Podcasts about boston children

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Best podcasts about boston children

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Latest podcast episodes about boston children

OPENPediatrics
"Tripledemic: What We Know So Far and What to Expect Going Forward" by Dr. Paul Offit

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 22:37


In this World Shared Practice Forum podcast, Dr. Paul Offit discusses the viruses causing the so-called “tripledemic.” Dr. Offit reviews the virulence, transmission, and vaccine potential related to Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). He shares current knowledge about the epidemiology and pediatric vaccination rates related to the Influenza A outbreak. Lastly, Dr. Offit gives an update on COVID-19 in the pediatric population, including details on current variants, the effectiveness and impact of the bivalent vaccines, and what to expect in the future. Upon listening to this presentation, learners should be able to: - Describe the surge of RSV infections observed in 2022, with likely causes - Explain the process of strain selection for the yearly Influenza vaccine - Summarize available data relating to the efficacy of the bivalent COVID vaccine Published: January 23, 2023. Citation: Offit P, Daniel D, Burns JP. Tripledemic: What we know so far and what to expect going forward on RSV, Influenza A, and SARS-CoV-2 in Children. 01/2023. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://soundcloud.com/openpediatrics/tripledemic-what-we-know-so-far-and-what-to-expect-going-forward-by-dr-paul-offit Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open-access and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

OPENPediatrics
"Laryngeal Cleft" by Dr. Reza Rahbar and Dr. Jessica Laird-Gion for OPENPediatrics

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 15:42


This podcast discusses the pre-operative, operative, and post-operative considerations for patients undergoing laryngeal cleft repair including: anatomy and pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pre-operative evaluation, anesthetic management, operative approach, and post-operative care. Upon viewing this presentation, participants will be able to: - Describe the anatomy and pathophysiology of a laryngeal cleft - List the common symptoms that a patient may exhibit with various types of laryngeal cleft. - Explain the approach used to diagnose a laryngeal cleft. - Describe the common preoperative evaluation for laryngeal cleft surgery. - Explain the anesthetic management plan for repair of type 1 and type II laryngeal clefts. - Describe the operative approach for repair of type 1 and type II laryngeal clefts. - Anticipate the post operative considerations following repair of type 1 and type II laryngeal clefts. Initial Publication: January 19, 2023 Citation: Laird-Gion J, O'Halloran A, Soohey R, Rahbar R, Watters K, Wolbrink TA. Laryngeal Cleft. 01/2023. Online Video. OPENPediatrics. Soundcloud link: https://soundcloud.com/openpediatrics/laryngeal-cleft. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Composers Datebook
"Truth Tones" for MLK

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 2:00


Synopsis Each January, Martin Luther King Day is observed on the third Monday of the month, and in 2009, MLK day fell on January 19th. To celebrate, the director of the Boston Children's Chorus commissioned and premiered a new work from the American composer Trevor Weston. Rather than set words spoken by King, Weston took a different course: “[Dr. King's] speeches speak to … the beauty of living in a society where the truth of equality is actually realized and often demonstrate a broad historical perspective,” says Weston, “so I celebrated King by using texts from the African Saint Augustine and the African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar.” From Saint Augustine's “Confessions,” Weston includes the line, “O Truth, you give hearing to all who consult you … you answer clearly, but all men do not hear you,” and from a Dunbar work entitled “The Poet,” this line: “He sang of life, serenely sweet/With now and then a deeper note.” Musically, Weston echoes works both medieval and modern, specifically the 12th century composer Hildegard von Bingen and the 20th century composer Morton Feldman, with a variation on the spiritual “Wade in the Water” tossed in for good measure. The result is a haunting, inward-looking choral work that Weston entitled “Truth Tones.” Music Played in Today's Program Trevor Weston "Truth Tones" Trinity Youth Chorus; Julian Wachner, conductor. Acis 72290

The Ultimate Health Podcast
516: Everything You've Been Told About Weight Loss Is Wrong! (Do This Instead) | Dr. David Ludwig

The Ultimate Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 83:31


Watch the full video interview on YouTube here: https://bit.ly/516drdavidludwig Dr. David Ludwig is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He's a Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. For more than 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of dietary composition on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low-glycemic index, low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has authored more than 200 scientific articles and presently serves as an editor at The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Dr. Ludwig is author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Always Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain Your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently. If you're just about to begin your weight loss journey or you've hit a plateau along the way, this conversation is for you! In this episode, we discuss: What is the carbohydrate-insulin model? Insulin is miracle grow for your fat cells Naked carbohydrates are a metabolic disaster The right way to eat carbs Shift your metabolism one meal at a time Transitioning from the SAD diet to a keto diet The first step to weight loss Are you a high insulin secreter? Type 1 diabetes and insulin Carbohydrates raise insulin and suppress glucagon (a bad combo) The problem with fructose Dr. Ludwig's approach to time-restricted eating Coffee stimulates weight loss Fasted exercise lowers insulin resistance Start walking after your meals Why exercise is a poor prescription for weight loss How your metabolism changes as you age Sleep and stress alter fat cell behaviour Being fat is not the problem, it's the ill health of your fat cells The nibbling vs. gorging study Figuring out the best time of day to eat for your insulin There's death in eating... no matter what diet you consume We need proper investment in our food supply Show sponsors: Just Thrive

Run the List
Episode 92: Hyponatremia

Run the List

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 27:05


Dr. Alexis "AC" Gomez, a second year fellow at the combined MGH, Brigham and Women's, and Boston Children's nephrology program, discusses her approach to hyponatremia with host Dr. Joyce Zhou. She shares the pathophysiology behind her diagnostic framework for hyponatremia and her systematic approach, and discusses pearls such as how to use ddAVP clamps in treating this disorder. Run the List podcast on AccessMedicine: https://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/multimedia.aspx#1460

Big Woods Bucks - Deer Hunting -Education & Entertainment
119 | “Sometimes assuming can be a catalyst for a mistake. At the very least take time to learn from it.”

Big Woods Bucks - Deer Hunting -Education & Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 82:02


Lee Schanz shares his account of the buck he killed but didn't find till the week after. Lee wanted to share to help you avoid making the mistake he did. Even with a killing shot deer don't always bleed. Ravens can be a tell-tale sign. At this year's Yankee Classic in VT. Jan. 20-22, 2023, we will announce BWB buck pool winner. Deer have been everywhere it is just a good winter for them with the lack of snow. Found only 1 coyote track in a 50 mile snowmachine ride. Mostly crust can't run dogs. Moose are sparring – they have been active but seem to be holding their antlers. In association with Coburn Summit Riders Snowmobile Club, BWB & Woodman Arms, Mark and Kassandra Woodman will be running the Boston Marathon this year to support The Boston Children's Hospital and their patient partner and her family. Buy a raffle ticket at 2 Muzzleloader raffle ticket purchase. What is a dooryard? Windstorm knocked tress down for plenty of feed in woods for deer. Don't forget to use the discount code for your onX membership. Go to on onxmaps.com and enter discount code bwb for 20% discount. Please keep important feedback. Please use the link below. The Big Woods Team… https://www.bigwoodsbucks.com/Contact

The Gerry Callahan Podcast
The Gerry Callahan Show (01/13/23)

The Gerry Callahan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 76:14


- More on Joe Biden and #garagegate. - Were the documents planted by the right wing extremists? - Billboard Chris joins the show to talk about his protest tomorrow at Boston Children's Hospital. - Wild Card Weekend NFL picks with Montante! Listen to Newsmax LIVE and see our entire podcast lineup at www.Newsmax.com/listen Download the free NEWSMAX app at www.newsmaxtv.com/app or go to www.NewsmaxTV.com to watch the real news!  Looking for NEWSMAX caps, tees, mugs & more? Check out the Newsmax merchandise shop at : http://nws.mx/shop Order Callahan Coffee right now, and while you're at it grab yourself a Bug The Chug Mug! callahancoffee.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Once Upon A Gene
Happiness Is Meant to Be Shared with Author, Storyteller, and NEMO Dadvocate Andrés Treviño

Once Upon A Gene

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 57:48


ONCE UPON A GENE - EPISODE 169 Happiness Is Meant to Be Shared with Author, Storyteller, and NEMO dadvocate Andrés Treviño Andrés Treviño is a dadvocate, author and storyteller. His story is full of twists and turns and even moving across countries to save his child. I had the pleasure of meeting him in person at the Global Genes Patient Advocacy Summit and I'm thrilled that you get to meet him too, because happiness is meant to be shared. EPISODE HIGHLIGHTS Can you tell us where your story begins? Andy and Sophia are the reason I got into advocacy. Andy was born in Mexico City with a condition called NEMO in 1999. Within 48 hours of birth, he developed a life-threatening infection and he wasn't able to fight the infection without IV antibiotics. My wife and I quickly became experts in extreme parenting, living in the hospital for almost 1000 days with Andy, battling infections of his nervous system, bones, GI tract, sinus and skin. We found a hopeful solution in moving to Boston. In Mexico City, we received a diagnosis of bad luck, but after a couple months at Boston Children's Hospital, we got a real diagnosis and real answers. In 2004, our daughter Sophia was born. Cells were gathered from her umbilical cord and at a couple months old, additional blood was taken from her bone marrow. The bone marrow and umbilical cord stem cells were used in a complex procedure to replace Andy's affected cells.  How are Andy and Sophia now? Andy is 23 and graduating college in December. He is studying Communications. Sophia just recently started college. They have a very special bond. We also have a third daughter Tanya who is 13 and a blessing.  What motivated your decision to do the work you're doing? My career was originally in professional communications, but after what we lived through, I wanted to help others facing similar situations and facing rare disease. I get to meet so many people in the rare disease community that inspire me with their resiliency.  What are your tips for someone who wants to tell their story? Think of six words that explain your story, like "happiness is meant to be shared", which is what I use to share my story. This gives you a starting point. Canned stories, or those that are read from a script, doesn't convey a story told from the heart. A raw story is sharing something very difficult and emotional which makes listeners feel bad for you, but it doesn't leave them compelled to do something. A well-told story is crafted, moments are selected to connect with the audience and practiced instead of read. Positive stories move people and make others feel hope.  LINKS & RESOURCES MENTIONED The Disorder Channel https://www.thedisordercollection.com/ Andy & Sofia: Stem cells, scientific miracles and one fit savior https://www.amazon.com/Andy-Sofia-scientific-miracles-savior/dp/0615422373 Living Proof Advocacy  https://www.livingproofadvocacy.com/ TUNE INTO THE ONCE UPON A GENE PODCAST Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/5Htr9lt5vXGG3ac6enxLQ7 Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/once-upon-a-gene/id1485249347 Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/once-upon-a-gene Overcast https://overcast.fm/itunes1485249347/once-upon-a-gene CONNECT WITH EFFIE PARKS Website https://effieparks.com/ Twitter https://twitter.com/OnceUponAGene Instagram https://www.instagram.com/onceuponagene.podcast/?hl=en Built Ford Tough Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/1877643259173346/ Interested in advertising on Once Upon a Gene? Email advertising@bloodstreammedia.com for more information!

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Up in the Air

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 161:38


Today on Boston Public Radio: We began the show by talking with listeners about a Stoughton High School student who was suspended for protesting the school district's ban on pride flags and Black Lives Matter flags. Juliette Kayyem discussed massive flight delays and cancellations after the Federal Aviation Association (FAA) reported an outage of its Notice to Air Missions System. Kayyem is former assistant secretary for Homeland Security under President Barack Obama, and the faculty chair of the homeland-security program at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Her latest book is "The Devil Never Sleeps: Learning to Live in an Age of Disasters." Corby Kummer talked about the closure of critically-acclaimed Danish restaurant Noma — often regarded as the best restaurant in the world. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jared Bowen weighed in on the return of the Golden Globes after multiple scandals involving racism, corruption, and sexual assault. Bowen is GBH's Executive Arts Editor. He hosts “Open Studio with Jared Bowen” on GBH Channel 2. Eric Deggans shared his favorite television shows of 2022, from "Abbott Elementary" to "We Need to Talk About Cosby." Deggans is NPR's TV critic, a contributor to NBC, MSNBC and BPR. He's also the author of “Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation.” Kenneth Griffith, Jacob Hiser, Mara Stein, and Jean-Caleb Belizaire of Boston Children's Chorus joined us for an in-studio performance ahead of their “Becoming King: 20th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Concert” at Boston Symphony Orchestra. Griffith is a conductor and Associate Director of Choirs for the Boston Children's Chorus. Hiser is the collaborative pianist for the Boston Children's Chorus. Stein and Belizaire are members of the Boston Children's Chorus. For tickets to Monday's “Becoming King: 20th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Concert” at Boston Symphony Orchestra, go to BostonChildrensChorus.org. We ended the show by talking with listeners about a recent string of airline fiascos, from surging ticket prices to last-minute cancellations.

DISRxUPT
Episode 22 | Disaster Response and the Pharmacist - Shannon Manzi

DISRxUPT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 47:52


Disasters are often catastrophic, in part because they are both rare and unpredictable. Whether it be a natural disaster such as a hurricane, a mass casualty event, or a global pandemic, having highly trained and qualified healthcare teams ready to deploy at a moment's notice is a key strategy to meet the medical needs of those affected. Today's pharmacists are well-trained to serve a key role on these rapid response teams. What does the pharmacist's role look like when responding to disasters? Dr. Shannon Manzi answers this question and many more related to disaster medical response. She currently serves as the Director of Safety & Quality for the Department of Pharmacy at Boston Children's Hospital. She is also an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and serves as Lead Pharmacist for the MA-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) as part of the National Disaster Medical System, Administration for Strategic Preparedness and Response, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Listen as she describes her role in disaster medical assistance teams and calls other pharmacists to action in this vital role. 

Crime Writers On...True Crime Review
The Battle for Justina Pelletier

Crime Writers On...True Crime Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 40:14


Justina Pelletier was a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder that required numerous surgeries and caused severe pain. When she was taken to Boston Children's Hospital, doctors suspected Justina's issues were psychological and not physical - and they suspected her parents were committing medical child abuse.Over the next 16 months, the Pelletiers used the media and threats of litigation to apply pressure on the hospital and the state to discharge their daughter. But administrators said these hardball tactics made it impossible to get Justina care at other facilities, further harming her prognosis.The Peacock documentary series “The Battle for Justina Pelletier” looks at the very public tug-of-war between parents and physicians convinced they're doing the best thing for a sick child, as well as the exploits of a computer hacker who came to her cause. It also explores the thornier question of what Justina's medical issues truly were and how that affected the adults' decisions.OUR SPOILER-FREE REVIEWS OF "THE BATTLE FOR JUSTINA PELLETIER" BEGIN IN THE FINAL 7 MINUTES OF THE EPISODE.

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare

Meet Our Guest: Angelika Fretzen, Ph.D., M.B.A. is the Wyss Institute's Technology Translation Director and COO. She earned her Ph.D. in organic chemistry at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and gained postdoctoral experience in the laboratory of Professor Gregory Verdine at Harvard University. Following her academic training, Dr. Fretzen pursued her M.B.A. at Suffolk University, Boston, and subsequently held leadership positions at Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, and at Catabasis Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge, MA, where she was Senior Vice President of Product Development.Key Insights: Dr. Fretzen discusses her experience of being a woman in STEM and how she encourages younger generations to join the STEM community.● From Germany to Harvard. Dr. Fretzen was young when she took interest in STEM. She quickly realized this was seen as an unorthodox path growing up in Germany, but nevertheless prevailed and made it to her current position at the Wyss Institute at Harvard University.● A Career In Chemistry. Going from industry to academia, she enjoyed this career turn. Her industry experience enabled her to gain a deep understanding of the processes involved in developing and de-risking therapeutic products from pre-clinical stages to the clinical market.● The Only Woman in The Room. Dr. Fretzen's impressive and innovative career has sometimes caused her to be the only woman in the room. Even if this was sometimes a difficult path to forge, she believes that no matter what you do, be sure to follow your passion.This episode is hosted by Sandra Fenwick, Former CEO, Boston Children's Hospital.Relevant Links: Read more about Angelika FretzenWyss Institute at Harvard University

The Pediatric Lounge
Episode # 50 Life as a Pediatric Resident in 1970s

The Pediatric Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 60:46


Jesse Hackell, MD, FAAP, is a graduate of Princeton University and received his MD degree from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1976. His pediatric residency was completed at Johns Hopkins as well, and he undertook one year of training in neonatal-perinatal medicine at The University of Texas in Houston. He practiced pediatrics in Rockland County, NY from 1981 until his retirement in 2022, and was a founding member of Pomona Pediatrics, now a division of Boston Children's Health Physicians, there in 1987. He is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics, with permanent certification. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and is the President of the New York State Chapter 3 of the AAP, and co-chair of the Pediatric Council for Chapters 2 & 3. He is Chair of the National AAP Committee on Practice and Ambulatory Medicine (COPAM) and has served on the executive committee of the AAP Section on Administration and Practice Management (SOAPM). His professional interests include addressing vaccine confidence, practice management, and advocacy on children's health issues.Dr. Herschell Lessin, MD FAAP is a legend in the pediatric community. He graduated from Yale Medical school and then went on to do his residency at Yale Children's Hospital. He then leads one of the largest mega groups in NY.  He was part of the ADHD guidelines for the AAP and continues to practice as well as provide expert testimony in medical cases.  Please subscribe to our podcast on apple or amazon and give us a great review. You can make suggestions for guests and topics on our website below. Thanks for listening. Follow us on social media YouTube, Instagram, WebPage The Pediatric Lounge - A Podcast taking you behind the door of the Physician's Lounge to get a deeper insight into what docs are talking about today, from the clinically profound to the wonderfully routine...and everything in between. The conversations are not intended as medical advice and the opinions expressed are solely those of the host and guest.

The Gary Bisbee Show
Retirement: The Next Chapter | Howard Kern, Sandra Fenwick, and Bill Zollars

The Gary Bisbee Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 7:13


Meet the Guests:This episode features three leaders previously interviewed on The Gary Bisbee Show. Listeners will hear from: Howard Kern, Former President and CEO, Sentara Healthcare; Sandra Fenwick, Former CEO, Boston Children's Hospital; and Bill Zollars, Former Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, YRC Worldwide Inc. Key Insights:Our guests offer valuable insight and advice on how to make the best transition to retirement. Pursue Your Interests. Retirement allows an active person to be more selective about how and where they can continue to contribute. Be Choosy. Recent retirees should not say yes to every opportunity; instead, find the balance that works best. Drop some of the old obligations; explore new avenues.Take time. Bill Zollars recommends taking up to six months to “reset” before committing to anything. This allows people to make wise decisions about how to allocate their time. Relevant Links:Read about Howard KernRead about Sandra FenwickRead about Bill Zollars

Good Morning Liberty
DBOTY - August Recap (Brian Stelter, Boston Children's, Not a Wall) || 897

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 40:26


Dumb Bleep of the Year starts NOW. Listen to the monthly recaps while we take Christmas break! This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp.  Give online therapy a try at Betterhelp.com/gml and get on your way to being your best self.    Join the private discord & chat during the show! joingml.com   Invest in your future & your human capital today  natescrashcourse.com   Like our intro song? https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Awkward Conversations
Did You Ever?

Awkward Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 26:03


Host Jodie Sweetin is joined by Amy McCarthy, Director of Social Work for the Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction Program (ASAP) at Boston Children's Hospital; Bob Sabouni Executive Producer of Awkward Conversations and actor and directorJake Busey.  Someday your child will ask you if you used drugs. What will you say when that question comes your way? Does genetics play a part in the predisposition to drug abuse? Today our panel discusses these questions and more on Awkward Conversations. Don't miss this episode.    IN THIS EPISODE: [00:00] Season One clip of conversation between parents deciding how much to tell their children about their drug experimentation.   [02:21] Clinical findings on the effect a parent's past drug use has on a child [03:33] Programs designed for the family or friend of an abuser and accepting the fact that addiction is a medical condition [10:12] The struggle of what to say to your child [16:26] Being honest with your child without laying out details [19:45] Bottom line advice KEY TAKEAWAYS: The drugs available today are far different than those 15 or 20 years ago.  They were  terrible for you and detrimental to your health.  Today the drugs on the streets can kill you. Parents don't have all the answers.  It is ok to tell your child that you will research their question when you don't know the answer.  Then do the research and understand why drug use is detrimental so you can give your child reasons. One pill can kill! It doesn't matter whether a parent did or didn't do drugs.  The pills today can kill. A child can make better choices when he has truthful information.   ***DISCLAIMER***The views, information, or opinions expressed during the Awkward Conversation series are solely those of the individuals, speakers, commentators, experts, and or hosts involved and do not necessarily reflect nor represent those of the production, associates or broadcaster, or any of its employees. Production is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the series available for viewing. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform. This series does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. This series is available for private, non-commercial use only. The production, broadcaster, or its channel cannot be held accountable for all or any views expressed during this program. Resources: SAMHSA Find Treatment   Emoji Decoder  DEA Takeback Website Growing Up Drug-Free: A Parent's Guide to Substance Use Prevention One Pill Could Kill Never Thought I'd Say This Podcast with Jodie Sweetin Team Upstandards with Trevor Donovan Get Smart About Drugs Website Elks Kid Zone Website Elks Drug Awareness Program Website Elks DAP on Twitter Elks DAP on Facebook Elks DAP on YouTube DEA Website DEA on Instagram DEA on Twitter DEA on Facebook DEA YouTube Channel     Watch Awkward Conversations Season 1 the series: Awkward Breakfast Conversations - Ep. 1 Awkward Lunch Conversations - Ep. 2 Awkward Dinner Conversations - Ep. 3      Bios:   Jodie Sweetin is an American actress and television personality known for her role as Stephanie Tanner in the ABC comedy series Full House and its Netflix sequel series Fuller House. Jodie is joined by Content Expert Amy McCarthy, a Senior Clinical Social Worker at Boston Children's Hospital. Amy McCarthy, LICSW, is the Director of Social Work for the Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction Program (ASAP) at Boston Children's Hospital, where she provides direct clinical and programmatic support. Additionally, Amy has extensive experience working in community-based settings providing care to young people with complex mental health needs and their families. As the former director of the Boston-Suffolk County Family Resource Center, she worked with an abundance of community partners to ensure residents had access to vital resources to meet basic needs and beyond. Amy received her Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) from Siena College and earned a Master's Degree in Social Work (MSW) from Wheelock College Jake Busey spent his childhood in sunny southern California, as well as a plethora of film sets around the country. His childhood was similar to a "military brat", a series of strung-together extended-stay location shoots, alternating with tours on the road with his father's various bands and associates. In a world of gypsies & artists, spending many years on tour buses and side-stage-studying such acts as Willie Nelson, Leon Russell, Little Feat, the Band, and Fleetwood Mac, Jake found his passion for music and performing live. Busey entered the industry at the age of 5 in his first motion picture, Dustin Hoffman's opus, "Straight Time" (1977), playing Son to his father and Cathy Bates. After finishing high school at Crossroads School and college in Santa Barbara, Jake returned to L.A to study the craft of acting for film seriously. He started auditioning at 20yrs old and booked his first role in a PBS film, "Shimmer," shot on location in Iowa. Slowly but surely, bit parts playing supporting characters in independent films would follow. After a few years of hard work and little returns, He was Cast as the villain in Showtimes "rebel highway series" Motorcycle Gang by Director John Milius. The film was part of an eight-film series and drew great attention amongst the "up and coming actor" buzz of Hollywood. He made his true debut on the big screen in 1994 alongside Stephen Dorff and Reese Witherspoon in the grind house grunge film "SFW," but that Buzz caught the eye of Robert Zemekis & Peter Jackson, which led jake to star opposite Michael J. Fox in the Frighteners. .soon after wrapping, big changes came from a 3-page monologue about religion vs. science when he landed "Contact" with Jodi Foster and Matthew McConnaghey. Then "Enemy of the State", then Vince Gilligan scribed "Home Fries," and most memorably as the smart-mouthed Private Ace Levy in the Sci-Fi cult classic "Starship Troopers." Jake was a force to be reckoned with in the late 1990s A-list film market. Then in the early 21st century, after the great success of "Identity," Jake took some risks with projects, and leaps of faith, stepping up into starring roles in such studio disasters as "Tomcats" and "the First 20 Million is always the hardest", Films hyped to glory among the Hollywood machine, which failed miserably, and left him needing to reassess his position. It was time for a break. Some time away was needed.   After a few-year hiatus from acting as he pursued directing films, "road-tripping" the country, and playing in his band around Hollywood, he was ready for his come-back. Jake blasted onscreen as a pyrotechnic specialist in the final season of FX's hit series "Justified", leaving many an audience member aghast, having thought he was a solid new addition to the show...alas, just a masterfully crafted cameo, blowing up in 30 seconds. When Robert Rodriguez cast him as the new Sex Machine for all three seasons of "From Dusk Till Dawn, Things started heating up again. In The History Channel mini-series "Texas Rising," Busey plays Samuel Wallace, the man credited with reciting the legendary warning, "Remember the Alamo!" directed by Roland Joffe.   His recent projects include "Mr. Robot", and Stranger Things", Showtime's "Ray Donovan," CBS television's "NCIS" Episode 346(1516), ABC's "Marvels agents of S.H.E.I.L.D.., Episode 513 & 519, and in the summer of 2018, he made his return to the summer tent-pole event scene with 20th Century Fox's "the_Predator".   A bit of a modern-day Renaissance man, Jake's passions in life includes fatherhood, acting, desert racing, architecture, playing music, flying planes when necessary, and fabricating anything mechanical in his metal shop.  

Pediatric Research Podcast
Barriers to finding a genetic diagnosis for children with rare disease.

Pediatric Research Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 13:46


Rare diseases affect millions of people in the USA. However, access to subspecialty care is not distributed equitably and there may be other barriers to clinic attendance. Furthermore, once established within the genetics clinic, families may still face barriers along the path to getting a molecular diagnosis.In this episode, we meet Early Career Investigator, Monica Wojcik, a neonatologist and geneticist at Boston Children's Hospital who ran a study to determine the influence of social determinants of health on the care-cascade following referral to a high-volume pediatric outpatient genetics clinic. Read the full study here: Rare diseases, common barriers: disparities in pediatric clinical genetics outcomes | Pediatric Research (nature.com) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

You Just Have To Laugh
357. Singing Comedy Impressionist Scott Record has a career and background as versatile as his talents

You Just Have To Laugh

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 38:43


As a child growing up in New England, Scott's early interests and training were in the fields of music, tap dancing, magic, acting, and sports. In between his schoolwork and hours spent working at his family's diner, (which Scott claims helped his character acting skills immeasurably), Scott acted with several regional companies, as well as with the Boston Children's Theater. As a musician, Scott had a treasured involvement with the Boston Pops Orchestra, playing in the percussion section during the final year of legendary conductor Arthur Fiedler's reign. Scott also played with numerous jazz, rock, and show bands throughout the New England area.Scott moved to New York in 1978 and first worked as a bouncer/bartender in a disco directly across the street from Dangerfield's, the famous nightclub named after the well-known comedian. After watching the celebrity names revolve weekly on the marquis of that establishment, Scott decided to test his talents on a Monday night at Dangerfield's. Rodney immediately liked Scott and took him on the road where he successfully worked for three years as Rodney Dangerfield's opening act. Since then, Scott has worked with many superstars including Ann Margret, Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Huey Lewis and the News, Tom Jones, Julio Iglesias, Perry Como, Tony Bennett, The Gatlin Brothers, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Celine Dion, Cher, Clint Black, and many more. Scott's headlining status has been enjoyed at the Mohegan Sun Casino Resort in CT, the McCallum Theatre in Palm Desert, CA, and other premium venues throughout the United States. Scott also performs in Las Vegas, Lake Tahoe, and in Atlantic City, where he was voted the Best Variety Act of the Year by Atlantic City Magazine. Scott is one of the most requested headliners on several of the world's most elite cruise lines. Corporate appearances make up yet another large percentage of Scott's current schedule. Golf is one of Scott's many passions. He currently headlines as well as competes in many of the major Pro-Am events sponsored by the PGA, LPGA, USGA, and the Seniors Tour. He has headlined at several Phoenix Open, the Player's Championship, and the Bay Hill Classic, in which he played in the Pro-Am with Tiger Woods and won that event! Scott also participates in many fun- raising charity tournaments, including the Bob Hope Desert Classic, the Kraft Nabisco LPGA Championship, and the AT&T Pebble Beach.

Help and Hope Happen Here
Prabal Chakrabarti and Venessa Ruget will talk about their beloved daughter Sajni who passed away after a 19 month fight against DIPG in July of 2017. Sajni had a desire to change the world , even though she was only 8 years old.

Help and Hope Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 56:45


After falling on her own several times and experiencing pain in her pinkie finger while playing the violin,  Prabal Chakrabarti and Venessa Ruget's  daughter Sajni was diagnosed with DIPG at the age of 7. Sajni tried to lead her best life possible for the next 19 months, as she spoke French fluently, rode horses, did karate, and wrote a letter to the White House about Climate Change. As Venessa put it, Sajni wanted to change the world. Sajni took over 100 trips to Boston Children's Hospital and took 10 trips to England as her parents tried to do whatever they could to help their beloved daughter. Unfortunately the viciousness of DIPG took over and she passed away on July 1st of 2017. 

WBUR News
In record numbers, families without shelter are turning to Massachusetts emergency departments

WBUR News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 6:32


"We end up becoming this kind of front door to the shelter system,” said Amanda Stewart, a doctor in the emergency department at Boston Children's Hospital. This year, her ER is on track to see 550 families whose primary concern is housing.

PRS Journal Club
“Risk Factors for Severe Macromastia” with Ingrid M. Ganske, MD - Dec. 2022 Journal Club

PRS Journal Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 14:11


In this episode of the Award-winning PRS Journal Club Podcast, 2022 Resident Ambassadors to the PRS Editorial Board – Saïd Azoury, Emily Long, and Ronnie Shammas- and special guest Ingrid M. Ganske, MD, discuss the following articles from the December 2022 issue: “Risk Factors Associated with Severe Macromastia among Adolescents and Young Women” by Massey, Firriolo, Nuzzi, et al. Read the article for FREE: https://bit.ly/SevereMacromastiaFactors Special guest Ingrid M. Ganske, MD, is a Pediatric Plastic Surgeon at Boston Children's Hospital, she specializes in cleft lip and palate, ear reconstruction, and vascular anomalies. Dr. Ganske completed postgraduate training in the Harvard Plastic Surgery Residency, followed by a Craniofacial Fellowship at Boston Children's Hospital. READ the articles discussed in this podcast as well as free related content from the archives: https://bit.ly/PRSDec22Collection

Awkward Conversations
The Talk - Part 3

Awkward Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 21:29


Host Jodie Sweetin is joined by Amy McCarthy, Dr. Aida Balsano, Director for Prevention Communications and Public Engagement at the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, and Robert Vincent, Associate Administrator for Alcohol Prevention and Treatment Policy at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Ultimately our goal is to help parents have“The Talk.” If it hasn't happened yet, then let's be prepared…if it has, how did it go? If you screwed it up, no worries. Let's figure out how to get it right. But, on the other hand, if you feel it went well, take this as a reminder that the talk is not a one-off, let's figure out what's next in this constant battle to keep those we love more than life itself safe! Today our panel discusses the consequences of substance abuse. Learn why explaining the “why” is essential when talking to your child. IN THIS EPISODE: [00:00] Overview of The Talk - Part 2 [01:46] The knowledge your child has regarding drugs may be faulty [05:49] How does a parent cope with feelings of betrayal and dishonesty? Should there be  consequences for bad behavior [10:18] The importance of telling a child why this behavior is bad for them [12:54] How the drugs have changed over the years [19:36] Upcoming episode of Awkward Conversations KEY TAKEAWAYS: Kids don't look at the consequences of drug use. They don't frame it as health, wellness, or well-being. Instead, they only think about the future and need to hear why drugs harm them. Parents need to be listening and present.  A “behavior contract,” or reward and consequences, should be clear to everyone. Likewise, there should be inevitable consequences for certain behaviors.  The potency of drugs has changed.  They are more potent than they have ever been.  And the sad thing about that fact is that the wrong pill can kill.     ***DISCLAIMER***The views, information, or opinions expressed during the Awkward Conversation series are solely those of the individuals, speakers, commentators, experts, and or hosts involved and do not necessarily reflect nor represent those of the production, associates or broadcaster, or any of its employees. Production is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the series available for viewing. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform. This series does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. This series is available for private, non-commercial use only. The production, broadcaster, or its channel cannot be held accountable for all or any views expressed during this program. Resources: SAMHSA Find Treatment   Emoji Decoder  DEA Takeback Website Growing Up Drug-Free: A Parent's Guide to Substance Use Prevention One Pill Could Kill Never Thought I'd Say This Podcast with Jodie Sweetin Team Upstandards with Trevor Donovan Get Smart About Drugs Website Elks Kid Zone Website Elks Drug Awareness Program Website Elks DAP on Twitter Elks DAP on Facebook Elks DAP on YouTube DEA Website DEA on Instagram DEA on Twitter DEA on Facebook DEA YouTube Channel   Watch Awkward Conversations Season 1 the series: Awkward Breakfast Conversations - Ep. 1 Awkward Lunch Conversations - Ep. 2 Awkward Dinner Conversations - Ep. 3      Bios:   Jodie Sweetin is an American actress and television personality known for her role as Stephanie Tanner in the ABC comedy series Full House and its Netflix sequel series Fuller House. Jodie is joined by Content Expert Amy McCarthy, a Senior Clinical Social Worker at Boston Children's Hospital. Amy McCarthy, LICSW, is the Director of Social Work for the Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction Program (ASAP) at Boston Children's Hospital, where she provides direct clinical and programmatic support. Additionally, Amy has extensive experience working in community-based settings providing care to young people with complex mental health needs and their families. As the former director of the Boston-Suffolk County Family Resource Center, she worked with an abundance of community partners to ensure residents had access to vital resources to meet basic needs and beyond. Amy received her Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) from Siena College and earned a Master's Degree in Social Work (MSW) from Wheelock College. Rob Vincent serves as the Associate Administrator for Alcohol Prevention and Treatment Policy for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Division of Systems Development. Before coming to SAMHSA Rob served as the Administrator for True North-Student Assistance & Treatment Services at the Educational Service District 113's Department of Educational Support in Olympia, Washington.  He was responsible for the development, implementation, and management of a (45) forty-five school district consortium addressing School Safety and Substance Abuse Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment programs within the five-county region.   Rob has worked in the area of substance abuse prevention, intervention, and Treatment for more than 34 years, as a nationally certified clinician, and has served as the Director for Counseling and Assistance Programs for the U.S. Navy during Desert Storm.  Rob served as the principal investigator of the Olympia Effective Adolescent Grant, and as a consultant specializing in the implementation of schools-based prevention and treatment programs for several states. He received his Master of Science in Education Degree from Southern Illinois University.   Dr. Aida Balsano serves as Director for Prevention Communications and Public Engagement at the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS).  Prior to joining SAMHSA in 2020, Aida was with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA, at the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture), where she served for ten years as the National Program Leader in Research and Evaluation in Family & Consumer Sciences. While at NIFA, she administered competitive grant programs and worked with administrators, faculty, and Cooperative Extension educators across the Land-Grant University system, as well as served as NIFA's liaison to Federal agencies and other national partners addressing existing and emerging programmatic, research, and evaluation needs, opportunities, and resources in the areas of individual, family and community quality of life in general and rural well-being specifically. Before her post with USDA, Aida worked as a Vice President for Evaluation and Policy at the Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation in Washington, DC, and as a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University, MA. Aida holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Child Development from Tufts University and a B.A. in Psychology from Grinnell College, IA.  

OPENPediatrics
Research Trends in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Current and Emerging Areas of Interest

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 15:01


In this World Shared Practice Forum podcast, Dr. Robert Tasker continues highlighting research trends from his position as Editor-in-Chief of the Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Journal. Dr. Tasker presents notable articles from 2022, shares a look into upcoming topics and themes for 2023, and provides his perspective on how academic journals such as PCCM are evolving to meet the needs of modern readers and clinicians. Following this podcast, listeners will be able to: - List some of the prominently featured and shared articles from Pediatric Critical Care Medicine for the first half of 2022 - Identify topics and areas of active research interest within the field of pediatric critical care medicine - Discuss approaches to increasing engagement with an academic publication, including content curation, online presentation, and uses of alternative formats such as podcasting Articles referenced: •2:17 Nellis ME, Karam O, Valentine SL, et al. Executive Summary of Recommendations and Expert Consensus for Plasma and Platelet Transfusion Practice in Critically Ill Children: From the Transfusion and Anemia EXpertise Initiative-Control/Avoidance of Bleeding (TAXI-CAB). Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(1):34-51. •2:27 Smith HAB, Besunder JB, Betters KA, et al. 2022 Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines on Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation, Neuromuscular Blockade, and Delirium in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients With Consideration of the ICU Environment and Early Mobility. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(2):e74-e110. •3:16 Dewan M. I Cannot Let It Go. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(3):214-215. doi:10.1097/PCC.0000000000002862 •4:16 Mazer MB, Bulut Y, Brodsky NN, et al. Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children: Host Immunologic Responses. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(4):315-320. •4:36 Kozyak BW, Fraga MV, Juliano CE, et al. Real-Time Ultrasound Guidance for Umbilical Venous Cannulation in Neonates With Congenital Heart Disease. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(5):e257-e266. •5:34 François T, Sauthier M, Charlier J, et al. Impact of Blood Sampling on Anemia in the PICU: A Prospective Cohort Study. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(6):435-443. Publish date: December 22, 2022. Citation: Tasker R, Daniel D, Burns JP. Research Trends in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Current and Emerging Areas of Interest. 12/2022. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://youtu.be/tcn-MQ_jHv4. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

OPENPediatrics
"Understanding Pain Behaviors of Nonverbal Children with Intellectual Disability" by Jean Solodiuk

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 37:54


In this podcast, Dr. Jean Solodiuk reviews approaches to the recognition and assessment of pain in children with intellectual disability. Dr. Solodiuk describes ways to define and measure pain in an individualized fashion, discusses collaborative approaches to pain management involving caregivers, and illustrates these principles using case examples. After this podcast, listeners will be able to: • Recognize the sources of complexity in defining the pain experience in children with intellectual disability • Apply an individualized approach to describing pain behaviors and severity for medically complex patients • Develop strategies to include caregivers in the assessment and management of pain Articles referenced: •2:00 McCrea RT, Tanke DH, Buckley LG, et al. Vertebrate Ichnopathology: Pathologies Inferred from Dinosaur Tracks and Trackways from the Mesozoic. Ichnos 2015;22:3-4,235-260. •8:31 Melzack R, Wall PD. Pain mechanisms: a new theory. Science. 1965;150(3699):971-979. •34:40 Morse BL, Solodiuk JC, Greco CD, Mauskar S, Hauer J. Initial Validation of GRASP: A Differential Diagnoses Algorithm for Children With Medical Complexity and an Unknown Source of Pain. Hosp Pediatr. 2020;10(8):633-640. Initial publication date: December 22, 2022 Citation: Solodiuk J, Perez C, Daniel D, Wolbrink TA. Understanding the pain behaviors of nonverbal children with intellectual disability. 12/2022. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. soundcloud.com/openpediatrics/understanding-pain-behaviors-of-nonverbal-children-with-intellectual-disability. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Weird Sounds: An Audio Companion to the Boston Art Book Fair
S1E8 - Episode 8: Emily Isenberg, Isenberg Projects

Weird Sounds: An Audio Companion to the Boston Art Book Fair

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 58:27


Support the Boston Art Book Fair today!   Oliver and Randi sat down with Emily Isenberg, Founder and President of Isenberg Projects, to learn more about her and her team of community strategists, creatives, tastemakers, deal makers, producers and artists – all, as she describes it, “obsessed with culture and driven by insatiable curiosity.  Isenberg Projects is a creative consulting agency based in Boston that specializes in placemaking and community engagement. Founded in 2011—and officially certified as a women owned business in the State of Massachusetts in early 2020—Isenberg Projects has produced hundreds of projects, pushing over 1 million dollars into the hands of the local creative economy.     When: Interviewed November 17, 2022 With thanks to everyone who took part in Boston Art Book Fair 2022! Emily and Oliver reflect on the history of Isenberg Projects and the DIY world of organizing cultural events in Boston.  They reference: Boston Children's Hospital Art Program Fourth Wall Gallery Girls Rock Campaign Boston Caleb Neelon HBS Allston Skirt Gallery (R.I.P.) We fondly remember the retro concept of “Selling out” Emily talks about IP's work with  Studio Allston We talk about art: Tony Goldman (R.I.P.), and Miami's Wynwood Walls LaMontagne Gallery est. 2007 Blanc Permitting: 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston Dining: New York's Outdoor Dining Sheds Baths: Japanese Onsen And Youth: Future Chefs, Youth Pride and Roxbury Youthworks The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan comes up, as does fearlessness, women-led businesses, and social media influencers. Digital Soup

Rik's Mind Podcast
News2Share's Ford Fischer Joins Us To Talk Twitter Files, Protests, & Extremism | Rik's Mind Ep 112

Rik's Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022


Friend-of-the-show Ford Fischer joins us to discuss recent events pertaining to “The Twitter Files” and the recent activities of extremist groups in the United States. If you haven't heard our previous episode with Ford ( Episode 83), Ford is a video journalist, primary source documentary filmmaker, and the Editor-in-Chief of News2Share.com, where he primarily focuses on political activism and extremism in the United States. His work has been featured on every major news network as well as Oscar, Emmy, and Golden Globe winning films. You can find more about Ford on his Twitter and News2share.comLike and subscribe to us on Youtube for more fun and exclusive content!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuM080VqVCe0gAns9V9WK9wSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/00gCjGhq8qrAEkraZnMwGR?go=1&sp_cid=ce203d55369588581151ec13011b84ac&utm_source=embed_player_pGoogle Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/u/1/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cucmlrc21pbmQuY29tL2xpc3Rlbj9mb3JtYXQ9cnNz?Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/riks-mind-podcast/id1460215365Show Notes:News2share | Official WebsiteNews2Share | YoutubeFord Fischer | TwitterNews2Share | TwitterBari Weiss “The Twitter Files Pt 2” | TwitterFormer NYT columnist Bari Weiss releases ‘Twitter Files Part Two' | The Hill‘Twitter Files' Touted by Musk Reveal How Execs Debated Decision to Block NY Post Account Over Hunter Biden Articles | VarietyRep. Ro Khanna pushed back on Twitter suppression of Hunter Biden laptop story | San Francisco ChronicleLeft-Wing Voices Are Silenced on Twitter as Far-Right Trolls Advise Elon Musk | The InterceptMan killed trying to break in Ohio FBI office appeared to threaten agents in social media posts. | PBS News HourBomb Threat at Boston Children's Hospital; Police Give All-Clear | NBC 10 BostonA Russian Facebook page organized a protest in Texas. A different Russian page launched the counterprotest. | The Texas TribuneThe FBI Calls It An 'Extremist Militia.' What Exactly Is 'This Is Texas Freedom Force?' | Texas Public RadioProud Boys, white supremacists protest of canceled drag story time event in Ohio among several across country | Cleaveland.comPatriot Front | ADLTHOMAS ROUSSEAU: Profile | Southern Poverty Law CenterBlack FedEx driver shot at by white men draws parallels to Ahmaud Arbery case | The GuardianDevil's Punchbowl — An American Concentration Camp So Horrific It was Erased from History | SPMG MediaTHREE SHOT, FIVE ARRESTS AS MILITIA GROUPS AND PROTESTERS CONVERGE ON LOUISVILLE | News2Share.comThe Not Fucking Around Coalition Is America's Largest Armed Black Militia | VICE on SHOWTIME

Help and Hope Happen Here
Dr. Mariella Filbin, who is a leading Neurooncologist at Dana Farber and Boston Children's Hospital will talk about the specific Pediatric Brain Cancers she works on, including DIPG which is the deadliest form of this terrible disease.

Help and Hope Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 42:00


Dr. Mariella Filbin was raised just outside of Vienna Austria, where she completed her academic road to becoming  a Neurooncologist. Thankfully for the Pediatric Brain Cancer Community in Boston, she came directly from Vienna and began her work at Dana Farber and Boston Children's Hospital. Dr. Filbin is now one of the leading practitioners in her field and will talk about many issues and topics concerning Pediatric Brain Cancer on today's podcast. 

Discover CircRes
December 2022 Discover CircRes

Discover CircRes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 23:14


This month on Episode 43 of Discover CircRes, guest host Nicole Purcell highlights two original research articles featured in the December 2 issue of Circulation Research. This episode also features an interview with Drs Aaron Phillips and Kevin O'Gallagher about their study, The Effect of a Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor on Neurovascular Regulation in Humans.   Article highlights:   Akerberg, et al. RBPMS2 Regulates RNA Splicing in Cardiomyocytes   Lv, et al. Cardiac Protection by MG53-S255A Mutant   Nicole Purcell:             Hi and welcome to Discover CircRes, the podcast of the American Heart Association's Journal, Circulation Research. I am your host, Dr Nicole Purcell, from the Huntington Medical Research Institutes in Pasadena, California, and today I will be highlighting two articles from our December 2 issue of Circulation Research. I'll also have a chat with Drs Aaron Phillips and Kevin O'Gallagher about their study, The Effect of a Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor on Neurovascular Regulation in Humans.   Nicole Purcell:             But before I get to the interview, here are a few article highlights. The first article we're going to highlight is RBPMS2 Is a Myocardial Enriched Splicing Regulator Required for Cardiac Function. This comes from Boston Children's Hospital with first author Dr Alexander Akerberg, and corresponding author Dr Jeffrey Burns. RNA splicing, along with transcription control and post-translational modifications, is a mechanism for fine tuning the expression of a gene for a particular purpose in a particular tissue. Factors that control splicing are thus often enriched in certain cell types. The factor, RBPMS2, for example, is enriched in the myocytes of amphibians, fish, birds and mammals.  This conserve tissue specificity suggesting essential role of RBPMS2 in heart function.   Akerberg and colleagues now confirm this is indeed the case. They generated zebra fish embryos and human cardiomyocytes lacking RBPMS2, and found the fish suffered early cardiac dysfunction by 48 hours post fertilization. The animal's hearts had reduced ejection fractions, compared with the hearts of controlled fish. At the cellular level, the RBPMS2 lacking fish cardiomyocytes displayed malformed sarcomere fibers and disrupted calcium handling, both of which were also seen in the RBPMS2 deficient human cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, RNA sequencing experiments revealed a conserve set of 29 genes in the RBPMS2-lacking fish and human cells that were incorrectly spliced. In revealing the essential cardiac role of RBPMS2 and its RNA targets, the work provides new molecular details for understanding vertebrate heart function and disease, say the team.   Nicole Purcell:             Our second article being highlighted is Blocking MG53 Serine 255 Phosphorylation Protects Diabetic Heart from Ischemic Injury. This comes from Peking University with first authors, Fengxiang L, Yingfan Wang and Dan Shan, as well as corresponding author Dr Rui-Ping Xiao. Midsegment 53, or MG53, is a recently discovered muscle-specific protein that is an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery with cardioprotective effects. MG53 thus has therapeutic potential, but for patients whose heart disease is linked to type 2 diabetes, there's a problem. MG53 also tags certain cellular proteins for destruction, including the insulin receptor and the insulin signaling factor, IRS1. Loss of these factors could worsen insulin resistance. lev and colleagues therefore investigate whether MG53 could be tweaked to provide protection without the diabetes downside.   Nicole Purcell:             They discovered the phosphorylation of MG53 at serine 255 is required for its role in protein destruction, and that a mutant version of MG53, incapable of this phosphorylation, MG53 serine to 255 alanine mutant, could still promote cardiomyocyte survival, and protect the cells from membrane damaging insults. Importantly, when a diabetic mouse model was injected with MG53 serine 255 to alanine mutant, the protein better protected the animals against myocardial infarction than injection with the wild type MG53, recipients of which had poor insulin sensitivity. Based on these findings, the authors suggest MG53 serine 255 alanine mutant could be developed into a heart protective drug, for use in diabetic and non-diabetic patients alike.   Nicole Purcell:             Today, Dr Aaron Phillips and Dr Kevin O'Gallagher from University of Calgary are with me to discuss their study, the Effect of a Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor on Neurovascular Regulation in Humans in our December 2 issue of Circulation Research. Thank you for joining me today.   Kevin O'Gallagher:    Hello, my name's Dr Kevin O'Gallagher. I'm a British Heart Foundation clinician scientist and interventional cardiologist at Kings College London and Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.   Aaron Phillips:            Hello, my name's Dr Aaron Phillips. I'm an associate professor in physiology, pharmacology, cardiac sciences, biomedical engineering and clinical neurosciences at the University of Calgary in the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Libin Cardiovascular Institute. I am also the director of the Restore Network, which is a large platform at the University of Calgary spanning all these groups, developing new tools and techniques for translational research into neurological conditions.   Nicole Purcell:            There are a lot of authors involved in this study. While all could not join us, I appreciate you taking the time to discuss your findings today. Your paper deals with looking at neurovascular control in humans. Two primary regulatory pathways are neurovascular coupling, or NVC, and dynamic cerebral autoregulation. Dr Phillips, can you explain what NVC to our audience, and what does dysregulation lead to?   Aaron Phillips:            Yeah, thanks Nicole and I'm happy to be here. Thank you for the invitation. NVC, or neurovascular coupling, we've been studying it for about 15 years. At its fundamental level, it's kind of this elegant interplay between neurons, which unfortunately have very limited capacity for substrate storage. The brain has very limited substrate storage capacity, and so neurons need to very rapidly match their metabolic activity to the blood flow that's being delivered to them, and that needs to happen locally, for areas of the brain that have greater metabolic needs as opposed to other areas.   What happens, in terms of dysregulation or conditions that are associated with dysregulation, it's an interesting story because we still really need to understand the mechanisms fully, in order to suss out what clinical conditions should have dysfunction of this unit. We know that certain conditions, such as vascular cognitive impairment, even spinal cord injury, we've done some work in stroke patients, it seems to be dysfunctional in all of these conditions, but understanding exactly why it's dysfunctional, we're still establishing that.   Nicole Purcell:             Great. You were talking about how it's the connection or interplay between blood flow, so we're talking about altered blood pressure seems to play a key role in neurovascular coupling. So, for those listeners not familiar with this field, can you explain how nitric oxide synthase and its isoforms, how this relates to NVC?   Aaron Phillips:            Well, nitric oxide synthase is an enzyme that produces nitric oxide that's expressed primarily in neurons. Nitric oxide is a powerful vasodilator. It actually works on quite a rapid time course. So, we surmised, we suspected, and there were some preclinical work before our human study, that neuronal sources of nitric oxide, being that nitric oxide is a potent vasodilator, we thought that would be likely to be mediating a large part of the neurovascular coupling response.   Nicole Purcell:             Great. So, Dr O'Gallagher, based on that, what was your main objective or hypothesis of this study, and how is your study novel from those that have already just suggested, looked at NOS regulation for cerebral blood flow?   Kevin O'Gallagher:    Thanks very much for the invite to talk. I mean, we hypothesized that nNOS would have a role in regulating neurovascular coupling. I think the novelty of our study is that although people have been interested in NOS and its regulation of cerebral vascular and cardiovascular blood flow, it's only relatively recently that there has become an agent available that will specifically inhibit nNOS, and therefore give us an idea of what it is doing, rather than previous inhibitors which just inhibit all of the three NOS isoforms. It was really that the development of the agent was what allowed us to do this study. I think it was really through that, that makes this an interesting finding that nNOS does play a role in neurovascular coupling, and really pushes the field forward ever so slightly.   Nicole Purcell:             Great. So, as you pointed out, this is a specific nNOS inhibitor, which is known as SMTC. It's a synthetic L-Arginine analog, right? That's really what sets your study apart. Can you tell us a little bit the audience, whether that be you, Dr Phillips or Dr O'Gallagher, about what your study was and what did you find, and how did an ambition of using this SMTC to inhibit nNOS affect systemic hemodynamic changes and NVC?   Aaron Phillips:            Yeah, I think both of us can probably speak to this interchangeably and add in different elements of the experiment. This is kind of a summary of the study, I guess. In advance of this, adding on what Kevin had just said in terms of the novelty of the study and the importance, we had done a lot of work previous to this paper where we were one of the groups that helped establish neurovascular coupling as a measure that could be tested in humans. This involved kind of understanding metabolism of the eye, how that's coupled to the visual cortex, and how to measure blood flow on a high temporal resolution in the visual cortex in response to visual input. That's why we used very well standardized perturbations involving tracking an eye, tracking a dot on a screen at a known one rate and a known one amplitude of movement, while also measuring the hyperemic response in the posterior brain.   Then we kind of went on and developed some new measures, developed some software that we're now proud is used in a few different labs around the world, that kind of automatically takes that input of repetitive eyes opening and closing and that hyperemic response, and it breaks it down into a single wave form. A single hyperemic response is superimposed of 10, 15, 20 cycles of those eyes open and eyes closed, and then when we superimpose all the wave forms together, we can generate different metrics from that hyperemic response that correspond to different elements.   One of the ways where software can, I guess dice out the hyperemic response, is by timing. We can look at very specific unique time windows over that 30 seconds of eyes open, and we can also look at the slope of the response, as well as we recently did some dimensionality reduction techniques and looked at specific computed measures of that hyperemic response. We published that a few years ago. Those were some of the tools that enabled this study, along with a fantastically unique drug that really could isolate that neuron expression of NOS and the capacity of nNOS to mediate neurovascular coupling.   Kevin O'Gallagher:    Obviously, we're going to use a systemic infusion of SMTC, the study drug, and we've used that before and shown it to be safe. But because a systemic infusion of SMTC through peripheral and systemic nNOS inhibition does cause an increase in systemic vascular resistance, and therefore an increase in mean arterial pressure of around about 7 mm of mercury, in addition to a cline placebo control condition, we also felt the need to have a pressure control condition. For that, we used phenylephrine to match the rise in mean arterial pressure that we anticipated we'd see with SMTC. We ended up with 12 healthy volunteers who attended on three separate visits, and so we had a party randomized double blinded intervention study where we measured the neurovascular coupling metrics, both before and after an infusion of one of the three conditions on each particular visit.   Aaron Phillips:            I just wanted to add into that, we had found previously that mean arterial pressure does have an effect on the hyperemic response. This was actually classically found by 1960s by Harper and Glass in a dog study, but we've repeated that in humans and kind of found that the ability of the brain to kind of... It's reserve for further vasodilation is dependent on pressure. As you drop it, neurovascular coupling will go away, and as you increase it, neurovascular coupling will increase partially, so it's important to standardize the mean arterial pressure levels. I always liken it to your water pressure in your house. You can't turn on a faucet with a given pressure unless you have that in the system upstream. That was a really important aspect of the study.   Nicole Purcell:             That was quite unique for your study, too. Not a lot of people have control for pressure.   Aaron Phillips:            Correct.     Kevin O'Gallagher:    I think it reflects the challenges of these healthy volunteer studies where you're trying to look at one particular part of the cardiovascular system, because as a cardiologist, if we were doing a study like this, looking at cardiovascular regulation, we would put a catheter into the coronary arteries in patients who had come for angiograms, and we'd give a local infusion of SMTC, as we've done in studies before. But with healthy volunteers, and ethically it really demanded a systemic infusion, so it was a really nice workaround to have that pressure control condition.   Nicole Purcell:             So, can you tell us a little bit about what your findings were?   Kevin O'Gallagher:    I think testament to the study design and the rigorous methodology that we employed, we did find with the resting steady state hemodynamics that SMTC condition performed as we would expect, and as we've seen in prior studies where we've given a systemic dose in that compared to both placebo and pressure control conditions, SMTC decreased cardiac output, and it decreased stroke volume, and also increased systemic vascular resistance, so very much as expected the resting hemodynamic conditions.   Aaron Phillips:            Yeah, thanks. Just adding onto that, moving on into some of the cerebral vascular measures. So again, we were measuring posterior cerebral artery velocity, blood velocity and specific responsiveness that it has to a visual stimuli. Between conditions, we didn't see a change in resting posterior cerebral artery velocity, so that was consistent between the conditions. Where we saw most of our change actually was in this very early period, the first five seconds of what we're going to call the hyperemic response, or the first five seconds of the neurovascular coupling response. That's where we saw our primary effect. We didn't see an effect in almost any of the neurovascular coupling measures that we generated in the actual sustained period after that initial rise, so that's where we saw our key inhibition with nNOS inhibition. What permitted that was the phenylephrine control group, again, allowing us to really look at apples and apples, not apples and oranges.   Nicole Purcell:             Great. So that early transient change that you saw, that as you said, hyperemic response, what therapeutic implications does this have for the field?   Kevin O'Gallagher:    Well, certainly there are conditions in which nNOS dysfunction, nNOS may be implicated, we mentioned a couple in the paper, some neurodegenerative diseases. But also, I think the field is now open for any vascular mediated headache syndrome, such as migraine, to investigate the potential role of nNOS from that angle. Then we haven't touched on already, but as well as dysfunctional, so decreased nNOS activity, there's also some conditions in which there's dysregulation or abnormally increased nNOS function. Again, we've highlighted this kind of study methodology is a tool that could be used to investigate those types of conditions.   Aaron Phillips:            These are all terrific points, and I think there's a lot of conditions where neurovascular coupling is impaired, and it's worth exploring them and understanding the specific role where nNOS might be a part of it. I also think there's a lot of interesting basic science surrounding this, in terms of the mechanisms. What was really interesting in this study, which is still kind of wracking my brain, is why didn't more of the neurovascular coupling response go away? This is a highly selective inhibitor for what was potentially thought by some groups to be a large mediator, this response. It was a relatively small inhibitory effect, and isolated to a small part of the neurovascular coupling response, just that early phase. So, still lots of work to do to kind of dice out the other pathways. They're probably highly redundant. This is such a critical mechanism in the central nervous system. Getting at it and humans is going to be tricky, but we're excited about the future and exploring some of those other avenues on the mechanistic cascade.   Nicole Purcell:             Based on the fact that you just had 12 healthy individuals, what do you see as some of the limitations of your study going forward, thinking about what you did?   Kevin O'Gallagher:    I think you've just hit on a key limitation. It was a small number of volunteers. They were all healthy, so we can't extrapolate these findings to conditions such as hypertension, where we know from other studies that cardiovascular responses, nNOS responses are impaired Also, this was a noninvasive study. We looked at the blood flow through Doppler, but we don't really know the effect of SMTC on cerebral artery diameter or other markers like that, so I think those are important limitations to mention.   Nicole Purcell:             I know I didn't ask this, and I know it was mentioned in the paper, but for our audience, and it was a small sample size, but did you see any sex differences between your male and female cohort?   Kevin O'Gallagher:    No. We did analyze for that and there were no sex differences. But again, it's an important limitation in that we didn't control for things like phase of the menstrual cycle. And again, with those limitations, all the results should be interpreted with those in mind.   Nicole Purcell:             Were there any challenges to the study that you found?   Kevin O'Gallagher:    I work in London in the UK, where we performed this study related protocols, and Professor Phillips from University of Calgary, his team flew over to perform the studies. I think there was a real organizational challenge because we had a relatively small time window in which to get all of the volunteers and their three study visits done. But I think it's testament to just how well Professor Phillips runs his team, and how fantastic a team they are in working together that all of those challenges were minimized and everything. It ran fairly smoothly, and certainly, the data was connected back in early 2020. I think we all retrospectively breathed a sigh of relief when the Covid pandemic started and we realized that had we had to reschedule another set of visits, we would've then knocked the study back a couple of years. So yeah, there were organizational challenges, but it was an absolute pleasure to work with Professor Phillips's and his team in this.   Aaron Phillips:            To add to that, I mean, it's not really related to necessarily the challenges, but I was going to list kind of the exact same thing. In the background. Kevin, and Professor Shaw, and Dr Gallagher were a tour de force on organizing quite a complicated study that involves some invasive protocols and unique experimental drug infusion. Getting all of that ethically approved, and organized, and structured, that was probably one of the biggest challenges of pulling this study off. Nicole Purcell:            Great. It was a very nice study. So lastly, what future studies are needed or have come out of this work that you'd like to tell us about?   Aaron Phillips:            Mechanistically, I would still like to explore why nNOS inhibition doesn't seem to affect the sustained elevation in blood flow. This maybe means going back to some of the astrocyte mediated mechanisms, and understanding knocking out, knocking in, exploring some of those. I'd also like to continue to study the neurovascular cupping response itself in clinical conditions. This may be a tool for helping to characterize the severity of a given neurovascular condition over time, and kind of validating this outcome measure as potentially a clinical tool and further expanding its research application.   Kevin O'Gallagher:    I would just add to that, that I tend to come to all of these things from a cardiologist light, and there are some conditions in cardiology where the microvascular is involved, and so the interest is then to see whether there's a linkage between the dysfunctional coronary microvascular responses with then cerebral microvascular responses. So again, I think there's plenty of future work to be done in that sphere.   Nicole Purcell:             Well, I want to thank you so much for joining me today, Dr Kevin O'Gallagher and Dr Aaron Phillips, for discussing your exciting findings with me today, and I look forward to seeing your future work. Thank you.   Aaron Phillips:            Thank you so much.   Kevin O'Gallagher:    Thank you so much.   Nicole Purcell:            That's it for highlights from the December 2 issue of Circulation Research. Thank you for listening. Please check out the CircRes Facebook page and follow us on Twitter and Instagram with the handle @CircRes and #DiscoverCircRes. Thank you to our guests, Drs Aaron Phillips and Kevin O'Gallagher. This podcast is produced by Ishara Ratnayaka, edited by Melissa Stoner, and supported by the editorial team of Circulation Research. Some of the copy texts for highlighted articles provided by Ruth Williams.   I am your host, Dr Nicole Purcell, filling in for Dr Cindy St. Hilaire, and this is Discover CircRes, your on-the-go source for the most up-to-date and exciting discoveries in basic cardiovascular research. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own, and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit ahajournals.org.  

Awkward Conversations
The Talk - Part 2

Awkward Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 20:15


SHOW NOTES: Host Jodie Sweetin is joined by Amy McCarthy, Dr. Aida Balsano, Special Assistant to the Director of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention and Robert Vincent, Associate Administrator for Alcohol Prevention and Treatment Policy at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Ultimately our goal is to help parents have “The Talk.” In this episode, we will discuss keeping the child's dignity intact while assisting them through difficult situations.  Separating what the child's behavior is and your love for the child can be hard when tempers are raging.   We will share tips on overcoming these situations and how to make “The Talk” beneficial to the child and not detrimental to your relationship.    IN THIS EPISODE: [00:00] Show excerpt  [02:25] Admitting as the parent that we are not perfect.  We make mistakes and may have made an error even in the position taken in the current conversation [06:36]Dos and Don'ts of having the conversation about substance abuse [11:53]LGBTQ children and the approach a parent takes [16:11] Anger and crisis mode versus compassion and empathy [18:24] Coming up on the next episode of Awkward Conversations   KEY TAKEAWAYS: Give your child a chance to participate in the “Talk.”  Don't direct the conversation at them but give both parent and child opportunities to voice their opinion.  There are cultural differences when there are age differences. Ensure that the child understands what you are communicating.  Don't assume you are on the same page. Don't lecture.  The goal is to keep the conversation going.  Kids will turn off a lecture. Instead, encouraging further discussion leaves them confident they can discuss anything with the parent.       ***DISCLAIMER***The views, information, or opinions expressed during the Awkward Conversation series are solely those of the individuals, speakers, commentators, experts, and or hosts involved and do not necessarily reflect nor represent those of the production, associates or broadcaster, or any of its employees. Production is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the series available for viewing. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform. This series does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. This series is available for private, non-commercial use only. The production, broadcaster, or its channel cannot be held accountable for all or any views expressed during this program. Resources: SAMHSA Find Treatment   Emoji Decoder  DEA Takeback Website Growing Up Drug-Free: A Parent's Guide to Substance Use Prevention One Pill Could Kill Never Thought I'd Say This Podcast with Jodie Sweetin Team Upstandards with Trevor Donovan Get Smart About Drugs Website Elks Kid Zone Website Elks Drug Awareness Program Website Elks DAP on Twitter Elks DAP on Facebook Elks DAP on YouTube DEA Website DEA on Instagram DEA on Twitter DEA on Facebook DEA YouTube Channel     Watch Awkward Conversations Season 1 the series: Awkward Breakfast Conversations - Ep. 1 Awkward Lunch Conversations - Ep. 2 Awkward Dinner Conversations - Ep. 3      Bios:   Jodie Sweetin is an American actress and television personality known for her role as Stephanie Tanner in the ABC comedy series Full House and its Netflix sequel series Fuller House. Jodie is joined by Content Expert Amy McCarthy, a Senior Clinical Social Worker at Boston Children's Hospital. Amy McCarthy, LICSW, is the Director of Social Work for the Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction Program (ASAP) at Boston Children's Hospital, where she provides direct clinical and programmatic support. Additionally, Amy has extensive experience working in community-based settings providing care to young people with complex mental health needs and their families. As the former director of the Boston-Suffolk County Family Resource Center, she worked with an abundance of community partners to ensure residents had access to vital resources to meet basic needs and beyond. Amy received her Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) from Siena College and a Master's Degree in Social Work (MSW) from Wheelock College. Rob Vincent serves as the Associate Administrator for Alcohol Prevention and Treatment Policy for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Division of Systems Development. Before coming to SAMHSA, Rob served as the Administrator for True North-Student Assistance & Treatment Services at the Educational Service District 113's Department of Educational Support in Olympia, Washington.  He was responsible for the development, implementation, and management of a (45) forty-five school district consortium addressing School Safety and Substance Abuse Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment programs within the five-county region.   Rob has worked in substance abuse prevention, intervention, and Treatment for more than 34 years as a nationally certified clinician. He served as the Director of Counseling and Assistance Programs for the U.S. Navy during Desert Storm.  Rob served as the principal investigator of the Olympia Effective Adolescent Grant, and as a consultant specializing in the implementation of schools-based prevention and treatment programs for several states. He received his Master of Science in Education Degree from Southern Illinois University. Dr. Aida Balsano serves as Director for Prevention Communications and Public Engagement at the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS).  Prior to joining SAMHSA in 2020, Aida was with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA, at the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture), where she served for ten years as the National Program Leader in Research and Evaluation in Family & Consumer Sciences. While at NIFA, she administered competitive grant programs and worked with administrators, faculty, and Cooperative Extension educators across the Land-Grant University system, as well as served as NIFA's liaison to Federal agencies and other national partners addressing existing and emerging programmatic, research, and evaluation needs, opportunities, and resources in the areas of individual, family and community quality of life in general and rural well-being specifically. Before her post with USDA, Aida worked as a Vice President for Evaluation and Policy at the Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation in Washington, DC, and as a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University, MA. Aida holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Child Development from Tufts University and a B.A. in Psychology from Grinnell College, IA.  

PRS Journal Club
“Presurgical Taping in Infants” with Ingrid M. Ganske, MD - Dec. 2022 Journal Club

PRS Journal Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 12:28


In this episode of the Award-winning PRS Journal Club Podcast, 2022 Resident Ambassadors to the PRS Editorial Board – Saïd Azoury, Emily Long, and Ronnie Shammas- and special guest Ingrid M. Ganske, MD, discuss the following articles from the December 2022 issue: “Does Presurgical Taping Change Nose and Lip Aesthetics in Infants with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate after Surgical Lip Repair? A Randomized Controlled Trial” by Abd El-Ghafour, Aboulhassan, Ragab El-Bei. Read the article for FREE: https://bit.ly/PresurgicalTaping Special guest Ingrid M. Ganske, MD, is a Pediatric Plastic Surgeon at Boston Children's Hospital, she specializes in cleft lip and palate, ear reconstruction, and vascular anomalies. Dr. Ganske completed postgraduate training in the Harvard Plastic Surgery Residency, followed by a Craniofacial Fellowship at Boston Children's Hospital. READ the articles discussed in this podcast as well as free related content from the archives: https://bit.ly/PRSDec22Collection

The Brian Lehrer Show
The State of the 'Tripledemic'

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 36:47


The flu, RSV, and COVID are all circulating at high levels, and the CDC and some municipalities (including NYC) are now recommending indoor masking. Jessica Malaty Rivera, infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital and The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, and senior advisor at Pandemic Prevention Initiative, discusses the state of all the respiratory viruses, how they are affecting hospital capacity and more related health news.

TNT Radio
Susan Linn on Lynn's Warriors with Lynn Shaw - 11 December 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 55:43


GUEST OVERVIEW: An author, psychologist, and award-winning ventriloquist, Susan Linn, Ed.D., is a world-renowned expert on creative play and the impact of media and commercial marketing on children. She is currently Research Associate at Boston Children's Hospital and Lecturer on Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. GUEST WEBSITE: https://www.consumingkids.com/ 

Ali on the Run Show
593. Claire Holt, Actress & Marathoner

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 63:10 Very Popular


"Seeing the best part of humanity, everyone out there cheering... Thousands of people just there to help you finish this race. To me, that was so inspiring. We're inundated today with negative news stories and stuff that goes wrong and the bad side of humanity. This, to me, was pure good." Claire Holt is an Australian-American actress who has starred in shows including The Vampire Diaries, The Originals, and Pretty Little Liars. And last month, this busy mom of two added something new to her list of accomplishments: marathoner! In this episode, Claire talks about how she got into running, why she wanted to run the 2022 New York City Marathon, and why she decided to do it now, with two young children (ages 2 and 3, just 17 months apart!), one of which was going through a sleep regression during the bulk of Claire's training. She talks about working with a coach, about her biggest pre-race fear (hint: it's oh so relatable), and about what she did to stay calm during the race. Plus, the tough parts of the race (shout-out to mile 24), the highlights, and everything in between. SPONSORS: UCAN: Click here and use code ALI for 20% off your next UCAN order. Napa Valley Marathon & Half Marathon: Click here to register for these races — taking place March 5, 2023 — today! What you'll get on this episode: How Claire is feeling, one month after running her first marathon (1:50) Claire's most vivid memories from the 2022 New York City Marathon (4:30) How Claire became a runner (6:30) Why Claire wanted to run a marathon, and why now? (10:45) Why Claire ran to raise money for the Boston Children's Hospital (14:20) What Claire's marathon training was like (17:10) Who is in Claire's village, and how she was feeling on race day (25:35) All about the race! (32:00) The post-race experience (45:45) How training for a marathon changed Claire's life (51:45) Follow Claire: Instagram @claireholt Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Subscribe to the newsletter Blog Strava SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

POLITICO's Pulse Check
Developing the RSV vaccine

POLITICO's Pulse Check

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 11:38


At the second day of the Milken Future of Health conference, Grace Scullion talks with Dr. Ofer Levy, a pediatrician specializing in infectious diseases at Boston Children's Hospital and a voting member of the FDA COVID vaccine advisory panel. Plus, Sen. Tim Kaine on why he's optimistic there will be funding for long covid in an end-of-year omnibus.

The News & Why It Matters
Twitter Files EXPLAINED: Why Trump Wants to REDO 2020 Election | 12/5/22

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 46:01


On Friday, Elon Musk released the "Twitter files," exposing the censorship of the Hunter Biden laptop story back in 2020. Plus, Boston Children's Hospital admitted that gender identity can be a "teen phase." And why was a child left unattended at a San Antonio drag show? Today's Sponsors: Whether you're looking to prevent hair loss, stimulate hair growth, or take better care of the hair you have, your KEEPS medical provider will help you find the right products. Go to https://Keeps.com/WHY for 50% off your first order. Patriot Mobile is America's ONLY Christian, conservative wireless provider, PLUS it offers nationwide coverage on the best 4G and 5G networks. Go to https://PatriotMobile.com/NEWS and get FREE ACTIVATION today with the offer code NEWS. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The News & Why It Matters
HUH? Justice Jackson Drags RACE into Religious Liberty Case | 12/6/22

The News & Why It Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 46:02


Yesterday, the Supreme Court heard the religious liberty case 303 Creative LLC v. Elenis, and Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson came up with a strange hypothetical about race. Plus, the Biden administration has opened an investigation into Elon Musk's company, Neuralink. And why did Boston Children's Hospital receive another threat? Today's Sponsors: This month, you'll get a FREE Goldback for every $5,000 purchased when you convert an existing IRA or 401k into a precious metals IRA with Birch Gold by December 22. Text WHY to 989898 to claim your free info kit on gold, then talk to one of Birch Gold's precious metals specialists. Bank On Yourself is a better way to grow and protect your hard-earned money. This retirement plan alternative hasn't had a losing year in over 160 years! You can get a FREE report with all the details on how the Bank On Yourself strategy adds guarantees, predictability, and control to your financial plan. Just go to https://BankOnYourself.com/MATTERS Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PRS Journal Club
“Narcotics and Pediatric Cranial Surgery” with Ingrid M. Ganske, MD - Dec. 2022 Journal Club

PRS Journal Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 14:13


In this episode of the Award-winning PRS Journal Club Podcast, 2022 Resident Ambassadors to the PRS Editorial Board – Saïd Azoury, Emily Long, and Ronnie Shammas- and special guest Ingrid M. Ganske, MD, discuss the following articles from the December 2022 issue: “Pediatric Outcomes following Cranial Vault Remodeling with Restricted Use of Postoperative Narcotics: A Retrospective Review” by Smith, Cimaroli, Loo, et al. Read the article for FREE: https://bit.ly/PediatricCranialNarcotics Special guest Ingrid M. Ganske, MD, is a Pediatric Plastic Surgeon at Boston Children's Hospital, she specializes in cleft lip and palate, ear reconstruction, and vascular anomalies. Dr. Ganske completed postgraduate training in the Harvard Plastic Surgery Residency, followed by a Craniofacial Fellowship at Boston Children's Hospital. READ the articles discussed in this podcast as well as free related content from the archives: https://bit.ly/PRSDec22Collection

Awkward Conversations

Host Jodie Sweetin is joined by Amy McCarthy, Dr. Aida Balsano, Special Assistant to the Director of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention and Robert Vincent, Associate Administrator for Alcohol Prevention and Treatment Policy at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Ultimately our goal is to help parents have “The Talk” if it hasn't happened yet, then let's be prepared…if it has, how did it go?  If you screwed it up, no worries. Let's figure out how to get it right. But, on the other hand, if you feel it went well, take this as a reminder that the talk is not a one-off, let's figure out what's next in this constant battle to keep those we love more than life itself safe!     In this episode, we will discuss the When and How's of talking with our kids about drugs and making smart choices.  IN THIS EPISODE: [00:00] Role play of child questioning the use of alcohol with parents [02:45] At what age should we have the “talk” regarding drugs and alcohol [04:18] Making the “talk” an opportunity rather than a conversation I “have” to have with my child [08:41] The research has shown kids want to have these conversations [11:50] Encouragement goes a long way [20:09] How to overcome the fear of having hard talks with your child   KEY TAKEAWAYS: The ideal conversation you can have with your child is non-threatening and non-confrontational. A parent's approach when discussing complex subjects with a child makes an enormous difference. It is ok to have quiet moments during talks with your kids.  Often both parties need time to reflect on what was said.  It is also ok as a parent not to have all the answers. Focus on the positive things in your child's life. Then, when it comes to young teens, ask lots of questions and be supportive as they try to find out who they are. ***DISCLAIMER***The views, information, or opinions expressed during the Awkward Conversation series are solely those of the individuals, speakers, commentators, experts, and or hosts involved and do not necessarily reflect nor represent those of the production, associates or broadcaster, or any of its employees. Production is not responsible and does not verify for accuracy any of the information contained in the series available for viewing. The primary purpose of this series is to educate and inform. This series does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. This series is available for private, non-commercial use only. The production, broadcaster, or its channel cannot be held accountable for all or any views expressed during this program. Resources: SAMHSA Find Treatment   Emoji Decoder  DEA Takeback Website Growing Up Drug-Free: A Parent's Guide to Substance Use Prevention One Pill Could Kill Never Thought I'd Say This Podcast with Jodie Sweetin Team Upstandards with Trevor Donovan Get Smart About Drugs Website Elks Kid Zone Website Elks Drug Awareness Program Website Elks DAP on Twitter Elks DAP on Facebook Elks DAP on YouTube DEA Website DEA on Instagram DEA on Twitter DEA on Facebook DEA YouTube Channel     Watch Awkward Conversations Season 1 the series: Awkward Breakfast Conversations - Ep. 1 Awkward Lunch Conversations - Ep. 2 Awkward Dinner Conversations - Ep. 3      Bios:   Jodie Sweetin is an American actress and television personality known for her role as Stephanie Tanner in the ABC comedy series Full House and its Netflix sequel series Fuller House. Jodie is joined by Content Expert Amy McCarthy, a Senior Clinical Social Worker at Boston Children's Hospital.   Amy McCarthy, LICSW, is the Director of Social Work for the Adolescent Substance Use and Addiction Program (ASAP) at Boston Children's Hospital, where she provides direct clinical and programmatic support. Additionally, Amy has extensive experience working in community-based settings providing care to young people with complex mental health needs and their families. As the former director of the Boston-Suffolk County Family Resource Center, she worked with an abundance of community partners to ensure residents had access to vital resources to meet basic needs and beyond. Amy received her Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) from Siena College and earned a Master's Degree in Social Work (MSW) from Wheelock College. Rob Vincent serves as the Associate Administrator for Alcohol Prevention and Treatment Policy for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Division of Systems Development. Before coming to SAMHSA Rob served as the Administrator for True North-Student Assistance & Treatment Services at the Educational Service District 113's Department of Educational Support in Olympia, Washington.  He was responsible for the development, implementation, and management of a (45) forty-five school district consortium addressing School Safety and Substance Abuse Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment programs within the five-county region.   Rob has worked in the area of substance abuse prevention, intervention, and Treatment for more than 34 years, as a nationally certified clinician, and has served as the Director for Counseling and Assistance Programs for the U.S. Navy during Desert Storm.  Rob served as the principal investigator of the Olympia Effective Adolescent Grant, and as a consultant specializing in the implementation of schools-based prevention and treatment programs for several states. He received his Master of Science in Education Degree from Southern Illinois University.   Dr. Aida Balsano serves as Director for Prevention Communications and Public Engagement at the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Dept. of Health and Human Services (HHS).  Prior to joining SAMHSA in 2020, Aida was with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA, at the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture), where she served for ten years as the National Program Leader in Research and Evaluation in Family & Consumer Sciences. While at NIFA, she administered competitive grant programs and worked with administrators, faculty, and Cooperative Extension educators across the Land-Grant University system, as well as served as NIFA's liaison to Federal agencies and other national partners addressing existing and emerging programmatic, research, and evaluation needs, opportunities, and resources in the areas of individual, family and community quality of life in general and rural well-being specifically. Before her post with USDA, Aida worked as a Vice President for Evaluation and Policy at the Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation in Washington, DC, and as a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University, MA. Aida holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Child Development from Tufts University and a B.A. in Psychology from Grinnell College, IA.