Podcasts about Casper

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Best podcasts about Casper

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Latest podcast episodes about Casper

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 09 The Spirit of Babylon Part 2

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 69:17


Behind Her Empire
How to Leave Your Corporate Job & Do Your Own Thing with Nicole Gibbons, Founder of Clare

Behind Her Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 55:04


Nicole Gibbons is the Founder of Clare, the only Black-owned paint brand in the US, and is a favorite of Jessica Alba, Maria Sharapova, and Nate Berkus to name a few. Before pursuing interior design, Nicole spent nearly a decade managing PR for one of the world's largest retail brands, Victoria's Secret. Although she was excelling in her career, Nicole felt uninspired and was looking for a new outlet for her creativity. She started working on a decorating blog on the side that ultimately gained serious traction and led her into the path of interior design. After working as a designer and establishing herself as a voice in the industry, Nicole decided to do another career pivot and had a yearning to build something that would be a household name. When working with clients, she always noticed the hassle around picking paints and saw an opportunity to disrupt the outdated paint industry and create a direct-to-consumer business that makes the entire process a way better experience. Nicole has been featured in top media outlets such as HGTV, The Rachael Ray Show, Good Morning America, and Oprah Winfrey's OWN. She's also raised venture capital from the backers of Warby Parker, Casper, Peloton, and more.We talk to Nicole today about the power of patience when it comes to building your business, how to think about your finance before you take the leap, how she raised money and built a tech business with zero connections to start, and so much more!In this episode, we'll talk to Nicole about:This episode is brought to you by beeya: * Learn more about beeya's seed cycling bundle at https://beeyawellness.com/free to find out how to tackle hormonal imbalances. * Get $10 off your order by using promo code BEHINDHEREMPIREFollow Nicole: * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nicolegibbonsstyle* Clare's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/clarepaint* Clare Website: https://www.clare.com/Follow Yasmin: * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/yasminknouri/* Stay updated & subscribe to our newsletter: https://www.behindherempire.com/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Lore
Episode 190: All That Glitters

Lore

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 28:11


It's a place where dreams are born, and were stars take flight. But beneath that thin, beautiful surface is a darker past, and the stories it holds are far from happy. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Native: Native creates safe, effective personal care products that use trusted ingredients and performance. For 20% off your first purchase, visit NativeDeodorant.com/20lore and use promo code 20LORE during checkout. Casper: From bedding, bed frames, and even a dog bed, Casper has everything to build the dream bedroom—for every kind of sleeper. Visit Casper.com to get $100 off select mattresses by using the offer code HISTORY100. Terms and conditions apply. BetterHelp: Join over a million other people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced BetterHelp counselor. Visit BetterHelp.com/LORE today for 10% off your first month. ———————— Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  All the shows from Grim & Mild: www.grimandmild.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 08 The Spirit of Babylon Part 1

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 66:29


Learning Bayesian Statistics
#54 Bayes in Theoretical Ecology, with Florian Hartig

Learning Bayesian Statistics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 68:38


Let's be honest: evolution is awesome! I started reading Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution, by Jonathan Losos, and I'm utterly fascinated.  So I'm thrilled to welcome Florian Hartig on the show. Florian is a professor of Theoretical Ecology at the University of Regensburg, Germany. His research concentrates on theory, computer simulations, statistical methods and machine learning in ecology & evolution. He is also interested in open science and open software development, and maintains, among other projects, the R packages DHARMa and BayesianTools. Among other things, we talked about approximate Bayesian computation, best practices when building models and the big pain points that remain in the Bayesian pipeline. Most importantly, Florian's main hobbies are whitewater kayaking, snowboarding, badminton and playing the guitar. Our theme music is « Good Bayesian », by Baba Brinkman (feat MC Lars and Mega Ran). Check out his awesome work at https://bababrinkman.com/ (https://bababrinkman.com/) ! Thank you to my Patrons for making this episode possible! Yusuke Saito, Avi Bryant, Ero Carrera, Brian Huey, Giuliano Cruz, Tim Gasser, James Wade, Tradd Salvo, Adam Bartonicek, William Benton, Alan O'Donnell, Mark Ormsby, Demetri Pananos, James Ahloy, Robin Taylor, Thomas Wiecki, Chad Scherrer, Nathaniel Neitzke, Zwelithini Tunyiswa, Elea McDonnell Feit, Bertrand Wilden, James Thompson, Stephen Oates, Gian Luca Di Tanna, Jack Wells, Matthew Maldonado, Ian Costley, Ally Salim, Larry Gill, Joshua Duncan, Ian Moran, Paul Oreto, Colin Caprani, George Ho, Colin Carroll, Nathaniel Burbank, Michael Osthege, Rémi Louf, Clive Edelsten, Henri Wallen, Hugo Botha, Vinh Nguyen, Raul Maldonado, Marcin Elantkowski, Adam C. Smith, Will Kurt, Andrew Moskowitz, Hector Munoz, Marco Gorelli, Simon Kessell, Bradley Rode, Patrick Kelley, Rick Anderson, Casper de Bruin, Philippe Labonde, Matthew McAnear, Michael Hankin, Cameron Smith, Luis Iberico, Tomáš Frýda, Ryan Wesslen, Andreas Netti, Riley King, Aaron Jones and Daniel Lindroth. Visit https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats (https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats) to unlock exclusive Bayesian swag ;) Links from the show: Florian's website: https://theoreticalecology.wordpress.com/ (https://theoreticalecology.wordpress.com/) Florian on Twitter: https://twitter.com/florianhartig (https://twitter.com/florianhartig) Florian on GitHub: https://github.com/florianhartig (https://github.com/florianhartig) DHARMa -- Residual Diagnostics for Hierarchical Regression Models: https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/DHARMa/index.html (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/DHARMa/index.html) BayesianTools -- General-Purpose MCMC and SMC Samplers and Tools for Bayesian Statistics: https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/BayesianTools/index.html (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/BayesianTools/index.html) Statistical inference for stochastic simulation inference -- theory and application: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2011.01640.x (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j.1461-0248.2011.01640.x) ArviZ plot rank function: https://arviz-devs.github.io/arviz/api/generated/arviz.plot_rank.html (https://arviz-devs.github.io/arviz/api/generated/arviz.plot_rank.html) Rank-normalization, folding, and localization -- An improved R-hat for assessing convergence of MCMC: https://arxiv.org/abs/1903.08008 (https://arxiv.org/abs/1903.08008) LBS #51 Bernoulli's Fallacy & the Crisis of Modern Science, with Aubrey Clayton: https://www.learnbayesstats.com/episode/51-bernoullis-fallacy-crisis-modern-science-aubrey-clayton (https://www.learnbayesstats.com/episode/51-bernoullis-fallacy-crisis-modern-science-aubrey-clayton) LBS #50 Ta(l)king Risks & Embracing Uncertainty, with David Spiegelhalter: https://www.learnbayesstats.com/episode/50-talking-risks-embracing-uncertainty-david-spiegelhalter... Support this podcast

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 07 Worship Him Who Made

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 49:59


AboutCONSENT™
EP 32 How Teaching Consent Is About More Than A 'I Said No' Conversation with Sarah Casper

AboutCONSENT™

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 52:51


Episode 32- About Consent Podcast “Comprehensive Consent” with Sarah Casper Show NotesEpisode Notes:0:00 - Intro 0:38 - Introduction of guest4:05 - Importance of parents teaching and practicing consent8:54 - Nuances of consent13:39 - Helping parents feel more at ease teaching consent 19:37 - Teaching adults consent/setting boundaries26:06 - AD26:55 - Starting practicing consent early 29:06 - Consent and the media36:23 - Learning to communicate39:26 - Communicating consent in relationships48:19 - Connecting with Comprehensive Consent51:24 - ClosingLinks Mentioned: Sarah's IG: @comprehensiveconsentcomprehensiveconsent.comThis episode was brought to you by CONSENTparenting™Learn more at consentparenting.com

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 06 The Hour of His Judgment Has Come Part 3

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 52:12


AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 05 The Hour of His Judgment Has Come Part 2

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 60:37


Podular Modcast
Episode 186: BASTL/Casper

Podular Modcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 100:16


This week we meet the fellas from BASTL and Casper and talk about the Soft Pop II (https://bastl-instruments.com/instruments/softpop2)! SPONSORS New Systems Instruments: https://nsinstruments.com/modules/inertia.html Secret Aardvark Sauce: https://secretaardvark.com/shop/sauce/fabulous-foursome/ After Later Audio:http://afterlateraudio.com/ Needham Woodworks: https://needhamwoodworks.com/ Patchwerks: https://patchwerks.com/ Schlappi Engineering: https://schlappiengineering.com/ High Guide Podcast (https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/the-high-guide/psyched-audio-journey-2-P7SCM6F_bcq/)

Do Big Things
#117 CHASING 400 with Justin Kinner

Do Big Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 88:43


Casper ultra runner, ski coach, and Complete Physical Therapy trainer Justin Kinner completed the Grand Slam of ultra running in summer 2021. This entails completing four 100-mile races over the summer. There will be a documentary coming out later this year, following his Grand Slam. Check this guy out, you're going to enjoy this conversation. ORIGINAL MUSIC by @the.pro.guey SPONSORS: xoskin.us PROMO code is BTC for 15% off biggerthanthetrail.com alteregorunning.com athleticbrewing.com PROMO code is MCROBERTSA20 for 20% off onpacewellness.com big-things-crewing.com patreon.com/dobigthings Life is short, DO BIG THINGS!

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 04 The Hour of His Judgment Has Come Part 1

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 56:26


POSTHOC Digital Salon With Susan MacTavish Best
Does God Need an R&D Department with Casper ter Kuile

POSTHOC Digital Salon With Susan MacTavish Best

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 55:28


Today's salon, “Does God Need an R&D Department,” is cohosted by POSTHOC and Templeton World Charity Foundation. The co-interviewer today is TWCF president Andrew Serazin. Our guest today is Casper ter Kuile, a Harvard Divinity School fellow and author of The Power of Ritual: Turning Everyday Activities into Soulful Practices. POSTHOC is a petri dish for ideas & thought-leaders. We host salons that connect people and spread ideas. We create unique and intimate experiences that stir the senses—a forum for the cross-pollination of ideas and conversations. Instagram: @posthocpictura Twitter: @PosthocSalons LinkedIn: Posthoc Facebook: @Posthocpictura

Enchanting Book Readings
Willie Bear's Christmas Wish

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 20:55


A world podcast premiere of "Willie Bear's Christmas Wish" children's book by Erik Daniel Shein. Erik is a Visionary, Novelist, Entrepreneur and Animal Welfare Advocate. Willie Bear is a broken ornament who can't participate in a magical event where all of the perfect ornaments are hung on the tree and they come to life at midnight each Christmas Eve. Willy wishes to be hung on the tree with the other ornaments and not be alone in the ornament box. Will Willie Bear get his wish this year? Make a wish with Willie Bear this Christmas :) Forward by Jan and Mickey Rooney (the actor!). Merry Christmas

Rap gehört zum guten Ton
"Gestern, heute usw." - Track by Track

Rap gehört zum guten Ton

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 48:08


Heute als Abschluss vor der Winterpause nochmal eine Playlist. Auf den entspannten Sonntag eine entspannte Folge aufgenommen und hoffentlich könnt ihr damit ebenso entspannt in die Woche starten. Carry on, fellas. Bis demnächst! P.S. Für die, die es nicht mitbekommen haben: Es geht weiter am 18.02.!

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 03 Fear God And Give Glory To Him

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 51:52


AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 02 The Everlasting Gospel

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 67:32


Screaming in the Cloud
An Enterprise Level View of Cloud Architecture with Levi McCormick

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 33:52


About LeviLevi's passion lies in helping others learn to cloud better.Links: Jamf: https://www.jamf.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/levi_mccormick TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open-source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers, and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I am known-slash-renowned-slash-reviled for my creative pronunciations of various technologies, company names, et cetera. Kubernetes, for example, and other things that get people angry on the internet. The nice thing about today's guest is that he works at a company where there is no possible way for me to make it more ridiculous than it sounds because Levi McCormick is a cloud architect at Jamf. I know Jamf sounds like I'm trying to pronounce letters that are designed to be silent, but no, no, it's four letters: J-A-M-F. Jamf. Levi, thanks for joining me.Levi: Thanks for having me. I'm super excited.Corey: Exactly. Also professional advice for anyone listening: Making fun of company names is hilarious; making fun of people's names makes you a jerk. Try and remember that. People sometimes blur that distinction.So, very high level, you're a cloud architect. Now, I remember the days of enterprise architects where their IDEs were basically whiteboards, and it was a whole bunch of people sitting in a room. They call it an ivory tower, but I've been in those rooms; I assure you there is nothing elevated about this. It's usually a dank sub-basement somewhere. What do you do, exactly?Levi: Well, I am part of the enterprise architecture team at Jamf. My roles include looking at our use of cloud; making sure that we're using our resources to the greatest efficacy possible; coordinating between many teams, many products, many architectures; trying to make sure that we're using best practices; bringing them from the teams that develop them and learn them, socializing them to other teams; and just trying to keep a handle on this wild ride that we're on.Corey: So, what I find fun is that Jamf has been around for a long time. I believe it is not your first name. I want to say Casper was originally?Levi: I believe so, yeah.Corey: We're Jamf customers. You're not sponsoring this episode or anything, to the best of my knowledge. So, this is not something I'm trying to shill the company, but we're a customer; we use you to basically ensure that all of our company MacBooks, and laptops, et cetera, et cetera, are basically ensured that there's disk encryption turned on, that people have a password, and that screensaver is turned on, basically to mean that if someone gets their laptop stolen, it's a, “Oh, I have to spend more money with Apple,” and not, “Time to sound the data breach alarm,” for reasons that should be blindingly obvious. And it's great not just at the box check, but also fixing the real problem of I [laugh] don't want to lose data that is sensitive for obvious reasons. I always thought of this is sort of a thing that worked on the laptops. Why do you have a cloud team?Levi: Many reasons. First of all, we started in the business of providing the software that customers would run in their own data centers, in their own locations. Sometime in about 2015, we decided that we are properly equipped to run this better than other people, and we started to provide that as a service. People would move in, migrate their services into the cloud, or we would bring people into the cloud to start with.Device management isn't the only thing that we do. We provide some SSO-type services, we recently acquired a company called Wandera, which does endpoint security and a VPN-like experience for traffic. So, there's a lot of cloud powering all of those things.Corey: Are you able to disclose whether you're focusing mostly on AWS, on Azure, on Google Cloud, or are you pretending a cloud with something like IBM?Levi: All of the above, I believe.Corey: Excellent. That tells you it's a real enterprise, in seriousness. It's the—we talk about the idea of going all in on one providers being a general best practice of good place to start. I believe that. And then there are exceptions, and as companies grow and accumulate technical debt, that also is load-bearing and generates money, you wind up with this weird architectural series of anti-patterns, and when you draw it on a whiteboard of, “Here's our architecture,” the junior consultant comes in and says, “What moron built this?” Usually two said quote-unquote, “Moron,” and then they've just pooched the entire engagement.Yeah, most people don't show up in the morning hoping to do a terrible job today, unless they work at Facebook. So, there are reasons things are the way they are; they're constraints that shape these things. Yeah, if people were going to be able to shut down the company for two years and rebuild everything from scratch from the ground up, it would look wildly different. But you can't do that most of the time.Levi: Yeah. Those things are load bearing, right? You can't just stop traffic one day, and re-architect it with the golden image of what it should have been. We've gone through a series of acquisitions, and those architectures are disparate across the different acquired products. So, you have to be able to leverage lessons from all of them, bring them together and try and just slowly, incrementally march towards a better future state.Corey: As we take a look at the challenges we see The Duckbill Group over on my side of the world, where we talk to customers, it's I think it is surprising to folks to learn that cloud economics as I see it is—well, first, cost and architecture the same thing, which inherently makes sense, but there's a lot more psychology that goes into it than math. People often assume I spend most of my time staring into spreadsheets. I assure you that would not go super well. But it has to do with the psychological elements of what it is that people are wrestling with, of their understanding of the environment has not kept pace with reality, and APIs tend to, you know, tell truths.It's always interesting to me to see the lies that customers tell, not intentionally, but the reality of it of, “Okay, what about those big instances you're running in Australia?” “Oh, we don't have any instances in Australia.” “Look, I understand that you are saying that in good faith, however…” and now we're in a security incident mode and it becomes a whole different story. People's understanding always trails. What do you spend the bulk of your time doing? Is it building things? Is it talking to people? Is it trying to more or less herd cats in certain directions? What's the day-to-day?Levi: I would say it varies week-to-week. Depends on if we have a new product rolling out. I spend a lot of my time looking at architectural diagrams, reference architectures from AWS. The majority of the work I do is in AWS and that's where my expertise lies. I haven't found it financially incentivized to really branch out into any of the other clouds in terms of expertise, but I spend a lot of my time developing solutions, socializing them, getting them in front of teams, and then educating.We have a wide range of skills internally in terms of what people know or what they've been exposed to. I'd say a lot of engineers want to learn the cloud and they want to get opportunities to work on it, and their day-to-day work may not bring them those opportunities as often as they'd like. So, a good portion of my time is spent educating, guiding, joining people's sprints, joining in their stand-ups, and just kind of talking through, like, how they should approach a problem.Corey: Whenever you work at a big company, you invariably wind up with—well, microservices becomes the right answer, not because of the technical reasons; because of the people reason, the way that you get a whole bunch of people moving in roughly the same direction. You are a large scale company; who owns services in your idealized view of the world? Is it, “Well, I wrote something and it's five o'clock. Off to production with it. Talk to you in two days, if everything—if we still have a company left because I didn't double-check what I just wrote.”Do you think that the people who are building services necessarily should be the ones supporting it? Like, in other words, Amazon's approach of having the software engineers being responsible for the ones running it in production from an ops perspective. Is that the direction you trend towards, or do you tend to be from my side of the world—which is grumpy sysadmin—where people—developers hurl applications into your yard for you to worry about?Levi: I would say, I'm an extremist in the view of supporting the Amazon perspective. I really like you build it, you run it, you own it, you architect it, all of it. I think the other teams in the organization should exist to support and enable those paths. So, if you have platform teams are a really common thing you see hired right now, I think those platforms should be built to enable the company's perspective on operating infrastructure or services, and then those service teams on top of that should be enabled to—and empowered to make the decisions on how they want to build a service, how they want to provide it. Ultimately, the buck should stop with them.You can get into other operational teams, you could have a systems operation team, but I think there should be an explicit contract between a service team, what they build, and what they hand off, you know, you could hand off, like, a tier one level response, you know, you can do playbooks, you could do, you know, minimal alert, response, routing, that kind of stuff with a team, but I think that even that team should have a really strong contract with, like, here's what our team provides, here's how you engage with our team, here's how you will transition services to our team.Corey: The challenge with doing that, in some shops, has been that if you decide to roll out a, you build it, you own it, approach that has not been there since the beginning, you wind up with a lot of pushback from engineers who until now really enjoyed their 5:30 p.m. quitting time, or whenever it was they wound up knocking off work. And they started pushing back, like, “Working out of hours? That's inhumane.” And the DevOps team would be sitting there going, “We're right here. How dare you? Like, what do you think our job is?” And it's a, “Yes, but you're not people.” And then it leads to this whole back and forth acrimonious—we'll charitably call it a debate. How do you drive that philosophy?Levi: It's a challenge. I've seen many teams fracture, fall apart, disperse, if you will, under the transition of going through, like, an extreme service ownership. I think you balance it out with the carrot of you also get to determine your own future, right? You get to determine the programming language you use, you get to determine the underlying technologies that you use. Again, there's a contract: You have to meet this list of security concerns, you need to meet these operational concerns, and how you do that is up to you.Corey: When you take a look across various teams—let's bound this to the industry because I don't necessarily want you to wind up answering tough questions at work the day this episode airs—what do you see the biggest blockers to achieving, I guess, a functional cultural service ownership?Levi: It comes down to people's identity. They've established their own identity, “As I am X,” right? I'm a operations engineer. I'm a developer, I'm an engineer. And getting people to kind of branch out of that really fixed mindset is hard, and that, to me, is the major blocker to people assuming ownership.I've seen people make the transition from, “I'm just an engineer. I just want to write code.” I hate those lines. That frustrates me so much: “I just want to write code.” Transitioning into that, like, ownership of, “I had an idea. I built the platform or the service. It's a huge hit.” Or you know, “Lots of people are using it.” Like, seeing people go through that transformation become empowered, become fulfilled, I think is great.Corey: I didn't really expect to get called out quite like this, but you're absolutely right. I was against the idea, back when I was a sysadmin type because I didn't know how to code. And if you have developers supporting all of the stuff that they've built, then what does that mean for me? It feels like my job is evaporating. I don't know how to write code.Well, then I started learning how to write code incredibly badly. And then wow, it turns out, everyone does this. And here we are. But it's—I don't build applications, for obvious reasons. I'm bad at it, but I found another way to proceed in the wide world that we live in of high technology.But yeah, it was hard because this idea of my sense of identity being tied to the thing that I did, it really was an evolve-or-die dinosaur kind of moment because I started seeing this philosophy across the board. You take a look, even now at modern SRE is, or modern DevOps folks, or modern sysadmins, what they're doing looks a lot less like logging into Linux systems and tinkering on the command line a lot more like running and building distributed applications. Sure, this application that you're rolling out is the one that orchestrates everything there, but you're still running this in the same way the software engineers do, which is, interestingly.Levi: And that doesn't mean a team has to be only software engineers. Your service team can be multiple disciplines. It should be multiple disciplines. I've seen a traditional ops team broken apart, and those individuals distributed into the services that they were chiefly skilled in supporting in the past, as the ops team, as we transitioned those roles from one of the worst on-call rotations I've ever seen—you know, 13 to 14 alerts a night—transitioning those out to those service teams, training them up on the operations, building the playbooks. That was their role. Their role wasn't necessarily to write software, day one.Corey: I quit a job after six weeks because of that style of, I guess, mismanagement. Their approach was that, oh, we're going to have our monitoring system live in AWS because one of our VPs really likes AWS—let's be clear, this was 2008, 2009 era—latency was a little challenging there. And [unintelligible 00:17:04] he really liked Big Brother, which was—not to—now before that became a TV show and at rest, it was a monitoring system—but network latency was always a weird thing in AWS in those days, so instead, he insisted we set up three of them. And whenever—if we just got one page, it was fine. But if we got three, then we had to jump in. And two was always undefined.And they turned this off from I think, 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. every night, just so the person I call could sleep. And I'm looking at this, like, this might be the worst thing I've ever seen in my life. This was before they released the Managed NAT Gateway, so possibly it was.Levi: And then the flood, right, when you would get—Corey: Oh, God this was the days, too—Levi: Yeah.Corey: —when you were—if you weren't careful, you'd set this up to page you on the phone with a text message and great, now it takes time for my cell provider to wind up funneling out the sudden onslaught of 4000 text messages. No thanks.Levi: If your monitoring system doesn't have the ability to say, you know, the alert flood, funnel them into one alert, or just pause all alerts, while—because we know there's an incident; you know, us-east-1 is down, right? We know this; we don't need to get 500 text messages to each engineer that's on call.Corey: Well, my philosophy at that point was no, I'm going to instead take a step beyond. If I'm not empowered to fix this thing that is waking me up—and sometimes that's the monitoring system, and sometimes it's the underlying application—I'm not on call.Levi: Yes, exactly. And that's why I like the model of extre—you know, the service ownership: Because those alerts should go to the people—the pain should be felt by the people who are empowered to fix it. It should not land anywhere else. Otherwise, that creates misaligned incentives and nothing gets better.Corey: Yeah. But in large distributed systems, very often the person is on call more or less turns into a traffic router.Levi: Right. That's unfair to them.Corey: That's never fun—yeah, that's unfair, and it's not fun, either, and there's no great answer when you've all these different contributory factors.Levi: And how hard is it to keep the team staffed up?Corey: Oh, yeah. It's a, “Hey, you want a really miserable job one week out of every however many there are in the cycle?” Eh, people don't like that.Levi: Exactly.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave, a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service, although I insist on calling it, “My squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the world's most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, you know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLAP and OLTP—don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again—workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: So, I've been tracking what you're up to for little while now—you're always a blast to talk with—what is this whole Cloud Builder thing that you were talking about for a bit, and then I haven't seen much about it.Levi: Ah, so at the beginning of the pandemic, our mutual friend, Forrest Brazeal, released the Cloud Resume Challenge. I looked at that, and I thought, this is a fantastic idea. I've seen lots of people going through it. I recommend the people I mentor go through it. Great way to pick up a couple cloud skills here and there, tell an interesting story in an interview, right? It's a great prep.I intended the Cloud Builder Challenge to be a natural kind of progression from that Resume Challenge to the Builder Challenge where you get operational experience. Again, back to that, kind of, extreme service ownership mentality, here's a project where you can build, really modeled on the Amazon GameDays from re:Invent, you build a service, we'll send you traffic, you process those payloads, do some matching, some sorting, some really light processing on these payloads, and then send it back to us, score some points, we'll build a public dashboard, people can high five each other, they can razz each other, kind of competition they want to do. Really low, low pressure, but just a fun way to get more operational experience in an area where there is really no downside. You know, playing like that at work, bad idea, right?Corey: Generally, yes. [crosstalk 00:21:28] production, we used to have one of those environments; oops-a-doozy.Levi: Yeah. I don't see enough opportunities for people to gain that experience in a way that reflects a real workload. You can go out and you can find all kinds of Hello Worlds, you can find all kinds of—like, for front end development, there are tons of activity activities and things you can do to learn the skills, but for the middleware, the back end engineers, there's just not enough playgrounds out there. Now, standing up a Hello World app, you know, you've got your infrastructures code template, you've got your pre-written code, you deploy it, congratulations. But now what, right?And I intended this challenge to be kind of a series of increasingly more difficult waves, if you will, or levels. I really had a whole gamification aspect to it. So, it would get harder, it would get bigger, more traffic, you know, all of those things, to really put people through what it would be like to receive your, “Post got slash-dotted today,” or those kinds of things where people don't get an opportunity to deal with large amounts of traffic, or variable payloads, that kind of stuff.Corey: I love the idea. Where is it?Levi: It is sitting in a bunch of repos, and I am afraid to deploy it. [laugh].Corey: What is it that scares you about it specifically?Levi: The thing that specifically scares me is encouraging early career developers to go out there, deploy this thing, start playing with it, and then incur a huge cloud bill.Corey: Because they failed to secure something or other reasons behind that?Levi: There are many ways that this could happen, yeah. You could accidentally push your access key, secret key up into a public repo. Now, you've got, you know, Bitcoin miners or Monero miners running in your environment. You forget to shut things off, right? That's a really common thing.I went through a SageMaker demo from AWS a couple years ago. Half the room of intelligent, skilled engineers forgot to shut off the SageMaker instances. And everybody ran out of the $25 of credit they had from the demo—Corey: In about ten minutes. Yeah.Levi: In about ten minutes, yeah. And we had to issue all kinds of requests for credits and back and forth. But granted, AWS was accommodating to all of those people, but it was still a lot of stress.Corey: But it was also slow. They're very slow on that, which is fair. Like, if someone's production environment is down, I can see why you care more about that than you do about someone with, “Ah, I did something wrong and lost money.” The counterpoint to that is that for early career folks, that money is everything. We remember earlier this year, that tragic story from the Robinhood customer who committed suicide after getting a notification that he was $730,000 in debt. Turns out it wasn't even accurate; he didn't owe anything when all was said and done.I can see a scenario in which that happens in the AWS world because of their lack of firm price controls on a free tier account. I don't know what the answer on this is. I'm even okay with a, “Cool you will—this is a special kind of account that we will turn you off at above certain levels.” Fine. Even if you hard cap at the 20 or 50 bucks, yeah, it's going to annoy some people, but no one is going to do something truly tragic over that. And I can't believe that Oracle Cloud of all companies is the best shining example of this because you have to affirmatively upgrade your account before they'll charge you a dime. It's the right answer.Levi: It is. And I don't know if you've ever looked at—well, I'm sure you'd have. You've probably looked at the solutions provided by AWS for monitoring costs in your accounts, preventing additional spend. Like, the automation to shut things down, right, it's oftentimes more engineering work to make it so that your systems will shut down automatically when you reach a certain billing threshold than the actual applications that are in place there.Corey: And I don't for the life of me understand why things are the way that they are. But here we go. It's a—[sigh] it just becomes this perpetual strange world. I wish things were better than they are, but they're not.Levi: It makes me terribly sad. I mean, I think AWS is an incredible product, I think the ecosystem is great, and the community is phenomenal; everyone is super supportive, and it makes me really sad to be hesitant to recommend people dive into it on their own dime.Corey: Yeah. And that is a—[sigh] I don't know how you fix that or square that circle. Because I don't want to wind up, I really do not want to wind up, I guess, having to give people all these caveats, and then someone posts about a big bill problem on the internet, and all the comments are, “Oh, you should have set up budgets on that.” Yeah, that's thing still a day behind. So okay, great, instead of having an enormous bill at the end of the month, you just have a really big one two days later.I don't think that's the right answer. I really don't. And I don't know how to fix this, but, you know, I'm not the one here who's a $1.7 trillion company, either, that can probably find a way to fix this. I assure you, the bulk of that money is not coming from a bunch of small accounts that forgot to turn something off or got exploited.Levi: I haven't done my 2021 taxes yet, but I'm pretty sure I'm not there either.Corey: The world in which we live.Levi: [laugh]. I would love this challenge. I would love to put it out there. If I could, on behalf of, you know, early career people who want to learn—if I could issue credits, if I could spin up sandboxes and say, like, “Here's an account, I know you're going to be safe. I have put in a $50 limit.” Right?Corey: Yeah.Levi: “You can't spend more than $50,” like, if I had that control or that power, I would do this in a heartbeat. I'm passionate about getting people these opportunities to play, you know, especially if it's fun, right? If we can make this thing enjoyable, if we can gamify it, we can play around, I think that'd be great. The experience, though, would be a significant amount of engineering on my side, and then a huge amount of outreach, and that to me makes me really sad.Corey: I would love to be able to do something like that myself with a, “Look, if you get a bill, they will waive it, or I will cover it.” But then you wind up with the whole problem of people not operating in good faith as well. Like, “All right, I'm going to mine a bunch of Bitcoin and claim someone else did it.” Or whatnot. And it's just… like, there are problems with doing this, and the whole structure doesn't lend itself to that working super well.Levi: Exactly. I often say, you know, I face a lot of people who want to talk about mining cryptocurrency in the cloud because I'm a cloud architect, right? That's a really common conversation I have with people. And I remind them, like, it's not economical unless you're not paying for it.Corey: Yeah, it's perfectly economical on someone else's account.Levi: Exactly.Corey: I don't know why people do things the way that they do, but here we are. So, re:Invent. What did you find that was interesting, promising there, promising but not there yet, et cetera? What was your takeaway from it? Since you had the good sense not to be there in person?Levi: [laugh]. To me, the biggest letdown was Amplify Studio.Corey: I thought it was just me. Thank you. I just assumed it was something I wasn't getting from the explanation that they gave. Because what I heard was, “You can drag and drop, basically, a front end web app together and then tie it together with APIs on the back end.” Which is exactly what I want, like Retool does; that's what I want only I want it to be native. I don't think it's that.Levi: Right. I want the experience I already have of operating the cloud, knowing the security posture, knowing the way that my users access it, knowing that it's backed by Amazon, and all of their progressively improving services, right? You say it all the time. Your service running on Amazon is better today than it was two years ago. It was better than it was five years ago. I want that experience. But I don't think Amplify Studio delivered.Corey: I wish it had. And maybe it will, in the fullness of time. Again, AWS services do not get worse as they age they get better.Levi: Some gets stale, though.Corey: Yeah. The worst case scenario is they sit there and don't ever improve.Levi: Right. I thought the releases from S3 in terms of, like, the intelligent tiering, were phenomenal. I would love to see everybody turn on intelligent tiering with instant access. Those things to me were showing me that they're thinking about the problem the right way. I think we're missing a story of, like, how do we go from where we're at today—you know, if I've got trillions of objects in storage, how do I transition into that new world where I get the tiering automatically? I'm sure we'll see blog posts about people telling us; that's what the community is great for.Corey: Yeah, they explain these things in a way that the official docs for some reason fail to.Levi: Right. And why don't—Corey: Then again, it's also—I think—I think it's because the people that are building these things are too close to the thing themselves. They don't know what it's like to look at it through fresh eyes.Levi: Exactly. They're often starting from a blank slate, or from a greenfield perspective. There's not enough thought—or maybe there's a lot of thought to it, but there's not enough communication coming out of Amazon, like, here's how you transition. We saw that with Control Tower, we saw that with some of the releases around API Gateway. There's no story for transitioning from existing services to these new offerings. And I would love to see—and maybe Amazon needs a re:Invent Echo, where it's like, okay, here's all the new releases from re:Invent and here's how you apply them to existing infrastructure, existing environments.Corey: So, what's next for you? What are you looking at that's exciting and fun, and something that you want to spend your time chasing?Levi: I spend a lot of my time following AWS releases, looking at the new things coming out. I spend a lot of energy thinking about how do we bring new engineers into the space. I've worked with a lot of operations teams—those people who run playbooks, they hop on machines, they do the old sysadmin work, right—I want to bring those people into the modern world of cloud. I want them to have the skills, the empowerment to know what's available in terms of services and in terms of capabilities, and then start to ask, “Why are we not doing it that way?” Or start looking at making plans for how do we get there.Corey: Levi, I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me. If people want to learn more. Where can they find you?Levi: I'm on Twitter. My Twitter handle is @levi_mccormick. Reach out, I'm always willing to help people. I mentor people, I guide people, so if you reach out, I will respond. That's a passion of mine, and I truly love it.Corey: And we'll of course, include a link to that in the [show notes 00:32:28]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Levi: Thanks, Corey. It's been awesome.Corey: Levi McCormick, cloud architect at Jamf. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me that service ownership is overrated because you are the storage person, and by God, you will die as that storage person, potentially in poverty.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Say hello to the bad guy: Mafia, Mobsters and Outlaws
EP 73: Casper Holstein Part 1:Harlem Numbers Kingpins "It says Mota"

Say hello to the bad guy: Mafia, Mobsters and Outlaws

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 68:23


Lock, Dan and Tank discuss the life of Harlem numbers pioneer Casper Holstein "The Bolito King" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/badguy-lock/message

AudioVerse Presentations (English)
Dee Casper: 01 Wandering In The Wilderness

AudioVerse Presentations (English)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 80:29


Out of the Hourglass
A Member Story ~ An Interview with Rob Yarbro

Out of the Hourglass

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 22:33


The first episode of the year features NCG's Sr. Business Coach, Colin Nolan and Rob Yarbro, Owner and President of Western View Painting (formally Wyoming View Painting) based in Laramie & Casper, WY. Rob tells the story of his trajectory into becoming an owner of a painting company and highlights the vision of company growth in a larger geographical territory - opening multiple locations from the start! Presenting unique challenges and opportunities, it has quickly required the standardization of processes, strong emphasis on team culture and optimal organizational consistency across multiple teams that are working hours apart.

Drive Safe, Text When Home
Episode 89 : Dalton Cahill, Bobby Turcotte, Brandon Casper, and Caleb Marsters (30 Seconds Go) Pt. 1

Drive Safe, Text When Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 63:00


Hey! Today is a 30 Seconds type day! These dudes were so much fun to talk to! We talk about how the band started and how awesome they are as people! We talk gear and so much other stuff! Seriously, I had so much fun with these dudes and I want meet them in life and give them hugs. They are such a good band so you should check them out, Also Also, Bobby wishes himself a happy birthday from the past! Thank you! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/drivesafetextwhenhome/support

Proseccolaune
Erste Bescherung des Jahres

Proseccolaune

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 67:58


Bummsfallera, erste Folge in 2022. Folgendes: ich brech mir grad die Finger an dem Folgentext. Gestern war Silvester, ich hab wenig geschlafen, den ersten klaren Gedanken hatte ich vor ner Stunde. Ich hab keine große Idee um euch hier noch was beizubringen. Wir haben für 2022 schon bisschen was geplant, ich denk auch dieses Jahr wird spannend für uns und euch. Naja langt dann auch mal, ne. Wir lieben euch abgöttisch. Eure Proseccolaune

Oddities: A Podcast of the Strangest by the Curious
Susan and Christopher Edwards & Ghosts of Flight 401

Oddities: A Podcast of the Strangest by the Curious

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 36:18


Welcome back to Oddities, the podcast where no topic is too *~*StRaNgE*~*.This week, Anna dives into an English couple that is involved in a wild true crime story. Then follow Cassie down the aisle of a haunted airplane, and its many moving parts. Some ghosts aren't Casper but they are warning you about faulty wires, and keep your eye on your neighbors.Follow us on social media: Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/odditiespodcastInstagram: http://www.instagram.com/odditiesinstaTwitter:  http://www.twitter.com/odditiestweetsEmail: oddities.talk@gmail.comCheck out our merch store: https://oddities-stay-strange.myspreadshop.com/Support the show (Https://www.patreon.com/odditiespodcast)

It Be Like That!
Angry Dad's Back

It Be Like That!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 108:48


This episode we're joined by Ben Bulman (aka the Angry Dad, aka B2The4thPower) as we talk 2021, Casper's Hotdogs and of course our NFL Picks)The Angry Dad: Linktree: https://t.co/tvG2FGr84yPodcast-Twitter- @IBLTPodcastE-mail- IBLTPodcast@gmail.coamInstagram: ibltpodcast Youtube: it be like that podcast Twitch: twitch.tv/ibltpodcastFind Us-Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, Spreaker, Blubrry, Facebook, Google PlaySlightly Irregular Podcasting Network: http://sipnet.us/Patrick-Twitter- @bigsolo64YouTube- solis64Twitch: Solis_64Blog-patricksthoughts64.blogspot.comOther- KVGT Podcast-kvgtpodcast.com, Chafing the Dream, Let Me Show You Something & Paranormal PativityBrian-Twitter- @t00lbertYouTube: toolbertBand- Angels Of FearTwitch: twitch.tv/terribbleterrorpodcastTerrible Terror Podcast - Wolf Cop -- Watch live at https://www.twitch.tv/ibltpodcast

Mystery on the Rocks
The Kidnapping of Casper Holstein

Mystery on the Rocks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 67:16


1928 New York. Prohibition has been in place for some time but some of the criminal underworld (who have been some of the few to profit from its tight grip) are sensing it is nearing its end. Casper Holstein, a black racketeer from Harlem who has considerable control over illegal gambling and has been very generous to black activism with his profits, is kidnapped at gunpoint. A ransom of $50,000 demanded. He is released three days later and he insists no ransom has been paid. Nor will he name his kidnappers.He also could have paid that ransom himself several times over...To this day, nobody knows who kidnapped him or why. Could it be dodgy attorney Dixie Davis? Maybe out-of-control hoodlum Dutch Schultz? Or Casper's rival in illegal gambling, the formidable Stephanie St Clair? Each have motive and each have an incredible story of their own.Join us for this season's stop-off in prohibition New York, where Chris chaperones Sooz and Masud to a threesome with a sexy gangster... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Learning Bayesian Statistics
#53 Bayesian Stats for the Behavioral & Neural Sciences, with Todd Hudson

Learning Bayesian Statistics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 56:12


Get a https://www.cambridge.org/it/academic/subjects/psychology/psychology-general-interest/bayesian-data-analysis-behavioral-and-neural-sciences-non-calculus-fundamentals?format=PB&isbn=9781108812900 (30% discount on Todd's book) by entering the code BDABNS22 at checkout! The behavioral and neural sciences are a nerdy interest of mine, but I didn't dedicate any episode to that topic yet. But life brings you gifts sometimes (especially around Christmas…), and here that gift is a book, Bayesian Data Analysis for the Behavioral and Neural Sciences, by Todd Hudson. Todd is a part of the faculty at New York University Grossman School of Medicine and also the New York University Tandon School of Engineering. He is a computational neuroscientist working in several areas including: early detection and grading of neurological disease; computational models of movement planning and learning; development of new computational and experimental techniques.  He also co-founded Tactile Navigation Tools, which develops navigation aids for the visually impaired, and Third Eye Technologies, which develops low cost laboratory- and clinical-grade eyetracking technologies. As you'll hear, Todd wanted his book to bypass the need for advanced mathematics normally considered a prerequisite for this type of material. Basically, he wants students to be able to write code and models and understand equations, even they are not specialized in writing those equations. We'll also touch on some of the neural sciences examples he's got in the book, as well as the two general algorithms he uses for model measurement and model selection. Ow, I almost forgot the most important: Todd loves beekeeping and gardening — he's got 25 apple trees, 4 cherry trees, nectarines, figs, strawberries, etc! Our theme music is « Good Bayesian », by Baba Brinkman (feat MC Lars and Mega Ran). Check out his awesome work at https://bababrinkman.com/ (https://bababrinkman.com/) ! Thank you to my Patrons for making this episode possible! Yusuke Saito, Avi Bryant, Ero Carrera, Brian Huey, Giuliano Cruz, Tim Gasser, James Wade, Tradd Salvo, Adam Bartonicek, William Benton, Alan O'Donnell, Mark Ormsby, Demetri Pananos, James Ahloy, Robin Taylor, Thomas Wiecki, Chad Scherrer, Nathaniel Neitzke, Zwelithini Tunyiswa, Elea McDonnell Feit, Bertrand Wilden, James Thompson, Stephen Oates, Gian Luca Di Tanna, Jack Wells, Matthew Maldonado, Ian Costley, Ally Salim, Larry Gill, Joshua Duncan, Ian Moran, Paul Oreto, Colin Caprani, George Ho, Colin Carroll, Nathaniel Burbank, Michael Osthege, Rémi Louf, Clive Edelsten, Henri Wallen, Hugo Botha, Vinh Nguyen, Raul Maldonado, Marcin Elantkowski, Adam C. Smith, Will Kurt, Andrew Moskowitz, Hector Munoz, Marco Gorelli, Simon Kessell, Bradley Rode, Patrick Kelley, Rick Anderson, Casper de Bruin, Philippe Labonde, Matthew McAnear, Michael Hankin, Cameron Smith, Luis Iberico, Alejandro Morales, Tomáš Frýda, Ryan Wesslen, Andreas Netti, Riley King, Aaron Jones and Daniel Lindroth. Visit https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats (https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats) to unlock exclusive Bayesian swag ;) Links from the show: 30% discount on Todd's book by entering BDABNS22 at checkout: https://www.cambridge.org/it/academic/subjects/psychology/psychology-general-interest/bayesian-data-analysis-behavioral-and-neural-sciences-non-calculus-fundamentals?format=PB&isbn=9781108812900 (https://www.cambridge.org/it/academic/subjects/psychology/psychology-general-interest/bayesian-data-analysis-behavioral-and-neural-sciences-non-calculus-fundamentals?format=PB&isbn=9781108812900) Book's webpage: https://www.hudsonlab.org/textbook (https://www.hudsonlab.org/textbook) For blurbs on each chapter: https://www.hudsonlab.org/textbookresources (https://www.hudsonlab.org/textbookresources) Code used in each chapter: https://www.hudsonlab.org/textbookresources (https://www.hudsonlab.org/textbook/f314a) For tutorials on Bayesian vs.... Support this podcast

The County 10 Podcast
Coffee Time: Former Fremont County resident completes 50 races in all 50 states

The County 10 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 30:35


(Lander, WY) - Ashley Martinez, formerly Lynch, recently accomplished a feat that will make most get tired just from reading it; as of December 12th, she has officially completed running a race in all 50 states. https://www.facebook.com/50races50states/posts/411715016985778 The current Casper resident, former Riverton local recently sat down with 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM's Coffee Time host Vince Tropea, where she filled us in on how and why she decided to run a race in every state despite having no background or previous desire for long distance running, and also shared a number anecdotes from along the way. (Our personal favorite was the story of how she turned a potential disaster in the form of a missed event, into signing up for a last minute, impromptu race through the vineyards of a winery.) Ashley told us that she initially took up running as way to quit smoking, and to set an example to her young daughter. What began as a goal "that started while laying on the couch recovering from my first Grand Teton Relay," just culminated in her 50th and final race in Honolulu, HI. (It should be noted that the 50th state would have happened sooner if not for COVID-19.) h/t Ashley Martinez image. Check out the full Coffee Time interview below, where Ashley shares her inspirational story of perseverance, strength, and overcoming one's fears, which begins around the 7 minute 15 second mark. To follow Ashley's journey, click here for Facebook, and here for Instagram.Be sure to tune in to Coffee Time every morning at 9:30 AM on 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM, or stream it live right here.

Soul Search - ABC RN
Casper ter Kuile: How everyday practices build joyful belonging

Soul Search - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 54:05


Meredith Lake chats to podcaster and author Casper ter Kulie whose been thinking about a big question: How do we make meaning as communities, and deepen our sense of connection to one another?

Filmnørdens Hjørne
Podcast 213 (Den om kristendom på film...)

Filmnørdens Hjørne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 270:27


Hjørnet pakkede det mobile studie og drog så langt mod vest i Danmark, som en Kjøwenhauner kan komme, uden at få våde tæer. Målet var at optage en ganske særlig episode med to ganske særlige gæster: Christian Thomsen og Peter Palmqvist Skjøtt Povlsen. De er to enormt gæve jyder, store filmnørder, dedikerede Filmnørdens Hjørne-fans og - i modsætning til Hjørnets hygge-ateistiske redaktør, Casper - kristne. Sammen har vi nu optaget episoden Den om kristendom på film…. Christian og Casper har i næsten tre år diskuteret muligheden for en episode med kristendom og filmnørderi som omdrejningspunkt, med udgangspunkt i netop Christians religiøse overbevisning. Det er svært at forklare kort og præcist, hvorfor vi synes det var en god idé. Til gengæld var det enormt let at finde grunde til IKKE at optage den. Først og fremmest er det nærmest uundgåeligt at udstille os selv og vores fordomme, uvidenhed og meget personlige livs- og verdensanskuelser. Dernæst kan vi utroligt let komme til at træde både hinanden og jer lyttere over tæerne, for vi er jo ikke ukritiske til hverken film eller hinanden. Allerede nu sidder flere af jer måske og tænker, at kristendom, Jesus-snak og livsfilosofi ikke hører hjemme i en filmpodcast. Måske har I ret. Vi var ærlig talt i tvivl. Christian er født og opvokset i Hvide Sande - en afsidesliggende egn af Danmark, hvor kristendommen nærmest er furet ind i landskabet gennem århundreder. Det virkede helt forkert ikke at optage episoden her. Egentlig skulle en lokal filmnørdet præst have været tredje mand på episoden, men han nåede at flytte sidste år. Af uransagelige årsager endte en bekendt med at anbefale at Christian i stedet inviterede en kristen filmnørd ved navn Peter fra Århus. Hvad han ikke vidste var, at Peter var med på scenen sammen med Casper og Nikolaj Tarp ved Århus Festuge, da Hjørnet optog Den om filmfællesskaber. Christian inviterede med andre ord en hardcore Hjørnefan, uden at ane det. Denne halvhellige treenighed har nu optaget en episk episode. Episke som i Cecil B. Demille-episk! Godt fire og en halv times samtale, der snørkler sig rundt om store emner som kristne film, Bibelfortællinger, tro, eksistens, livsværdier og den menneskelige essens af en filmoplevelse. Højtragende? You bet! Højhellig? Ind i mellem. Ærlig og nysgerrig? 100%! Ja, det er en episode, der varer 4½ time, hvilket nok skræmmer en del væk, men det var så helstøbt en oplevelse, vi fik fanget, at den bare skal ha' lov at stå som den er. Og døren er hermed åbnet på klem for flere episoder af samme slags, for selvom det ikke er ufarligt, hvad kan der så ikke komme ud af at tage en snak om jødedom på film? Islam? Buddhisme? Osv. Vi håber i hvert fald, at I vil tage imod denne episode med åbne ører. Med venlig hilsen og glædelig jul, Christian, Peter & Casper

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text
A Christmas Poem from Casper: Good Bones by Maggie Smith (Warning! Features a swear word!)

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 1:38


Every Christmas, Casper likes to read us a poem. This year it's 'Good Bones' by Maggie Smith.We'll be back with our regularly scheduled episodes on January 6th. Happy Holidays! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Petersen's Bowhunting Radio
Christmas With Casper

Petersen's Bowhunting Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 68:44


It's Christmas Eve, and Contributor Clint Casper joins Editor Christian Berg to recap their fall hunts and share lessons learned along the way. Berg recounts his trifecta of whitetail success in Kansas, Ohio and Pennsylvania, while Casper reflects on grinding for 47 days in the Utah backcountry without punching a tag.

Nüchtern betrachtet - Der
090 Anfangen aufzuhören - Alkohol bekämpft sich nicht von alleine!

Nüchtern betrachtet - Der "Nie wieder Alkohol" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 9:27


Aufschieben bringt rein gar nichts... nicht aufhören ist aber auch keine Option. Warum und was Casper damit zu tun hat, das erkläre ich in diesem Video.Programm: Lerne neu über den Alkohol zu denken!▶️ https://nie-wieder-alkohol.de/drymindPodcast: https://nie-wieder-alkohol.de/podcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nie_wieder_alkoholWebseite: https://nie-wieder-alkohol.deMentoring: https://nie-wieder-alkohol.de/mentoringBuch: https://nie-wieder-alkohol.de/bucheBook: https://nie-wieder-alkohol.de/ebookFür Fragen hau mir einfach alles hier in die Kommentare, schreib mit auf Whatsapp unter 01601550942 oder schick mir eine DM auf Instagram.Lerne aus meinen Fehlern und lass die Alkoholsucht hinter dir! Schluss mit den Versuchen vom Trinken wegzukommen, hör auf vergebens mit deinem Alkoholproblem zu hadern... Mit reiner Willenskraft kommt man nicht davon los. Ich habe es vorher vom Feierabendbierchen, über den Wodka bis zum Leberschaden getrieben und dann doch den Entzug geschafft, wenn auch anders, als ich es dir raten würde. Wenn du also auch denkst, dass du Alkoholiker bist und gerne aufhören und der Sucht entkommen willst, dann beschäftige dich bitte unbedingt weiter mit dem Thema, bleib am Ball und lerne aus meinen Fehlern. Du musst nicht alles alleine machen. Freue dich lieber auf dein selbstbestimmtes, nüchternes Leben!Dein Dennis#sober #nüchtern #alkohol #niewiederalkohol #alkoholproblem #alkoholiker #alkoholverzicht #sobriety #drymind #vollfrei #alkoholfrei #alkoholsucht #drymind  #alkoholsüchtig #alkoholproblem #trinker #trinken #soberme #zucleanfürdenscheiß #soberberlin #soberhamburg #coabhängigkeit #soberbewegungdeutschland #vollfrei #selbstliebe #health #gesundheit #sobermentoring #sobermentor #ohnealkoholSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/niewiederalkohol)

Win Make Give with Ben Kinney
Casper the Friendly Renter

Win Make Give with Ben Kinney

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 26:18


In this episode, Ben shares a story with Chad and Bob about his new investment property in Arizona and the spooky and strange things that have been happening. ---------- Join our Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/winmakegive   Part of the Win Make Give Podcast Network

Und dann kam Punk
52: Max Gruber (DRANGSAL) - Und dann kam Punk

Und dann kam Punk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 178:10


Im Gespräch mit Max. Wir reden über Klaus Lage, Geschäftskonten bei der Sparkasse, Generation Computer, Jackass & Viva la Bam, Turbonegros Ass Cobra mit Nice Price, Kurt Cobains Tagebücher und GG Allin, Sailor Men von Tocotronic, The Locust bei Jerry Springer, die ersten drei Danzig Alben, dass Marilyn Manson sich ficken soll, das Fatal in Landau, ab jetzt hör ich Deutschpunk (Wärthers Schlechte), das "Arbeit ist Scheiße"-Shirt von APPD, Zaunpfahl & Staatspunkrott, die Augen von Atze von den Troopers, unmögliches Aussehen, "Drahti", Minderwertigkeitskomplexe, die Shane MacGowan-Doku, Sizarr aufm Melt Festival, Klaus Lage & Hubert Kah, Hans-A-Plast (mal wieder), die Pop 2000 Doku, Iceages New Brigade, das rosane Netbook der Schwester, Anne Haffmanns & ein Praktikum bei Domino/Mute Records, Human Abfall & Messer, das Music-Biz, being a man of slender needs, das Intro-Cover kaufen, Iffi von Static Shock, Lieblingsband Glue, being a sucker for melody, Ariel Pink, Dagobert & Tommi Stumpff, minding your own business, gern SWR Handwerkskunst gucken, Live-Wrestling & Jürgen Drews, Songwriting Session für 19jährige Yannicks, Mit Verachtung mit Casper, müde im Kit Kat Club, "wirf dein ego weg", Kontrollfreak sein, "1979" von Christian Kracht, "Wie ich den Black Metal nach Leipzig brachte", 60 mal am Tag "Girl U Want" von Devo, uvm.

Enchanting Book Readings
Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

Enchanting Book Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 8:21


A hilarious and fun reading of Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer by the #1 Children's book reader Lady Twizzelton a friend of Sir Herbert Sneakies. Check out our books and merchandise :) https://enchantedbooks.godaddysites.com/ Rudolph is a small reindeer with a bright shiny nose that isolated him from the other reindeer. The other reindeer made fun of Rudolph's shinny nose. But this foggy Christmas eve Santa assigned his top reindeersto guide his sleigh and be on his team. Everyone was assigned a job for Santa's big day to deliver toys but Rudolph. A storm brewed and Santa offered Rudolph the lead position on Santa's sled team! Rudolph finds that being unique brings great rewards. What makes you unique? Shine bright. Your pal, "Jack the Bear and Golden Hair" story book by Sir Herbert Sneakies at Amazon's children's books. PUBLIC Domain :) Merry Christmas Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast. https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies

Lore
Episode 188: Hide and Seek

Lore

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 27:28


Some of the darkest stories and traditions are hiding inside one of our most beloved times of the year. Let's take a fun and frightening journey into the heart of it all. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Squarespace: Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support. Start your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%. Casper: From bedding, bed frames, and even a dog bed, Casper has everything to build the dream bedroom—for every kind of sleeper. Visit Casper.com to get $100 off select mattresses by using the offer code HISTORY100. Terms and conditions apply. BetterHelp: Join over a million other people taking charge of their mental health with the help of an experienced BetterHelp counselor. Visit BetterHelp.com/LORE today for 10% off your first month. ———————— Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  All the shows from Grim & Mild: www.grimandmild.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bop or Flop
2021 Wrapped and Replayed - ep. 50

Bop or Flop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 59:25


Well, we've made it. It's the end of our 2nd season and our 50th episode. The haters said and continue to say it needs to end. Well we have news for you, haters. It is ending. (Until next year.) Tune in as we talk through our personal music year-end streaming #s, our top albums of 2021, and so much more. Don't go far, because we are coming back and will be STRONGER THAN EVER! (With a sponsor?!?! CASPER????) Leaders, you're inspirational, an icon, the moment, now c'mon now. Thank you for all you do and for continuing to tune in.   @therealestsimon @theehren @boporfloppodcast

The Real Question
Trying to Be Cool

The Real Question

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 44:09


Vanessa's step-daughter is *very* cool. But...is that a good thing? And what is coolness really?With help from West Side Story and Gone Girl, Vanessa and Casper explore the social capital and social manipulation of coolness. --We are so grateful to our supporters on Patreon who make this show possible. If you can, please considering chipping in See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Edge of NFT Podcast
NFT NYC & Dreamverse Part 2: Feat. Defy Trends (Elena Garidis & Imge Su Cetin), Videocoin/VividLabs (Kellam Ames), Casper Association & Labs (Ralf Kubli, Joe Benso & Ashok Ranadive), and Metaplex (Jonathan Choi)

Edge of NFT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 61:51


Today's episode is one of an incredible series we're sharing from our visit to New York City in the first week of November 2021. Listen in for exclusive access to conversations we had at the NFT.nyc convention and Dreamverse as well as snippets from our run-ins with amazing folks on the street and in parties and private events. You'll hear from the top players in NFT from Beeple to Gary Vee and discover everything in between. These sessions cut right from one hot interview to the next without much chatter in between to give you the feeling of being there and listening in on various key conversations. We'll introduce our guests as the enter. This episode features incredible series of conversations. We kick things off learning about Defy Trends from co-founders Elena Garidis & Imge Su Cetin. Then we explore VividLabs (formerly Videocoin) with Kellam Ames. After that we get inside the groundbreaking Casper ecosystem with reps from Casper Association & Capser Labs: Ralf Kubli, Joe Benso and Ashok Ranadive. Finally, we wrap things up with a rousing and inspiring Solana-focused conversation with Jonathan Choi of Metaplex Studios.

Booze and Bulls**t
All The WY Goodness

Booze and Bulls**t

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 38:29


Welcome to episode 76!Marina starts off by telling us about the incredibly sad and unfortunate death of Megan Montgomery. Then AD, follows with the disappearance and death of Lisa Marie Kimmel, in a place Marina knows well, Casper, WY. Come interact with us on social media! Instagram: @boozeandbullshitpodcastFacebook Page and Group: Booze and Bullshit podcastTwitter: Boozeandbullsh1

CAGcast
CAGcast #707: Casper the Ghosted Mattress

CAGcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 80:02


The gang talks Halo Infinite, Ubisoft NFTs, the shifted role of game reviews, and all the shrimp talk you can eat.

Learning Bayesian Statistics
#52 Election forecasting models in Germany, with Marcus Gross

Learning Bayesian Statistics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 58:08


Did I mention I like survey data, especially in the context of electoral forecasting? Probably not, as I'm a pretty shy and reserved man. Why are you laughing?? Yeah, that's true, I'm not that shy… but I did mention my interest for electoral forecasting already! And before doing a full episode where I'll talk about French elections (yes, that'll come at one point), let's talk about one of France's neighbors — Germany. Our German friends had federal elections a few weeks ago — consequential elections, since they had the hard task of replacing Angela Merkel, after 16 years in power. To talk about this election, I invited Marcus Gross on the show, because he worked on a Bayesian forecasting model to try and predict the results of this election — who will get elected as Chancellor, by how much and with which coalition? I was delighted to ask him about how the model works, how it accounts for the different sources of uncertainty — be it polling errors, unexpected turnout or media events — and, of course, how long it takes to sample (I think you'll be surprised by the answer).  We also talked about the other challenge of this kind of work: communication — how do you communicate uncertainty effectively? How do you differentiate motivated reasoning from useful feedback? What were the most common misconceptions about the model? Marcus studied statistics in Munich and Berlin, and did a PhD on survey statistics and measurement error models in economics and archeology. He worked as a data scientist at INWT, a consulting firm with projects in different business fields as well as the public sector. Now, he is working at FlixMobility. Our theme music is « Good Bayesian », by Baba Brinkman (feat MC Lars and Mega Ran). Check out his awesome work at https://bababrinkman.com/ (https://bababrinkman.com/) ! Thank you to my Patrons for making this episode possible! Yusuke Saito, Avi Bryant, Ero Carrera, Brian Huey, Giuliano Cruz, Tim Gasser, James Wade, Tradd Salvo, Adam Bartonicek, William Benton, Alan O'Donnell, Mark Ormsby, Demetri Pananos, James Ahloy, Robin Taylor, Thomas Wiecki, Chad Scherrer, Nathaniel Neitzke, Zwelithini Tunyiswa, Elea McDonnell Feit, Bertrand Wilden, James Thompson, Stephen Oates, Gian Luca Di Tanna, Jack Wells, Matthew Maldonado, Ian Costley, Ally Salim, Larry Gill, Joshua Duncan, Ian Moran, Paul Oreto, Colin Caprani, George Ho, Colin Carroll, Nathaniel Burbank, Michael Osthege, Rémi Louf, Clive Edelsten, Henri Wallen, Hugo Botha, Vinh Nguyen, Raul Maldonado, Marcin Elantkowski, Adam C. Smith, Will Kurt, Andrew Moskowitz, Hector Munoz, Marco Gorelli, Simon Kessell, Bradley Rode, Patrick Kelley, Rick Anderson, Casper de Bruin, Philippe Labonde, Matthew McAnear, Michael Hankin, Cameron Smith, Luis Iberico, Alejandro Morales, Tomáš Frýda, Ryan Wesslen, Andreas Netti, Riley King and Aaron Jones. Visit https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats (https://www.patreon.com/learnbayesstats) to unlock exclusive Bayesian swag ;) Links from the show: German election forecast website: https://www.wer-gewinnt-die-wahl.de/en (https://www.wer-gewinnt-die-wahl.de/en) Twitter account of electoral model: https://twitter.com/GerElectionFcst (https://twitter.com/GerElectionFcst) German election model code: https://github.com/INWTlab/lsTerm-election-forecast (https://github.com/INWTlab/lsTerm-election-forecast) LBS #27 -- Modeling the US Presidential Elections, with Andrew Gelman & Merlin Heidemanns: https://www.learnbayesstats.com/episode/27-modeling-the-us-presidential-elections-with-andrew-gelman-merlin-heidemanns (https://www.learnbayesstats.com/episode/27-modeling-the-us-presidential-elections-with-andrew-gelman-merlin-heidemanns) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Podcorn - https://podcorn.com/privacy Support this podcast

The Real Question
Bad Chaplaincy (Part 2)

The Real Question

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 48:21


We got so many questions for our "bad chaplaincy" episode last month, we decided we needed another round! This week, Casper and Vanessa answer your questions about work, exes, and how to know when you're on the right path.--We are so grateful to our supporters on Patreon who make this show possible. If you can, please considering chipping in! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mastering Social Media for Schools
Family Connections: Building Trust and Relationships with John Casper

Mastering Social Media for Schools

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 45:45


Looking for ideas to engage families with your school district? Then you're in the right spot! John is going to share a BUNCH of strategies to build trust while celebrating the great things happening in your school district.IN THIS EPISODE, JOHN DISCUSSES:What social media channels he manages for the district Alternate ways to share events (beyond just creating a flyer)Strategies to get content from staff and parentsA unique approach to handling those negative social media gossip groupsSPECIAL GUESTJohn CasperCommunications CoordinatorWinona Area Public Schools, MinnesotaWinona Area Public Schools - HomeFollow John on Twitter: @johncasperjr Email: john.casper@winona.k12.mn.us School Website: https://winonaschools.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WAPS861 Twitter:https://twitter.com/herkythewinhawk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/winonaschools/ USEFUL INFORMATIONJohn's examples - click hereInterested in our membership program? Learn more here: https://socialschool4edu.com/ MORE RESOURCESFree Video Training: Learn the simple secrets behind social media for K12 schools!Sign up for our free e-newsletter - click herewww.SocialSchool4EDU.com

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text
Shame: The Dueling Club (Book 2, Chapter 11)

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 44:51


Vanessa and Matt explore the theme of Shame in Chapter Eleven of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, with special guest Casper ter Kuile! This week they discuss the highs and lows of sleep-away camp, Crabbe's potion-making skills, and Harry's newly discovered fluency in Parseltongue. Throughout the episode we consider the question: what lies on the other side of shame?Thank you to Prabhanjan for this week's voicemail! Next week we're reading Chapter 12, The Polyjuice Potion, through the theme of Guilt.--It's two sickles to join S.P.E.W., and only two dollars to join our Patreon for extra bloopers every week! Please consider helping us fill our Gringotts vault so we can continue to make this show. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Lore
Episode 186: Invisible Boundaries

Lore

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:02


One of the most frightening aspects of our lives is something that's hidden from our eyes. And yet its impact is so powerful and destructive that we've spent centuries running in fear from it. Well, except for one brave community, that is. ———————— This episode of Lore was sponsored by: Squarespace: Build your own powerful, professional website, with free hosting, zero patches or upgrades, and 24/7 award-winning customer support. Start your free trial website today at Squarespace.com/lore, and when you make your first purchase, use offer code LORE to save 10%. Casper: From bedding, bed frames, and even a dog bed, Casper has everything to build the dream bedroom—for every kind of sleeper. Visit Casper.com to get $100 off select mattresses by using the offer code HISTORY100. Terms and conditions apply. SimpliSafe: Secure your home with 24/7 professional monitoring for just $15 a month. No contracts, no salespeople, just simple and easy security. Visit SimpliSafe.com/Lore to save 20% on your SimpliSafe security system and get your first month free when you sign up for Interactive Monitoring service. ———————— Lore Resources:  Episode Music: lorepodcast.com/music  Episode Sources: lorepodcast.com/sources  All the shows from Grim & Mild: www.grimandmild.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com