Podcasts about boston children

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Best podcasts about boston children

Latest podcast episodes about boston children

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Which Comes First, Overeating or Obesity? Carbohydrates, Insulin and Metabolic Health

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 67:19


Standard treatment for obesity, based on a law of physics, assumes that all calories are alike, and that to lose weight one must simply “eat less and move more.” However, this prescription rarely works over the long term. According to the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model of obesity, the metabolic condition of fat cells plays a key role in determining body weight. High intakes of processed carbohydrate raise insulin levels and program fat cells to store too many calories, leaving too few for the rest of the body. Consequently, hunger increases, and metabolic rate slows in the body's attempt to conserve energy. From this perspective, calorie-restricted, low-fat diets amount to symptomatic treatment, destined to fail for most people. Instead, a dietary strategy aiming to lower insulin secretion promises to increase the effectiveness of long-term weight management and chronic disease prevention. David S. Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D., is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and professor of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. For more than 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of dietary composition on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease—with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has authored more than 200 scientific articles and presently serves as an editor at the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and The BMJ. Dr. Ludwig is author of the number-one New York Times bestseller Always Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently. MLF ORGANIZER Patty James SPEAKERS David S. Ludwig M.D., Ph.D., Endocrinologist and Researcher, Boston Children's Hospital; Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School; Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health Patty James M.S., N.C. Nutritionist; Chef; Author—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 12th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Interview with a Pedipod
Drs. Glotzbecker, Hydorn and Shore, Oct 2021

Interview with a Pedipod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 86:06


Drs. Michael Glotzbecker of Rainbow Babies, Ben Shore of Boston Children's, and Chris Hydorn of Prisma and MUSC join Nick Fletcher of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta for a reunion after 10 years in practice. This group co-authored a paper in the past describing the experiences and lessons of their first year in practice. Today they reflect on their first decade. The co-authors discuss how their practices have changed, steering their academic careers, learning to cope with complications, pearls for new pedipods, and more!   The original article that inspired this episode: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24590338/  

The Healthy Skin Show
216: Could Your Rash Be A Sign Of Lymphoma? w/ Dr. Peter Lio

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 29:05


Most times, a skin rash is a skin rash. But sometimes, if the skin condition comes out of nowhere, and if it does not respond to treatment, it could be a sign that something else is going on. And that something could be lymphoma. My guest today is Dr. Peter Lio, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology & Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, completed his internship in Pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, and his Dermatology training at Harvard where he served as Chief Resident in Dermatology. While at Harvard, he received formal training in acupuncture. Dr. Lio has written a textbook on Integrative Dermatology and has published over 100 papers. Join us as we discuss whether your skin rash could be a sign of lymphoma. Have you ever experienced a skin rash being a sign of something else? Tell me about it in the comments! In this episode: Can a rash start off as one thing, but become something else? How can you tell whether a rash might be an indication of something else? Why swollen lymph nodes should be assess by your doctor What is a lipoma? Could chronic hives be a sign of cancer? Quotes “Lipomas are really, really common. They're basically little fatty lumps. They're just a little bit of extra fat tissue, it's usually just under the skin.” [16:39] “There are also a whole bunch of signs that are called paraneoplastic signs. These are things that are associated with cancer. And again, they're all pretty rare.” [2:02] Links Find Dr. Lio Online Healthy Skin Show ep. 001: How to Protect & Strengthen Your Skin Barrier w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 037: Nickel Allergy And Eczema w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 104: Topical B12 For Skin Rashes w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 136: Alternative Solutions For Rosacea w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 176: Dealing With Recurrent Skin Infections w/ Dr. Peter Lio Follow Dr. Lio on Twitter | Facebook

Why We Marathon
Episode 24: Austin Prario and a Guest Appearance from his dad Dave Prario

Why We Marathon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 46:41


Austin Prario was born with a serious heart condition and only has three chambers in his heart. Doctors told his parents seven weeks before his birth, and right around the Boston Marathon, that he would never be a varsity athlete or be able to run a marathon. The doctors however didn't know Austin's determination or that his father Dave was a runner too. So Dave decided to run the marathon the next year to support Boston Children's Hospital and he carried Austin across the finish line in one of the most memorable Boston Marathon photos ever. Yet, the running wouldn't stop there and Austin was determined to run the marathon himself. But you need to understand how Austin's heart functions to really appreciate his effort. On a good day it operates at 90 percent capacity but usually, his oxygen levels are in the 80s. Austin has a great analogy to a bike during this episode to really explain how much harder his heart needs to work to receive the same amount of oxygen as a regular heart. Austin started training for the 2017 Boston Marathon to also raise money for the same doctors that saved his life at Boston Children's Hospital. He became the first person with three chambers in their heart to finish the Boston Marathon and would go on to do it once more in 2019 to help inspire all children with congenital heart disease. Conveniently, Austin's dad was home during the interview and was able to share his parts of their story too.

Resiliency in Running
Running from my London Marathon Experience: How I Ran 26.2 Miles Without Stopping

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 18:23


Recapping my incredible experience last Sunday at the London Marathon! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episode mentioned: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Training-for-Your-First-Marathon-My-Running-Story--Running-Basics--How-I-Trained-For-a-Half--Full-Marathon--Instagram-QA-emhljc ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:38


Raspberries, ellagic acid reveal benefits in two studies Oregon State University, October 1, 2021.    Articles that appeared recently in the Journal of Berry Research report that raspberries and compounds present in the fruit could help support healthy body mass and motor function, including balance, coordination and strength.   In one study, Neil Shay and colleagues at Oregon State University fed mice a high fat, high sugar diet plus one of the following: raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, ellagic acid (a polyphenol that occurs in a relatively high amount in raspberries), raspberry ketone, or a combination of raspberry ketone and ellagic acid. Additional groups of animals received a high fat, high sugar diet alone or a low fat diet.   While mice that received the high fat and sugar diet alone experienced a significant increase in body mass, the addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate or ellagic acid plus raspberry ketone helped prevent this effect. Of note, mice that received raspberry juice concentrate experienced gains similar to those of animals given a low fat diet. "We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," Dr Shay stated.   In another study, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, and her associates at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging gave 19 month old rats a control diet or a diet enhanced with raspberry extract for 11 weeks. Psychomotor behavior was assessed during week 7 and cognitive testing was conducted during weeks 9-10.   Animals that received raspberry performed better on psychomotor coordination and balance, and had better muscle tone, strength and stamina than those that received a control diet. "These results may have important implications for healthy aging," stated Dr Shukitt-Hale. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."       Massage doesn't just make muscles feel better, it makes them heal faster and stronger Harvard University, October 6, 2021 Massage has been used to treat sore, injured muscles for more than 3,000 years, and today many athletes swear by massage guns to rehabilitate their bodies. But other than making people feel good, do these "mechanotherapies" actually improve healing after severe injury? According to a new study from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the answer is "yes." Using a custom-designed robotic system to deliver consistent and tunable compressive forces to mice's leg muscles, the team found that this mechanical loading (ML) rapidly clears immune cells called neutrophils out of severely injured muscle tissue. This process also removed inflammatory cytokinesreleased by neutrophils from the muscles, enhancing the process of muscle fiber regeneration. The research is published in Science Translational Medicine. "Lots of people have been trying to study the beneficial effects of massage and other mechanotherapies on the body, but up to this point it hadn't been done in a systematic, reproducible way. Our work shows a very clear connection between mechanical stimulation and immune function. This has promise for regenerating a wide variety of tissues including bone, tendon, hair, and skin, and can also be used in patients with diseases that prevent the use of drug-based interventions," said first author Bo Ri Seo, Ph.D., who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Core Faculty member Dave Mooney, Ph.D. at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. Seo and her coauthors started exploring the effects of mechanotherapy on injured tissues in mice several years ago, and found that it doubled the rate of muscle regeneration and reduced tissue scarring over the course of two weeks. Excited by the idea that mechanical stimulation alone can foster regeneration and enhance muscle function, the team decided to probe more deeply into exactly how that process worked in the body, and to figure out what parameters would maximize healing. They teamed up with soft robotics experts in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Conor Walsh, Ph.D., to create a small device that used sensors and actuators to monitor and control the force applied to the limb of a mouse. " The device we created allows us to precisely control parameters like the amount and frequency of force applied, enabling a much more systematic approach to understanding tissue healing than would be possible with a manual approach," said co-second author Christopher Payne, Ph.D., a former Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard Biodesign Lab who is now a Robotics Engineer at Viam, Inc.  Once the device was ready, the team experimented with applying force to mice's leg muscles via a soft silicone tip and used ultrasound to get a look at what happened to the tissue in response. They observed that the muscles experienced a strain of between 10-40%, confirming that the tissues were experiencing mechanical force. They also used those ultrasound imaging data to develop and validate a computational model that could predict the amount of tissue strain under different loading forces. They then applied consistent, repeated force to injured muscles for 14 days. While both treated and untreated muscles displayed a reduction in the amount of damaged muscle fibers, the reduction was more pronounced and the cross-sectional area of the fibers was larger in the treated muscle, indicating that treatment had led to greater repair and strength recovery. The greater the force applied during treatment, the stronger the injured muscles became, confirming that mechanotherapy improves muscle recovery after injury. But how? Evicting neutrophils to enhance regeneration To answer that question, the scientists performed a detailed biological assessment, analyzing a wide range of inflammation-related factors called cytokines and chemokines in untreated vs. treated muscles. A subset of cytokines was dramatically lower in treated muscles after three days of mechanotherapy, and these cytokines are associated with the movement of immune cells called neutrophils, which play many roles in the inflammation process. Treated muscles also had fewer neutrophils in their tissue than untreated muscles, suggesting that the reduction in cytokines that attract them had caused the decrease in neutrophil infiltration. The team had a hunch that the force applied to the muscle by the mechanotherapy effectively squeezed the neutrophils and cytokines out of the injured tissue. They confirmed this theory by injecting fluorescent molecules into the muscles and observing that the movement of the molecules was more significant with force application, supporting the idea that it helped to flush out the muscle tissue. To pick apart what effect the neutrophils and their associated cytokines have on regenerating muscle fibers, the scientists performed in vitro studies in which they grew muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) in a medium in which neutrophils had previously been grown. They found that the number of MPCs increased, but the rate at which they differentiated (developed into other cell types) decreased, suggesting that neutrophil-secreted factors stimulate the growth of muscle cells, but the prolonged presence of those factors impairs the production of new muscle fibers. "Neutrophils are known to kill and clear out pathogens and damaged tissue, but in this study we identified their direct impacts on muscle progenitor cell behaviors," said co-second author Stephanie McNamara, a former Post-Graduate Fellow at the Wyss Institute who is now an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "While the inflammatory response is important for regeneration in the initial stages of healing, it is equally important that inflammation is quickly resolved to enable the regenerative processes to run its full course." Seo and her colleagues then turned back to their in vivo model and analyzed the types of muscle fibers in the treated vs. untreated mice 14 days after injury. They found that type IIX fibers were prevalent in healthy muscle and treated muscle, but untreated injured muscle contained smaller numbers of type IIX fibers and increased numbers of type IIA fibers. This difference explained the enlarged fiber size and greater force production of treated muscles, as IIX fibers produce more force than IIA fibers. Finally, the team homed in on the optimal amount of time for neutrophil presence in injured muscle by depleting neutrophils in the mice on the third day after injury. The treated mice's muscles showed larger fiber size and greater strength recovery than those in untreated mice, confirming that while neutrophils are necessary in the earliest stages of injury recovery, getting them out of the injury site early leads to improved muscle regeneration. "These findings are remarkable because they indicate that we can influence the function of the body's immune system in a drug-free, non-invasive way," said Walsh, who is also the Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and whose group is experienced in developing wearable technology for diagnosing and treating disease. "This provides great motivation for the development of external, mechanical interventions to help accelerate and improve muscle and tissue healing that have the potential to be rapidly translated to the clinic." The team is continuing to investigate this line of research with multiple projects in the lab. They plan to validate this mechanotherpeutic approach in larger animals, with the goal of being able to test its efficacy on humans. They also hope to test it on different types of injuries, age-related muscle loss, and muscle performance enhancement. "The fields of mechanotherapy and immunotherapy rarely interact with each other, but this work is a testament to how crucial it is to consider both physical and biological elements when studying and working to improve human health," said Mooney, who is the corresponding author of the paper and the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. "The idea that mechanics influence cell and tissue function was ridiculed until the last few decades, and while scientists have made great strides in establishing acceptance of this fact, we still know very little about how that process actually works at the organ level. This research has revealed a previously unknown type of interplay between mechanobiology and immunology that is critical for muscle tissue healing, in addition to describing a new form of mechanotherapy that potentially could be as potent as chemical or gene therapies, but much simpler and less invasive," said Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.   Vitamin E could help protect older men from pneumonia University of Helsinki (Finland), October 7 2021.    An article that appeared in Clinical Interventions in Aging reported a protective role for vitamin E against pneumonia in older men.   For the current investigation, Dr Harri Hemilä of the University of Helsinki, Finland analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study conducted in Finland. The trial included 29,133 men between the ages of 50 to 69 years who smoked at least five cigarettes daily upon enrollment. Participants received alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), beta carotene, both supplements, or a placebo for five to eight years.   The current study was limited to 7,469 ATBC participants who started smoking at age 21 or older. Among this group, supplementation with vitamin E was associated with a 35% lower risk of developing pneumonia in comparison with those who did not receive the vitamin.  Light smokers who engaged in leisure time exercise had a 69% lower risk compared with unsupplemented members of this subgroup. The risk in this subgroup of developing pneumonia by age 74 was 12.9%.   Among the one-third of the current study's population who quit smoking for a median period of two years, there was a 72% lower risk of pneumonia in association with vitamin E supplementation. In this group, exercisers who received vitamin E experienced an 81% lower pneumonia risk.   Dr Hemilä observed that the benefit for vitamin E in this study was strongest for older subjects—a group at higher risk of pneumonia.   "The current analysis of individual-level data suggests that trials on vitamin E and pneumonia on nonsmoking elderly males are warranted," he concluded.       Toxic fatty acids to blame for brain cell death after injury New York University, October 7, 2021 Cells that normally nourish healthy brain cells called neurons release toxic fatty acids after neurons are damaged, a new study in rodents shows. This phenomenon is likely the driving factor behind most, if not all, diseases that affect brain function, as well as the natural breakdown of brain cells seen in aging, researchers say. Previous research has pointed to astrocytes—a star-shaped glial cell of the central nervous system—as the culprits behind cell death seen in Parkinson's disease and dementia, among other neurodegenerative diseases. While many experts believed that these cells released a neuron-killing molecule to "clear away" damaged brain cells, the identity of this toxin has until now remained a mystery. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation provides what they say is the first evidence that tissue damage prompts astrocytes to produce two kinds of fats, long-chain saturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines. These fats then trigger cell death in damaged neurons, the electrically active cells that send messages throughout nerve tissue. Publishing Oct. 6 in the journal Nature, the study also showed that when researchers blocked fatty acid formation in mice, 75 percent of neurons survived compared with 10 percent when the fatty acids were allowed to form. The researchers' earlier work showed that brain cells continued to function when shielded from astrocyte attacks.  "Our findings show that the toxic fatty acids produced by astrocytes play a critical role in brain cell death and provide a promising new target for treating, and perhaps even preventing, many neurodegenerative diseases," says study co-senior author Shane Liddelow, Ph.D. Liddelow, an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Health, adds that targeting these fats instead of the cells that produce them may be a safer approach to treating neurodegenerative diseasesbecause astrocytes feed nerve cells and clear away their waste. Stopping them from working altogether could interfere with healthy brain function. Although it remains unclear why astrocytes produce these toxins, it is possible they evolved to destroy damaged cells before they can harm their neighbors, says Liddelow. He notes that while healthy cells are not harmed by the toxins, neurons become susceptible to the damaging effects when they are injured, mutated, or infected by prions, the contagious, misfolded proteins that play a major role in mad cow disease and similar illnesses. Perhaps in chronic diseases like dementia, this otherwise helpful process goes off track and becomes a problem, the study authors say. For the investigation, researchers analyzed the molecules released by astrocytes collected from rodents. They also genetically engineered some groups of mice to prevent the normal production of the toxic fats and looked to see whether neuron death occurred after an acute injury. "Our results provide what is likely the most detailed molecular map to date of how tissue damage leads to brain cell death, enabling researchers to better understand why neurons die in all kinds of diseases," says Liddelow, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Langone. Liddelow cautions that while the findings are promising, the genetic techniques used to block the enzyme that produces toxic fatty acids in mice are not ready for use in humans. As a result, the researchers next plan is to explore safe and effective ways to interfere with the release of the toxins in human patients. Liddelow and his colleagues had previously shown these neurotoxic astrocytes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis, among other diseases.   Clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside: Vitamin safely boosts levels of important cell metabolite linked to multiple health benefits University of Iowa Health Care, October 3, 2021   In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of Vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage.   Studies in mice have shown that boosting the levels of this cell metabolite -- known as NAD+ -- can produce multiple health benefits, including resistance to weight gain, improved control of blood sugar and cholesterol, reduced nerve damage, and longer lifespan. Levels of NAD+ diminish with age, and it has been suggested that loss of this metabolite may play a role in age-related health decline.   These findings in animal studies have spurred people to take commercially available NR supplements designed to boost NAD+. However, these over-the-counter supplements have not undergone clinical trials to see if they work in people.   The new research, reported in the journal Nature Communications, was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), which supplied the NR used in the trial. Brenner is a consultant for ChromaDex. He also is co-founder and Chief Scientific Adviser of ProHealthspan, which sells NR supplements under the trade name Tru NIAGEN®.   The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner's lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics. The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.   "This trial shows that oral NR safely boosts human NAD+ metabolism," Brenner says. "We are excited because everything we are learning from animal systems indicates that the effectiveness of NR depends on preserving and/or boosting NAD+ and related compounds in the face of metabolic stresses. Because the levels of supplementation in mice that produce beneficial effects are achievable in people, it appears than health benefits of NR will be translatable to humans safely."   The next step will be to study the effect of longer duration NR supplementation on NAD+ metabolism in healthy adults, but Brenner also has plans to test the effects of NR in people with diseases and health conditions, including elevated cholesterol, obesity and diabetes, and people at risk for chemotherapeutic peripheral neuropathy.   Prior to the formal clinical trial, Brenner conducted a pilot human study -- on himself. In 2004, he had discovered that NR is a natural product found in milk and that there is pathway to convert NR to NAD+ in people. More than a decade of research on NR metabolic pathways and health effects in mice and rats had convinced him that NR supplementation had real promise to improve human health and wellness. After consulting with UI's institutional review board, he conducted an experiment in which he took 1 gram of NR once a day for seven days, and his team analyzed blood and urine samples using mass spectrometry. The experiment showed that Brenner's blood NAD+ increased by about 2.7 times. In addition, though he reported immediate sensitivity to flushing with the related compound niacin, he did not experience any side effects taking NR.   The biggest surprise from his metabolomic analysis was an increase in a metabolite called NAAD, which was multiplied by 45 times, from trace levels to amounts in the micromolar range that were easily detectable.   "While this was unexpected, I thought it might be useful," Brenner says. "NAD+ is an abundant metabolite and it is sometimes hard to see the needle move on levels of abundant metabolites. But when you can look at a low-abundance metabolite that goes from undetectable to easily detectable, there is a great signal to noise ratio, meaning that NAAD levels could be a useful biomarker for tracking increases in NAD+ in human trials."   Brenner notes this was a case of bidirectional translational science; having learned something from the initial human experiment, his team was able to return to laboratory mice to explore the unexpected NAAD finding in more detail.   Brenner's mouse study showed that NAAD is formed from NR and confirmed that NAAD levels are a strong biomarker for increased NAD+ metabolism. The experiments also revealed more detail about NAD+ metabolic pathways.   In particular, the researchers compared the ability of all three NAD+ precursor vitamins -- NR, niacin, and nicotinamide -- to boost NAD+ metabolism and stimulate the activity of certain enzymes, which have been linked to longevity and healthbenefits. The study showed for the first time that oral NR is superior to nicotinamide, which is better than niacin in terms of the total amount of NAD+ produced at an equivalent dose. NR was also the best of the three in stimulating the activity of sirtuin enzymes. However, in this case, NR was the best at stimulating sirtuin-like activities, followed by niacin, followed by nicotinamide.   The information from the mouse study subsequently helped Brenner's team design the formal clinical trial. In addition to showing that NR boosts NAD+ in humans without adverse effects, the trial confirmed that NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of NAD+ supplementation in people.   "Now that we have demonstrated safety in this small clinical trial, we are in a position to find out if the health benefits that we have seen in animals can be reproduced in people," says Brenner, who also is co-director of the Obesity Research and Education Initiative, professor of internal medicine, and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI.   Protecting the ozone layer is delivering vast health benefits Montreal Protocol will spare Americans from 443 million skin cancer cases National Center for Atmospheric Research, October 7, 2021 An international agreement to protect the ozone layer is expected to prevent 443 million cases of skin cancer and 63 million cataract cases for people born in the United States through the end of this century, according to new research. The research team, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), ICF Consulting, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focused on the far-reaching impacts of a landmark 1987 treaty known as the Montreal Protocol and later amendments that substantially strengthened it. The agreement phased out the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Stratospheric ozone shields the planet from harmful levels of the Sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting life on Earth. To measure the long-term effects of the Montreal Protocol, the scientists developed a computer modeling approach that enabled them to look to both the past and the future by simulating the treaty's impact on Americans born between 1890 and 2100. The modeling revealed the treaty's effect on stratospheric ozone, the associated reductions in ultraviolet radiation, and the resulting health benefits.  In addition to the number of skin cancer and cataract cases that were avoided, the study also showed that the treaty, as most recently amended, will prevent approximately 2.3 million skin cancer deaths in the U.S. “It's very encouraging,” said NCAR scientist Julia Lee-Taylor, a co-author of the study. “It shows that, given the will, the nations of the world can come together to solve global environmental problems.” The study, funded by the EPA, was published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Mounting concerns over the ozone layer Scientists in the 1970s began highlighting the threat to the ozone layer when they found that CFCs, used as refrigerants and in other applications, release chlorine atoms in the stratosphere that set off chemical reactions that destroy ozone. Concerns mounted the following decade with the discovery of an Antarctic ozone hole. The loss of stratospheric ozone would be catastrophic, as high levels of UV radiation have been linked to certain types of skin cancer, cataracts, and immunological disorders. The ozone layer also protects terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as agriculture. Policy makers responded to the threat with the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, in which nations agreed to curtail the use of certain ozone-destroying substances. Subsequent amendments strengthened the treaty by expanding the list of ozone-destroying substances (such as halons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs) and accelerating the timeline for phasing out their use. The amendments were based on Input from the scientific community, including a number of NCAR scientists, that were summarized in quadrennial Ozone Assessment reports. To quantify the impacts of the treaty, the research team built a model known as the Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework. This model, which draws on various data sources about ozone, public health, and population demographics, consists of five computational steps. These simulate past and future emissions of ozone-destroying substances, the impacts of those substances on stratospheric ozone, the resulting changes in ground-level UV radiation, the U.S. population's exposure to UV radiation, and the incidence and mortality of health effects resulting from the exposure. The results showed UV radiation levels returning to 1980 levels by the mid-2040s under the amended treaty. In contrast, UV levels would have continued to increase throughout this century if the treaty had not been amended, and they would have soared far higher without any treaty at all.  Even with the amendments, the simulations show excess cases of cataracts and various types of skin cancer beginning to occur with the onset of ozone depletion and peaking decades later as the population exposed to the highest UV levels ages. Those born between 1900 and 2040 experience heightened cases of skin cancer and cataracts, with the worst health outcomes affecting those born between about 1950 and 2000. However, the health impacts would have been far more severe without the treaty, with cases of skin cancer and cataracts rising at an increasingly rapid rate through the century.  “We peeled away from disaster,” Lee-Taylor said. “What is eye popping is what would have happened by the end of this century if not for the Montreal Protocol. By 2080, the amount of UV has tripled. After that, our calculations for the health impacts start to break down because we're getting so far into conditions that have never been seen before.” The research team also found that more than half the treaty's health benefits could be traced to the later amendments rather than the original 1987 Montreal Protocol. Overall, the treaty prevented more than 99% of potential health impacts that would have otherwise occurred from ozone destruction. This showed the importance of the treaty's flexibility in adjusting to evolving scientific knowledge, the authors said. The researchers focused on the U.S. because of ready access to health data and population projections. Lee-Taylor said that the specific health outcomes in other countries may vary, but the overall trends would be similar. “The treaty had broad global benefits,” she said.     What is Boron? The trace mineral boron provides profound anti-cancer effects, in addition to maintaining stronger bones. Life Extension, September 2021 Boron is a trace mineral found in the earth's crust and in water. Its importance in human health has been underestimated. Boron has been shown to have actions against specific types of malignancies, such as: Cervical cancer: The country Turkey has an extremely low incidence of cervical cancer, and scientists partially attribute this to its boron-rich soil.1 When comparing women who live in boron-rich regions versus boron-poor regions of Turkey, not a single woman living in the boron-rich regions had any indication of cervical cancer.2(The mean dietary intake of boron for women in this group was 8.41 mg/day.)  Boron interferes with the life cycle of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a contributing factor in approximately 95% of all cervical cancers.1  Considering that HPV viruses are increasingly implicated in head and neck cancers,3,4 supplementation with this ultra-low-cost mineral could have significant benefits in protecting against this malignancy that is increasing in prevalence. Lung cancer: A study conducted at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2005 found that increased boron intake was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy. Prostate cancer: Studies point to boron's ability to inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells.  In one study, when mice were exposed to boric acid, their tumors shrank by as much as 38%.6 One analysis found that increased dietary boron intake was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.7 Several human and animal studies have confirmed the important connection between boron and bone health. Boron prevents calcium loss,8 while also alleviating the bone problems associated with magnesium and vitamin D deficiency.9 All of these nutrients help maintain bone density. A study in female rats revealed the harmful effects a deficiency in boron has on bones, including:10 Decreased bone volume fraction, a measure of bone strength, Decreased thickness of the bone's spongy inner layer, and Decreased maximum force needed to break the femur. And in a study of post-menopausal women, supplementation with3 mg of boron per day prevented calcium loss and bone demineralization by reducing urinary excretion of both calcium and magnesium.8 In addition to its bone and anti-cancer benefits, there are nine additional reasons boron is an important trace mineral vital for health and longevity. It has been shown to:1 Greatly improve wound healing, Beneficially impact the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D, Boost magnesium absorption, Reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Raise levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, Protect against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity, Improve the brain's electrical activity, which may explain its benefits for cognitive performance, and short-term memory in the elderly, Influence the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and Potentially help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Because the amount of boron varies in the soil, based on geographical location, obtaining enough boron through diet alone can be difficult. Supplementing with low-cost boron is an effective way to maintain adequate levels of this overlooked micronutrient.

Resiliency in Running
Running from Pre-Race Nerves before Marathon Day: Training for the London Marathon Series

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 14:58


Thank you for supporting me the past 18 weeks! Hope you enjoyed this series :) ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episode mentioned: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Training-for-Your-First-Marathon-My-Running-Story--Running-Basics--How-I-Trained-For-a-Half--Full-Marathon--Instagram-QA-emhljc ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

This Week In Wellness
TWIW 124: Could it be carb intake rather than overeating that causes obesity?

This Week In Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 6:54


This Week In Wellness Dr. David Ludwig, Endocrinologist at Boston Children’s Hospital and Professor at Harvard Medical School has published a paper with the bold claim that over consuming processed carbs rather than overeating is the primary cause of the worldwide obesity crisis. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/09/210913135729.htm https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ajcn/nqab270/6369073 The post TWIW 124: Could it be carb intake rather than overeating that causes obesity? appeared first on The Wellness Couch.

Resiliency in Running
Running from Tips with a Running Coach: Interviewing Author and Under Armour Coach Ambassador Desmond Dunham

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 28:49


Go checkout Coach Dez's book, Running Against the Odds! Instagram: @coachdezdunham ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Playlists mentioned: My everyday running playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0SPrcH3GlTQayOWalvvaGl Fartlek playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3w3ezzLpmRpiS3N6iFTNrD Fartlek 2.0 playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/76hjAJjBRbm6GLRKeJB0oR Hype playlist (when I need motivation): https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3Vwt5GO7gdHI75e28C2N96 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Food Psych Podcast with Christy Harrison
[Repost] #217: The Life Thief, Part 3: How Diet Culture Steals Your Well-Being with Kendrin Sonneville, Eating-Disorders and Weight Stigma Researcher

Food Psych Podcast with Christy Harrison

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 80:53


Weight-stigma and eating-disorders researcher Kendrin Sonneville joins us to discuss how diet culture steals our well-being by perpetuating fatphobia, why even seemingly subtle forms of weight stigma can lead to poorer health, the role of science in the paradigm shift toward Health At Every Size®, why weight stigma is more than just a health issue, and so much more. Plus, Christy answers a listener question about intuitive eating and fears around weight loss. (This episode originally aired on December 9, 2019.) Kendrin Sonneville, ScD, RD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Sonneville also holds an adjunct appointment at Harvard Medical School and is a Collaborating Mentor for the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders (STRIPED) at Boston Children's Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Sonneville is a registered dietitian, behavioral scientist, and public health researcher whose research focuses on the prevention of eating disorders among children, adolescents, and young adults. Dr. Sonneville uses a weight-inclusive framework to study how to promote health and well-being without inadvertently increasing body dissatisfaction, disordered eating, and weight stigma. Find her online at KendrinS.sph.umich.edu. Subscribe to our newsletter, Food Psych Weekly, to keep getting new weekly Q&As and other new content while the podcast is on hiatus! If you're ready to break free from diet culture once and for all, come check out Christy's Intuitive Eating Fundamentals online course. You'll get all your questions answered in an exclusive monthly podcast, plus ongoing support in our private community forum and dozens of hours of other great content. Christy's first book, Anti-Diet, is available wherever you get your books. Order online at christyharrison.com/book, or at local bookstores across North America, the UK, Australia, and New Zealand. Grab Christy's free guide, 7 simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food, for help getting started on the anti-diet path. For full show notes and a transcript of this episode, go to christyharrison.com/foodpsych. Ask your own question about intuitive eating, Health at Every Size, or eating disorder recovery at christyharrison.com/questions.

Resiliency in Running
Running from Wrapping Up Year 2 of Marathon Training: London Marathon Series

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 15:10


An episode to give you motivation, and push you to go farther than your limits! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Playlists mentioned: My everyday running playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0SPrcH3GlTQayOWalvvaGl Fartlek playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3w3ezzLpmRpiS3N6iFTNrD Fartlek 2.0 playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/76hjAJjBRbm6GLRKeJB0oR Hype playlist (when I need motivation): https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3Vwt5GO7gdHI75e28C2N96 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

The Brian Lehrer Show
COVID Vaccine Questions and Answers

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 39:34


Jessica Malaty Rivera, infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, answers listeners' questions on COVID immunity, the vaccine, how it spreads and takes calls from unvaccinated callers.

Resiliency in Running
Running from Cycling 5,000 Miles To Write A Book: Interview with David Richman (Author, Triathlete, Philanthropist)

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 37:15


I had the pleasure of interviewing a very cool guy named David Richman! He's not only run over 50 triathlons, he's also completed 15 Ironman's, more than 50 marathons, and a 5,000 solo bike ride from California to Florida to New York to write his book, Cycle of Lives! Make sure you check him out! david-richman.com ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Pedia Pain Focus
#79. Pain Amongst Neonates, Infants and Young Children

Pedia Pain Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 67:43


There's no better way to kick off September as the Pain Awareness Month than bringing you a conversation with Dr. Kanwaljeet S. Anand, whose research took the medical world by storm, even risking his license, as he sought out to answer the question of; what if we give children anesthesia and analgesia?  I truly believe that he is the reason why my career as a pediatric pain and palliative care physician exists today and serves as an available path for many healthcare professionals. In this episode,  Dr.  Anand, a professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, describes his groundbreaking research back in the 80s, when a popular held belief was that babies don't feel pain!  With the findings  and intervention offered in his RCT, they were able to cut down the infant mortality rates by half.  It is the work of doctors like him that paved the path for someone like me to practice pediatric pain management as a specialty-- hoping to save and improve the lives of many more children by debunking the fallacies that still surround children's pain and its management.   Takeaways In This Episode   What fueled Dr. Anand's desire to research perioperative care for infants His hypothesis around morbidity and mortality of neonates and infants undergoing surgeries, relationship to anesthetic management  Conducting the randomized controlled trial study and its results that changed the history and trajectory of childrens pain and perioperative management Sometimes it's worth picking the fights How his study gained momentum and changed how the healthcare world approaches pain management for children and infants When and how infants develop the ability to feel pain The long-term consequences of poorly or inadequately  managing children's pain Changing the minds of colleagues who perpetuate the belief that children are “hardy” and will “get over it” Dr. Anand's message to the audience   Links Connect with Dr. Kanwaljeet S. Anand: Stanford Profile LinkedIn Love, Pain, and Intensive Care. K.J.S. Anand, Richard W. Hall Clinicians' Pain Evaluation Toolkit Proactive Pain Solutions   About the Guest    Kanwaljeet S. Anand, MBBS, MD, D Phil, FRCCM   He is currently the professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He directs the pain and stress neurobiology lab, the Jackson Vaughan Critical Care Research Fund, and he serves as the Editor of the journal Pediatric Research and is the Division Chief for Pediatric Critical Care at the Department of Pediatrics at Standford School of Medicine. He graduated from M.G.M. Medical College, Indore (India). He received the D.Phil. degree as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, followed by a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School, a categorical Pediatrics residency training at Boston Children's Hospital, and a Critical Care Medicine fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He is the recipient of innumerable awards, including the Dr. Michael Blacow Award from the British Pediatric Association in 1986, the Pediatric Resident Research Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the inaugural Young Investigator Award in Pediatric Pain from the International Association for Study of Pain in 1994, the Jeffrey Lawson Award for advocacy of children's pain relief, the highest recognition in pediatric pain medicine in the United States. He's also been awarded many awards across Europe in many countries such as the Nils Rosén von Rosenstein Award from the Swedish Academy of Medicine and the 2015 Journées Nationales de Néonatologie Address at The Pasteur Institute to name a few. For his dedication and work in the field of pediatric pain management, he is considered a world authority on pain and stress in newborns and pain management in infants. 

Resiliency in Running
Running from Testing Positive for COVID: Isolation During Marathon Training

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 12:40


Last weekend I tested positive for COVID! Here's how it went and what this means for marathon training! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Playlists mentioned: My everyday running playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0SPrcH3GlTQayOWalvvaGl Fartlek playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3w3ezzLpmRpiS3N6iFTNrD Fartlek 2.0 playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/76hjAJjBRbm6GLRKeJB0oR Hype playlist (when I need motivation): https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3Vwt5GO7gdHI75e28C2N96 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

I'm Probably Wrong (About Everything)
#108 Dr. Claudia Gold: Childism - Prejudice Against Children

I'm Probably Wrong (About Everything)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 62:43


Dr. Claudia Gold practiced general and behavioral pediatrics for over 25 years and now specializes in early childhood mental health. Gold is the director of The Hello It's Me Project, a rural community based-program designed to promote healthy relationships between infants and their caregivers. Gold works as a clinician with FIRST Steps Together, a United States federally funded program for pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorders, and as an infant-parent mental health consultant at Volunteers in Medicine, Berkshires. Gold has written numerous articles and she presents regularly for audiences of both parents and professionals around the world. Gold has written four books: The Power of Discord with co-author Ed Tronick, forthcoming June 2020, The Developmental Science of Early Childhood(2017), The Silenced Child(2016), and Keeping Your Child in Mind(2011). Gold is also on the faculty of the Infant-Parent Mental Health Fellowship Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston, the Brazelton Institute at Boston Children's Hospital , and the Berkshire Psychoanalytic Institute.

Gluten Free News
Pen Pal Program Connects Kids with Celiac

Gluten Free News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 1:51


The Celiac Kids Connection, based at Boston Children's Hospital, created a pen pal program for kids with Celiac. A Celiac Kids Connection representative connects your child with another celiac child, anywhere in the country. They can write letters, email, call, or communicate in any they choose!More info here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdTSKklNsGsuuTCzip4sslVNVwrj0VWiK3MvwFiNVZYjmjrcQ/viewform See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Recovery Bites with Karin Lewis
Empowering Balance over Performance with Nicole Farnsworth, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN, CPT

Recovery Bites with Karin Lewis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 55:19


In this episode, I am joined by Nicole Farnsworth, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN, CPT. Nicole works as a dietitian for the Sports Medicine Team and the Female Athlete Program at Boston Children's Hospital. She is additionally a clinical dietitian at Laura Moretti Nutrition and the consulting sports dietitian for Wheaton College. Nicole is a member of the Female Athlete Conference Planning Committee and served as co-chair for the 2021 Female Athlete Conference. Nicole's interest in working with athletes stems from her experience as a track and field pentathlete and heptathlete as an undergraduate student at Harvard. Nicole is dedicated to educating athletes on the importance of adequate fueling for health and performance and regularly lectures for local and regional athletic teams and organizations.Join Karin and Nicole for a discussion on the mental and physical energy required for collegiate athletes, cultural and ritualistic competition preparation risks, “race weight,” the Female Athlete Triad and Relative Energy Deficiency in Sports (REDS), the prevalence of eating disorders in certain sports, athletic character traits, and much more!CONNECT WITH NICOLE:• Learn more about Nicole by visiting her bios on the Female Athlete Program, Boston Children's Hospital and Laura Moretti Nutrition• Follow Nicole on Twitter and Instagram• View details from this year's Virtual Female Athlete Conference and register for their next conference• Read Nicole's article, “Specific dietary practices in female athletes and their association with positive screening for disordered eating” published on BioMed Central• Learn more about the Female Athletic Program's research, services, specialties, and health guides____________________ Apply to be a guest on the show here!

Resiliency in Running
Running from Amenorrhea: Relationship Between Stress & The Reproductive System, Steps To De-Stress This Month

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 13:55


Before anyone tries to tell me I'm pregnant, I promise you I'm not! Today's episode is all about opening up about my current stresses and the effect it's having on my body! It's important for me to address it now rather than continue to joke about it, and if you're in the same boat I hope you do too! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Books mentioned: Working Hard, Hardly Working by Grace Beverly Reinventing Your Life by Jeffrey Young ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Is Dairy Good For Us? | This episode is brought to you by ButcherBoxWe have no biological requirement for dairy, and yet, we've been told over and over again that this food is a great source of calcium and that milk makes healthy bones and we should drink it daily. However, the research shows that none of this is true. In fact, close to 70 percent of the world's population is genetically unable to properly digest milk and other dairy products—a problem known as lactose intolerance. But even if you aren't lactose intolerant, consuming dairy can lead to weight gain, bloating, acne, gas, allergies, eczema, brittle bones, and sometimes even cancer.In this mini-episode, Dr. Hyman discusses why he often works with patients to eliminate dairy in conversations with his colleagues Lisa Dreher and Dr. Elizabeth Boham. He also speaks with Dr. David Ludwig about his recent research on milk and dairy products.Lisa Dreher is a registered dietitian who got her undergraduate nutrition degree at the Rochester Institute of Technology and completed a dietetic internship through Cornell University. Lisa first worked in the acute care hospital setting and became a Clinical Nutrition Specialist working in Pediatric Gastroenterology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. At the same time, she pursued her Masters degree in Nutrition and Integrative Health from the Maryland University of Integrative Health and started practicing integrative and functional nutrition in private practice before joining UWC in 2015. She has since received additional training through the Institute for Functional Medicine. Over the past 10 years, Lisa has delivered several public health lectures on the role of food as medicine and her work has been showcased in Reader's Digest, on National Public Radio, and she was featured in the Broken Brain 2 series. She also developed the Digestive Health and Gut Microbiome training module for the Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine practice group through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Elizabeth Boham is a physician and nutritionist who practices Functional Medicine at The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA. Through her practice and lecturing she has helped thousands of people achieve their goals of optimum health and wellness. She witnesses the power of nutrition every day in her practice and is committed to training other physicians to utilize nutrition in healing. Dr. Boham has contributed to many articles and wrote the latest chapter on Obesity for the Rankel Textbook of Family Medicine. She is part of the faculty of the Institute for Functional Medicine and has been featured on the Dr. Oz show and in a variety of publications and media including Huffington Post, The Chalkboard Magazine, and Experience Life. Her DVD Breast Wellness: Tools to Prevent and Heal from Breast Cancer explores the Functional Medicine approach to keeping your breasts and whole body well.David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is co-director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center and founder of the Optimal Weight for Life program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For more than 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of dietary composition on metabolism, body weight, and risk for chronic disease. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been a Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and The BMJ. He has written 3 books for the general public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox. Right now ButcherBox has a special offer for new members. If you sign up today you'll get 2 ribeye steaks free in your first box plus $10 off by going to butcherbox.com/farmacy.Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Lisa Dreher, “A Simple Diet Experiment That May Solve Most Of Your Health Issues” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/FeJHNRJ3 Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Boham, “Acne, Weight Gain, Facial Hair, Hair Loss, Infertility: Is PCOS The Cause?” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/68G64S1YFind Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. David Ludwig, “Why Most Everything We Were Told About Dairy Is Wrong” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/DrDavidLudwig See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Replay of Pediheart Podcast #130: What Are The Stressors And Fears Of The New Pediatric Cardiology Fellow?

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 37:26


From August 2020 - This week we delve into the topic of fellow wellness and review a recent work from the Boston Children's group on fellow fears and stressors when beginning their training. Are there patterns amongst the fellow concerns that can be identified and used to inform interventions to help allay these fears and reduce the stress? We speak with Dr. David Brown, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School and also Dr. Tony Pastor who is the ACHD Fellow at Boston Children's Hospital/Brigham and Women's Hospital about their thoughts on fellow fears and stressors as well as fellow (and doctor) wellness. An important topic for our milestone 130th episode. doi: 10.1007/s00246-019-02276-z. Back next week with a new episode!

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health
We're better off when we unstick the stereotypes around eating disorders

Harvard Chan: This Week in Health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 18:36


Eating disorders affect a population the size of the state of Texas, cost the economy tens of billions of dollars, and kill 10,000 Americans per year. If eating disorders are so common, expensive, and deadly, why don't we talk about them more? Bryn Austin, director of the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders (STRIPED), says we need to start by getting rid of our "sticky" stereotypes about who is affected by eating disorders.Guest: S. Bryn Austin, professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Harvard Chan School, a faculty member at Boston Children's Hospital, and director of the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders (STRIPED).

Help and Hope Happen Here
Ricardo Garcia is the co founder of the Biotech Company called Oncoheroes Biosciences. This company focuses exclusively on coming up with brand new drugs to help modernize treatments for Pediatric Cancer patients.

Help and Hope Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 51:55


Ricardo Garcia's son Richi was diagnosed with high risk Medulloblastoma when he was 6 years old in 2011 and living in Spain. The Garcia family moved to Brookline, Ma. after the diagnosis and now 10 years later, after going through treatment at Boston Children's Hospital and Dana Farber, Richi is doing well and leading a good life. Ricardo will talk about Richi's cancer battle, the Richi Childhood Cancer Foundation that he started in 2013, and the Biotech company Onceoheroes Biosciences that he cofounded a few years ago, which is is 100 percent focused on developing new drugs that will help pediatric cancer patients in future years. 

Tokyo Alumni Podcast
Tokyo Alumni Podcast Episode 72: Harald Gjerde, MD, FRCSC (St. Mary's 2006) - Doctor - Pediatric Ophthalmologist

Tokyo Alumni Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 28:58


Harald Gjerde, MD, FRCSC (St. Mary's 2006) Physician – Pediatric Ophthalmologist ​ Harald is a Canadian national who is ethnically Norwegian and Chinese, who was born and raised in Tokyo. He attended the now-closed Santa Maria International School, later transferring and graduating from St. Mary's International School as Valedictorian for the class of 2006. ​He earned an Honors degree in Microbiology and Immunology from McGill University and completed medical school at the University of Manitoba. He completed a residency in Ophthalmology at Dalhousie University, and finished a fellowship in Pediatric Ophthalmology at Boston Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School. He was the Clinical Director of the Special Olympics Canada Opening Eyes eye-screening program for Atlantic Canada. He has worked as a professional narrator and voice actor, to authoring scientific papers, as well as being a published poet and writer. He will be moving to Vancouver this winter to work for the BC Children's Hospital as a Pediatric Ophthalmologist, and work as a Clinical Instructor at the University of British Columbia. TIMESTAMPS 1:05 - Introduction 4:45 - When did you want to become a doctor? 7:58 - How has growing up overseas affected your practice as a doctor? 14:04 - Choosing Canada or the US for school for someone who wants to go to med school 21:04 - Santa Maria and St. Marys 25:00 - What is to come

Resiliency in Running
Running from Race Day & Training Must-Haves: Training For the London Marathon Series

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 15:34


Listener/follower requested topic, hope you enjoy! :) ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Playlists mentioned: My everyday running playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0SPrcH3GlTQayOWalvvaGl Fartlek playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3w3ezzLpmRpiS3N6iFTNrD Fartlek 2.0 playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/76hjAJjBRbm6GLRKeJB0oR Hype playlist (when I need motivation): https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3Vwt5GO7gdHI75e28C2N96 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

PBS NewsHour - Segments
COVID-19 surge: Why we need more data on breakthrough infections

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 6:57


In May, the CDC made a decision to reduce tracking and collecting data on breakthrough infections to only those involving hospitalizations and deaths -- leaving a big gap in understanding the impact of variants as COVID-19 cases surge across the nation once again. Jessica Malaty Rivera, an infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, and former science communication lead at the COVID Tracking Project joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
COVID-19 surge: Why we need more data on breakthrough infections

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 6:57


In May, the CDC made a decision to reduce tracking and collecting data on breakthrough infections to only those involving hospitalizations and deaths -- leaving a big gap in understanding the impact of variants as COVID-19 cases surge across the nation once again. Jessica Malaty Rivera, an infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital, and former science communication lead at the COVID Tracking Project joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

OPENPediatrics
Emerging Trends in Research: Clinical Research Concepts by Dr. Robert Tasker for OPENPediatrics

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 23:20


In Part 1 of this two-part World Shared Practice Forum podcast, Dr. Robert Tasker, Editor-in-Chief of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Journal, discusses emerging trends in clinical research along with the research topics he expects to grow in the near future. Dr. Tasker also offers suggestions to improve your manuscript submission and increase the likelihood of your manuscript being accepted for publication. After the podcast, listeners will be able to: -Forecast future trends in research using current data -Gain an understanding of the factors considered by editors when choosing from content submissions -Feel more confident about submitting their work to journals Initial publication: August 20, 2021. Speakers: Robert C. Tasker, MA, MBBS, MD, FRCP, FRCPCH Editor-in-Chief for Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Journal Founding Chair in Neurocritical Care at Boston Children's Hospital Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School Traci Wolbrink, MD, MPH Co-Director, OPENPediatrics Senior Associate in Critical Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital Associate Professor of Anaesthesia, Harvard Medical School Citation: This recording is intended to be used as an educational resource for healthcare providers. It is in no way a substitute for the independent decision making and judgment of a qualified healthcare professional. It should not be used to make a diagnosis, or to overrule the advice of a qualified health care provider, nor should it be used to provide advice for emergency medical treatment. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching a full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Inside the Lab
S2Ep1: Personnel Management

Inside the Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 50:12


Pathology administrators are tasked with the recruitment, retention, and management of laboratory staff. But how do you attract personnel for hard-to-fill positions? And how do you help young pathologists and laboratory professionals advance their careers and become the next generation of leaders?  On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Ms. Kelley Suskie, MHSA, FACMPE, Administrator for the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Mr. John Baci, MBA, C-PM, Executive Director of Anatomic Pathology at Boston Children's Hospital, and Mr. Martin Lawlor, Director of Finance and Administration for the Department of Pathology at Michigan Medicine, to discuss personnel management. Our panelists explain what administrators can do to prepare for the retirement cliff facing pathology, challenging laboratory professionals to mentor the next generation of leaders. They explore how personnel management differs in an academic versus clinical setting and offer strategies for networking in the pathology administration community. Listen in as our panelists share their most challenging personnel management experiences and get their advice on confronting bad behavior early on and holding people accountable for their actions as pathology administrators. Topics Covered  ·  Suggestions for recruiting and retaining personnel for hard-to-fill positions· Creating succession plans for the laboratory professionals ·  Preparing for the retirement cliff the pathology field is facing and developing the next generation of leaders· Why it's better to help top performers advance and move on rather than hold them back· How to reconcile making yourself invaluable in the lab with empowering your team· How personnel management differs in an academic vs. clinical setting· Strategies for connecting with others in the community of academic pathology administration· The importance of both internal and external networking in the personnel management space· Challenging personnel management experiences· Developing the courage to confront bad behavior early on and hold people accountable for their actions· Our panelists' advice around mentoring aspiring pathology administrators Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. SuskieMs. Suskie on LinkedInMs. Suskie on Twitter Connect with Mr. Baci Mr. Baci at Boston Children's HospitalMr. Baci on LinkedIn Connect with Mr. Lawlor Mr. Lawlor at Michigan Medicine Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. Swails Dr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP Store 

Resiliency in Running
Running from Dating (One Year Later): Deleting Dating Apps, Reflecting on One Year Without Dating

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 16:55


Reflecting one year later on my episode 'Running from Dating in 2020' - hope you enjoy it! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episodes mentioned: Running from Dating in 2020: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Dating-in-2020-ej9qj9 Running from Identity: Attachment Styles in Adoptees Interview with Emma Rady https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Identity-Attachment-Styles-in-Adoptees-Interview-with-Emma-Rady-el88jt Running from Commitment: Interview with Amber Grubenmann of the Womens Dating & Confidence Podcast https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Commitment-Interview-with-Amber-Grubenmann-of-the-Womens-Dating--Confidence-Podcast-enmfbo ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Booked mentioned: Attached: https://www.waterstones.com/book/attached/amir-levine/rachel-heller/9781529032178 Reinventing Your Life: https://www.waterstones.com/book/reinventing-your-life/jeffrey-e-young/janet-s-klosko/9781912854356 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Experiencing Data with Brian O'Neill
071 - The ROI of UX Research and How It Applies to Data Products with Bill Albert

Experiencing Data with Brian O'Neill

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 45:30


There are many benefits in talking with end users and stakeholders about their needs and pain points before designing a data product.    Just take it from Bill Albert, executive director of the Bentley University User Experience Center, author of Measuring the User Experience, and my guest for this week's episode of Experiencing Data. With a career spanning more than 20 years in user experience research, design, and strategy, Bill has some great insights on how UX research is pivotal to designing a useful data product, the different types of customer research, and how many users you need to talk to to get useful info.   In our chat, we covered: How UX research techniques can help increase adoption of data products. (1:12) Conducting 'upfront research': Why talking to end users and stakeholders early on is crucial to designing a more valuable data product. (8:17) 'A participatory design process': How data scientists should conduct research with stakeholders before and during the designing of a data product. (14:57) How to determine sample sizes in user experience research -- and when to use qualitative vs. quantitative techniques. (17:52) How end user research and design improvements helped Boston Children's Hospital drastically increase the number of recurring donations. (24:38) How a person's worldview and experiences can shape how they interpret data. (32:38) The value of collecting metrics that reflect the success and usage of a data product. (38:11) Quotes from Today's Episode “Teams are constantly putting out dashboards and analytics applications — and now it's machine learning and AI— and a whole lot of it never gets used because it hits all kinds of human walls in the deployment part.” - Brian (3:39)   “Dare to be simple. It's important to understand giving [people exactly what they] want, and nothing more. That's largely a reflection of organizational maturity; making those tough decisions and not throwing out every single possible feature [and] function that somebody might want at some point.” - Bill (7:50)   “As researchers, we need to more deeply understand the user needs and see what we're not observing in the lab [and what] we can't see through our analytics. There's so much more out there that we can be doing to help move the experience forward and improve that in a substantial way.” - Bill (10:15)   “You need to do the upfront research; you need to talk to stakeholders and the end users as early as possible. And we've known about this for decades, that you will get way more value and come up with a better design, better product, the earlier you talk to people.” - Bill (13:25)   “Our research methods don't change because what we're trying to understand is technology-agnostic. It doesn't matter whether it's a toaster or a mobile phone — the questions that we're trying to understand of how people are using this, how can we make this a better experience, those are constant.” - Bill (30:11)   “I think, what's called model interpretability sometimes or explainable AI, I am seeing a change in the market in terms of more focus on explainability, less on model accuracy at all costs, which often likes to use advanced techniques like deep learning, which are essentially black box techniques right now. And the cost associated with black box is, ‘I don't know how you came up with this and I'm really leery to trust it.'” - Brian (31:56) Resources and Links: Bentley University User Experience Center: https://www.bentley.edu/centers/user-experience-center Measuring the User Experience: https://www.amazon.com/Measuring-User-Experience-Interactive-Technologies/dp/0124157815 www.bentley.edu/uxc: https://www.bentley.edu/uxc LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/walbert/

OPENPediatrics
"Breastfeeding" by Lucy Rubin for OPENPediatrics

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 9:52


This podcast will describe the benefits of breastmilk and the physiology of breastfeeding, discuss ways to counsel new mothers and families about nutrition for their infant, and explore some common breastfeeding challenges and solutions. Initial publication date: August 10, 2021 Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Resiliency in Running
Running from Illnesses & Injuries During Training + One Year of Podcasting!

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 11:09


I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episodes mentioned: Running from Training for Your First Marathon: My Running Story, Running Basics, How I Trained For a Half & Full Marathon, Instagram Q&A: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Training-for-Your-First-Marathon-My-Running-Story--Running-Basics--How-I-Trained-For-a-Half--Full-Marathon--Instagram-QA-emhljc ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
John Brownstein, Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children's Hospital

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 8:14


This episode features John Brownstein, Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children's Hospital. Here, he discusses his role as Chief Innovation Officer, his pride in Boston Children's Hospital, and more.

Parents At Work
38: Moms in Fundraising

Parents At Work

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 39:27


In this episode of Parents at Work, Lori Mihalich-Levin and Jason Levin interview two amazing working moms who are leaders in the fundraising profession, Pradnya Haldipur and Kara Barnes.  Pradnya Haldipur is the Vice President of Development at Code.org, where she leads fundraising and philanthropic strategy. She has more than 24 years of development and management experience in a myriad of national and international settings. She went to Code.org with experience from prestigious academic medical institutions such as Children's National Medical Center in Washington DC, Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, and Boston Children's Hospital, as well as think tanks, global development organizations, and the arts. Over the course of her career, she has raised more than $145M to support research, capital projects, endowment, operations, and programmatic projects.  Pradnya was born in Mumbai, India but grew up in New Jersey. She resides in Silver Spring, MD, with her husband Joe Clemons, their children, Mirza Cate (age 8) and Xavier Anant (age 6) who are avid Code.org users. Kara Barnes is the Senior Director of Planned Giving at American University in Washington D.C. where she helps donors structure gift arrangements that create a meaningful legacy at the university and positive change in the world. She has over 20 years of experience in non-profit fundraising, with a focus on major gifts and planned giving. She has served in development positions in the arts and public media as well as higher education. Kara is a proud mid-westerner and lives in Washington D.C. with her husband Dave and son Lewis. Pradnya and Kara share the tensions and benefits of being working moms involved in mission-based roles that they are very passionate about, and how they manage to stay committed to their work and families while maintaining good physical and mental health. You won't want to miss this truly engaging conversation about boundaries, relationship-building, and passion.. The lessons to learn are unmatched. So stay tuned! Show Highlights Being a mom while moving the mission forward at work (03:15) Kara's working mom story: Integrating her love and passion for fundraising into her family life (05:11) How to go about boundary setting between work and family (09:11) The lack of more extensive maternity leave policies and the harm it causes (12:15) Anticipated changes in non-profits that will be geared towards better support systems for their employees (17:02) Changes happening in the fundraising industry that will affect working parents (21:32) How having children has made these leaders more successful in their careers (25:20) Forming great work relationships from the authenticity of inviting who you are and your family life into your work related interactions (28:14) Kara's way of staying grounded in her work and family life (32:12) Adopting a mindset of loving both work and home life while using technology to achieve balance (35:37) Links and Resources https://pepparent.org/ (Positive Encouragement Parenting) https://www.mindfulreturn.com/freemie/ (What's a Freemie? A genius invention for working parents) https://readysetlaunch.net/ (Jason's Website) https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasonlevincareercoach/ (Jason on Linkedin) https://www.mindfulreturn.com/ (Lori's Website) https://www.linkedin.com/in/lorimihalichlevin/ (Lori on Linkedin)

PBS NewsHour - Science
Masks, vaccinations, delta: Why we are at a 'critical point' in the pandemic

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 8:38


Surges in Delta cases across the nation have changed and undone some of the progress made against the COVID-19 pandemic: the CDC has advised fully vaccinated people to remain cautious and even wear masks indoors. Jessica Malaty Rivera, an infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital joins to discuss the potential risks posed by the Delta variant. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Masks, vaccinations, delta: Why we are at a 'critical point' in the pandemic

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 8:38


Surges in Delta cases across the nation have changed and undone some of the progress made against the COVID-19 pandemic: the CDC has advised fully vaccinated people to remain cautious and even wear masks indoors. Jessica Malaty Rivera, an infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital joins to discuss the potential risks posed by the Delta variant. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Masks, vaccinations, Delta: Why we are at a 'critical point' in the pandemic

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 8:38


Surges in Delta cases across the nation have changed and undone some of the progress made against the COVID-19 pandemic: the CDC has advised fully vaccinated people to remain cautious and even wear masks indoors. Jessica Malaty Rivera, an infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital joins to discuss the potential risks posed by the Delta variant. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Resiliency in Running
Running from Hitting the Halfway Point in Marathon Training: Training for the London Marathon Series

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 11:31


I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episodes mentioned: Running from Identity: Attachment Styles in Adoptees, Interview with Emma Rady https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Identity-Attachment-Styles-in-Adoptees-Interview-with-Emma-Rady-el88jt Running from Dynamic Running Therapy: Interview with William Pullen Author and Founder https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Dynamic-Running-Therapy-Interview-with-William-Pullen--Author-and-Founder-et39ao Running from the David Goggins 4x4x48 Challenge https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-the-David-Goggins-4x4x48-Challenge-esamu2 Running from the 24 Hour Challenge: My Experience Running One Mile Every Hour For 24 Hours https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-the-24-Hour-Challenge-My-Experience-Running-One-Mile-Every-Hour-For-24-Hours-e128mko Running from Training for Your First Marathon: My Running Story, Running Basics, How I Trained For a Half & Full Marathon, Instagram Q&A: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Training-for-Your-First-Marathon-My-Running-Story--Running-Basics--How-I-Trained-For-a-Half--Full-Marathon--Instagram-QA-emhljc ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Scott Becker Vaccine News Update 7-29-21

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 2:27


In this episode Scott Becker discusses the following points: 1. Pfizer vaccine booster shot update 2. More health system expected to mandate vaccines 3. Great recent podcast recordings with John Brownstein at Boston Children's Hospital and Robert Pearl, Former President and CEO of the Permanente Group, and more.

The Ortho Show
Hosted by Dr. Scott Sigman – “Father/Daughter Orthopedic Surgeon Duo”

The Ortho Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 17:34


We have the dynamic father/daughter duo of Dr. Michael Redler and Dr. Lauren Redler on this episode, who joined us at AOSSM/AANA in Nashville. Dr. Michael Redler was a founding partner of The Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Center, which merged with Connecticut Orthopaedics in 2018. He specializes in sports medicine as well as hand and upper extremity surgery. Dr. Lauren H. Redler specializes in operative and non-operative treatment of sports medicine injuries in pediatric, adolescent and adult patients. She utilizes advanced, minimally invasive arthroscopic surgical techniques to repair sports-related of injuries of the shoulder, elbow, and knee. We discuss her two orthopedic subspecialty fellowships: one in Sports Medicine at Hospital for Special Surgery and the other in Pediatric Sports Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital. Other topics include: -Their differences being in an academic vs. private practice setting -Being able to compare cases together -How social media is important in both of their practices Find out more about Dr. Michael Redler here. Find out more about Dr. Lauren Redler here.

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley
Environmental Roundtable: Climate Change Fuels Extreme Weather, Shutting Down Oil Pipelines, And The Country's First Black Chief Of US Forest Service

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 31:55


Climate deniers are on the hot seat, as temperatures soar and extreme weather blows through communities across the country. Plus, oil pipelines are on pause — or shut down completely — including the infamous Keystone XL pipeline. And a history-making appointment, as the first African American is named to lead the U.S. Forest Service. Those stories and more on our environmental roundtable. Guests: Dr. Aaron Bernstein, interim director of The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Bernstein is a pediatrician at Boston Children's Hospital and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Heather Goldstone, chief communications officer at Woodwell Climate Research Center and former host GBH's weekly science-focused radio show, Living Lab Radio. Sam Payne, digital organizer and communications specialist at the Better Future Project. Editor's note: This segment was recorded one week ago. In the time since taping, floods swept Europe and China, the Bootleg Fire in Oregon expanded and another heat wave hit the American West. Smoke from wildfires on the West Coast reached the East Coast and British Columbia declared a state of emergency over wildfires.

Resiliency in Running
Running from Slowing Down: Mentally, Physically & Emotionally

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 19:16


I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Book mentioned: Working Hard, Hardly Working Author: Grace Beverley ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episodes mentioned: Running from Training for Your First Marathon: My Running Story, Running Basics, How I Trained For a Half & Full Marathon, Instagram Q&A: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Training-for-Your-First-Marathon-My-Running-Story--Running-Basics--How-I-Trained-For-a-Half--Full-Marathon--Instagram-QA-emhljc ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Head To Heart
How to Operate on Life with Dr. Peter T. Yu - S1E16

Head To Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 59:53


This episode is with Dan's Best friend, Dr. Peter T. Yu! We discuss "How to Operate on Life" which encompasses everything from diet and exercise to learning how to align your goals. Dr. Peter Yu is an accomplished pediatric surgeon with education and training from the finest institutions in the United States. This background and experience has translated into high-quality, effective care with a patient-centered and data-driven approach. He strongly believes that the key factors in an excellent surgical outcome are compassion, technical excellence and clear communication with patients, their families, his surgical team and referring physicians. Dr. Yu hails from St. Louis. He earned an undergraduate degree in psychology from Stanford University with an additional master's degree in biology coursework at Washington University in St. Louis. His medical education was completed at the University of Missouri, Columbia. His internship, residency and research fellowship in general surgery were completed at UC San Diego, where he also served as chief resident. Dr. Yu also completed fellowships at Boston Children's Hospital and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He is board-certified in three specialties: general surgery, surgical critical care and pediatric surgery. In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Yu has secured research grants and has an extensive list of publications with a focus on outcomes research. He consistently presents lectures at national conferences and is a member of several professional associations dedicated to the advancement of surgical care for children. He completed a master's degree of public health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Yu is a compassionate physician dedicated to working together with community pediatricians to treat and heal the children of Orange County and beyond. His inpatient expertise spans the breadth of pediatric surgery, including fetal surgery, neonatal surgery and trauma, and his outpatient expertise includes thoracic surgery, abdominal surgery, minimally invasive surgery, tumors, pediatric hernias, hydrocele and circumcision. Enjoy this episode! Follow Head to Heart on social media: Podcast page: https://anchor.fm/head-to-heart1 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9nJf13iatwSkeQGPwNjerg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/weareheadtoheart/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Head-To-Heart-111053981031030/ TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMe2XV8FP/

Resiliency in Running
Running from My Biggest Insecurities as a Runner: Training For The London Marathon Series

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 18:41


I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episodes mentioned: Running from My First In-Person Race Post-COVID: My Experience & How to Deal with Bad Race Days: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-My-First-In-Person-Race-Post-COVID-My-Experience--How-to-Deal-with-Bad-Race-Days-e11rb3d ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Resiliency in Running
✰ Resiliency in Running x Best Wishes Podcast: Running from Eating Disorders, Sexual Trauma & Heartbreak ✰

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 51:46


This week's episode, I'm sharing a podcast interview I did with Sophie of the Best Wishes Podcast! Sophie is incredibly sweet and was such a great chat! Please go check out her podcast! I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Check out Sophie: IG: @bestwishespod Sound Editor: Daisy Smith Music: Megan Blair Artwork: Rosie Smith Partner: @thebouncebackclub ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 07.07.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 62:18


Cranberry Powder Attenuates Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia University of Suwon (South Korea), June 21, 2021   Cranberry powder (CR) is reported to be effective against lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and recurrent urinary tract infections. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in men older than 50 years is a common cause of LUTS. Here, we attempted to evaluate if CR is also effective for treating BPH using a BPH-induced rat model, which was orally administered CR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200–250 g were randomly divided into the following six groups (n = 9): noncastration group; castration group; BPH group; BPH and cranberry for 8-week (CR8W) group; BPH and cranberry for 4-week (CR4W) group; and BPH and saw palmetto group (saw palmetto). Compared with the BPH group, the CR8W group showed a significant decrease in prostate weight (by 33%), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels (by 18% in serum and 28% in prostate), 5-alpha reductase levels (18% reduction of type 1 and 35% of type 2), and histological changes. These results indicate that CR could attenuate BPH by inhibiting 5-alpha reductase and by reducing other biomarkers such as prostate weight and DHT levels. Thus, CR may be an effective candidate for the development of a functional food for BPH treatment. IACUC (USW-IACUC-R-2015-004).   In our investigation, the administration of CP significantly prevented the progression of BPH by reducing the 5AR levels, and consequently reducing DHT levels in the serum and prostate, along with reduction of the prostate size. This study demonstrated that CR exerts positive effects against BPH, based on biochemical and histological changes in BPH-induced rats. Although further investigation and validation is required, our study provides evidence, for developing a potential treatment for BPH from natural products.     Psychedelic spurs growth of neural connections lost in depression Yale University, July 5, 2021 The psychedelic drug psilocybin, a naturally occurring compound found in some mushrooms, has been studied as a potential treatment for depression for years. But exactly how it works in the brain and how long beneficial results might last is still unclear. In a new study, Yale researchers show that a single dose of psilocybin given to mice prompted an immediate and long-lasting increase in connections between neurons. The findings are published July 5 in the journal Neuron. "We not only saw a 10% increase in the number of neuronal connections, but also they were on average about 10% larger, so the connections were stronger as well," said Yale's Alex Kwan, associate professor of psychiatry and of neuroscience and senior author of the paper. Previous laboratory experiments had shown promise that psilocybin, as well as the anesthetic ketamine, can decrease depression. The new Yale research found that these compounds increase the density of dendritic spines, small protrusions found on nerve cells which aid in the transmission of information between neurons. Chronic stress and depression are known to reduce the number of these neuronal connections. Using a laser-scanning microscope, Kwan and first author Ling-Xiao Shao, a postdoctoral associate in the Yale School of Medicine, imaged dendritic spines in high resolution and tracked them for multiple days in living mice. They found increases in the number of dendritic spines and in their size within 24 hours of administration of psilocybin. These changes were still present a month later. Also, mice subjected to stress showed behavioral improvements and increased neurotransmitter activity after being given psilocybin. For some people, psilocybin, an active compound in "magic mushrooms," can produce a profound mystical experience. The psychedelic was a staple of religious ceremonies among indigenous populations of the New World and is also a popular recreational drug. It may be the novel psychological effects of psilocybin itself that spurs the growth of neuronal connections, Kwan said. "It was a real surprise to see such enduring changes from just one dose of psilocybin," he said. "These new connections may be the structural changes the brain uses to store new experiences."   How long can a person live? The 21st century may see a record-breaker University of Washington, July 2, 2021 The number of people who live past the age of 100 has been on the rise for decades, up to nearly half a million people worldwide. There are, however, far fewer "supercentenarians," people who live to age 110 or even longer. The oldest living person, Jeanne Calment of France, was 122 when she died in 1997; currently, the world's oldest person is 118-year-old Kane Tanaka of Japan. Such extreme longevity, according to new research by the University of Washington, likely will continue to rise slowly by the end of this century, and estimates show that a lifespan of 125 years, or even 130 years, is possible. "People are fascinated by the extremes of humanity, whether it's going to the moon, how fast someone can run in the Olympics, or even how long someone can live," said lead author Michael Pearce, a UW doctoral student in statistics. "With this work, we quantify how likely we believe it is that some individual will reach various extreme ages this century." Longevity has ramifications for government and economic policies, as well as individuals' own health care and lifestyle decisions, rendering what's probable, or even possible, relevant at all levels of society. The new study, published June 30 in Demographic Research, uses statistical modeling to examine the extremes of human life. With ongoing research into aging, the prospects of future medical and scientific discoveries and the relatively small number of people to have verifiably reached age 110 or older, experts have debated the possible limits to what is referred to as the maximum reported age at death. While some scientists argue that disease and basic cell deterioration lead to a natural limit on human lifespan, others maintain there is no cap, as evidenced by record-breaking supercentenarians. Pearce and Adrian Raftery, a professor of sociology and of statistics at the UW, took a different approach. They asked what the longest individual human lifespan could be anywhere in the world by the year 2100. Using Bayesian statistics, a common tool in modern statistics, the researchers estimated that the world record of 122 years almost certainly will be broken, with a strong likelihood of at least one person living to anywhere between 125 and 132 years. To calculate the probability of living past 110 -- and to what age -- Raftery and Pearce turned to the most recent iteration of the International Database on Longevity, created by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. That database tracks supercentenarians from 10 European countries, plus Canada, Japan and the United States. Using a Bayesian approach to estimate probability, the UW team created projections for the maximum reported age at death in all 13 countries from 2020 through 2100. Among their findings: Researchers estimated near 100% probability that the current record of maximum reported age at death -- Calment's 122 years, 164 days -- will be broken; The probability remains strong of a person living longer, to 124 years old (99% probability) and even to 127 years old (68% probability); An even longer lifespan is possible but much less likely, with a 13% probability of someone living to age 130; It is "extremely unlikely" that someone would live to 135 in this century. As it is, supercentenarians are outliers, and the likelihood of breaking the current age record increases only if the number of supercentenarians grows significantly. With a continually expanding global population, that's not impossible, researchers say. People who achieve extreme longevity are still rare enough that they represent a select population, Raftery said. Even with population growth and advances in health care, there is a flattening of the mortality rate after a certain age. In other words, someone who lives to be 110 has about the same probability of living another year as, say, someone who lives to 114, which is about one-half. "It doesn't matter how old they are, once they reach 110, they still die at the same rate," Raftery said. "They've gotten past all the various things life throws at you, such as disease. They die for reasons that are somewhat independent of what affects younger people. "This is a very select group of very robust people."     Dried Plum Consumption Improves Total Cholesterol and Antioxidant Capacity and Reduces Inflammation in Healthy Postmenopausal Women San Diego State University, June 27, 2021 Dried plums contain bioactive components that have demonstrated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to determine if dried plum consumption reduces the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in postmenopausal women, specifically examining lipid profiles, oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, and inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. We conducted a 6-month, parallel-design controlled clinical trial, where 48 postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to consume 0, 50, or 100 g of dried plum each day. After 6 months of intervention, total cholesterol (TC) in the 100 g/day treatment group (P = .002) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the 50 g/day treatment group (P = .005) improved significantly compared to baseline. Inflammatory biomarkers interleukin-6 (P = .044) and tumor necrosis factor-α (P = .040) were significantly lower after 6 months within the 50 g/day dried plum group compared to baseline. Moreover, total antioxidant capacity increased significantly within the 50 g/day group (P = .046), and superoxide dismutase activity increased significantly within both 50 and 100 g/day groups (P = .044 and P = .027, respectively) after 6 months compared to baseline. In addition, plasma activities of alanine transaminase (P = .046), lactate dehydrogenase (P = .039), and creatine kinase (P = .030) were significantly lower after 6 months in the 50 g/day dried plum group. These findings suggest that daily consumption of 50–100 g dried plum improves CVD risk factors in postmenopausal women as exhibited by lower TC, oxidative stress, and inflammatory markers with no clear dose dependence.     Regular physical activity linked to more 'fit' preteen brains   Childrens Hospital Boston, July 2, 2021 We know exercise has many health benefits. A new study from Boston Children's Hospital adds another benefit: Physical activity appears to help organize children's developing brains. The study, led by Dr. Caterina Stamoulis, analyzed brain imaging data from nearly 6,000 9- and 10-year-olds. It found that physical activity was associated with more efficiently organized, robust, and flexible brain networks. The more physical activity, the more "fit" the brain. "It didn't matter what kind of physical activity children were involved in," says Dr. Stamoulis, who directs the Computational Neuroscience Laboratory at Boston Children's. "It only mattered that they were active." Crunching the data Dr. Stamoulis and her trainees, Skylar Brooks and Sean Parks, tapped brain imaging data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a long-running study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. They used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to estimate the strength and organizational properties of the children's brain circuits. These measures determine how efficiently the brain functions and how readily it can adapt to changes in the environment. "The preteen years are a very important time in brain development," notes Dr. Stamoulis. "They are associated with a lot of changes in the brain's functional circuits, particularly those supporting higher-level thought processes. Unhealthy changes in these areas can lead to risky behaviors and long-lasting deficits in the skills needed for learning and reasoning." The team combined these data with information on the children's physical activity and sports involvement, supplied by the families, as well as body mass index (BMI). Finally, they adjusted the data for other factors that might affect brain development, such as being born before 40 weeks of gestation, puberty status, sex, and family income. Healthy brain networks Being active multiple times per week for at least 60 minutes had a widespread positive effect on brain circuitry. Children who engaged in high levels of physical activity showed beneficial effects on brain circuits in multiple areas essential to learning and reasoning. These included attention, sensory and motor processing, memory, decision making, and executive control (the ability to plan, coordinate, and control actions and behaviors). In contrast, increased BMI tended to have detrimental effects on the same brain circuitry. However, regular physical activity reduced these negative effects. "We think physical activity affects brain organization directly, but also indirectly by reducing BMI," Dr. Stamoulis says. Analyzing brain effects In the analyses, the brain was represented mathematically as a network of "nodes": a set of brain regions linked by connections of varying strength. Physical activity had two kinds of positive effects: on the efficiency and robustness of the network as a whole, and on more local properties such as the number and clustering of node connections. "Highly connected local brain networks that communicate with each other through relatively few but strong long-range connections optimizes information processing and transmission in the brain," explains Dr. Stamoulis. "In preteens, a number of brain functions are still developing, and they can be altered by a number of risk factors. Our results suggest that physical activity has a positive protective effect across brain regions."   Could Sumac Be Effective on COVID-19 Treatment? Fırat University Medicine Faculty (Turkey), June 11, 2021 Sumac is an herbal product, commonly consumed as a spice and was used for medical treatment for centuries. The phytochemical structure of Sumac was studied extensively, and it was established that the herb contained tannins, polyphenols, flavonoids, organic acids, and essential oils. Various scientific studies demonstrated that Sumac had a free oxygen radical-scavenging effect, a protective effect against liver damage, antihemolytic, leukopenia, and antifibrogenic effects, along with its antiviral, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Recently, several scientific studies described the pathophysiology, clinical course, and the treatment of COVID-19 infection. The examination of the characteristics of COVID-19 infection revealed via the clinical studies suggests that Sumac extract could be useful in the treatment of COVID-19. Given the scientific studies focusing on the beneficial effects of Sumac, the present review aims to provide an encouraging viewpoint to investigate whether Sumac is effective in treating COVID-19 infection. Antiviral Effect SARS-CoV2 virus, which causes COVID-19 infection, is a highly infectious RNA virus. There are no scientific studies on whether Sumac is effective against the SARS-CoV2 virus. On the contrary, the medications currently being used for treatment were directly administered in clinics, without scrutinizing whether they were effective against the novel coronavirus. Subsequently, several medications were identified to be useful during the clinical course of the disease. Yet, there are scientific in vitro and in vivo studies that investigated the antiviral effects of Sumac against several viruses. In a study, bioflavonoids isolated from Sumac were evaluated for their antiviral activities. Sumac presented inhibitory activities against respiratory viruses (influenza A, influenza B, and measles) and herpes viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, and varicella zoster virus [VZV]).2 Another study found that Sumac extract exhibited significant antiviral activity against fish pathogenic infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus. Furthermore, it was considered that Sumac was a potential antiviral therapeutic against fish viral diseases.3 In a study conducted in 2015, it was established that urushiol obtained from Sumac exhibited reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). It was specified that Sumac could be used as a biological resource due to such inhibitory activity.4 Another study focusing on HIV found that Sumac extracts exhibited anti-HIV activity due to inhibiting the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and protease activity. It was also demonstrated that Sumac inhibited the viral load in HIV-infected CEM-GFP (a CD4+ T-lymphocytic reporter cell line expressing green fluorescent protein [GFP] under HIV-1 LTR promoter) cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.5 Another study reported that Sumac extract presented strong antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2. The study also revealed that Sumac extract did not only interact with the viral envelope but also interacted with the surface of the host cells of the viruses, thus, disrupted the ability of the virus to adsorb and penetrate the host cells.6 The above-mentioned studies indicated the antiviral effects of Sumac extracts. The review of the viruses, on which Sumac is effective, such as influenza, HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, and HIV-1 demonstrated that the common point between these viruses was the fact that they are all enveloped viruses, contain dense lipids in their envelopes, and are sensitive to ether.7 Coronaviruses share the same common features.7 Sumac is likely to affect the lipid layer in the virus envelope, disrupting the adsorption to the host cell and preventing the virus from penetrating the host cell, positively contributing to the infection. Naturally, this hypothesis should be evidenced in future studies. However, its effectiveness on the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV2) should be clarified first through animal testing and subsequently should be tested through human subjects. Conclusion An evaluation of the up to date knowledge, revealed by the clinical studies, on the characteristics of COVID-19 infection, its pathophysiology, clinic, and treatment, suggests that the use of Sumac extracts could be beneficial. Based on the beneficial effects indicated by the scientific studies on Sumac extracts, the present review could be encouraging to investigate its effectiveness for COVID-19 treatment. The authors of the present study believe that the benefits of Sumac extract can be tested by adding the adverse-effect-free Sumac extract to treatment and protecting the existing treatment protocols.   Sugar intake during pregnancy is associated with allergy and allergic asthma in children University of Bristol (UK), July 5, 2021 High maternal sugar intake during pregnancy may increase the risk of allergy and allergic asthma in the offspring, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) involving almost 9,000 mother-child pairs. While some research has reported an association between a high consumption of sugar-containing beverages and asthma in children, the relation between maternal sugar intake during pregnancy and allergy and asthma in the offspring has been little studied. The team, which included researchers from University of Bristol, used data from a world-leading birth cohort study, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), also known as 'Children of the 90s'. The cohort recruited mothers who were pregnant in the 1990s and has been following up their offspring ever since. The current study, which is published in the European Respiratory Journal, analysed associations between maternal intake of free sugars in pregnancy and allergy (defined by positive skin tests to common allergens, namely dust mite, cat and grass) and asthma at seven years of age. While there was only weak evidence for a link between free sugar intake in pregnancy and asthma overall, there were strong positive associations with allergy and allergic asthma (where the child was diagnosed with asthma and had positive skin tests to allergens). When comparing the 20 per cent of mothers with the highest sugar intake versus the 20 per cent of mothers with the lowest sugar intake, there was an increased risk of 38 per cent for allergy in the offspring (73 per cent for allergy to two or more allergens) and 101 per cent for allergic asthma. The team found no association with eczema or hay fever. Lead researcher Professor Seif Shaheen from QMUL said: "We cannot say on the basis of these observations that a high intake of sugar by mothers in pregnancy is definitely causing allergy and allergic asthma in their offspring. However, given the extremely high consumption of sugar in the West, we will certainly be investigating this hypothesis further with some urgency. "The first step is to see whether we can replicate these findings in a different cohort of mothers and children. If we can, then we will design a trial to test whether we can prevent childhood allergy and allergic asthma by reducing the consumption of sugar by mothers during pregnancy. In the meantime, we would recommend that pregnant women follow current guidelines and avoid excessive sugar consumption." The team speculate that the associations may be explained by a high maternal intake of fructose causing a persistent postnatal allergic immune response leading to allergic inflammation in the developing lung. The researchers controlled for numerous potential confounders in their analyses, such as background maternal characteristics, social factors and other aspects of maternal diet, including foods and nutrients that have been previously linked to childhood asthma and allergy. Importantly, the offspring's free sugar intake in early childhood was found to have no association with the outcomes seen in the analysis. As the study is observational, it does not prove a causal link between maternal sugar intake and allergies or asthma. A randomised controlled trial would be needed to definitively test causality.

Resiliency in Running
Running from My Marathon Training Diet: What I Eat in a Week + Pre/During/Post-Run!

Resiliency in Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2021 15:50


I'm running for the Boston Children's Hospital for the London 2021 Marathon! Please consider donating! https://secure.childrenshospital.org/site/TR/ActiveEvents/ActiveEvents?px=2051217&pg=personal&fr_id=2076 ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Episodes mentioned: Running from Training for Your First Marathon: My Running Story, Running Basics, How I Trained for a Half/Full Marathon, Instagram Q&A: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/episodes/Running-from-Training-for-Your-First-Marathon-My-Running-Story--Running-Basics--How-I-Trained-For-a-Half--Full-Marathon--Instagram-QA-emhljc ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Questions? Comments? Shoot me a message! Podcast IG: @resiliencyinrunning Personal IG: @liznewcomer www.resiliencyinrunning.com linktr.ee/resiliencyinrunning www.youtube.com/resiliencyinrunning Canva Free Trial: https://www.canva.com/join/lkc-rsl-fgc Headliner Free Trial: https://make.headliner.app/referral/elizabeth.newcomer_HV4fOz --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/resiliencyinrunning/support

Where We Live
How To Increase COVID Vaccination Rate With Delta Variant Looming?

Where We Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 49:00


More than two thirds of Connecticut residents have received at least one shot of the covid vaccine. At the same time, a new and fast-spreading “delta variant” of covid has spread around the globe and has become an ever-growing portion of new covid cases in the United States. This hour, we wade into all of this with public health experts. Will the delta variant impact our behaviors this summer? GUESTS: Saad Omer -  Director, Yale Institute for Global Health, and Professor of Medicine in Infectious Diseases Tekisha Dwan Everette - Executive director of Health Equity Solutions John Brownstein - Epidemiologist and chief innovation officer at Boston Children's Hospital; also a professor at Harvard Medical School Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Relentless Health Value
EP327: Pharma Hooking Up With Start-ups, With Naomi Fried, PhD, About PharmStars™

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 32:25


You can subscribe to this show two ways. One way is through the iTunes podcast app or your podcast app of choice. That's a cool way to subscribe because then the show just kind of turns up in your podcast app each week and you can decide to listen to it on the fly. The other way is to subscribe on our Web site. This is more like a newsletter subscription. If you subscribe this way, you get an email each week that transcribes the show introduction, plus includes timed show notes. Many people subscribe both ways, just saying, because each way has different benefits that are pretty complementary. If you subscribe to the newsletter, you only get the newsletter. We are frankly way too busy doing other things to send out other emails. Also, you can easily unsubscribe at any time. I saw a post the other day in Twitter. Someone wrote, “So much can be done to improve community and share lessons to improve outcomes. The trick is making money without selling patient data to Pharma.” Here's my question for you, and I'm legit asking: I have seen many use cases that benefit patients and that are incredibly worthwhile. But no one is willing to pay for them. That's the first point this Tweet I just read infers. And I've seen it time and time again: gaps in care no one is willing to fill. If you're speaking about very specific patient populations in very specific therapeutic categories, like some rare diseases, you're not going to find basically anyone besides Pharma who has the bandwidth, the money, the expertise, and the reach to fill that gap. If you contemplate this further, and I have, Pharma might be the only entity who, if they do it, the price of health care doesn't immediately go up. Hear me out here because I'm wading into controversial waters, so let me make my point before you jump me in a dark alley. If Pharma does something and it comes out of their existing marketing budget or their R&D budget or some other existing budget, them spending money on filling a patient gap versus them spending money on some TV ad is not going to impact the price of the drug either way. If the price of the drug is already too high, the price of the drug is still too high. That's going to be true regardless. Why not let Pharma pay the freight for making sure their own patient populations get the best care possible? This show is posted on LinkedIn and Twitter. Let me know what your thoughts are. I'm very interested. In this health care podcast, I am really pleased to be speaking with Naomi Fried, PhD. Dr. Fried has had and continues to have a storied career. Each of her roles has always circled around innovation. She's been the chief innovation officer at Boston Children's, where she built their first digital health accelerator. She was recruited by Biogen after that to be their VP of innovation and external partnerships. She founded a consulting practice focused on innovation, and her latest endeavor, which she talks about later on in this show, is PharmStars, which is, in my own words, a sort of 10-week crash course/accelerator for digital health start-ups looking to work with Pharma—and for Pharma looking to work with digital health start-ups. You can learn more about PharmStars at pharmstars.com. Naomi Fried, PhD, is the founder and CEO of PharmStars, the first and only pharma-focused accelerator for digital health start-ups, dedicated to driving digital health adoption to improve patient outcomes. PharmStars understands and addresses the challenges that Pharma and start-ups face when seeking to collaborate. Its PharmaU™ program supports its digital health start-ups and pharma members seeking to “bridge the gap,” leading to greater success and faster adoption of “beyond the molecule” solutions for patients. PharmStars provides education and mentoring to digital health start-ups seeking engagement with pharma and biotech firms. Its pharma members are committed to working with its graduating start-ups. Applications for participation in the first cohort are due July 21, 2021. Dr. Fried is also the co-founder and managing partner of Ambit Health Ventures, an early-stage venture capital fund focused on digital health investments. Previously, she was the CEO of the consulting firm Health Innovation Strategies, VP of innovation and external partnerships at Biogen, the first chief innovation officer at Boston Children's Hospital, and the first VP of innovation and advanced technology at Kaiser Permanente. She advises and serves on the boards of digital health start-ups. 03:42 What does the pharma–start-up gap look like? 05:49 Why is it hard to navigate Big Pharma when trying to partner with start-ups? 09:53 “A lot of what contributes to that pharma–start-up gap is a lack of understanding.” 10:05 What's the best way to navigate the pharma–start-up partnership? 10:55 “There's not a clear path as to who should be engaged from the pharma side, because the value proposition wasn't well articulated.” 12:27 “Even if … the product is better, if it's such an uphill battle to get them through the hoops and to work with them, they may not be the partner of choice.” 13:45 Why are start-ups surprised at who all is involved with the decision-making process on the pharma side? 15:51 Where might start-ups run into regulatory oversight compliance issues? 20:41 “Setting expectations and talking early on … really, just understanding on both sides … they have to meet each other and work around these requirements.” 22:02 “Start-ups really are under financial pressure.” 26:33 “Pharma has a lot to offer digital health start-ups.” 27:40 Is Pharma any good at selling something to a provider? 29:22 What do start-ups need to keep in mind when pitching to Pharma? 30:35 “Understanding Pharma's needs, how they work, what they will pay for is so important for start-ups.” You can learn more about PharmStars at pharmstars.com. @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma What does the pharma–start-up gap look like? @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma Why is it hard to navigate Big Pharma when trying to partner with start-ups? @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma “A lot of what contributes to that pharma–start-up gap is a lack of understanding.” @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma What's the best way to navigate the pharma–start-up partnership? @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma “Even if … the product is better, if it's such an uphill battle to get them through the hoops and to work with them, they may not be the partner of choice.” @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma “Start-ups really are under financial pressure.” @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma “Pharma has a lot to offer digital health start-ups.” @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma What do start-ups need to keep in mind when pitching to Pharma? @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma “Understanding Pharma's needs, how they work, what they will pay for is so important for start-ups.” @NaomiFried of @AmbitHealth discusses @PharmStars on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast #digitalhealth #pharma