various experiences, what was it that convinced you before others? I mean, you're not the only one now in the Valley that has started to focus on manufacturing and including hardware again, but it is rare still. What does it require to not just think about manufacturing but actually start to do compute for manufacturing? Is it just a matter of coming up with techniques? Or is it a whole kind of awareness that takes longer? So, in your case, you've been aware of manufacturing, acutely aware of it for decades. CHRISTOPHER: I would say there are two things, one is obvious, and the other was actually surprising to me. The obvious one is, of course, knowledge and experience. When we work on sonar technology that shoots a beam down an echogram that comes back to detect fish in the ocean, it's very necessary, not just convenient, but necessary for the engineers that work on that to understand the physics of sound waves travel underwater, and so on. So that education, I have long debates, and it's not just recently. When we were trying to structure a syllabus for a new university, I had long debates with my machine-learning friends, and they said, "We don't need physics." And I said, "We need physics." That's one thing. But you can concretely identify you need to know this. You need to know this. So if you're going to do this, learn the following thing. The thing that was more unexpected for me in the last five years as I sort of sound this bell of saying, hey, we need to modify our approach; we need to optimize our algorithms for this world, is a cultural barrier. It's kind of like the story of if you have a hammer, you want to go look for nails. So Silicon Valley today does not want to look for screwdrivers yet for this world. TROND: So you're saying Silicon Valley has kind of canceled the physical world? If you want to be really sort of parabolic about this, it's like software is eating the world, meaning software is what counts, and it's so efficient. Why go outside this paradigm, basically? If there's a problem that apparently can't be fixed by software, it's not a valuable problem. CHRISTOPHER: Or I can't solve that problem with my current approach. I just have to squint at it the right way. I have to tweak the problem this way and so on despite the fact that it's sort of an insurmountable challenge if you tried to do so. And concretely, it is like, just give me enough data, and I'll solve it. And if you don't have enough data, you know what? Go back and get more data. [chuckles] That's what I myself literally said. But people don't have the luxury of going back to get more data. They have to go to market in six months, and so on. TROND: Right. And so manufacturing...and I can think of many use cases where obviously failure, for example, is not something...you don't really want to go looking for more failure than you have or artificially create failure in order to stress test something unless that's a very safe way of doing so. So predictive maintenance then seems like a, I guess, a little bit of a safer space. But what is it about that particular problem that then lends itself to this other approach to automating labeling? Or what exactly is it that you are advocating one should do to bridge to digital and the physical AIs? CHRISTOPHER: I actually disagree that it is a safer space. TROND: Oh, it's not a safer space to you. CHRISTOPHER: That itself there's a story in that, so let's break that down. TROND: Let's do it. CHRISTOPHER: So, again, when I say Silicon Valley, it is a symbol for a larger ecosystem that is primarily software and digital. And when I say we, because I've worn many hats, I have multiple wes, including academia; I've been a professor as well. When we approach the predictive maintenance problem, if you approach it as machine learning, you got to say, "Do this with machine learning," the first thing you ask for...let's say I'm a data scientist; I'm an AI engineer. You have this physical problem. It doesn't matter what it is; just give me the dataset. And the data set must have rows and columns, and the rows are all the input variables. And then there should be some kind of column label. And in this case, it'll be a history of failures of compressors failing, you know, if the variables are such, then it must be a compressor. If the variables are such, it must be the air filter, and so on. And it turns out when you ask for that kind of data, you get ten rows. [laughs] That's not enough to do machine learning on. So then people, you know, machine learning folks who say they've done predictive maintenance, they actually have not done predictive maintenance. That's the twist. What they have done is anomaly detection, which machine learning can do because, with anomaly detection, I do not need that failure label. It just gives me all the sensor data. What anomaly detection really does is it learns the normal patterns. If you give it a year's worth of data, it'll say, okay, now I've seen a year's worth of data. If something comes along that is different from the past patterns; I will tell you that it's different. That's only halfway to predictive maintenance. That is detecting that something is different today. That is very different from, and it isn't predicting, hey, that compressor is likely to fail about a month from now. And that when we were part of Panasonic, it turns out the first way...and we solved it exactly the way I've described. We did it with the anomaly detection. And then we threw it over the wall to the engineer experts and said, "Well, now that you have this alert, go figure out what may be wrong." And half of the time, they came back and said, "Oh, come on, it was just a maintenance event. Why are you bothering me with this?" TROND: But, Christopher, leveraging human domain expertise sounds like a great idea. But it can't possibly be as scalable as just leveraging software. So how do you work with that? And what are the gains that you're making? CHRISTOPHER: I can show you the messenger exchange I had with another machine-learning friend of mine who said exactly the same thing yesterday, less than 24 hours ago. TROND: [laughs] CHRISTOPHER: He said, "That's too labor-intensive." And I can show you the screen. TROND: And how do you disprove this? CHRISTOPHER: Well, [chuckles] it's not so much disproving, but the assumption that involving humans is labor-intensive is only true if you can't automate it. So the key is to figure out a way, and 10-20 years ago, there was limited technology to automate or extract human knowledge, expert systems, and so on. But today, technologies...the understanding of natural language and so on, machine learning itself has enabled that. That turns out to be the easier problem to solve. So you take that new tool, and you apply it to this harder physical problem. TROND: So let's go to a hard, physical problem. You and I talked about this earlier, and let's share it with people. So I was out fishing in Norway this summer. And I, unfortunately, didn't get very much fish, which obviously was disappointing on many levels. And I was a little surprised, I guess, of the lack of fish, perhaps. But I was using sonar to at least identify different areas where people had claimed that there were various types of fish. But I wasn't, I guess, using it in a very advanced way, and we weren't trained there in the boat. So we sort of had some sensors, but we were not approaching it the right way. So that helped me...and I know you work with Furuno, and Garmin is the other obviously player in this. So fish identification and detection through sonar technology is now the game, I guess, in fishery and, as it turns out, even for individuals trying to fish these days. What is that all about? And how can that be automated, and what are the processes that you've been able to put in place there? CHRISTOPHER: By the way, that's a perfect segue into it. I can give a plug perhaps for this conference that I'm on the organizing committee called Knowledge-First World. And Furuno is going to be presenting their work exactly, talking a lot about what you're talking about. This is kind of coming up in November. It is the first conference of its kind because this is AI Silicon Valley meets the physical world. I think you're talking about the fish-finding technology from companies like Furuno, and they're the world's largest market share in marine navigation and so on. And the human experts in this are actually not even the engineers that build these instruments; it's the fishermen, right? The fishermen who have been using this for a very long time combine it with their local knowledge, you know, warm water, cold water, time of day, and so on. And then, after a while, they recognize patterns that come back in this echogram that match mackerel, or tuna, or sardines, and so on. And Furuno wants to capture that knowledge somehow and then put that model into the fish-finding machine that you and I would hold. And then, instead of seeing this jumbled mess of the echogram data, we would actually see a video of fish, for example. It's been transformed by this algorithm. TROND: So, I mean, I do wish that we lived in a world where there was so much fish that we didn't have to do this. But I'm going to join your experiment here. And so what you're telling me is by working with these experts who are indeed fishermen, they're not experts in sonar, or they're not experts in any kind of engineering technology, those are obviously the labelers, but they are themselves giving the first solutions for how they are thinking about the ocean using these technologies. And then somehow, you are turning that into an automatable, an augmented solution, essentially, that then can find fish in the future without those fishermen somehow being involved the next time around because you're building a model around it. CHRISTOPHER: I'll give you a concrete explanation, a simplified version of how it works, without talking about the more advanced techniques that are proprietary to Furuno. The conceptual approach is very, very easy to understand, and I'll talk about it from the machine learning perspective. Let's say if I did have a million echograms, and each echogram, each of these things, even 100,000, is well-labeled. Somebody has painstakingly gone through the task of saying, okay, I'm going to circle this, and that is fish. And that is algae, and that's sand, and that's marble. And by the way, this is a fish, and this is mackerel, and so on. If somebody has gone through the trouble of doing that, then I can, from a human point of view, just run an algorithm and train it. And then it'll work for that particular region, for that particular time. Okay, well, we need to go collect more data, one for Japan, the North Coast, and one for Southwestern. So that's kind of a lot of work to collect essentially what this pixel data is, this raw data. When you present it to an experienced fisherman, he or she would say, "Well, you see these bubbles here, these circles here with a squiggly line..." So they're describing it in terms of human concepts. And then, if you sit with them for a day or two, you begin to pick up these things. You don't need 100,000-pixel images. You need these conceptual descriptions. TROND: So you're using the most advanced AI there is, which is the human being, and you're using them working with these sonar-type technologies. And you're able to extract very, very advanced models from it. CHRISTOPHER: The key technology punch line here is if you have a model that understands the word circle and squiggly line, which we didn't before, but more recently, we begin to have models, you know, there are these advances called large language models. You may have heard of GPT-3 and DALL-E and so on, you know, some amazing demonstrations coming out of OpenAI and Google. In a very simplified way, we have models that understand the world now. They don't need raw pixels. These base models are trained from raw pixels, but then these larger models understand concepts. So then, we can give directions at this conceptual level so that they can train other models. That's sort of the magic trick. TROND: So it's a magic trick, but it is still a difficult world, the world of manufacturing, because it is physical. Give me some other examples. So you worked with Panasonic. You're working with Furuno in marine navigation there and fishermen's knowledge. How does this work in other fields like robotics, or with car manufacturing, or indeed with Panasonic with kind of, I don't know, battery production or anything that they do with electronics? CHRISTOPHER: So, to give you an example, you mentioned a few things that we worked on, you know, robotics in manufacturing, robotics arm, sort of the manufacturing side, and the consistency of battery sheets coming off the Panasonic manufacturing line in Sparks, Nevada as well as energy optimization at Westinghouse. They supply into data centers, and buildings, and so on. And so again, in every one of these examples, you've got human expertise. And, of course, this is much more prevalent in Asia because Asia is still building things, but some of that is coming back to the U.S. There are usually a few experts. And by the way, this is not about thousands of manufacturing line personnel. This is about three or four experts that are available in the entire company. And they would be able to give heuristics. –They will be able to describe at the conceptual level how they make their decisions. And if you have the technology to capture that in a very efficient way, again, coming back to the idea that if you make them do the work or if you automate their work, but in a very painstaking way like thousands of different rules, that's not a good proposition. But if you have some way to automate the automation, automate the capturing of that knowledge, you've got something that can bridge this physical, digital divide. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com, and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: How stable is that kind of model knowledge? Because I'm just thinking about it in the long run here, are these physical domain experts that are giving up a little bit of their superpower are they still needed then in a future scenario when you do have such a model? Or will it never be as advanced as they are? Or is it actually going to be still kind of an interface that's going to jump between machines and human knowledge kind of in a continuous loop here? CHRISTOPHER: Yeah, in the near term, it turns out we're not working on replacing experts as much as scaling experts. Almost every case we've worked on, companies are in trouble largely because the experts are very, very few and far between, and they're retiring. They're leaving. And that needs to be scaled somehow. In the case of, for example, the cold chain industry all of Japan servicing the supermarkets, you know, there's 7-ELEVEN, there's FamilyMart, and so on, there are three experts who can read the sensor data and infer what's likely to fail in the next month. So in the near term, it's really we need these humans, and we need more of them. TROND: I'm glad to hear that even that is a bit of a contrarian message. So you're saying physical infrastructure and the physical world matters. You're saying humans matter. [laughs] It's interesting. Yeah, that's contrarian in Silicon Valley, I'll tell you that. CHRISTOPHER: It is. And, in fact, related to that problem, Hussmann, which is a refrigeration company, commercial refrigeration supplies to supermarkets. It was a subsidiary of Panasonic. It has a really hard time getting enough service personnel, and they have to set up their own universities, if you will, to train them. And these are jobs that pay very well. But everybody wants to be in software these days. Coming back to the human element, I think that long-term I'm an optimist, not a blind optimist but a rational one. I think we're still going to need humans to direct machines. The machine learning stuff is data that reflects the past, so patterns of the past, and you try to project that in the future. But we're always trying to effect some change to the status quo. Tomorrow should be a better day than today. So is that human intent that is still, at least at present, lacking in machines? And so we need humans to direct that. TROND: So what is the tomorrow of manufacturing then? How fast are we going to get there? Because you're saying, well, Silicon Valley has a bit of a learning journey. But there is language model technology or progress in language models that now can be implemented in software and, through humans, can be useful in manufacturing already today. And they're scattered examples, and you're putting on an event to show this. What is the path forward here, and how long is this process? And will it be an exponential kind of situation here where you can truly integrate amazing levels of human insight into these machine models? Or will it take a while of tinkering before you're going to make any breakthroughs? Because one thing is the breakthrough in understanding human language, but what you're saying here is even if you're working only with a few experts, you have to take domain by domain, I'm assuming, and build these models, like you said, painstakingly with each expert in each domain. And then, yes, you can put that picture together. But the question is, how complex of a picture is it that you need to put together? Is it like mapping the DNA, or is it bigger? Or what kind of a process are we looking at here? CHRISTOPHER: If we look at it from the dimension of, say, knowledge-based automation, in a sense, it is a continuation. I believe everything is like an s-curve. So there's acceleration, and then there's maturity, and so on. But if you look back in the past, which is sort of instructive for the future, we've always had human knowledge-based automation. I remember the first SMT, the Surface Mount Technology, SMT wave soldering machine back in the early '90s. That was a company that I helped co-found. It was about programming the positioning of these chips that would just come down onto the solder wave. And that was human knowledge for saying, move it up half a millimeter here and half a millimeter there. But of course, the instructions there are very micro and very specific. What machine learning is doing...I don't mean to sort of bash machine learning too much. I'm just saying culturally, there's this new tool really that has come along, and we just need to apply the tool the right way. Machine learning itself is contributing to what I described earlier, that is, now, finally, machines can understand us at the conceptual level that they don't have to be so, so dumb as to say, move a millimeter here, and if you give them the wrong instruction, they'll do exactly that. But we can communicate with them in terms of circles and lines, and so on. So the way I see it is that it's still a continuous line. But what we are able to automate, what we're able to ask our machines to do, is accelerating in terms of their understanding of these instructions. So if you can imagine what would happen when this becomes, let's say, ubiquitous, the ability to do this, and I see this happening over the next...Certainly, the base technology is already there, and the application always takes about a decade. TROND: Well, the application takes a decade. But you told me earlier that humans should at least have this key role in this knowledge-first application approach until 2100, you said, just to throw out a number out there. That's, to some people, really far away. But the question is, what are you saying comes after that? I know you throw that number out. But if you are going to make a distinction between a laborious process of painful progress that does progress, you know, in each individual context that you have applied to human and labeled it, and understood a little case, what are we looking at, whether it is 2100, 2075, or 2025? What will happen at that moment? And is it really a moment that you're talking about when machines suddenly will grasp something very, very generic, sort of the good old moment of singularity, or are you talking about something different? CHRISTOPHER: Yeah, I certainly don't think it's a moment. And, again, the HP-11C has always calculated Pi far faster and with more digits than I have. So in that sense, in that particular narrow sense, it's always been more intelligent than I am. TROND: Yeah. Well, no one was questioning whether a calculator could do better calculations than a human. For a long time -- CHRISTOPHER: Hang on. There's something more profound to think about because we keep saying, well, the minute we do something, it's okay; that's not intelligence. But what I'm getting to is the word that I would refer to is hyper-evolution. So there's not a replacement of humans by machines. There's always been augmentation, and intelligence is not going to be different. It is a little disturbing to think about for some of us, for a lot of us, but it's not any different from wearing my glasses. Or I was taking a walk earlier this morning listening to your podcast, and I was thinking how a pair of shoes as an augmented device would seem very, very strange to humans living, say, 500 years ago, the pair of shoes that I was walking with. So I think in terms of augmenting human intelligence, there are companies that are working on plugging in to the degree that that seems natural or disturbing. It is inevitable. TROND: Well, I mean, if you just think about the internet, which nowadays, it has become a trope to think about the internet. I mean, not enough people think about the internet as a revolutionary technology which it, of course, is and has been, but it is changing. But whether you're thinking about shoes, or the steam engine, or nuclear power, or whatever it is, the moment it's introduced, and people think they understand it, which most people don't, and few of us do, it seems trivial because it's there. CHRISTOPHER: That's right. TROND: But your point is until it's there, it's not trivial at all. And so the process that you've been describing might sound trivial, or it might sound complex, but the moment it's solved or is apparently solved to people, we all assume that was easy. So there's something unfair about how knowledge progresses, I guess. CHRISTOPHER: That's right. That's right. We always think, yeah, this thing that you describe or I describe is very, very strange. And then it happens, and you say, "Of course, that's not that interesting. Tell me about the future." TROND: Well, I guess the same thing has happened to cell phones. They were kind of a strange thing that some people were using. It was like, okay, well, how useful is it to talk to people without sitting by your desk or in the corner of your house? CHRISTOPHER: I totally remember when we were saying, "Why the hell would I want to be disturbed every moment of the day?" [laughs] I don't want the phone with me, and now I -- TROND: Right. But then we went through the last decade or so where we were saying, "I can't believe my life before the phone." And then maybe now the last two, three years, I would say a lot of people I talk to or even my kids, they're like, "What's the big deal here? It's just a smartphone," because they live with a smartphone. And they've always had it. CHRISTOPHER: They say, "How did you get around without Google Maps?" And then somebody says, "We used maps." And I said, "Before Google Maps." [laughter] TROND: Yeah. So I guess the future here is an elusive concept. But I just want to challenge you one more time then on manufacturing because manufacturing, for now, is a highly physical exercise. And, of course, there's virtual manufacturing as well, and it builds on a lot of these techniques and machine learning and other things. How do you see manufacturing as an industry evolve? Is it, like you said, for 75 years, it's going to be largely very recognizable? Is it going to look the same? Is it going to feel the same? Is the management structure the way engineers are approaching it, and the way workers are working? Are we going to recognize all these things? Or is it going to be a little bit like the cell phone, and we're like, well, of course, it's different. But it's not that different, and it's not really a big deal to most people. CHRISTOPHER: Did you say five years or 50 years? TROND: Well, I mean, you give me the timeframe. CHRISTOPHER: Well, in 5 years, we will definitely recognize it, but in 50 years, we will not TROND: In 50 years, it's going to be completely different, look different, feel different; factories are all going to be different. CHRISTOPHER: Right, right. I mean, the cliché is that we always overestimate what happens in 5 and underestimate what happens in 50. But the trend, though, is there's this recurring bundling and unbundling of industries; it's a cycle. Some people think it's just, you know, they live ten years, and they say it's a trend, but it actually goes back and forth. But they're sort of increasing specialization of expertise. So, for example, the supply chain over the last 30 years, we got in trouble because of that because it has become so discrete if you want to use one friendly word, but you can also say fragmented in another word. Like, everybody has been focused on just one specialization, and then something like COVID happens and then oh my God, that was all built very precisely for a particular way of living. And nobody's in the office anymore, and we live at home, and that disrupts the supply chain. I think if you project 50 years out, we will learn to essentially matrix the whole industry. You talked about the management of these things. The whole supply chain, from branding all the way down to raw materials, is it better to be completely vertically integrated to be part of this whole mesh network? I think the future is going to be far more distributed. But there'll be fits and starts. TROND: So then my last question is, let's say I buy into that. Okay, let's talk about that for a second; the future is distributed or decentralized, whatever that means. Does that lessen or make globalization even more important and global standardization, I guess, across all geographical territories? I'm just trying to bring us back to where you started with, which was in the U.S., Silicon Valley optimized for software and started thinking that software was eating the world. But then, by outsourcing all of the manufacturing to Asia, it forgot some essential learning, which is that when manufacturing evolves, the next wave looks slightly different. And in order to learn that, you actually need to do it. So does that lesson tell you anything about how the next wave of matrix or decentralization is going to occur? Is it going to be...so one thought would be that it is physically distributed, but a lot of the insights are still shared. So, in other words, you still need global insight sharing, and all of that is happening. If you don't have that, you're going to have pockets that are...they might be very decentralized and could even be super advanced, but they're not going to be the same. They're going to be different, and they're going to be different paths and trajectories in different parts of the world. How do you see this? Do you think that our technology paradigms are necessarily converging along the path of some sort of global master technology and manufacturing? Or are we looking at scattered different pictures that are all decentralized, but yet, I don't know, from a bird's eye view, it kind of looks like a matrix? CHRISTOPHER: I think your question is broader than just manufacturing, although manufacturing is a significant example of that, right? TROND: It's maybe a key example and certainly under-communicated. And on this podcast, we want to emphasize manufacturing, but you're right, yes. CHRISTOPHER: The word globalization is very loaded. There's the supposedly positive effect in the long run. But who is it that said...is it Keynes that said, "In the long run, we're all dead?" [laughs] In the short run, the dislocations are very real. A skill set of a single human being can't just shift from hardware to software, from manufacturing to AI, within a few months. But I think your question is, let's take it seriously on a scale of, say, decades. I think about it in terms of value creation. There will always be some kind of disparity. Nature does not like uniformity. Uniformity is coldness; it is death. There have to be some gradients. You're very good at something; I'm very good at something else. And that happens at the scale of cities and nations as well. TROND: And that's what triggers trade, too, right? CHRISTOPHER: Exactly. TROND: Because if we weren't different, then there would be no incentive to trade. CHRISTOPHER: So when we think about manufacturing coming back to the U.S., and we can use the word...it is correct in one sense, but it's incorrect in another sense. We're not going back to manufacturing that I did. We're not going back to surface mount technology. In other words, the value creation...if we follow the trajectory of manufacturing alone and try to learn that history, what happens is that manufacturing has gotten better and better. Before, we were outsourcing the cheap stuff. We don't want to do that. But then that cheap stuff, you know, people over there build automation and skills, and so on. And so that becomes actually advanced technology. So in a sense, what we're really doing is we're saying, hey, let's go advanced at this layer. I think it's going to be that give and take of where value creation takes place, of course, layered with geopolitical issues and so on. TROND: I guess I'm just throwing in there the wedge that you don't really know beforehand. And it was Keynes, the economist, that said that the only thing that matters is the short term because, in the end, we are all dead eventually. But the point is you don't really know. Ultimately, what China learned from manufacturing pretty pedestrian stuff turned out to be really fundamental in the second wave. So I'm just wondering, is it possible to preempt that because you say, oh, well, the U.S. is just going to manufacture advanced things, and then you pick a few things, and you start manufacturing them. But if you're missing part of the production process, what if that was the real advancement? I guess that is what happened. CHRISTOPHER: Okay. So when I say that, I think about the example of my friend who spent, you know, again, we were a Ph.D. group at Stanford together. And whereas I went off to academia and did startups and so on, he stayed at Intel for like 32 years. He's one of the world's foremost experts in semiconductor process optimization. So that's another example where human expertise, even though semiconductor manufacturing is highly automated, you still need these experts to actually optimize these things. He's gone off to TSMC after three decades of being very happy at one place. So what I'm getting to is it is actually knowable what are the secret recipes, where the choke points are, what matters, and so on. And interestingly, it does reside in the human brain. But when I say manufacturing coming back to the U.S. and advanced manufacturing, we are picking and choosing. We're doing battery manufacturing. We're doing semiconductor, and we're not doing wave soldering. So I think it is possible to also see this trend that anybody who's done something and going through four or five iterations of that for a long time will become the world's expert at it. I think that is inevitable. You talk of construction, for example; interestingly, this company in Malaysia that is called Renong that is going throughout Southeast Asia; they are the construction company of the region because they've been doing it for so long. I think that is very, very predictable, but it does require the express investment in that direction. And that's something that Asia has done pretty well. TROND: Well, these are fascinating things. We're not going to solve them all on this podcast. But definitely, becoming an expert in something is important, whether you're an individual, or a company, or a country for sure. What that means keeps changing. So just stay alert, and stay in touch with both AI and humans and manufacturing to boot. It's a mix of those three, I guess. In our conversation, that's the secret to unlocking parts of the future. Thank you, Christopher, for enlightening us on these matters. I appreciate it. CHRISTOPHER: It's my pleasure. TROND: You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Human-First AI. Our guest was Christopher Nguyen, CEO, and Co-Founder of Aitomatic. In this conversation, we talked about the why and the how of human-first AI because it seems that digital AI is one thing, but physical AI is a whole other ballgame. My takeaway is that physical AI is much more interesting of a challenge than pure digital AI. Imagine making true improvements to the way workers accomplish their work, helping them be better, faster, and more accurate. This is the way technology is supposed to work, augmenting humans, not replacing them. In manufacturing, we need all the human workers we can find. As for what happens after the year 2100, I agree that we may have to model what that looks like. But AIs might be even more deeply embedded in the process, that's for sure. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 80: The Augmenting Power of Operational Data, with Tulip's CTO, Rony Kubat as our guest. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes, and if so, do let us know by messaging us. We would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The augmented podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects the people, machines, devices, and systems used in a production and logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring. You can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially about how industrial tech is going. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and on YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Christopher Nguyen.

The Eric Metaxas Show
Larry Taunton

The Eric Metaxas Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 45:57


Larry Taunton has just completed an eye-opening four-part series for the Daily Wire about Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Todd Herman Show
The "smartest people in the world" are amazingly stupid because they have become The Lie. Ep_471_Hr-2

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 52:10


THE THESIS: When you reject the source of truth, you will be consumed by lies.THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES: Matthew 13: 14-2314 In them is fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah:“‘You will be ever hearing but never understanding; you will be ever seeing but never perceiving.15 For this people's heart has become calloused; they hardly hear with their ears, and they have closed their eyes.Otherwise they might see with their eyes, hear with their ears, understand with their heartsand turn, and I would heal them.'16 But blessed are your eyes because they see, and your ears because they hear. 17 For truly I tell you, many prophets and righteous people longed to see what you see but did not see it, and to hear what you hear but did not hear it.18 “Listen then to what the parable of the sower means: 19 When anyone hears the message about the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what was sown in their heart. This is the seed sown along the path. 20 The seed falling on rocky ground refers to someone who hears the word and at once receives it with joy. 21 But since they have no root, they last only a short time. When trouble or persecution comes because of the word, they quickly fall away. 22 The seed falling among the thorns refers to someone who hears the word, but the worries of this life and the deceitfulness of wealth choke the word, making it unfruitful. 23 But the seed falling on good soil refers to someone who hears the word and understands it. This is the one who produces a crop, yielding a hundred, sixty or thirty times what was sown.”THE NEWS & COMMENT:People of the lie have rendered “hate” a meaningless word because they apply both everything--requiting Voter ID is “hate”--and then, turning on a dime, only subsets of the same thing. For instance, if a same-sex-attracted man kills other same-sex-attracted men, that is not “hate.” It only becomes “hate” when an intersectional ally group is harmed. People who are not of The Lie know better. If you walk into a business and start shooting innocent people that, in and of itself, is hateful. What The Party means, of coure, is was this particular, sinful hate due to the sexual orientation and so-called “gender identity” of the victims. Cops identify suspect in Colorado LGBTQ nightclub shooting; Colorado Police are still investigating whether the attack at Club Q was a hate crimeIs this “hate?” The number of people killed--many, in fact, murdered--under cover of The Party's Covid tactics now outnumbers in deaths some of the most tragic human-caused deaths in history. Worse, it appears the mRNA injections will continue to kill some and render others infertile. The “smartest people in the world” can't see this, because they have rejected the source of truth, so they have become The Lie. There has never been a mechanism described that would make the Covid Flu more deadly to people due to their ethnic heritage (although the CCP is almost certainly working on that). There are, though, comorbidities and age-related mechanisms for harm. Obesity, diabetes, lung disease and low Vitamin-D. These situations tend to be pronounced in black people. But, why be factual and contextual when you divide people? Pray for Sheila Jackson-Lee, a woman of The Lie.[AUDIO] - Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee claims there's a direct connection between slavery and disparities in Covid-19 deaths, suggesting "reparations" could have "cut Covid-19 transmission and infection rates."Is this hateful? It is injected people who are still getting Covid and passing it on. Watch: NBC News Advises Parents To Keep Kids Away From "Unvaccinated Individuals". . . it is also injected people who are now vulnerable to diseases their bodies would otherwise conquer, like RSV. How many doctors really don't know it's the injections causing this versus the ones who know--but are afraid to say--it's the mRNA? The People of The Lie work together:Deep state money supply: FTX, the collapsed crypto exchange, funded the “TOGETHER Trial” to discredit ivermectinThe smartest people in the world were stupid enough to believe this was not a scam. Or, were they scheming enough to shut-up and pretend it was real so they could make--and launder--money? . . . the smartest people in the world told us time and again the injection passports were a conspiracy theory. Funny thing about that . . . Biden promises world leaders US will strengthen 'digital COVID-19 certificates'; Under the 23rd section of the statement, the White House says that it acknowledges the importance of "shared technical standards and verification methods," and specifically states that it will seek to build on the "success" of existing standards and digital Covid-19 certificates.The NAZIs called it a “Gesundheitpass.” [AUDIO] - https://en.langenscheidt.com/german-english/gesundheitspassTwo bad actors, pun intended, talk to an actor who now runs Ukraine. This is meant to inspire us to unquestionably funnel even more money to Ukraine. Wich FTX dead, what other money laundering tricks do they have over there?[AUDIO] - THE TRUDEAUS - if you have never questioned if you were being played, question it now. This vomit inducing set up by the Trudeau Twins is embarrassing and cringeworthyOne of the owners of Dictator-Bro, Justin Treadeau has thrown some words in the air and created a sentence that really means: “give us even more control …'[AUDIO] - G20 - Here's Klaus Schwab, on the great Great Reset none of you voted for. “Deep systemic restructuring of our world and this will take some time. And the world will look differently after we have gone through this transition process” Unelected elites have stolen your choices.. . . while we can see the results of the policies of people like Schwabb all around the world. Germany has been pretending entire countries can be powered by renewable. Now, Germany is facing physics.“Green” energy is collapsingWhat happens when China stops making our pills? Amid the Adderall Shortage, People With A.D.H.D. Face Withdrawal and Despair; Without medication, patients are wondering what comes next.

CrossroadsET
Digital Dollar' Begins in US; G20 Used to Advance Great Reset

CrossroadsET

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 93:41


An experimental “digital dollar” is being rolled out by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, with involvement from financial companies including Mastercard, Citigroup, HSBC Holdings, and Wells Fargo. The 12-week experiment will work as a test for the creation of a centralized bank digital currency (CBDC) in the United States, similar to the “digital yuan” used by the Chinese regime. Meanwhile, global leaders and representatives met for the G20 summit in Bali, where they were joined by Bill Gates and Klaus Schwab. Following the meeting, they announced new programs that align with the “great reset” agenda. This includes new climate change laws, including reparations from wealthy countries to third world countries. ⭕️ Stay up-to-date with Josh with the Crossroads NEWSLETTER

The Rubin Report
Elon Musk Brings Back a Bunch of Huge Banned Twitter Accounts | Direct Message | Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 63:58


Dave Rubin of “The Rubin Report” talks about Elon Musk reinstating Donald Trump's Twitter account; Elon Musk's savage response to AOC's tweet about the workers of Twitter; the ending of the Jordan Peterson's Twitter ban; CBS News' brief hiatus from Twitter due to Musk's leadership; Adam Kinzinger telling CNN's Jake Tapper conspiracies about why Elon Musk ended Donald Trump's Twitter ban; the end of Bob Chapek ruining Disney as he has been fired and replaced by Bob Iger; Dave Portnoy explaining to Tucker Carlson how Sam Bankman-Fried used FTX and Alameda Research to fund Democrat donations to help write crypto regulations; Klaus Schwab telling the crowd at the B20 summit how society needs to be restructured; how the Oregon mask mandate may become permanent; how China's zero-COVID policy is creating a dystopia; the G20's push for vaccine passports for travel; Giorgia Meloni's takedown of Emmanuel Macron's exploitation of African nations; and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Todd Herman Show
Trump, Elon: how their (now common) enemies define the societal battle we face Ep_468_Hr-2

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 55:56


THE THESIS: Trump is to the Deep State what Twitter under Elon could be to the rest of The Party. THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES: Psalm 83:33 With cunning they conspire against your people; they plot against those you cherish.Proverbs 21:28-3128 A false witness will perish, but a careful listener will testify successfully.29 The wicked put up a bold front, but the upright give thought to their ways.30 There is no wisdom, no insight, no plan that can succeed against the Lord.31 The horse is made ready for the day of battle, but victory rests with the Lord.THE NEWS & COMMENT:Elon Musk has said he will empower citizen journalism. This, of course, terrifies the Mockingbird Media who seek to regain complete narrative control. They consider Elon a gate-crasher. Citizen reporting beats legacy media on a crucial, complex story (yet again); While the New York Times et al offer puffery on Sam Bankman-Fried and the FTX collapse, expert outsiders sift through the wreckage and get to the truth; this is Twitter and Substack at their bestTwitter is where we learn how desperate the Mockingbirds are to work with the DO”J” to hide the truth about Paul Pelolsi.NBC suspends correspondent after retracting his story on Paul Pelosi attack, report; The report by "Today Show" correspondent Michael Almaguer report seems to contradict police and prosecutors' claims and spurred conspiracy theories.But, Elon is not the free speech absolutist he fancies himself . . . The Party considers President Trump a gate-crasher. He spoke truths about America that are not to be voiced by people in power. We learned from President Trump's words--and then what the DO”J” did to him--how corrupt that organization really is at the top. Just like we learn so much of value from independent data analysts and truth-telling doctors on Twitter. [AUDIO] - MSNBC Contributor: This prosecutor will be almost EXCLUSIVELY focused on Donald Trump."Of course, this has nothing to do with politics. Just like the DO”J”, FBI, CDC, FDA and DHS conspiring with Twitter and other social media companies to keep truth telling doctors and others from crashing the gates. [AUDIO] - Karine Jean-Pierre: “We do not politicize the Department of Justice.”Does this guy seem like he's capable of honest investigation on a non-ideological basis? Jack Smith has been a Swamp Creature forever. Read about him in this 2014 report on the IRS's targeting of conservatives:Does this seem impartial? The DO”J” wants the judge hearing the social media censorship case to make sure citizens never get to see video of Fauci and his fellow psychopaths in depositions The same feds threatening Trump are threatening Elon. In this case, it's Senator Markey, a man who performed a hoax in partnership with the uber-hoaxters at the Washington Post, all to frame Elon Musk. [AUDIO] - @SenMarkey threatens @elonmusk: "You cannot ignore what the federal government is requiring of your company, and that goes for ... guardrails that have to be built around social media ... They will pay a price if they don't put safeguards in place at Twitter"President Trump was the first big-time candidate for President to speak so openly and convincingly about the globalists since JFK. Like Klaus . . .[AUDIO] - G20 - Here's Klaus Schwab, on the great Great Reset none of you voted for. “Deep systemic restructuring of our world and this will take some time. And the world will look differently after we have gone through this transition process.” And Klaus's possession, Justin . . . [AUDIO] - TRUDEAU - Speaking at the B20 (the business leaders offshoot of the G20) Trudeau confirms only government approved free speech will be allowed online & monitored by A.I. For your own safety

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 711 | The Climate Cabal Doubles Down on Depopulation | Guest: Marc Morano

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 50:30


Today we're joined by Marc Morano, founder of Climate Depot and author of "The Great Reset: Global Elites and the Permanent Lockdown," to discuss the politics of climate change ideology and the recent COP27 U.N. climate change conference held in Egypt. We discuss the global elites' need to force the doctrine of climate change upon us and explain exactly why this is the specific issue they've chosen. We look at some of the science behind their beliefs and ask if there's some truth behind any of it. One example of wishy-washy science is the former insistence that polar bears will quickly become extinct. Now we see polar bear statistics scrapped from climate change materials, as polar bear populations increase. We hear about the COP27 climate change conference and discuss why Klaus Schwab, who gave a speech at the conference, seems to be regarded as a national leader of sort despite only heading the WEF. We take a look at the hypocrisy of global leaders and regimes as they say one thing, yet live very differently, and ask the question: What can we do to push back? --- Timecodes: [2:03] Christmas merch [3:26] Interview with Marc begins [5:40] How did the climate become the interest of so many powerful people? [11:04] Legitimacy in climate science [15:32] Population control [19:32] Klaus Schwab at COP27 climate change conference [25:30] Hypocrisy in climate change ideology [34:26] COP27 climate change conference recap [43:34] What can we do to push back? --- Today's Sponsors: Good Ranchers — change the way you shop for meat today by visiting GoodRanchers.com/ALLIE and use promo code 'ALLIE' to get two Black Angus NY strip steaks & two pasture raised chicken breasts FREE for Black Friday! Cozy Earth — go to CozyEarth.com/ALLIE and use promo code 'ALLIE' at checkout to save 35% off your order! Carly Jean Los Angeles — use promo code 'ALLIEB' to save 20% off your first order at CarlyJeanLosAngeles.com! --- Relevant Previous Episodes: Ep 344 | The Great Reset: Everything You Need to Know | Guest: Justin Haskins https://apple.co/3V55vxm Ep 678 | Great Reset Update: Farm Shutdowns & Power Rationing | Guest: Justin Haskins https://apple.co/3UOx7Hl Ep 578 | Putin vs. the Great Reset? | Guest: Justin Haskins https://apple.co/3V5YIU4 --- Christmas Merch: Use code "BlackFriday" at checkout to get 30% off by Black Friday! Full collection: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey?sort_by=created-descending#MainContent "Thrill of Hope" crewneck (white): https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey/products/a-thrill-of-hope-crewneck-sweatshirt-white "Thrill of Hope" crewneck (green): https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey/products/a-thrill-of-hope-crewneck-sweatshirt-olive "Raise a Joyful Ruckus" crewneck (green): https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey/products/raise-a-joyful-ruckus-crewneck-sweatshirt "Raise a Joyful Ruckus" crewneck (blue): https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey/products/raise-a-joyful-ruckus-crewneck-sweatshirt-blue "You Better Watch Out" sticker: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey/products/you-better-watch-out-sticker --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise – use promo code 'ALLIE10' for a discount: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec
EPISODE 316: Klaus Schwab Declares global MULTICRISIS at G20 and Calls for 'world restructuring', w/Savanah Hernandez

Human Events Daily with Jack Posobiec

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 25:17


EPISODE DESCRIPTION: On this very special edition of Human Events Daily, Jack Posobiec is joined by Savanah Hernandez to break down the latest developments of The Great Reset. From Klaus Schwab's cryptic messaging to world leaders at G20 to the ramifications of the depopulation crisis, Poso and Hernandez pull zero punches and cut through all the static. They also dive deep into Governor Abbot's invocation of the invasion clauses of the U.S. and Texas Constitutions to defend the border  - all this and more on today's Human Events Daily!Here's your Daily dose of Human Events with @JackPosobiec Save up to 65% on MyPillow products by going to MyPillow.com/POSO and use code POSO To get $500 of free silver on a qualifying purchase go to https://allegiancegold.com/POSO/ with code POSO