Podcasts about Venture capital

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Best podcasts about Venture capital

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Latest podcast episodes about Venture capital

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel
SPOS #797 - David Schonthal On Innovation And New Ideas

Six Pixels of Separation Podcast - By Mitch Joel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 53:57


Welcome to episode #797 of Six Pixels of Separation. Here it is: Six Pixels of Separation - Episode #797 - Host: Mitch Joel. David Schonthal is a Clinical Professor of Innovation & Entrepreneurship at the Kellogg School of Management, where he teaches courses in new venture creation, design thinking, business acquisition, healthcare entrepreneurship, corporate innovation and creativity. He also serves as the Faculty Director of Kellogg's Zell Fellows Program, a selective venture accelerator program designed to help student entrepreneurs. Outside of Kellogg David is a Senior Director of Business Design at IDEO, David focuses on helping organizations build and launch new ventures, design new business models, and establish go-to-market strategies. David also serves as an Operating Partner at 7WireVentures, a healthcare technology-focused venture capital firm, and is a Venture Partner at Pritzker Group. He is also a Global Advisor at Design for Ventures, a Tokyo-based early-stage venture fund that invests in design-led Japanese startups. David is a co-founder of MATTER, a 25,000-square-foot innovation center in downtown Chicago focused on supporting healthcare entrepreneurship and serves as a member of Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot's technology, innovation and entrepreneurship council, ChicagoNext. More recently he co-authored the book, The Human Element - Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas with Loran Nordgren. This is for anyone who wants to launch new ideas and innovation into the world and your work. Enjoy the conversation... Running time: 53:57. Hello from beautiful Montreal. Subscribe over at Apple Podcasts. Please visit and leave comments on the blog - Six Pixels of Separation. Feel free to connect to me directly on Facebook here: Mitch Joel on Facebook. or you can connect on LinkedIn. ...or on Twitter. Here is my conversation with David Schonthal. The Human Element - Overcoming the Resistance That Awaits New Ideas. Loran Nordgren. Kellogg School of Management. Follow David on Twitter. Follow David on LinkedIn. This week's music: David Usher 'St. Lawrence River'.    

Equity
LinkedOut

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 18:29


In today's episode, talk our way through some big breaking news from the technology world so that we can better understand just what is going on.Danny and Alex got together late Friday on a Twitter Space to discuss Microsoft's decision to pull LinkedIn from the Chinese market, a move that lit up headlines around the world. That LinkedIn was still in China in 2021 may feel more surprising than the news that it will exit that particular market, but the moment matters all the same as it marks the end of an experiment -- could a mega-tech company have a US HQ and a first-party service live in China?Er, no, it turns out. Not really.Microsoft found itself jammed between its own ethics, and governmental censure. It was a lose-lose for the company, so pulling the plug was the smart move. The company isn't going to miss the revenue.For startups, the Microsoft decision is a good reminder that doing business in China is at a minimum very hard for non-Chinese companies, and perhaps impossible. Recall that Microsoft had to work with a Chinese company (21Vianet) to get Azure into the country at all, and that the Chinese government is using a few companies to build a new OS for the country so that it can replace Windows.Precisely how good that OS will prove is not yet clear, at least from a consumer perspective.And then we riffed on GitLab's IPO. My favorite topic of the week. You'll see why it came up when you hit play. Chat Monday!

Taste Radio
Staying Current? It's All About A Convergence Of Convenience, Health And Indulgence

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 57:31


This episode highlights notable news and new products from the perspective of Taste Radio hosts Ray Latif, Jacqui Brugliera and Mike Schneider, including an unusual cola collaboration, a groundbreaking law impacting CBD brands, flavor-driven innovation in overnight oatmeal, RTD cocktails and hummus. The show also includes updates on BevNET and NOSH's upcoming pitch competitions, a recap on beverage-related innovation, news and trends observed at the recently held 2021 NACS trade show and interviews with two entrepreneurs representing emerging brands: Cori Sue Morris, the founder and CEO of super-premium nut butter brand Retreat Foods and Susan Palmer, the founder and CEO of Little Red Kitchen Bake Shop, a maker of small-batch baked goods. Show notes: 1:05: Love It Or Hate It… We're Talking About It. -- The hosts opined about Pepsi's new limited-edition Cracker Jack flavor, why we're convinced that we have a brand competition that would suit almost any early-stage food or beverage company, Mike's excitement at the passage of Assembly Bill 45 and products that tickled the hosts' fancy over the past week, including a remarkable non-alcoholic canned cocktail and an upstart brand of freeze dried fruits and vegetables that is so(w) good. 21:14: A Re-Energized NACS Show -- Taste Radio editor Ray Latif sat down with BevNET Managing Editor Martin Caballero to discuss his major takeaways from this year's NACS trade show, including  innovation in the energy drink category and how emerging brands are targeting the space, new products from the Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo that are targeting the convenience store channel and Vita Coco's new canned offering. 33:13: Interview: Cori Sue Morris, Founder/CEO, Retreat Foods -- Latif spoke with Morris at Natural Products Expo East 2021 for a conversation about the backstory and positioning of Retreat Foods, which markets adaptogenic-infused nut butters, why she's targeting Goop enthusiasts and how she mapped out social and pricing strategies for the brand. 43:05: Interview:  Susan Palmer, Founder & CEO, Little Red Kitchen Bake Shop -- Also recorded at the Expo East 2020 show, Latif spoke with Palmer, whose Brooklyn-based company makes small batch, artisan cookies and sweet treats that are baked with mostly organic, fair trade and non-GMO ingredients. The conversation chronicled Palmer's experience as an entrepreneur, her commitment to high quality ingredients, the challenges of wholesaling fresh products, the company's recent alignment with rapid delivery service Gorillas and how she's positioning the brand for distribution in major retail chains. Brands in this episode: Ghia, Ithaca Hummus, Diesel Water, Sow Good, MUSH, Pepsi, Cedar's, Later Days Coffee, A Dash, Alani Nu, Soul Fixx Elixirs, MOSH, Super Coffee, Ethan's, Riot Energy, Shaka Tea, Zoa, C4, Rockstar Energy, Bang Energy, Monster Energy, Naked Juice, Smartwater, AHA, Minute Maid, Zico, Odwalla, Suja, Barrilitos, Vita Coco, Retreat Foods, Little Red Kitchen Bake Shop

Future Food
How 'cool' fertilizers can sequester carbon and more, with Amy Yoder

Future Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:17


Amy Yoder is CEO of Anuvia Plant Nutrients, a company that's converting waste to help crops uptake fertilizers more efficiently, and even help them to sequester carbon in the soil. She is a trailblazer being one of the best-funded women in agtech on record, raising $103 million in Series D earlier this year.For those of you who aren't knowledgeable about the fertilizer industry, Amy gives a great description. Enjoy this episode with a powerhouse of agtech, Amy Yoder.

Equity
Coinbase goes fishing for Opensea's catch

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:18


This week was one of our strongest shows yet, with a wide diversity of news items that were genuinely fun (and complicated) to chew through. And even though we started off kind of grumpy, we laughed through tech difficulties, crypto puns, and fintech CAC. It's called coping.Here's what we got into:Magic Leap raised $500 million about which we have thoughts, Mindbody's acquisition of ClassPass caught our eye for obvious reasons (and the fact that it also raised $500 million), and we dug into SoWork's fascinating business proposition.mPharma and the race to horizontal, holistic mental health: Telehealth is great and useful but no panacea. However, in the realm of mental health it's potentially life-changing for millions.OpenSea went from being one of the main characters in our fraud show, to being the underdog that we're rooting for - now that Coinbase is building a copycat.Since we tried to keep the show tight, a ton of news was left on the cutting room floor. The good news, though, is that we're back tomorrow with a spicy bonus episode about Microsoft pulling LinkedIn from the Chinese market. Oof.

Getting Smart Podcast
Daniel Pianko and Nasir Qadree of Investing in the Future of Learning

Getting Smart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:15


On this episode of the Getting Smart Podcast, Tom is joined by Daniel Pianko and Nasir Qadree. Daniel is the co-founder and managing director of Achieve Partners, an investment fund harnessing digital transformation to build new models for learning and new pathways to good jobs. He also hosts the Better Money, Better World podcast.  Nasir Qadree is the Founder and Managing Partner at Zeal Capital Partners, an inclusive investment vehicle partnering with entrepreneurs to bridge America's Wealth and Skills gaps.  Before Zeal, Nasir led AT&T social impact fund and before that was head of education at Village Capital, an early impact seed fund. Let's listen in as they discuss investment in learning, why it's more important than ever and how investments are shifting towards social, as well as financial impacts. 

Forward Thinking Founders
748 - Alex Pennington (Finish & Feast) On Enabling Fine Dining Anywhere in the UK

Forward Thinking Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:53


Alex Pennington is the cofounder of Finish and Feast. Finish & Feast is on a very simple mission: to bring fine dining to everyone, anywhere in the UK. To achieve this mission, they have created the UK's premier fine dining meal assembly kit platform, which allows people across the UK to enjoy food from some of the best chefs and restaurants on offer. ★ Support this podcast ★

Forward Thinking Founders
747 -Sagnik Ghosh (Worqhat) On Helping Young Minds Build a Better Future

Forward Thinking Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:46


Sagnik Ghosh is the cofounder of Worqhat. Worqhat aims to create a better life and a better future for University Students and Graduates.★ Support this podcast ★

Silicon Carne, un peu de picante dans la Tech
Ouvrez, ouvrez la cage aux VCs

Silicon Carne, un peu de picante dans la Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 60:55


Dans cet épisode de Silicon Carne, on vous dit tout sur le nouveau visage du Venture Capital. On passe en revue les nouvelles formes de financement qui s'offrent aux startups et les nouveaux modèles de fonds. Du crowdfunding, aux Business Angels en passant par les Rolling Funds, on vous explique tous les avantages et les inconvénients.

Equity
How to sell clothes online and actually make money

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 21:37


This is our Wednesday show, the time of the week when we niche down to a single topic. Today? Fashion.Natasha and Danny and Alex got together to dig into the world of fashion resale and rental. It's no small market, giving birth to both public companies, unicorns, and startups. Most recently, well-known fashion rental player Rent the Runway filed to go public, giving us a window in its own numbers.Those figures led us to a few questions about how best to go about making money from clothes in a retail context. From our chat:Selling vs. Renting vs. Reselling: To start, we wanted to help you group startups into three buckets: those who sell customers to people, those who rent goods to customers, and those who resell pre-owned goods to customers.Rent the Runway's numbers: We had some issues with Rent the Runway's business model given that it appears that the company is simply underpricing its clothing items given its cost structure. How Wall Street will price the company, or whether Rent the Runway is hoping to sell to a larger company came into the conversation.Who else should we have an eye on: To close, Natasha detailed a number of startups including Queenly, Curtsy and Rebag. Oh, and Depop (which recently sold to Etsy $1.6 billion).Startups are tearing up old retail models, which we are here for. We are less here for adjusted EBITDA that reads like magical realism. 

Investing in Impact
Using Venture Capital to Drive Cures for Type 1 Diabetes - Sean Doherty // Chairman of the JDRF T1D Fund

Investing in Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:51


In episode 34 of the Investing in Impact podcast, I speak with Sean Doherty, Chairman of the JDRF T1D Fund, on using a combination of venture capital and philanthropy to drive cures for type 1 diabetes (T1D) by catalyzing private investment.Sean Doherty led the concept-creation, design and capital financing of the Fund, and he has driven its strategy since inception. Sean retired at the end of 2018 from his role as Managing Director of Bain Capital, LP, a private global investment firm which he joined in 2005 as the firm's first general counsel.  In this role he built a pioneering and industry-leading deal lawyer and risk management group during a time of rapid growth and institutionalization of the alternative asset industry. He also had a diverse operational and constituency management role at Bain Capital, where he led crisis management, press and external communications, government relations, branding and philanthropic initiatives and was deeply involved in governance matters and capital raising. Earlier in his career he worked at Ropes & Gray LLP and was a law clerk to a federal district judge in Boston. Prior to law school, he was a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, in which he served on a Middle East Force frigate from 1990-94.Sean and his wife, Suzy, have been involved with JDRF since 2002 when their son Finn was diagnosed with T1D at the age of 2. He served on the JDRF International Board and its Executive Committee from 2016 to 2019 following more than a decade of service on the JDRF New England Chapter Board, including two years as its President.He received a J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School and a B.A. magna cum laude in Government from Harvard College. He serves on the boards of directors of two companies with T1D programs and is also a member of the board of trustees of Thayer Academy in Braintree, MA.About The JDRF T1D FundA philanthropic vehicle run as a venture capital fund. Launched in December 2016, the T1D Fund was established to create a new investment market aimed at delivering solutions to people living with or at risk of developing T1D.They are now one of the largest disease-focused venture philanthropy funds in the world, with $100m in assets and our philanthropic dollars are spurring private investment to ultimately secure the billions we need to generate cures.The portfolio consists of therapeutics, diagnostics, devices and vaccines, with an emphasis on cure-oriented therapies.Listen to more Causeartist podcasts here.Check out the Impact Investor platform here - Discover Impact Investors from around the world.Partner with us - Learn moreWe are powered by:Podcast Made with TransistorPodcast cover design Made with CanvaBuild amazing web platforms with Webflow

The Personal Finance Podcast
The 10 Commandments of Salary Negotiation (Increase Your Income!)

The Personal Finance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:22


75. The 10 Commandments of Salary Negotiation (Increase Your Income!) Want to learn the system to negotiate your salary? Here is the EBOOK.   We have a YOUTUBE channel! Check it out here!  Our Latest Videos:  5 ETFs to Hold For Life (Never Sell These!) How Much You Need to Save to Retire (Master Saving Money!) How to Become a Millionaire With a Small Amount of Money (Is it Really This Easy!?) Got questions? Ask me on Instagram Here. @mastermoneyco This is the fastest way to get a response from me. You can also ask questions on TikTok @mastermoneyco Sponsors Thank you to Mint Mobile for sponsoring the show! Check them out at mintmobile.com/PFP Thanks to Policygenius for their support! Get a free life insurance quotes at Policygenius.com Thanks to our sponsor Manscaped (Manscaped.com) for sponsoring this episode of the podcast. Use code PFP20 at checkout for 20% off + Free Shipping! Thanks to OurCrowd for sponsoring the show! Invest in Venture Capital at OurCrowd.com/PFP Thanks to Masterworks for Sponsoring the show! Invest in art at masterworks.io/pfp   Want to Support the Show? Follow on Spotify or Follow and Leave a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts! Today We Discuss:  How to systematically negotiate your salary.  How to know when to give information. How to mine for intel during interviews.  How to do the research to make sure your offer is competitive.  Episodes Mentioned More Episodes You Will Love:  How to Negotiate Your Salary Like a Pro  How to Ask Your Boss for a Raise (and get it!) How to Run the Numbers on a Rental Property  How to Buy a House with Only 3.5% Down! (The FHA Loan Explained) If you Control These 3 Expenses You Can Spend Lavishly on Everything Else How to Spend Money on Things That Bring You Value (Live Your Best Life!) Check out all the Stuff I Recommend!  M1 Finance Open a Roth IRA Personal Capital Free Wealth Management + Budget App and Fee analyzer!  CIT BANK (Best Savings Account) Best Personal Finance Books  The Simple Path to Wealth - J L Collins  The Millionaire Next Door - Thomas Stanley I Will Teach You To Be Rich - Ramit Sethi  Rich Dad Poor Dad - Robert Kiyosaki ** Some links may be affiliate links and we earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. We only recommend products we truly believe in.  Check us out on social fam!  Twitter Dollar After Dollar Instagram www.thepersonalfinancepodcast.com www.dollarafterdollar.com www.mastermoney.co Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Beyond The Hype: Artificial Intelligence
SO3E03. Transforming playtime

Beyond The Hype: Artificial Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 68:25


In this episode, MMC Investment Manager, Dele Akinyemi, talks to Nigel Phan, Founder of Whirli. An MMC portfolio company that is the world's first fully flexible sharing economy platform for children's toys. They discuss how Nigel came to founding Whirli, despite not yet having children, what it is like to be a sole founder and what people can do to transition to a circular economy.

The CPG Guys
FBA Aggregators with Boosted Commerce's Sarah Dajani

The CPG Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:48


The CPG Guys, Sri & PVSB, are joined in this episode by Sarah Dajani, VP of Operations at Boosted Commerce, a FBA (Fulfillment by Amazon) aggregator focused on accelerating the growth of beloved consumer brands.Follow  Sarah Dajani on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sdajani/Follow Boosted Commerce on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/boostedcommerce/Follow Boosted Commerce online at: https://boostedcommerce.com/Sarah answers these questions:1) You have a background in food & beverage marketing as well as personal care. Please share with us a bit about your journey and how it led you to Boosted Commerce?What are some of the current market conditions that make FBA aggregation one of the hottest verticals going on right now?2) Please tell us about Boosted Commerce and your unique approach to acquiring beloved consumer brands?3) Why is the CPG space such an interesting opportunity for acquisition? What do you look for when building out a portfolio?5) How do these brands find their way into the Boosted portfolio? Are you seeking them out and, if so, what resources are you using to identify the needles in the haystack?6) What resources & capabilities does Boosted Commerce bring to bear on accelerating these brands that you are acquiring? Why are these often completely new to these brands?7) What are the key components that Boosted Commerce activates against to deliver repeatable success as you acquire & scale these businesses?8) Is the end goal to build a sustainable portfolio of brands, is it to build and sell to a larger manufacturer for their portfolio? Help us understand the end-state a little better.DISCLAIMER: The content in this podcast episode is provided for general informational purposes only. By listening to our episode, you understand that no information contained in this episode should be construed as advice from CPGGUYS, LLC or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for research on any subject matter. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by CPGGUYS, LLC. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent.  CPGGUYS LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, consequential or other damages arising out of any individual's use of, reference to, or inability to use this podcast or the information we presented in this podcast.

upside
[614 Startups] Sam Baddoo of Fleri

upside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:20


On this episode, Elio interviews Sam Baddoo, Founder of Fleri. Fleri helps immigrants protect the people who matter most back home with health insurance. Every year immigrants in the Diaspora send billions of dollars to Africa oftentimes to pay for healthcare. Without direct insight into how the funds are being spent and whether adequate treatment is being provided, immigrants are left to worry about whether the money they are sending will contribute to their loved ones wellbeing.Fleri is changing that by allowing immigrants to purchase health insurance for the loved ones creating a win-win-win-win situation for the policyholder, patient, doctors and insurance companies. First, the policyholder knows that they are providing access to high-quality healthcare for their loved one and they can see what treatments have been received. Next, the patient has access to vetted physicians and receives care in clinically sound facilities. The doctors are able to treat patients with the ability to pay thereby providing capital for infrastructure investment and finally, insurance companies have the premiums to build robust networks and offer more affordable plan options.Fleri is building a commercial solution to what has been an intractable problem in the developing world by creating a robust healthcare insurance ecosystem with incentives for all stakeholders.Subscribe to 614 StartupsFollow upside on TwitterJoin the upside network

Project Medtech
Medtech Money --- Episode 30: Jennifer McMahon, Principal at Seroba Life Sciences --- Women in Medtech Venture Capital & How Early-Stage European VCs Invest

Project Medtech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:32


In this episode, Giovanni and Jen discuss how she got involved in the space, what her fund invests in, contrasting time to exit for Biotech vs. Medtech, failure rates of an investment in Medtech, the MDR and how it is affecting deal flow in Europe, the Medtech ecosystem in Ireland, women in Medtech and more. Jennifer McMahon LinkedIn Seroba Life Sciences Website Giovanni Lauricella LinkedIn Project Medtech LinkedIn Project Medtech Website

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives
Lessons in Rapid Growth: Scaling the Avalanche Ecosystem -Jay Kurahashi-Sofue, Nick Mussallem, Ava Labs, Ep. 167

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:26


Within a month, the total value deposited across Avalanche projects grew over 1000% to $9B. As an investor, this obviously caught my attention, and I'm excited to have Jay Kurahashi-Sofue (@jkays17) and Nick Mussallem (@_nMoose) from Ava Labs share their learnings on achieving rapid growth in crypto. Small UX decisions that grew value by billions How to deploy grants for lasting impact What email & Uber teach us about abstraction and incentives in Layer 1s How to cater to DeFi natives and institutions What people underestimate about Avalanche Host: @mrjasonchoi. Not financial advice.

Taste Radio
In The Face Of Adversity, What Would ‘Buddha' Do? Try Otherworldly Innovation.

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 66:34


Like many food and beverage entrepreneurs, Buddha Brands co-founders Chris Magnone and Mark Cigos introduced themselves to the industry as exhibitors at Natural Products Expo West. At the time, the Canadian business partners were marketing coconut water, a product they saw as an anchor for a platform of premium and clean label food and drinks aimed at addressing modern consumers' demand for plant-based and nutritious products.  In the years since, Buddha Brands has seen its share of hits and misses and while coconut water is no longer the company's primary focus, the founders' vision persists via a line of keto-friendly snack bars launched in 2020. Made with MCT oil, sunflower seeds and pea protein, the bars contain no sugar alcohols, palm oils, dairy or soy and are now available at over 1,500 natural independent retailers and grocery stores in the U.S. including nationwide at Sprouts. Buddha Brands also completed its first round of outside capital in July, adding $3 million to support retail expansion of the keto bars along with new product development. In an interview featured in this episode, Magnone and Cigos spoke about the formation of Buddha Brands, key learnings from the brand's U.S. debut and how they responded to adversity and innovation that fell flat. They also explained how they have navigated a challenging time for the bar category and why the timing was right to bring in new investment. This episode also includes an interview with Jen Ballen and Joe Magliano, the co-founders of Otherworld Foods, a new company that is pursuing a positive impact on the food system by aligning locally sourced and upcycled ingredients with nostalgia-inspired products. Launched earlier this year, Otherworld markets vegan and superfood-infused pancake and waffle mixes that are currently sold direct-to-consumer. Our conversation offered a glimpse into the company's formation, go-to-market strategy and ambitious mission.   Show notes:   0:52: Interview: Chris Magnone and Mark Cigos, Co-Founders, Buddha Brands -- Taste Radio editor Ray Latif spoke with Magnone and Cigos about the community of Canadian food and beverage entrepreneurs, how the founding team came together to form Buddha Brands and why persistence was the key to landing new retail placement. They also explained why it was a mistake to expand distribution too quickly, why the launch of an innovative coconut jerky failed to attract consumers and what they learned from the experience. Later, Magnone and Cigos discussed how the keto bars fit into their original vision for the company, how they were able to persevere amid the pandemic and why they sought non-dilutive capital for Buddha Brands' recent funding round. 45:23: Interview: Jen Ballen and Joseph Magliano, Co-Founders, Otherworld Foods -- Ballen and Magliano sat down with Latif at Expo East 2021 and spoke about the origins of the company and how they recruited a team of world-renowned innovators and chefs to help formulate the mixes. They also discussed why they chose to launch the brand prior to having a product to sell and what they view as the biggest learning curve for early-stage entrepreneurs. Brands in this episode: Buddha Brands, Manitoba Harvest, Mid-Day Squares, Love Good Fats, Guru Energy, Otherworld Foods

LatinxAmerica's podcast
Marco Casas Talks About Closing Gaps of Access To Capital, Opportunity & Outcomes

LatinxAmerica's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:01


VCFamilia member Marco Casas  is a Venezuelan-born professional who has been named to Business Insider's "100 rising stars who represent the future of venture capital." His career extends across early-stage ventures and global public companies. Marco is passionate about fintech and other disruptive technologies closing gaps of access to capital, opportunity, and outcomes. Marco pursues these interests via a partnerships and business development full-time role at American Express, and via Angel investing and active participation in organizations like VCFamilia, a Latinx in tech community, Toy Ventures, an operator-led venture fund, Rally Cap Ventures, an emerging markets fintech fund, On Deck Fintech and the Council of Foreign Relations, where Marco is a Term Member.  Marco received his BA in political science from Middlebury College and MBA degrees from Columbia and London Business School. He's a proud Latinx immigrant, now settled in New York by way of Swaziland and Russia. Outside of work, Marco is active in the community, serving on the associate board of the Madison Square Boys & Girls Club. He is a happy husband and father of two girls. https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcocasas/

The Quest with Justin Kan
From Twitch to Y Combinator CEO @Michael Seibel (2020)

The Quest with Justin Kan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 85:09


I sat down with my Justin.tv cofounder, Michael Seibel, to talk about how we turned our live reality show Justin.tv into the global platform that eventually became Twitch. Michael was previously the CEO of Y Combinator, the seed stage fund known as the first investor in Stripe, Dropbox, Instacart, Coinbase, Reddit, and thousands of other startups. Michael is one of my closest friends and an amazing mentor. In this episode we talk about his education at Yale, founding Justin.tv together, mentoring the Airbnb founders early on, how to get funded by Y Combinator, and so much more.  (This episode was originally released as S1:E1 in 2020) If you liked  this episode, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter! A thank to our sponsors Universe and CashApp for making this podcast possible.   THE QUEST MEDIA | CONTENT MEETS SILICON VALLEY |

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz
[Venture Capital Series] Founding the Next Apple With Richard Melmon of Bullpen Capital and NSV Wolf Capital

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 47:36


Richard Melmon is a pioneer in the technology industry. He launched the first spreadsheet, VisiCalc, he was in charge of the early advertising for Apple, and he launched the first digital watch at Intel. Richard is the Co-founder of Electronic Arts, a company with a $30 billion market cap. He also co-founded Melmon Tawa & Partners, a high-tech advertising agency acquired by Livingston and Co. in 1989. Richard built and sold Objective Software to Asymetrix in 1993. He has co-founded and built many businesses ever since.  More recently, Richard co-founded Bullpen Capital in 2010 with Paul Martino and Duncan Davidson and has led several of its key investments, including Braze and Homelight. Richard is also is Managing Partner at NSV Wolf Capital. In this episode… One common thread among successful entrepreneurs is that they have built companies that failed. Richard Melmon is no exception. He thought all that a company needed to succeed was good marketing, but that became his most significant career regret.  Fast forward many successful exits later, Richard shares some of his entrepreneurial battle scars that could set you straight on your way to building the next Apple. Why does Richard think everyone else is wrong about AI being the future? What is that one thing a company must get right to succeed?  Listen to this episode of the Inspired Insider Podcast with Dr. Jeremy Weisz featuring Richard Melmon, Co-founder at Bullpen Capital and NSV Wolf Capital. They discuss Richard's tech background, his running with Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, co-founding Electronic Arts (EA), becoming a venture capitalist, the many scars along the way, and skepticism about AI. Stay tuned! 

Inside Outside
Ep. 268 - Kevin Leland, Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Dir. of Applied Innovation at Baxter on Open Innovation & Global Connections

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:12


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. The three of us talk about the changing world of open innovation and what it takes to connect and collaborate, to solve big industry problems. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at BaxterBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing set of guests. Today, we have Kevin Leland, who is the CEO and Founder of Halo. And Matt Muller, who is the Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. Welcome. Kevin Leland: Thank you. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you both on the show to talk about a topic that's near and dear to a lot of folks out there. That's the topic of open innovation and how to corporates and startups and new ideas get started in this whole world of collaborative innovation. Kevin you're the CEO and founder of Halo. What is Halo? And how did you get started in this open innovation space? Kevin Leland: Halo is a marketplace and network where companies connect directly with scientists and startups for research collaborations. It's about as simple to post RFP or a partnering opportunity on Halo as it is to post a job on LinkedIn. And then once it's posted scientists submit their research proposals. We went live in January. Matt and the team of Baxter was our very first customer. So, the earliest of early adopters and they were a really fantastic partner.I came across the idea of Halo and got into open innovation really kind of by accident. The original concept for Halo was crowd funding for medical research. So, a little bit different, but we would work with technology transfer offices at universities to identify promising technology that just needed a little bit of funding to get to the next level.And through that experience, I learned that scientists needed more than just funding. They needed the expertise and the resources of industry. Meanwhile, I was learning how industry was actively trying to partner with these scientists and these early-stage startups, because they realized that they were less good at the early-stage discovery process of research. And so to me, it seemed like an obvious marketplace solution. And so that's where the impetus of the business came and how we started. Brian Ardinger: Let's turn it over to you Matt. From the other side of the table, from a corporation, trying to understand and facilitate and accelerate innovation efforts. What is open innovation mean to you and how did Halo come to play a part in that?Matt Muller: As you mentioned earlier, I'm Director of Applied Innovation here at Baxter and I am in our Renal Care Business. And so that's the business at Baxter that's focused on treating end stage kidney disease. And that's one of Baxter's largest businesses. As a company, we have over $12 billion in sales annually, and dialysis in the renal care businesses, is our largest business unit.And it is an area that we've struggled with innovation. And particularly what we excel at, at Baxter is we excel at treating kidney disease in the home. So, this is a particular therapy called peritoneal dialysis. Patients are able to do it in their home while they sleep. And one of the big challenges that we have today with peritoneal dialysis is that patients need dialysis solution. They use about 12, 15 liters of this sterile medical solution every night to do their therapy. And today the way we do that and the way we've done it ever since this therapy has been around since early seventies is we literally deliver that solution in bags, by trucks. We make it in big plants in the United States and trucks drive all across the country and they deliver it to patients in their home.And as a company, we, for a long time have said, we really need to change this business model. It's not sustainable for us. It requires our patients store a lot of water in their home or the solution rather in their home. And they have to essentially dedicate a whole room of their houses to storage of their supplies.So, we have, for the longest time said, we want to change how this is done. And we want to be able to use the patient's own water in their home. And instead of delivering all these bags of solutions deliver concentrates much like if you go on, you buy a soft drink at the movie theater, it comes from a concentrated box of syrup that is, you add water to it and you have your soft drink. And so that's our vision. And we've struggled for many years of how to bring innovation into the marketplace for making that pure water that we need in the home. We have a lot of very bright scientists at Baxter. The problem is that as Kevin mentioned before, our scientists are really good at solving particular problems in particular getting products to market. Where we've been struggling is that the science has not or at least we haven't been aware of the science that could really allow us to break this barrier and make the leap to be able to make this pure solution medical grade solution in the home. And that's why we've reached out to Kevin and his platform as a way to do that is to go out to a really broad community of researchers to bring new ideas into the company, to help us figure out new ways to approach the problem.Brian Ardinger: The history of open innovation is long. And there's a lot of things that have been tried in the past. Did Baxter try other methods in the past? Or how did you go about trying to determine what things we should innovate internally and try to solve that way versus when and where we go outside for solutions? Matt Muller: I would say as a company, we probably hadn't been as involved specifically in the university and in the startups space. So, a lot of times as a company, we have a lot of people that come to us with ideas and looking for funding. Most of the time, it's a very common proposition that they give you. They need a certain amount of funding, and in three years, they'll have a product. Three years is like the magic number. And the reality is that it's frequently the claims and the charity are very oversold, and we haven't been really successful in that type of space. And so, we've been really looking at different ways to engage a larger community. The other element of it too, is sometimes when you talk open innovation, we're limited by our existing network of people. And so that is the employees and who they work with. Maybe it's the fact we're in Northern Illinois, we're close to Northwestern University and people here have relationships with professors at Northwestern.So, we develop those relationships and the open innovation opportunities through those connections. We've been looking into how do we expand that? Reach a broader audience and get a global connection, so to speak and open to new ideas. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great segue. Kevin, you've worked with companies also besides Baxter out there and that. What are some of the typical mistakes or challenges that you see corporations making when trying to get started in an open innovation.Kevin Leland: First of all get started is kind of the big challenge, because there's still some resistance to open innovation, and even the term open can be scary to some companies because it implies, or it can be interpreted as we're letting all of our competitors know what our strategic interests are. And so, I'm even hesitant sometime about using the word open. I mean, we're really about facilitating partnerships between companies and researchers who have mutually shared interests and can work together to solve problems. Some of the approaches in the past to me just seemed really inefficient, like traveling around the world and going to conferences and hoping you hear somebody speak or get a referral from someone or just call up the universities. Or just more likely to just work with Harvard, Yale, and Princeton are just example of select universities as if there couldn't possibly be great research coming out anywhere else.And so that was part of the problem that I was trying to solve with Halo in terms of democratizing access to companies like Baxter for all scientists, regardless of where they are in the world, or what institution, where they reside and making the process a lot easier for both the scientists and for the company.Because one of the reasons that companies don't pass a wider net is because it's a lot of tedious administrative work in terms of emailing and downloading attachments and PDFs. So, the platform is designed to streamline that entire process so they can cast a wider net. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: Are there types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better when tackled in this open format or open environment? Kevin Leland: We're focused on scientific innovation. So the other key difference is that all of our community are PhDs or part of funded startups. So it's not a challenge site where just anybody can submit an idea. So that's one of the key differences. Brian Ardinger: Are the types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better in this type of environment.Kevin Leland: In the case of Halo, we seen everything from very specific requirements that were similar to what Baxter was looking for where they lay out the actual technical requirements of what they're looking for. And then on the other side of the spectrum, we have what Bayer has done, which is a very open-ended call for proposals around the area of sustainable agriculture. And so, the platform is flexible enough that it works for either approach. The key difference, I mean, it really depends on the goal of the company. So in the case of Baxter, a lot of our other customers like Pepsi or Reckitt, they're looking for a very specific solution, to a challenge that they have. Whereas a company like Bayer kind of doesn't know what they don't know, and they're just kind of want to see what's out there.And then from a management perspective, when you do have a very open-ended call, you get a lot more proposals and the more specific requirements the fewer you are going to get. So, it kind of depends on, on what your ultimate strategy is. Brian Ardinger: That's a great way to segue it back to Matt. I'm assuming that your work with Halo is not the only type of innovation initiative that's going on at Baxter. Can you talk a little bit about some of the other innovation efforts that are going on there and how does your work with Halo fit in with those?Matt Muller: As a company, really, a lot of our innovation framework is built into our core business objectives. The way we're structured as a company we're in business units. So, as I said, I work in renal care, so everything, we start with our business and understanding what does that business strategy. Where do we want to play as a company? And then what are the key problems that we want to solve?And I mentioned up front one of the key problems right now that we want to solve, is we want to figure out how to be a more sustainable business and get away from shipping water across the globe. So that's a key strategic initiative for our business. So, then what we define at that point, what are the key elements or the problems that we need to solve in meeting that strategic initiative. One is how do we purify water in the home? And then we figure out what are the ways, you know, based on those specific problems we find we have, what are the best ways to solve that problem?So, in some cases, we're at a point where we need more ideas. Whereas a company, we stagnated and we tried these pathways are not fruitful. We're kind of keep banging our head against the wall. Let's really go out there and see what's out there. And that was an example of what we did with Halo. We also have our own internal engineering organization. We're a global company. So, there are specific things that we may do from an innovation project where we would work on it internally because we feel like we have the internal expertise. Or a lot of times what we will do is we'll look for external partnerships and that may be in the form of through various engineering consulting companies and product development consulting companies that we may partner with because they may have very specific experiences in a space that we're interested in, or maybe an adjacent space.And that's another big element is we get siloed and focused in medical. But there are a lot of adjacent areas where technologies are being developed and, you know, maybe it's the petroleum or refining industry, or maybe it's, you know, some other area of medical that we just don't play in. And we can bring in these consultant firms that just have much broader exposure. And so that's also an element that we look at. So it's really a mix between this open concept like what we do with Halo, engineering consulting and partnerships, and then internal. Brian Ardinger: You know the world is changing so fast and everything is happening so rapidly that it's tough to keep up. Even if you're an expert in your particular industry, like you said, even understanding what's going on in cross industries and that. Kevin, can you talk a little bit about the types of industries that you serve and why a platform like this can give advantage to corporate?Kevin Leland: Yeah, absolutely. I thought it was interesting when Matt was talking about getting inspiration from other industries like oil and gas or petroleum, because that's really what the platform is designed for. Researchers don't necessarily think in terms of what the commercial application is. They think of what their expertise is. And by collecting all this data on what their focus area is and then on the flip side, what companies are interested in, we can more programmatically find connections that in potential partners where otherwise, it would really have no idea that there might be a fruitful opportunity there. In general, we've been focused like broadly on the area of sustainability, which can include anything from sustainable agriculture, like Bayer to sustainable packaging or work with PepsiCo and then water treatment, which is what we did with Matt and his team.So that's a really broad category. We do have a few other opportunities are kind of outside that scope. But we are also looking at doing more in the medicine and pharmaceutical areas as well. Brian Ardinger: Matt, can you talk a little bit about the early days of finding an innovation effort like this? What were some of the challenges or pitfalls or things you had to do to get buy in and then go and actually execute on this particular challenge? Matt Muller: It's hard to sometimes in a large company get traction. And so, you need a champion. And Kevin's known that cause we've actually worked together to help to get that traction within Baxter. I think it helped as we got started because Kevin had some prior connections with some core people at Baxter, which helped to get some initiative.But I think the biggest challenge is getting started and showing the value and gaining the buy-in to get something like this funded internally in a large company. I think a lot of people have an opinion of large companies have endless resources. And can do anything they want. But the reality is everything's looked at very closely.You're constantly getting distracted with the new crisis or the new area of focus. And people are constantly changing roles and companies. So, you need that champion internally. You need to then be able to get that own internal opportunity to influence. To get the approval, to fund something like this.But then secondly, you need the success stories to come out of it, because if you don't have that initial success, chances are that then you're not going to get that momentum and people aren't going to believe in following through with it. And that was key to our relationship here is getting really some initial successes that we could point to. And then things have kind of evolved from there. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great point. I think a lot of companies are naturally more fearful because failing in an existing business model is not a good thing, but yet to innovate, you know, that there are some things that are probably not going to work and that. Open innovation almost gives you some opportunity to try and test and experiment a little bit outside of your core realm.Gives you a little bit more ground cover sometimes to have different types of conversations than you would have, just if it was only internal and working from that perspective. Kevin, what else are you seeing when it comes to the benefits of companies reaching outside of their four walls to create their innovation initiatives? Kevin Leland: The biggest benefit and maybe Matt can speak to this is they're identifying partners that they would have never known about otherwise. So Matt was able to identify a team in Australia. UNSW Sydney. And I don't think Baxter has anyone on the ground there, and probably wouldn't have found that otherwise. And then the secondary benefit is it's almost like a market analysis tool or market intelligence tool because the companies are learning about new technologies and trends and different pockets of innovation around the world that they really didn't have visibility into previously.Brian Ardinger: What are you guys most excited about moving forward?Kevin Leland: I'm really excited to see this working. So, you know, I did a ton of customer discovery before launching Halo. I had dozens of interviews with innovation executives on one side and scientists on the other side. But you never really know until you actually go into the wild and introduce a platform to the users to see if it's going to work. And we've done 20 plus RFPs now since Baxter. We work to put 12 Fortune 500 companies, every one of them has resulted in signed agreements. And, you know, obviously it takes time to see these products into the marketplace, but that's the next thing I'm excited about is when Baxter introduces a new home dialysis device, where patients can make the dialysis solution from their kitchen and don't have to have 900 pounds of solution sitting in their bedroom.Brian Ardinger: Matt, what are you excited about? Matt Muller: Well, I like your vision of the future there, Kevin, first of all. Beyond that, you know, and obviously helping us accelerate, getting the innovative products to market. The other thing that I've really enjoyed is being able to make these broader connections that we never would have before. Kevin used the example of we're connected now with the University of New South Wales on a really interesting research project.But the other thing that this connected us with is a whole network of experts on an NSF Foundation called New, which is very well aligned with some of our core business and research interests that we never would have had before. You know, if we hadn't been involved with this initiative. And so, it's those types of things that also really get me excited because it really helps us.You know, at the end of the day we're scientists. We're engineers. We all like collaborating with other scientists and engineers to solve problems. And this is just exciting because it broadens that network for us even more. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Matt and Kevin, thank you for collaborating here at Inside Outside Innovation and sharing some of the insights on what's working in this new changing landscape that we're in. So, I appreciate you both being on. If people want to find out more about yourselves or the companies and that that you work at, what's the best way to do. Kevin Leland: For me, they can connect with me on LinkedIn. Just search Kevin Leland should be one of the top three, I think, or go to Halo. Science Matt Muller: And similarly, you can connect with me on LinkedIn. I'm Matthew Muller, Director of Applied Innovation, Baxter Healthcare. We also have a company bio description on Kevin's platform. Halo. We also have put out two new challenge statements with respect to some of the key technical challenges that we have in our space. So, you know, go to Kevin's platform and check those out as well, please.Brian Ardinger: Well, Matthew, Kevin, thank you again for being on Inside Outside Innovation. I look forward to continuing the conversation and thank you very much.Kevin Leland: Thanks Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Black Tech Green Money
TERM SHEETS, a talk with New York VC, Richard Kerby

Black Tech Green Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 45:03


Richard is Co-Founder and General Partner at Equal Ventures. Prior to co-founding Equal Ventures, Richard was an investor at Venrock, where he led seed-stage and Series A stage investments in 6Sense, Amino Apps, Beckon, Burner, Luxe Valet, and Salsify. On this episode, AfroTech's Will Lucas sits down with Richard Kerby to talk about the things that are at the core of Venture Capital: investing early stage entrepreneurs and startups, and how to know if a startup is a good fit for your investment profile. Follow Will Lucas on Instagram at @willlucas Learn more about other Black tech disruptors and innovators at AfroTech.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

True Growth con Fernando Trueba
#051. Brian Requarth - De Cero A Exit. Tienes Que Creer En Ti Mismo.

True Growth con Fernando Trueba

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 61:28


Brian Requarth es el CEO y Co-Fundador de Latitud, una aceleradora de negocios que ayuda a emprendedores en Latinoamérica a construir las empresas líderes del futuro. Antes de fundar Latitud, Brian fundó VivaReal -- un portal de clasificados inmobiliarios en Brasil que levantó más de $70M de USD, unió fuerzas con grupo Zap y fue finalmente adquirido por OLX por más de $650M de USD en 2020. Brian platica sus inicios como emprendedor, sus momentos más difíciles, el crecimiento de VivaReal y su visión sobre el emprendimiento en México y el futuro de Venture Capital.

Speaking to Influence
Ep 75: Ellen Weber Exec Dir., Robin Hood Ventures: Entrepreneurship & Angel Investment

Speaking to Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:28


On this episode Ellen Weber shares the common mistakes entrepreneurs make when communicating with potential investors and how you can engage and connect while asking for the funding you need. Listen in as Laura and Ellen explore the basics of building rapport, the difference between angel investors and private equity, and the three things that every investor looks for in an entrepreneur when making an investment. Ellen Weber is the Executive Director of Robin Hood Ventures, a leading angel group helping to fuel startup growth in the Philadelphia region. She also serves as the Executive Director of Mid-Atlantic Diamond Ventures, hosted by Temple University's Fox School of Business Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute, and is an Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, and the co-chair of Temple's Entrepreneurship Advisory Board.   You can connect with Ellen in the following ways: Website: https://www.robinhoodventures.com/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elleneweber/   To learn more about Dr. Laura Sicola and how mastering influence can impact your success go to https://www.speakingtoinfluence.com/quickstart and download the quick start guide for mastering the three C's of influence.   You can connect with Laura in the following ways: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurasicola LinkedIn Business Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/vocal-impact-productions/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWri2F_hhGQpMcD97DctJwA Facebook: Vocal Impact Productions Twitter: @Laura Sicola  Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/vocalimpactproductions Instagram: @VocalImpactProductions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Build a Business Success Secrets
The Superconnector in the Venture Capital Ecosystem, Carl Grant | Ep. 175

Build a Business Success Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:35


As EVP, Global Business Development at Cooley, Carl Grant leads a team of super connectors who are connected to venture capital firms and the technology and life sciences ecosystems. During Covid, Carl designed Venture Raise to help entrepreneurs find the investors who are the best fit for their companies and get to know connectors who can get them a proper referral to the investor. Carl Grant and I have known each other for over two decades. He's a great guy, always smiling and you'll love this epsiode where we talk about his move to Austin Texas, venture capital and his Venture Raise company that can help you find investors for your business. Links from this episode: * Venture Raise * Cooley  

Equity
Equity Monday: I hear this fintech thing is going to be big

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:10


This is Equity Monday, our weekly kickoff that tracks the latest private market news, talks about the coming week, digs into some recent funding rounds and mulls over a larger theme or narrative from the private markets. You can follow the show on Twitter here. I also tweet.Markets were busy, with Chinese tech stocks rallying and the rest of the world posting a mix of gains and losses. If you are bullish on public markets, excellent. But if you are bearish, don't worry -- there are diverse enough signals out this morning to satisfy any investing thesis.Facebook goes on American political TV: To talk about changes it is going to make to its product. A product that it built. It wants point for fixing the thing it made broken. Sure.And Tesla, after delaying the roll-out of a beta for Full Self Driving, is also being asked by some in India to build cars in that country.CRED is raising even more money, at an even higher valuation.Mono gets the Tiger imprimatur, which matters as the startup could prove that the Plaid model will spawn regional players.French mobile gaming company Homa Games raised $50 million on the back of huge download numbers.And ahead we have the GitLab direct listing, and AvidExchange IPO.Chat you on Wednesday!

Go To Market Grit
CRO, Stripe, Mike Clayville: Building Tornado Companies

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 72:03


Mike Clayville, CEO at Stripe, joins this week's conversation to discuss what it's like to turn companies into forces of nature, using Mike's chosen metaphor, the tornado. While Mike might be the first guest to compare company growth to a natural phenomenon, his insight is invaluable. Mike comes from a small town outside of Declo, Idaho, and grew up working on the family farm and ranch. It was there that Mike gained the hard work ethic that has catapulted him into the worlds of engineering and then finance. All along the way, he made himself known as “the guy in the cowboy hat” - be it in board meetings, or on business trips to Paris or Japan.In this episode, Mike and Joubin discuss the cultural significance of Mike's hat and the importance of not forgetting where you came from. They also discuss Mike's tenure at IBM when it was in decline, and how Mike shifted things there into an upward trajectory. Mike also explains his idea of first principles as a means to leading tornado companies, the innovation of Amazon, The Clayville Foundation and their fight against cancer, and more.In this episode, we cover: Mike's early life in Declo, Idaho, where he worked on his family farm - and the symbolism behind his cowboy hat. (3:11) The reason behind Mike's switch from engineering to finance - and a look at his tenure at IBM, the tremendous challenge he faced during its decline, and how he turned it around. (7:06) Mike's philosophy on uncovering the first principle mindset and the qualities of a tornado. (13:44) The early days of Amazon and public cloud - and how Mike used first principles to lead some of the largest enterprises into a new world of technology. (18:33) An overview of Stripe: How Stripe helps companies understand their customers and how it compares to AWS in today's internet economy. (26:42) Why you should fail as an innovator and be willing to be misunderstood- and how Amazon's innovation model contains the secret sauce of success. (32:56) Selling as a muscle memory sport: Why Mike refers to prospecting as the calisthenics of sales - and a dive into the stages of prospecting. (39:42) More on the importance of prospecting and why cold-calling is the best way to start a sales career. (43:15) Mike talks about his detailed briefing process and how it helps maintain efficiency when getting to the heart of their customer's needs. (48:50) How Mike's daily runs inspire some of his best ideas - and an in-depth look at his effective decision-making process. (53:51) The Clayville Foundation: How The Clayville Foundation honors his late wife and seeks to find cures for cancer through technology and science. (01:03:00) 

Investing in Impact
Investing in Natural Medicine and Mindfulness - Joshua Haynes // Managing Partner at Masawa Fund

Investing in Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 39:31


If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe, review, and share this podcast!In this episode of the Investing in Impact podcast, I speak with Joshua Haynes, Managing Partner at Masawa Fund on working in 35 countries, speaking 7 languages, and using natural medicine, technology, and workplace wellness to help billions of people live impactful lives in the global economy.Joshua's story and path is incredibly powerful. He overcame depression, anxiety, and an eating disorder. Tough childhood raised on welfare by a single mother = grit + perseverance.He displays over 20 years leading curation at the nexus of innovation, technology, and social impact. He served as a Peace Corps Volunteer, data analyst, software developer, consultant, digital product + service designer.Joshua also served as a Diplomat in the Obama Administration (USAID), managed $190M in impact grant funding for the US & Swedish Govs, pioneered new impact partnership types and ways of working.Degrees from Boston University (Finance); The Fletcher School, Tufts University (MBA).Masawa is the mental wellness impact fund. Through a laser focus on financial viability, social impact maximization, and founder resilience + organizational health, we nurture capital to nurture minds.Masawa invests in organizations with products proven to directly or indirectly result in improved mental wellness: Natural healing approaches: nutrition, exercise, natural medicine, mindfulness, etc. Technology-accelerated recovery: software and hardware innovations  Workplace wellness: approaches to impact people where they spend the most time Listen to more Causeartist podcasts here.We are powered by:ImpactInvestor - Discover Impact Investors from around the world.Podcast Made with TransistorPodcast cover design Made with CanvaBuild amazing web platforms with Webflow

Equity
Community is the new AI

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 28:59


Natasha and Mary Ann and Alex were all aboard this week with Grace on the dials, which meant that we had a flat lovely time recording Equity for you. Of course, Equity is TechCrunch's venture capital focused podcast where we dig into the most critical funding rounds, and natter about the key news items impacting startups.Before we hop into this week's topics, you can follow the show on Twitter, where we rather often host impromptu Twitter spaces that sometimes become episodes. Come hang!Here's the rundown for this week:Chalo raises $40M to improve bus transit in India: This startup wins name (and startup) of the week. Chalo wants to tackle inefficiencies in India's bus system, so we noodle over why that makes sense and what challenges could be ahead.Masterworks raises $110M for fractional art ownership: Call it a Series A if you must, but the megaround that Masterworks just raised helps underscore the global shift towards alternative investing, and fractional ownership. How long until we get Masterworks on the blockchain? That would be the real IRL-NFT crossover we are kinda waiting for.CostCertified wants to save your next home reno project:  CostCertified, which just participated in Y Combinator's summer cohort, raised $8.45M in seed funding. The Canadian company's end goal is to build the “Amazon for construction.” CostCertified allows contractors to send a shoppable interactive estimate to homeowners so that they can choose their selections during a project, and see the effect on price instantly.All about community: Community has been watered down, there's no doubt about it. But, there is still arguments for why it works - and we make them (often).Google invests in Africa: American tech giant Google is putting capital to work in Africa, but in the form of infra investment and early-stage investing. Frankly both make good sense given the advertising giant's business model.Edtech goes B2B: Udemy is going public! We have dug through the numbers already, but thankfully with Natasha on the show we got to go a level deeper on where edtech revenues may come from next.And that's our show! We are back bright and early on Monday!

Women in Venture Capital
[S2E9] A Conversation with Maggie Vo and Olivia Gaudree | CIO and Partner @ Fuel Venture Capital | Blue Shores Capital | Thomson Reuters

Women in Venture Capital

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:44


In this episode, Maggie Vo and Olivia Gaudree from Fuel VC, talk about their individual journeys into investing and the importance of networks and mentors in succeeding. They also touch on what differentiates Fuel VC from other firms and the startup scene in Miami before finally sharing their experience with gender disparity in VC and the belief that positive change needs to be encouraged through a top down approach.

Project Medtech
Medtech Money --- Episode 29: Gaston Vasseur, Investment Manager at Anaxago --- Insight into Early-Stage Medtech and Digital Health Venture Capital in France

Project Medtech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 52:15


In this episode, Giovanni and Gaston discuss early stage investments in Medtech, how they invest on a deal by deal basis through network of investors, the Medtech scene in France and Europe as a whole, filling the gap in France between early stage investors and late stage investors, how the French government is supporting innovation, how the MDR is affecting Medtech deal flow, and more. Gaston Vasseur LinkedIn Anaxago Website Giovanni Lauricella LinkedIn Project Medtech LinkedIn Project Medtech Website

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
The Miami Tech Scene: Chris Adamo, Brian Brackeen, and Max Tuchman

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 56:26


3:00 - Career Journey and Early Lessons (Chris Adamo)5:09 - Working at 1-800-Flowers6:55 - Opportunities8:00 - Mindset Practice/Second Nature8:36 - Career Change9:54 - First Job Shift / Startup Scene in Miami11:40 - Hardest part in getting into Startup13:04 - Why is Miami so Special15:32 - Story of Colorful Shirts17:27 - Key Lesson taught by Chris Dad18:30 - Chris Legacy19:18 - Chris's North Star21:19 - Max's Introduction23:33 - Brian's Introduction25:00 - Why Miami is so great overall26:36 - Saturation Point28:46 - What is Miami missing out on?31:33 - Secret Sauce / Team Work and Culture34:48 - Opportunities in Miami38:54 - Keeping the Passion strong in remote work39:49 - Go-to Interview Questions (Soft skills)44:29 - How to pay forward47:06 - Brian's Best Mentor48:50 - Miami in 10 years51:55 - Greatest Piece of advice  

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany
Incari wants to be the OS for the cars of the future

Startuprad.io - Startup podcast from Germany

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 40:26


Incari is a software provider, from Berlin. Currently, they are mostly working on interfaces for the automotive industry but want to develop further into an operating system for the interfaces of cars.

Agtech - So What?
Farmers and Startups: Lessons and Tips for Collaborating

Agtech - So What?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 40:55


The divide between farmers and startups can seem like a chasm. Tech culture and agriculture have evolved from completely different backgrounds, and even seem to have their own languages. So how can agtech bring together two very different groups?In this episode, you'll hear practical tips from farmers and agtech experts on how to build mutually beneficial relationships. For startups, this includes approaching farmers as partners, rather than ‘customers,' and understanding ‘grower economics'. And for farmers, it's about finding opportunities to access and help shape new products as the startup iterates. This might look like an equity partnership, an advisory relationship, or even becoming a co-founder.On the panel:Walt Duflock - Vice President of Innovation, Western GrowersEmma Weston - CEO & Co-Founder, AgriDigital Pete Nelson - President & Executive Director, AgLaunchThis episode is an edited version of an AusAgritech Meetup, sponsored by Foodbytes! by Rabobank. For more information and resources, visit our website.

Forward Thinking Founders
746 - Rohan Agrawal (Incentify) On Building a Social Network Around Music Discovery

Forward Thinking Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 7:53


Rohan Agrawal is the cofounder of Incentify. Incentify is fostering a community that engages around music, and make connections with people who share your same music taste.★ Support this podcast ★

Equity
The metaverse is coming for Squid Game

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 27:13


Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch's venture capital focused podcast where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines. This is our Wednesday show, the time of the week when we niche down to a single topic. Today? Gaming.Natasha and Danny and Alex got together to discuss the gaming world from a few perspectives, including those of startups and the largest platform players in tech. Alex is a gamer. Danny is a board gamer. And Natasha isn't big on digital games. So, we had a good array of viewpoints. The goal of our episode was to understand why gaming is garnering more interest from Big Tech and startups alike, and how the business model and environment has evolved over the years.Here's what we got into:A new gaming fund from a16z, and recent venture capital totals, as compiled by our friends over at Crunchbase News.Amazon's new hit game, and Apple's epic gaming profits.It appears, by our read, that the gaming industry has evolved from single-sale titles to games with recurring incomes that studios have become venture-backable; this is testament to both business model evolution and general gaming popularity, as much as it is indicative of how much money it is possible to earn supporting the games industry as a tech shop as well.Still, we wanted to spend a few minutes on the challenges that still await those trying to spin up a game overnight.After we talked through the context and challenges, we riffed on the why! It includes just what a metaverse is, how NFTs can slot into the conversation, and more.All we need now is a release date for Royal Court, Paradox.

The Personal Finance Podcast
Should You Buy a House in a Red Hot Market?! (The Answer May Surprise You!)

The Personal Finance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 30:16


74. Should You Buy a House in a Red Hot Market?! (The Answer May Surprise You!) We have a YOUTUBE channel! Check it out here!  Our Latest Videos:  5 ETFs to Hold For Life (Never Sell These!) How Much You Need to Save to Retire (Master Saving Money!) How to Become a Millionaire With a Small Amount of Money (Is it Really This Easy!?) Got questions? Ask me on Instagram Here. @mastermoneyco This is the fastest way to get a response from me. You can also ask questions on TikTok @mastermoneyco Sponsors Thank you to Mint Mobile for sponsoring the show! Check them out at mintmobile.com/PFP Thanks to Policygenius for their support! Get a free life insurance quotes at Policygenius.com Thanks to our sponsor Manscaped (Manscaped.com) for sponsoring this episode of the podcast. Use code PFP20 at checkout for 20% off + Free Shipping! Thanks to OurCrowd for sponsoring the show! Invest in Venture Capital at OurCrowd.com/PFP Thanks to Masterworks for Sponsoring the show! Invest in art at masterworks.io/pfp   Want to Support the Show? Follow on Spotify or Follow and Leave a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts! Today We Discuss:  How to navigate a hot market.  How much you should spend on a house.  What type of loan you should get.  Do you need to buy a house?  Episodes Mentioned + More Episodes You Will Love:  How to Run the Numbers on a Rental Property  How to Buy a House with Only 3.5% Down! (The FHA Loan Explained) If you Control These 3 Expenses You Can Spend Lavishly on Everything Else How to Spend Money on Things That Bring You Value (Live Your Best Life!) Check out all the Stuff I Recommend!  M1 Finance Open a Roth IRA Personal Capital Free Wealth Management + Budget App and Fee analyzer!  CIT BANK (Best Savings Account) Best Personal Finance Books  The Simple Path to Wealth - J L Collins  The Millionaire Next Door - Thomas Stanley I Will Teach You To Be Rich - Ramit Sethi  Rich Dad Poor Dad - Robert Kiyosaki ** Some links may be affiliate links and we earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. We only recommend products we truly believe in.  Check us out on social fam!  Twitter Dollar After Dollar Instagram www.thepersonalfinancepodcast.com www.dollarafterdollar.com www.mastermoney.co Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

upside
[Think Like An Owner] Badge Stone – Earning His Badge and Making His Mark in Search Fund Investments – Ep. 83

upside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 64:58


This week's feed drop features Alex Bridgeman and his podcast, Think Like An Owner.Alex's guest is Badge Stone. Badge started his search journey with Stone Pump & Trench that was on the verge of bankruptcy when he acquired it. After turning it around, he acquired another company called Perimeter Security. He sold both and made investing in searchers his full-time role through his firm, WSC & Company, alongside two other partners. Badge has invested in over a hundred searchers and has extensive experience as both an investor and operator.WSC's seven-person team is based in Charlotte, North Carolina and is investing and of its second fund, a $100 million fund closed earlier this year focused on the traditional search fund model.During our discussion, we talk about turning Stone Pump & Trench around, lessons learned from over a hundred search fund investments, a few notable companies, he's been a part of, what's typically missing in a new company, and a wide range of discussion on board construction and usage for entrepreneurs and investors alike. This episode is fantastic and I learned a ton and I think you will too.You can subscribe to Think Like An Owner on iTunes, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Breaker, and TuneIn.Follow Alex Bridgeman on TwitterFollow upside on TwitterJoin the upside network

Revealing the Ivory Tower
Mental Health, Shark Tank, and Football

Revealing the Ivory Tower

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 100:02


What do Shark Tank, football, and our field have in common? Find out in the season 2 finale with Dr. Annie (@queenbehaviorchange), who gave a helpful and balanced view of the role of venture capital and ethics in the mental health field! Think you know venture capital/finances? Think you know the challenges in the mental health field? This is an episode for all! Music by: Kevin MacLeod and DJ DanceAlone

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives
"Things Can Compound Indefinitely": Secrets of Multicoin Capital's Success - Kyle Samani, Ep. 166

Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 41:33


Since its inception, Multicoin Capital has made multiple highly public and successful bets in crypto including being one of the first and largest investors in Solana. 3 years and multiple 1000x bets later, Kyle Samani (@KyleSamani), Managing Partner at Multicoin, joins me once again to discuss: Finding contrarian bets, and when to know you're wrong What went right with the Solana bet; what went wrong with the EOS bet How Kyle sizes bets and when to double down How Multicoin separates decisions and outcomes Which 1 ecosystem excites Kyle beyond Solana Host: Jason Choi @mrjasonchoi . Not financial advice. ------------ Sponsors ------------- PARASWAP is the best place to trade your tokens and get the best price in DeFi today. Get started on paraswap.io/blockcrunch ------------ Disclosures ------------- Disclaimer: Jason Choi is a General Partner at Spartan Capital, a subsidiary of The Spartan Group. All opinions expressed by Jason and podcast guests are solely their own opinions and do not reflect the opinion of The Spartan Group and any of its subsidiaries

Taste Radio
These Founders Are Upending The Status Quo... And Smiling Along The Way

Taste Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 52:40


Four inspired founders. Four disruptive brands. Four stories about innovation, preparation and persistence. In this episode, recorded at Natural Products Expo East 2021, Taste Radio editor Ray Latif sat down with four early-stage and emerging brand owners, including Emily Griffith, the founder and CEO of Lil Bucks, a brand of sprouted buckwheat snacks; Tyler Phillips, the founder and CEO of chickpea-based muffin company Hummii; Dyanna Salcedo, the co-founder and CEO of kids oatmeal brand Oats In Coats; and Bev Martin, the co-founder of Simply Ghee, a maker of grass-fed ghee products. The entrepreneurs reflected on their respective paths within the food industry, from brand ideation and early struggles to social strategies and retail planning. The conversations highlight the perspective of founders who are attempting to reframe legacy categories via next-generation brands and products. 1:36: Interview: Emily Griffith, Founder & CEO, Lil Bucks -- Griffith spoke about her efforts to expand the availability of Lil Bucks from natural to mainstream retail channels, the impact of the brand's inclusion within Target's accelerator program and how she's refined the company's consumer marketing strategy. She also discussed innovation planning, investor reception to the brand, crowdfunding efforts and staffing needs. Later, she shared a warning to other early-stage entrepreneurs about having to buy back stock from retailers, the importance of building a community, attracting and compensating advisors and how Lil Bucks is focused on creating localized social content via Tik Tok. 19:57: Interview: Tyler Phillips, Founder & CEO, Hummii -- Phillips shared the inspiration for Hummii, and the brand's origins in Puerto Rico, how the name was derived from a combination of hummus, healthy and yummy and the challenges in working with chickpeas. He also discussed the brand's quirky logo and label design, how he assesses staffing needs and why passion and flexibility are key to working with early stage companies. Later, he spoke about aligning with accelerator programs, creating a community around the brand and Hummii's ongoing Kickstarter campaign. 30:29: Interview: Dyanna Salcedo, Co-Founder & CEO, Oats In Coats -- Salcedo spoke about her background in investment banking and cutting her teeth in CPG, the genesis of Oats In Coats and how the company is attempting to differentiate itself from legacy oatmeal brands by injecting fun and creativity into its branding and marketing. She also explained how the brand is approaching storytelling through graphics and games, its role as a facilitator between parents and kids, why she views Oats In Coats as “kid-friendly but not childish,” the differences between being CPG executive versus a founder and why the company's go-to-market strategy includes alternative retail channels. 41:11: Interview: Bev Martin, Co-Founder, Simply Ghee -- After a quick explanation of how ghee is made, Martin spoke about what he views as the mainstream opportunities for the product, the origins of the Simply Ghee name and its tagline of “better butter,” and a recent brand revamps. She also discussed the company's roots in Lancaster, Penn. and the area as a key source of A2 milk, standing out from competing and commodity brands by highlighting independence and quality and sourcing and her experience transitioning into the food industry. Later, she discussed challenges from growing too fast, how the company is attempting to align with consumer lifestyles via grassroots marketing and how she gauges the potential for new products. Brands in this episode: Lil Bucks, Manitoba Harvest, Hummii, Entenmann's, Oats In Coats, Minna, Enjoy Life Foods, Five Acre Farms, Mid-Day Squares, Simply Ghee

Speaking Podcast
#115 Dealing with Politicans - Priscilla Schelp

Speaking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 34:52


All Episodes can be found at www.speakingpodcast.com All Social Media + Donations link https://linktr.ee/speaking Sponsor : http://coolabulla.com Use Discount Code Speaking for a 10% Discount Our Facebook Group can be found at www.facebook.com/speakingpodcast All my 5 Podcast can be found at http://roycoughlan.com/ About my Guest: Moderator and prolific speaker, Priscilla Schelp is a connector between business, VC, politics and individuals. She draws inspiration from collecting very different experiences: Over the last 10 years, Priscilla Schelp has had an extensive global career finding innovative approaches to advise large listed companies, SMEs, start-ups and NGOs . In her consulting roles at PwC and KPMG, she had a strong focus on advising boards on risk & crisis management, strategy and innovation . Her time as a Manager in Venture Capital fueled her passion for the adoption of new trends, technologies and business models. Supporting her practical experience with up-to-date research, she is about to complete her Doctorate in Supply Chain Risk Management at the renowned Cranfield University (UK). These various experiences enable her to grasp the big picture while understanding the needs and aims of different groups in society and business. Growing up as a Swiss-German and living and working across the world lead to a wide cultural understanding. As a European citizen, she is specifically concerned with the future market competitiveness of Europe and aims to establish sustainable alliances for global stability & security and solve some of the world`s most pressing problems together. ​ What we Discussed: - Priscilla's love of Polo and explaining the Rules - Networking Tips - Dealing with Politicans - Structuring Moderations - Dealing with ADD - Virtual World and more How to Contact Priscilla: https://priscillaschelp.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/priscillaschelp/ https://www.instagram.com/priscillaschelp/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/roy-coughlan/message

Acquired
Michael Mauboussin Master Class — Moats, Skill, Luck, Decision Making and a Whole Lot More

Acquired

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 84:45


We sit down with the one & only Michael Mauboussin to dive deep into his incredible body of work: untangling skill and luck, measuring moats, persistence of returns in venture capital, decision making and — particularly timely — expectations investing and how to think about valuations in the current 2021 market environment. (!!) Michael's work is maybe our most frequent carve out on Acquired, so we're pumped to finally have a chance to interview the man himself. Big thank you to Patrick O'Shaughnessy and Brent Beshore for introducing us all at Capital Camp this year! If you love Acquired and want more, join our LP Community for access to over 50 LP-only episodes, monthly Zoom calls, and live access for big events like emergency pods and book club discussions with authors. We can't wait to see you there. Join here at: https://acquired.fm/lp/ Sponsors: Thanks to SoftBank Latin America for being our presenting sponsor for this special episode. If you are an entrepreneur, employee, other investor or simply someone who's interested in learning about the best young companies in LatAm right now, get in touch with them at: https://bit.ly/acquiredsoftbanklatam , and tell them that Ben and David sent you! You can get learn more about careers at their portfolio company QuintoAndar at https://carreiras.quintoandar.com.br Thank you as well to Modern Treasury and to Fundrise. You can learn more about them at: https://bit.ly/acquiredmoderntreasury (and you can find our reverse interview with them at https://www.moderntreasury.com/acquired ) https://bit.ly/acquiredfundrise Jobs! Big news — we now have a full Acquired Job Board! It's a one-stop-shop with all the very best opportunities from the amazing companies in the Acquired community, including folks like Solana, Italic, Pilot, RabbitHole, Modern Treasury, Vouch, Zapier, Levels and more. AND, if you're more casually open to opportunities, we have a form you can fill out and we'll handpick the best ones and personally send to you as they come up. Check it out at https://www.acquired.fm/jobs Links: Michael's wonderful talk at Google: https://youtu.be/1JLfqBsX5Lc The new revised edition of Expectations Investing: https://www.amazon.com/Expectations-Investing-Reading-Returns-Heilbrunn/dp/0231203047/ The Success Equation: https://www.amazon.com/The-Success-Equation-Untangling-Investing/dp/1422184234/ Measuring the Moat: https://research-doc.credit-suisse.com/docView?language=ENG&format=PDF&sourceid=csplusresearchcp&document_id=1066439791&serialid=4uA2wHojCvFKzqWfwIyDvkSN1pkXRpb43LvyclLcJsk%3D&cspId=null Public to Private Equity: https://www.morganstanley.com/im/publication/insights/articles/articles_publictoprivateequityintheusalongtermlook_us.pdf ‍Note: Acquired hosts and guests may hold assets discussed in this episode. This podcast is not investment advice, and is intended for informational and entertainment purposes only. You should do your own research and make your own independent decisions when considering any financial transactions.

Inside Outside
Ep. 267 - Esther Gons, Co-founder of Ground Control & Author of Innovation Accounting on Measure Innovation

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 18:41


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Esther Gons, CEO and Co-founder of Ground Control and Author of the upcoming book, Innovation Accounting. Esther and Brian Ardinger, Inside Outside Innovation Cofounder, talk about the ins and outs of innovation accounting, and what companies should be doing to track and measure their innovation initiatives. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. Interview Transcript with Esther Gons, CEO and Co-founder of Ground Control and Author of Innovation AccountingBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Esther Gons. She is CEO and co-founder of Ground Control, which is a software platform that helps companies measure innovation and co-author of the corporate startup, and upcoming book Innovation Accounting. Welcome Esther to the show. Esther Gons: Thank you, Brian. I'm really happy to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you on the show. We've had Dan Toma, your co-author of the Corporate Startup and Tendayi Viki on the show in the past. How did you get involved in this innovation space?Esther Gons: I think for me, it's been a journey of entrepreneurship. So, my background is basically being an entrepreneur, starting startups, helping startups. So, I've always been an entrepreneur. And one of my first things that I did when I still was actually in my studies of Information Science was starting a business.And one of the things that I was asked to do by one of the bigger computer companies was building something completely new around their selling of computers. And I think that was one of the first corporate startups that I did, but it wasn't called that way, way back when. But I build over the course of two years, a platform with personal logins, with all sorts of new technologies and things that you could do just to sell their computers, to be able to be working from home. So, blog posts that weren't called blog posts. That was just content from people saying your employees will be so loyal. If you have them working from home, all these kinds of things. I even had other vendors ramped up with furniture, stuff like that. It was an amazing platform. And after two years and a lot of money when we finally launched nothing really happened.And the computer company didn't understand because there were no sales whatsoever and they just simply pulled the plug. But for me, that was a really important event because I was asking myself what went wrong there? What was the risk involved? Was it too early? How could I have known? And that was a search that put me on the path of pioneering and innovation and understanding how you could deal with that. So obviously that platform that failed was 20 years too early. If we look at the situation right now and we needed a COVID pandemic to get there. But yes, that got me into the puzzle, discovering things like the Lean Startup methodology when Steve Blank wrote about it and then working with other entrepreneurs to get it working. To evolve it. To make sure that startups heard about it. So that was when I started to volunteer for a lot of startup activity in Amsterdam. And got involved in that in the tech scene, since I've always been a tech entrepreneur. Brian Ardinger: Your first book, the Corporate Startup really gave corporations that inside look on what it was like and what it is like, to think and act, and move like startups. And create new business models from scratch. And it was a great opportunity to provide a framework for how corporations think about that. Your new book, Innovation Accounting, I'd love to start there. What is innovation? Accounting, and why is it so important? Esther Gons: A lot of corporates asked for metrics. You're absolutely right. But they usually ask for the one metric to rule everything, right? So how are we doing in terms of innovation? And then they use innovation as a catch-all phrase. We want to know about all of our innovation, right? We want to see everything in our portfolio. So, what we've seen with working with a lot of clients, because we like to be practical about things that we write.We want to know that it works. Is that for that startup kind of innovation, which is different from what you do in terms of innovation in the rest of your company, you could be doing a digital transformation. You could be optimizing your current processes with startups. It's all innovation, but if you truly want to do new business model innovation. Breakthrough in disruptive innovation. Then you actually need something else than the processes and the accounting systems that you have in your current company. And we noticed that if people didn't have that new system in place and they were trying to do Lean Startup and they were trying to build new business models, if they didn't have the whole system, the whole package, then it all turned back into incremental innovation again.So, then we thought, well, we have to let people know that if they truly want to do new business model innovation, this kind of disruptive innovation, they can measure that with the indicators that they have in their current company with that current system. Because then it will always fail or turn back into incremental innovation again.So, let's talk about that word innovation accounting, that Eric Ries, once coined as being the system that teams needed to have to be accountable for the decisions they made based on data. And talk about how that evolved into something else. And then what do you need inside a company? What kind of system do you need, need inside of a company to actually measure that kind of innovation?Brian Ardinger: I think that's such an important point that corporations really need to define innovation and understand the spectrum of it. You know, everything from, like you said, the stuff close to the core of that optimization of what they're currently doing and how that differs significantly from transformational innovation when you're trying to come up with a brand new business model. Why do you think it's so difficult for companies to understand this distinction and be able to do something about it? Esther Gons: For a company, it's ingrained in their system, that their goal is to optimize and grow their current system. Right? That's what they are there for. The CEO has been appointed by the shareholders to do that specific thing. So that means that their whole existence, their future is based on, on executing on that core thing. And that also means that everything that they have gathered around it, their processes, their culture, their people, are based around that. And it's hard to understand something that isn't there yet. Something that is probably really risky. So, if you can't see it, then it's harder to understand and to act around it. So, I think it's actually a good point that you're making Brian, because what we've seen is that if you do not make it visible by either a new system with innovation accounting, or in any other way, then top level, it's hard to make that distinction because you can't see it. You're just seeing the investment that you're making, but you can see what you're doing. And what I always say is that you have to look at it in terms of buckets, right? There's buckets that do not have a really high risk, and that have business goals that are aligned with your core business. So fine, you can do that with the current systems and your investment will have to return something in probably a year, because that's what you're used to.But if you're investing in a high-risk bucket, startups are high risk. I'm a investor myself. So, most VCs know this. This is a high-risk profession, right? You don't know how many will return, what kind of money. And the timelines are vague, could be three years, could be 12 years. So, these high risk buckets needs to have a different approach.But you need to have some sort of visibility in terms of control. So, if you make the bet in your strategy, just that saying, okay, I have business models that are fading. I need to look at the future. Then at least you should have some sort of visibility of what you are doing with that future. So are you betting on a specific innovation thesis like we've described in the Corporate Startup. So, then you want to understand how that is going along. Are we doing well? Are we turning that strategy into, into something really practical? Is your funnel turning into a portfolio? So, you need all kinds of indicators to be able to understand that without falling back to your financial indicator. Because naturally, if you're looking for something that is really new, you're searching and your core business is learning, which means that you do not have a return in Dollars or Euros. You have a return on insights and learnings, and that's what you work for. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: So, let's talk about some of those particular metrics. Traditional metrics might be things like profitability, number of customers, things like that. When you get into, on the innovation front, especially transformational innovation, what are some of the early metrics that you should be looking at? Esther Gons: That sounds really simple, right? And I can give you like three indicators, but it makes sense to sort of understand first that what we understand in terms of innovation accounting is like a whole package of indicators. Because you do not only want to understand every single individual team and how that idea is turning into a business model, right. Because we're talking about that journey from idea to business model, and that is a risky journey because you're searching. But you also want to understand how all of the teams are doing inside of the program that you have. Then you want to understand if you have enough ideas to turn that into future portfolio products or services. Is that going along? Do we need more ideas? Is everything stopped at, I don't know, stage two then we definitely have to look at what's going on here. And then you need to also understand from a strategic level, if your bets for the future are doing well. And if your total investment in the future is turning into something that you want for the company. So, these are three levels of indicators or different kinds of indicators that have some sort of abstraction from each other, right? So, at a team level, you need to understand things. Then the manager needs to understand things in terms of how are the teams doing? That is abstracted from the team indicators and strategy level.They don't want to understand how every team is doing, but they do want to understand how that is translated into their portfolio strategy, for instance. So, I think it's important to understand that where Eric Ries said innovation accounting is for the teams. If you want to do it within a corporate situation, you want to do it in a different setting. So, you need to manage all these things and you need be sort of aware or in control of how all of these investments are doing. And if there is some return, I don't know, in the future. Brian Ardinger: So, if I'm part of an innovation team and I'm trying to understand if I'm making progress, what should I be looking at? Should I be looking at the number of ideas I'm working on, the number of assumptions that I'm testing? Where should I start? Esther Gons: For me, the most important thing for, for this kind of innovation is understanding that your core business is learning. So that means there need to be teams that are doing a unified way of working and validating with experiments. Methodically de-risking that business model. Right. So that means that you want to understand if they're learning well. So how many learnings did they have? Maybe you can look at a experiment learning ratio so that every experiment have a learning or not. Or are we doing experiments for the sake of experiments, for instance. If you put that against time or against cost. Because learning for teams is essentially the core business. Brian Ardinger: So, the idea of measuring that against velocity, how fast do they learn, and the cost of that learning. Is that what you're looking at?Esther Gons: So as soon as you put learning the core, you can look at these things, right? So, what is the learning philosophy? What is the learning ratio? What is the velocity cost ratio? How much time do they spend in a certain state, for instance, doing the learnings? That makes sense if you look at the learnings. That is their core business. But I wouldn't ramp up everything if you start. And just look at the core business and what you want to improve, because you have these indicators to be able to steer and improve of them.Brian Ardinger: So, at the organizational level, what are some of the metrics at that portfolio level that companies should be using to know if they're making progress? Esther Gons: That's the top level. You mean the strategic level? I think it's important to understand if you look at that strategic level. The indicators are basically, framed around questions. So, from a strategic point of view, what you're doing is trying to understand how much your company is really under risk of disruption. Right? So is your current business model under threat of, or fade or disruption? Then that is really important to understand. So, we always say, if you look at your portfolio to understand how much you should invest in this kind of innovation, then look at your portfolio in terms of business models and not in terms of products. People usually look at it, in terms of products, right? But then if you look at it, in terms of business models, most of these products are, have the same business model, especially in product driven companies. But the question is my company under the risk of disruption, or is innovation driving growth in the company, that will give you an answer into how much of your investment should actually go to disruptive innovation.And that could then translate into indicators like portfolio fade, stuff like that. And the other questions you should ask yourself is how does my company future look like, right? Am I betting in the right direction? So how is the innovation thesis doing in terms of progressing towards newer stages. Or how efficient is my innovation ecosystem, if I look into the average speed of these innovation going through the stages or are my investment returning something in so many years. Brian Ardinger: So, looking at things like how much of my revenue is coming from new initiatives, things along those lines?Esther Gons: Things along those lines, but that's the easiest one. And that's one that corporates usually want to see that. So that's why I usually stay away from those in questions like this, because in essence, of course you want to understand how much of your growth is driven by revenue from these kinds of disruptive innovations. If you are starting out with innovation accounting right now, you won't be seeing that until three years or four years from now.I think it's then better to look at different kind of indicators on a funnel level. So, what is going on in the funnel? How many of these ideas are actually starting? And how many end up in different stages. Is that progressing well. With one of your innovation theses that you defined, because you wanted to bet in that specific future, nothing is happening after the second stage, you should ask yourself, is this the right pieces? Should we look at it again? So, you need to have some insight depending on the maturity level of your innovation ecosystem, to be able to steer towards a better ecosystem. Brian Ardinger: The last topic I want to talk about is you're based in Amsterdam, so I'd love to get your insights, and I'm curious to know what you're seeing as it pertains to European companies and their approach to innovation and how it may differ from what's going on in the U S. Esther Gons: So, the things I've seen in Europe, but maybe in the Netherlands specifically, is that the Lean Startup and the Lean Startup Methodology is a little bit farther ahead than it is in the U S maybe, especially in terms of the systematic approach towards the Lean Startup and how to do that within a corporate. Which I'm really happy about because that sort of helps me with the innovation accounting. And then the other way around in the U S there is within startups, I'm not sure how that is in a corporate world. But within startups, there's far more appetite for risk investment. So, in Europe, we tend to be a little bit risk averse. Show me first, and then can you at least show me a revenue first before we do any kind of innovation? So, you're dependent on really early-stage angels, if you want to prove that revenue first. But that differs in country per country. But if you look at ten European investment funds, that those tend to be a little bit more risk averse then the U S. And you can see that back into the amount of investments. So, if you compare VC investments, in terms of numbers, US are higher than they are in Europe. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Well, I can't wait to go a copy of Innovation Accounting. Your books are always so great because they're visual and they're tactical with templates and guides and that. If people want to find out more about your book or about yourself, what's the best way to do that? Esther Gons: For the book, definitely go to Innovation Accounting Book.com, where we have the table of contents and you can download the resources and also look where you can order, and pre-order the book. If you want to know more about me or my company, then simply go to ToGroundControl.Com or might be a little bit more difficult as EstherEmmelyGons.NL. Brian Ardinger: Well, thank you Esther, for being on Inside Outside Innovation. I look forward to continuing to have these conversations about what makes innovation so great and appreciate your time and your insights. Thank you. Esther Gons: Love to be here Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Hack My Business
What You NEED To Know Before You Seek Venture Capital With Arlan Hamilton, Backstage Capital Founder & Managing Partner Episode 26

Hack My Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 27:22


According to Arlan Hamilton, the founder and managing partner of Backstage Capital and one of the most accomplished venture capitalists in the world, “striving for perfection in your business can be detrimental”. In this episode, we had the special opportunity to hear this advice directly from the record-breaking Arlan Hamilton herself. Arlan's company, Backstage Capital, is a very successful seed investment fund that backs overachieving and underrepresented startup founders and Arlan shares with us her invaluable advice on the importance of timing and what she looks for in a company. Tune in to learn when it's right to seek VC funding for YOUR business or when it's better to bootstrap it. More from Arlan:  Visit Arlanwashere.com for free programs Visit Backstage Capital: https://backstagecapital.com/  Get the book: It's About Damn Time  Finding Arlan: LinkedIn: @Arlan Hamilton  Instagram: @arlanwashere Facebook: @Arlan Hamilton Twitter: @Backstage_Cap & @ArlanWasHere   To join our community and get the most up-to-date resources and information for YOUR small business visit our NEW website: https://www.smallbusinessfront.com *Tell us what hack you're applying to YOUR business in the review section of Apple Podcasts and we'll give you and your biz a shout out in an upcoming episode! *Thank you for listening and please share the show or an episode you love with your favorite small business! We believe that when you succeed we all succeed, so let's share the knowledge and resources!

3 Takeaways
An Insider's Perspective on Venture Capital: Sierra Ventures Founder and Advisor Peter Wendell (#61)

3 Takeaways

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 34:44


Peter Wendell founded Sierra Ventures, a Silicon Valley venture capital firm that has invested more than $2 billion in a wide variety of successful technology companies. Peter co-teaches Stanford University's Graduate School of Business, “Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital” course with former Google CEO, Eric Schmidt. He is a trustee of Merck and was chairman of the board of Princeton University Investment Company (PRINCO), which manages Princeton University's endowment.Peter provides an insider's perspective on venture capital. Find out how start-ups can secure funding and grow to become unicorns – start-ups valued at over $1 billion. There are currently more than 800 unicorn start-ups worldwide.

Ambition Today
Scott Wayman's Plan for Kangarootime to Support the $648 Billion Care Economy

Ambition Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 56:51


Scott Wayman's shares his epically inspiring founder story. His passion for Kangarootime is next level and the company is currently focused on winning the childcare management software space for daycares and preschools. With plans to expand to the larger “care economy” which includes not only early education & childcare but also elder & senior care. A $648B TAM in the U.S. Alone according to Melinda Gate's Pivotal Ventures. The Kangarootime team brilliantly positioned themselves throughout COVID19 as leaders in the space, by taking time to host educational sessions about how their customers can best adapt their centers, as well as quickly shipping new features such as contactless check-in/out, health checks, and more. I have personally watched Scott relentlessly grow this company from their early days at Founder Institute, through several investments from 43North, and was very excited to sit down with him for this episode. ========== Visit Ambition Today on the Web: ​www.siskar.co/ambitiontoday Follow Kevin Siskar on Twitter: ​twitter.com/TheSiskar Follow Kevin Siskar on Instagram: instagram.com/thesiskar Follow Kevin Siskar on Facebook: facebook.com/kevin.siskar Add Kevin Siskar on Snapchat: snapchat.com/add/krsiskar Kevin Siskar brings you ambitious entrepreneurs inspired by Tim Ferriss Show, How I Built This with Guy Raz, Residual Income, Entrepreneur on Fire, NPR, HBR, TED Radio Hour, the StartUp podcast with Alex Blumberg by Gimlet Media, Pat Flynn, Tony Robbins, The Uncertain Hour, Bigger Pockets, Art of Charm, Dave Ramsey, Planet Money, Jocko Podcast, EntreLeadership, Zigler, APM Marketplace, This Week In Startups with Jason Calacanis, Mixergy, Seth Godin, Joe Rogan Experience, GaryVee, James Altucher, Monocle 24, How to Start a Startup, Crooked Media, and The $100 MBA Show with Omar Zenhom, and Casey Neistat. Be sure to listen and subscribe to Ambition Today in the iTunes Store for iOS (apple.co/1NRRPzL), on Google Play Music (goo.gl/LmmciJ), or on Stitcher for Android (bit.ly/1Rn01dy).

Forward Thinking Founders
745 - Ken Babcock (Tango) On Creating Product Documentation On-Demand

Forward Thinking Founders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 11:35


Ken Babcock is a cofounder of Tango. With Tango, create process or product documentation on-demand.★ Support this podcast ★

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis
FOMOnday: FOMO Venture Capital & Willy Wonka

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 13:47


This is FOMOnday, the snackable companion to FOMO Sapiens that starts your week with hot takes, life hacks, listener mail, and even some FOMO therapy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices