Podcasts about Venture capital

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Venture capital

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    Best podcasts about Venture capital

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    Latest podcast episodes about Venture capital

    Scale Up Your Business Podcast
    Todd Herman On Mastering Your Identity To Transform Performance

    Scale Up Your Business Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 58:57


    Todd Herman has been entrenched in the world of elite performers working with the highest achievers in sports & business for over two decades. In this episode, Todd talks to Nick about the value of attaining a flow state and what it can help us to achieve, the importance of identity, and how by gaining mastery over it, we can accelerate growth, 10x our self-development, and achieve stunning performance in every area of life and business. KEY TAKEAWAYS Sports participants and athletes understand the value of flow, and how by tapping into an almost subconscious level of engagement, we can achieve incredible results. Nature is the ultimate meta-frame on judging whether something is true or not. The world around us abides by a set of chaotic natural laws that keep us all thriving. Flow creates growth, and drives momentum. This leads to enjoyment, which should be one of the most important metrics we use to determine success in business. Identity should be used as a device and mechanism to help us see and explore what else we are made of and what we can achieve. BEST MOMENTS 'When you're playing in a flow state - in that zone - all of your capabilities get to come out of you' 'One of the pitfalls of ambitious, top-achieving people is the expectation of some sort of outcome' 'Flow can be applied to a human. It can be applied to a team. It can be aligned to a business' 'If you don't have an attitude of playfulness, that means you're taking yourself way too seriously' VALUABLE RESOURCES Scale Up with Nick Bradley: scaleup.vip/podcast Scale Up Your Business, coaching/consulting: https://suyb.global To download a free gift from Nick - The 5 Reasons Why Your Business Will Never Get To 8-Figures ... How To Fix It Fast! - https://www.scaleupmastermind.com/free-guide1 Take the SUYB Predictable Growth Assessment™, to measure your current business performance and show you where to focus next to get to where you want to be: https://scaleup.vip/PredictableGrowthAssessment Todd Herman - https://toddherman.me ABOUT THE HOST  Nick Bradley is a renowned entrepreneur, investor, speaker, and business growth expert. His background is growing and scaling Venture Capital and Private Equity backed businesses, across the UK, the US, and further afield. Over the last decade, he has completed 117 acquisitions and 25 business exits with a combined valuation of over $5bn dollars. His “Scale Up Your Business” podcast, which ranked #1 on iTunes' business charts, has more than 350k downloads in over 130 countries. His mission is to help business founders build valuable businesses and create life-changing exits so they can realise freedom, wealth, and impact. CONTACT METHOD Nick's Facebook page: https://scaleup.vip/FB Nick's LinkedIn: https://scaleup.vip/LI Nick's Instagram: https://scaleup.vip/IG Scale Up Your Business, coaching/consulting: https://suyb.global We help business founders scale their business to a life-changing exit within 36 months. Please feel free to get in touch if we can assist. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors
    SaaStr 568: Mind the Gap: Balancing Growth and Efficiency in Tougher Times with Point Nine Managing Partner Christoph Janz

    The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 25:54


    In the last few weeks, the VC funding environment has changed dramatically. In this session, Christoph will share tactical advice on how to weatherproof your financial plan for the funding downturn.   You can see Christoph's slides here: https://www.slideshare.net/saastr/mind-the-gap-balancing-growth-and-efficiency-in-tougher-times-with-point-nine   Want to join the SaaStr community? We're the

    Watt It Takes
    Antora Energy CEO Andrew Ponec

    Watt It Takes

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 67:17


    Heavy industries like manufacturing, food processing, mining, and construction require a staggering amount of energy, often in the form of heat. But until recently, there hasn't been a good way to generate that amount of heat using electricity. As a result, we burn fossil fuels to make these essential materials and products. About a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. come from these industrial processes.Learning how to generate these high temperatures without burning fossil fuels is a really difficult problem, but it's a necessary step in cleaning up some of the hardest-to-decarbonize sectors of our economy. That's the challenge our guest, Antora Energy CEO and Co-founder Andrew Ponec, is tackling.Antora's thermal energy storage solution takes the electricity generated from renewables and stores it in the form of heat using carbon blocks – at a cost and efficiency comparable to traditional battery technology. The radiating light emitted by the carbon can also be captured by the company's modified photovoltaic cells and converted back into electricity.Emily sat down with Andrew to talk about what it takes to roll out an entirely new kind of thermal energy storage technology. They talked about lessons that Andrew learned from his first climate tech startup, and discussed the role Antora's technology will play in cleaning up heavy industry.Powerhouse is an innovation firm that works with leading global corporations to help them find, partner with, invest in, and acquire the most innovative startups in clean energy, mobility, and climate. Powerhouse Ventures backs seed-stage startups building innovative software to rapidly decarbonize our global energy and mobility systems. You can learn more at powerhouse.fund, and you can subscribe to our newsletter at https://www.powerhouse.fund/subscribe.To hear more stories of founders building our carbon-free future, hit the “subscribe” button and leave us a review on Apple podcasts.Watt It Takes is brought to you by Baker Botts. Founders and leaders of clean energy companies around the world turn to Baker Botts for legal advice at every stage of their journey, from incorporation to exit. To scale your clean energy business faster, visit bakerbotts.com.

    On Point
    The Importance of Empathy in Venture Capital with Brad Harrison ‘94, Founder and Managing Partner of Scout Ventures

    On Point

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 68:01


    This episode of On Point features an interview with Brad Harrison, Founder and Managing Partner of Scout Ventures, an early-stage venture capital firm making the world a better, safer place by investing in frontier and dual-use technologies built by veterans, intelligence leaders, and premier research labs.Brad is an entrepreneur and seasoned business development executive with a passion for building companies that are pushing the envelope of technological innovation. He has successfully helped incubate several companies out of the Scout office and has deep experience developing concepts to include co-authoring 3 patents in search, geo-tagging, and personalization. Brad was a distinguished honor graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1994 and served as an Airborne Ranger in the United States Army for five years before retiring as a Captain. He also graduated from the MIT Sloan School of Management where he studied New Product and Venture Development.In this episode of On Point, Brad discusses his experience in the military as a leader and why he always put the lives of his soldiers first. He explains how the skills and experiences he had at West Point and in the Army helped prepare him to be an entrepreneur, venture capitalist, and mentor. Brad talks about his mission of making the world a better, safer place by guiding and investing in people to help build their business dreams and gain personal successes.-------------“The advice that I give to people that come out of the academy and out of the military is you need to understand how special you are. You're different than everybody else out there. Right? If you were in combat, you had to make decisions, split-second decisions in an everly changing environment where it was life or death, right. You've got the capacity to think and process information in a way that your peers just don't have.” - Brad Harrison-------------Episode Timestamps(02:24) Segment: AAR(03:37) Brad's West Point experience(05:37) Impactful classes at West Point(07:07) How Brad spent his summers(07:52) Brad's experience in the Army(13:00) Mentorship in the Army(15:59) Segment: SitRep(30:27) Brad on founder empathy(34:33) Sports aligning with VC(36:35) Funding at Scout Ventures(43:21) Academy Investor Network and the West Point AOG Entrepreneurs Summit(45:21) Segment: SOP(48:39) Brad's daily routine(52:15) How to cultivate relationships(57:11) About the Academy Investor Network(61:14) Segment: Giving Back-------------LinksBrad Harrison's LinkedInBrad Harrison's TwitterTim Hsia's LinkedInLance Dietz's LinkedInWest Point Association of GraduatesOn Point Podcast 

    Startup Savants
    Raising Venture Capital 101 with Jules Miller of Mindset Ventures

    Startup Savants

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 55:40


    Jules Miller is a partner at Mindset Ventures, an international venture capital firm that invests in early-stage enterprise software companies. Prior to working in venture capital, Jules also founded her own company and worked at a variety of startups. She has an extensive background in blockchain and has been in the venture capital space for quite some time.Full Show NotesEpisode Notes From founder to venture capitalist [1:12]Angel investors vs venture capitalists … what's the difference? [3:38]Why did Jules decide to become a VC investor after creating her own startups? [4:18]Funding a diverse group of founders and working to create change in the VC industry [6:01]Growth and people — the two most important qualities Jules focuses on when funding projects [8:03]Venture capitalists focus on different business stages and each developmental stage of a startup carries different levels of risks [10:48] If you are not planning to grow 200% to 300% a year, reconsider seeking out VC funds  [13:42]Most VCs will want a seat on the company's board, so be prepared to give up influence in your company if you choose to seek VC funding [14:36]VCs invest in startups that scale quickly and need to make quick decisions. Overinvolved CEOs may struggle with this [15:41]The coaching and mentorship relationship between a founder and the VC firm [18:13]How to pitch to VC firms on the first meeting — Hint: be concise [20:41]Jule's investment committee will pay attention to the five Ts: team, TAM, technology, traction, and terms [23:02]Investors typically want 10x on their revenue over five to ten years [26:21]Fit matters. Good ideas may not be funded for various reasons [28:29]People problems and team dynamics can be reasons startups do not succeed in the initial stages [30:12]Ask questions! Both VCs and founders need to ask each other questions and assess fit [33:08]Don't take rejection personally, and learn from rejection [36:41]Tech industries and software businesses with strong margins are hot right now [39:55]Focus on the relationship you are trying to form with the VC firm and engage the audience [43:48]Pivoting is still possible as the company grows, and there are always options [46:22]How the pandemic changed the locations of startup hubs (Hint: You don't need to live in NYC or Silicon Valley to succeed) [49:50]Jules's word of advice “If you can show growth, you can raise venture capital” [52:52]Get more exciting entrepreneur content and podcast exclusives on StartupSavant.com. Watch Startup Savant founder interviews on YouTube and follow us on social media: Instagram TwitterLinkedIn

    Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives
    How Galaxy is Building the Social Graph for Web 3, Ep. 203

    Blockcrunch: Crypto Deep Dives

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:45


    Monthly trading volume on Hashflow grew from $20m in August to $670m in October after a campaign with Project Galaxy - that's a 3000% increase in volume in 3 months! Project Galaxy is an open and collaborative data network that empowers developers to build better products and communities using on-chain credentials. In this episode, co-founder of Project Galaxy, Harry shares with us: What is Galaxy and On-chain Credentials Use-cases of Galaxy Galaxy's token and own chain   Host: Jason Choi @mrjasonchoi . Not financial advice.   ------------ Timestamps ------------- (00:00:00) – Introduction (00:02:22) – Introduction to Galaxy (00:05:37) – User's On-chain Data (00:09:42) – Importance of Privacy in Web 3 (00:11:13) – Biggest Use-Cases for Galaxy (00:14:29) – Difference with Competitors e.g DegenScore (00:23:07) – Building an Open and Permissionless Platform (00:25:28) – Project Types that Best Benefit from Galaxy (00:27:55) – Galaxy's Token - $GAL (00:31:28) – Galaxy's Own Chain  (00:34:06) – Possible Reasons of Failure (00:37:20) – Exciting Milestones Ahead ----------- Sponsors ------------- dYdX is the Leading Decentralized Exchange for trading perpetual contracts. Users enjoy low fees, deep liquidity, up to 20x more buying power and even earn $DYDX from trading. Trade on dYdX today at: https://trade.dydx.exchange   ----------- More Resources --------- Guest Project Galaxy's Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProjectGalaxyHQ Project Galaxy's Website: https://galaxy.eco/   Blockcrunch Blockcrunch VIP: https://blockcrunch.substack.com/ Blockcrunch Twitter: https://twitter.com/theBlockcrunch Jason Choi's Twitter: https://twitter.com/mrjasonchoi   ------------ Disclosures ------------- Disclaimer: The Blockcrunch Podcast (“Blockcrunch”) is an educational resource intended for informational purposes only. Blockcrunch produces a weekly podcast and newsletter that routinely covers projects in Web 3 and may discuss assets that the host or its guests have financial exposure to. Views held by Blockcrunch's guests are their own. None of Blockcrunch, its registered entity or any of its affiliated personnel are licensed to provide any type of financial advice, and nothing on Blockcrunch's podcast, newsletter, website and social media should be construed as financial advice. Blockcrunch also receives compensation from its sponsor; sponsorship messages do not constitute financial advice or endorsement.      

    Taste Radio
    Buyers Were Initially Skeptical About His Brand. Now, It's An Anchor For A Fast-Growing Set.

    Taste Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:01


    When Ibraheem Basir launched A Dozen Cousins in 2018, retail buyers questioned the marketability of the brand's first products, a line of premium-positioned cooked beans. Four years later, those buyers are asking a different question: “How do we keep up with consumer demand?” A former marketing executive with General Mills, Basir founded A Dozen Cousins to increase accessibility of better-for-you food within Black and Latino communities via healthy ingredients, authentic seasonings and convenient preparation. Available in varieties such as Mexican Cowboy Pinto Beans and Trini Chickpea Curry, the beans are packaged in microwavable pouches that can be heated in 60 seconds. As A Dozen Cousins expanded distribution, the brand found traction with a broad variety of consumers seeking a quick, flavorful meal or side dish. The company has since added two complementary product lines – bone-broth cooked rice and seasoning sauces for rice and meat dishes – and widened its presence in stores across retail channels, including Whole Foods, Walmart, Trader Joes, Kroger and REI. In an interview featured in this episode, Basir spoke about how the brand's initial focus has evolved, working with co-manufacturing partners to ensure quality standards, why sampling was critical to its development and why keeping a foot in the familiar is a key tenet of its innovation strategy. He also explained why A Dozen Cousins is relatively quiet about raising capital and shared his take on improved opportunities and continuing challenges for BIPOC food entrepreneurs. Show notes: 0:42: Interview: Ibraheem Basir, Founder & CEO, A Dozen Cousins – Basir spoke with Taste Radio editor Ray Latif at NOSH Live Summer 2022 where they discussed their shared experience growing up in large families, alternate names for A Dozen Cousins and how the brand addresses “two different levels” of consumer needs. Basir also spoke about how he prepared for a national launch at Whole Foods while the brand was still in its infancy, the impact of his experience as an employee at a large food conglomerate, what social media taught the company about the unexpected ways consumers used the beans and what moved the needle for retail buyers that were initially skeptical about the brand. Later, he explained why the launch of A Dozen Cousins' rice was about creating something “additive” to the category, why he wants the brand to be “in the middle of the spectrum” when it comes to innovation, the reason the company isn't vocal about funding and why he points to the lack of “insider knowledge” as a hurdle for BIPOC founders. Brands in this episode: A Dozen Cousins, Annie's

    Startup Insider
    VC Talk mit 3VC – die angesagtesten Investoren im Porträt (Venture Capital • Investor • Fonds)

    Startup Insider

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 48:11


    In der Nachmittagsfolge begrüßen wir heute Peter Lasinger, Co-Founder und Partner von 3VC, und sprechen mit ihm u.a. über die Auflage eines Fonds mit einem Volumen von 150 Millionen Euro. 3VC ist eine europäische Risikokapitalgruppe, die in mittel- und osteuropäische Technologie-Startups mit globalen Expansionsplänen investiert. Dabei liegt der Fokus auf ein Investment in der Seed-Phase und in den Series A und B, bei dem der VC nicht nur finanzielle Unterstützung anbietet, sondern den Portfoliounternehmen auch den Zugang zu einem internationalen Co-Investment-Netzwerk von VC-Partnern zur Verfügung stellt. Zu diesem Portfolio gehören u.a. Jodel, PicsArt, Storyblok, Assaia, Kaia Health, Lokalise, Authenteq, RapidCompact, Deep Code (Exit), Gamee (Exit) und Tatum. Mit den Startups Picsart, Deepcode und Gamee sind drei der Portfoliounternehmen mit einer jeweiligen Bewertung von über einer Milliarde US-Dollar zu Unicorns aufgestiegen. Die Risikokapitalgruppe wurde im Jahr 2017 unter dem Namen Capital300 von Roman Scharf und Peter Lasinger in Wien gegründet. Das Team von 3VC besteht aus einem vielfältigen und interdisziplinären Team mit einer paritätischen Geschlechterverteilung. Im Jahr 2018 hatte 3VC seinen ersten Fonds mit einem Volumen von 50 Millionen US-Dollar aufgelegt, aus denen die bisherigen Investment gespeist wurden. Nun gab der Risikokapitalgeber das First Closing seines zweiten Fonds 3VC II mit einem Gesamtvolumen von 150 Millionen Euro bekannt. Der Wagniskapitalgeber hält trotz des signifikant höheren Volumens des neuen Fonds weiterhin an seiner Strategie fest, in 3-4 wachstumsstarke Softwareunternehmen pro Jahr im DACH-Raum und in Osteuropa zu investieren.

    Tech Nest: The Real Estate and Tech Show
    It's All About the People in Property Management with Joe Polverari, Co-founder of PURE Property Management

    Tech Nest: The Real Estate and Tech Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 52:00


    More about PURE Property Management and Joe PolverariPURE Property Management is the fastest growing profitable residential property management and technology companies in the U.S. Led by a team of experienced industry professionals and seasoned technology innovators, PURE acquires residential property management companies and invests in their people and processes. By deploying technology and providing operational efficiencies, PURE creates simple and satisfying experiences for residents and investors, including institutional portfolio managers.Joseph Polverari is co-founder and general partner of Silicon Valley-based PURE Property Management, the fastest growing profitable residential property management and technology company in the U.S. He is a seasoned entrepreneur and fintech pioneer, who led corporate development and strategy at Yodlee, a financial data aggregation and analytics platform, through its IPO in 2014 and subsequent acquisition by Envestnet. Polverari is leveraging his expertise to lead an experienced team of industry insiders looking to transform the traditionally cumbersome and complex process of managing properties. Connect with Joe on LinkedIn Check out PURE Property Management

    Climate Tech Cocktails
    London Tech Week (1/2)! OLIO: Tessa Clarke

    Climate Tech Cocktails

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 71:21


    Tessa Clarke, Co-founder and CEO of OLIO on the size of the food waste crisis:“If it were a country, food waste would be the third largest source of greenhouse gas emission after the USA and China, and that's because a landmass larger than China is used every single year to grow food that is never eaten.”OLIO connects neighbours with each other and with local businesses so surplus food can be shared, not thrown away. This could be food nearing its sell-by date in local stores, spare home-grown vegetables, bread from your baker, or the groceries in your fridge when you go away. For your convenience, OLIO can also be used for non-food household items too.

    Inside Outside
    Designing Resilient Remote Teams: IO2020 Replay with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / Hubspot

    Inside Outside

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 25:37


    In honor of our upcoming IO2022 innovation Accelerated Summit, which is happening September 19th and 20th in Lincoln Nebraska. Thought it'd be nice to pull some of the best interviews and sessions from our IO2020 virtual event. So, over the next few weeks, check out some of our amazing speakers and grab a ticket for the upcoming event. We'd love to see you there. Tickets and more information can be found at io2022.com. And now back to the show. Inside Outside Innovation is a podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started.Interview Transcript with Steph Smith, Trends.co / The Hustle / HubspotBrian Ardinger: We are excited to have Steph Smith here with the Hustle and Trends to talk about one of these amazing new trends that we're seeing. It's the whole move to remote work. Steph is the Head of Trends and Product Manager at the Hustle, which is a great newsletter, if you don't subscribe to that. Trends is their exclusive group. And I I've got to say it's, it's one of the best groups out there to talk about new things that are happening out there, new business leaders, things along those lines. She's got a new book out called Standing Out in 2020. Doing Content Right. And I know she's been doing a series of sessions on that. It's an eBook. You can check it out at stephsmith.io. She's been blogging for a ton of time. And she's also been in this world of remote work. Been a digital nomad for a while. So, with that, I'm going to just turn over to Steph. And we'll talk the trend of remote working. Steph Smith: Sweet. Thanks so much. That was a great intro, Brian. Today, I'm going to be talking about something that I care a lot about. I saw some other people in the chat mention that they've been working remotely for a long time. Two, I'm going to be talking about thinking past the office and designing what I call resilient, remote teams. And I do this in a little bit of a different way than I think most presentations on this topic are, which give you a lot of super, super concrete, like you must do this. I like to think of this more so as how do we think about what has changed? What does that mean? And what can we learn from this? So, I use three books and I'll get into that in a second to actually convey some of these points. But just quickly, I don't want to talk about myself very much. Brian gave me a great intro. All you need to know is that I have been working remotely for the last four or five years now. And I did that originally at a company called Top Tell, which was one of those kind of remote first companies built from the ground up to be remote. Now I work at a company called The Hustle and I've done some remote training for different companies. And in general, have been nomadding around for the last couple years as I work remotely. So that's enough about me. Let's talk about where we are in this world. As I mentioned before COVID there was a series of companies I'd say only a couple dozen of scale that were built up to be remote. From the ground up, they said, you know what, we're never going to have any offices. Or if we do, we're going to be remote first. Companies like Zapier Basecamp, Web Flow. All these companies were built from the ground up to facilitate positive remote working environment. Now, as we all know, you saw this kind of trend, the slow trickle of people that were searching for remote work overtime. This is Google trends from 2004 to present. Then as we all know, 2020. crazy year. We see this big spike and we're all remote, whether we want to be or not. And this includes huge companies like Google, Cora, Coinbase. Shopify that at least are either going to be remote for several, several years or in some cases like Shopify have just claimed that they are now remote first from here forward. The question then becomes with all of these companies with now millions, if not billions of people that are kind of thrown into this new environment, what happens. What happens to these organizations that weren't built from the ground up? Like Zapier, Base Camp, or Buffer. Some of the questions that I have here, allude to what I'll be talking about in this presentation. So how does remote work or the shift influence how people interact with one another? How does it influence the social fabric or culture of the company? How does this change how potentially leaders should or can operate at these organizations?And in general, this all brings me back to the title of this presentation. How do we build resilient teams? And resiliency in this case means teams that thrive in the environment that they're put in, right. It doesn't feel like they're kind of pushing against walls. It doesn't feel like there's friction to achieve certain things.It feels like they're put in an environment where they're put in a place to succeed by nature, by the nature of the environment that they're in. So, as I said, this presentation is really based on three books that I've read and, and I think are excellent. It's Give and Take, Algorithms to Live By and The Four Tendencies.And I like using books like this to really frame these conversations because these books are actually not based on remote work at all. They're based on human psychology. They're based on how people interact in given situations or environments. And then I just layer on a question. Is this still true with remote work or how does this change as people go from an in-person environment to remote. And so, we'll talk specifically about how giving and taking behavior may change with remote work. We'll talk about how we can design systems. So, using something From Algorithms to Live By, Game Theory. How do we incentivize people to actually act in their best interest? Because they don't always do that on their own. And how do we in general make remote work sustainable. And then I'll talk about the potential archetype of remote worker using this four tendencies framework. To preface the three books and the three things that we'll talk about, I want to jump back to summarize where we are.So, we as a society had a majority of people working in offices. And now we have a majority of people working remotely. And I like to kind of facetiously say that when you work in an office, you work in a box. And that box is predefined for you. And even though it's a little facetious in terms of the analogy, a lot of that is true in the sense that you have a lot of things, whether it's, you know, where you're physically working, how you're working exactly, when you're working. A lot of that is super predefined for you. And for some people that's actually better. Some people that's worse. I'm not trying to ascertain whether one is better or worse, but the idea is that before you had a lot of things mapped out for you, right? And now when you're working remotely, the way, the analogy that I like to give is that box is kind of like stripped clean.So, you get rid of the walls, you get rid of exactly when, how you work. And now a lot of people are left to figure out how to build their own box. And what I see a lot of people doing, whether it's individuals or companies is they basically do this Control C Control V where they basically say, you know, we had all these things, these processes, these systems, these frameworks that worked in our office. So, let's just take all those and let's paste them into our new environment. And that can work. But what I think we have a unique opportunity to do is in fact, rethink the box. So, build our new box from the ground up. So instead of just copying everything and saying, oh, this worked there. It should work here. Let's just rethink what are the things that we should operate by in this new environment? How do we rebuild our box? And something more important than that is instead of giving our employees a new box saying, hey, this is your box. Please take it. And again, abide by these rules or operations or logistics. Let's actually just give them the tools to build their own box. And this kind of summarizes part of what I'm, I'm getting to at least to preface three examples is, is a quote from Amir. Who's a CEO of Doist one of those kind of remote first and companies. And he says, basically, remote. Isn't just a different way to work. It's a different way to live. We have to acknowledge that we're kind of blurring these lines and people, you know, experience isolation, anxiety, depression. And in general, we need to figure out ways in systems to resolve this new, almost more complex issue where you have people, people's work and their lives just meshing into this continuous system.All right. So, what are the cornerstones of remote work? I mentioned this because this bleeds into some of the examples. So remote work overall, at least prior to COVID, when people weren't forced into it, really prioritized three things over three other things. Meaning output trumped input, which meant that didn't matter exactly how many hours you were working or exactly what you did to get to the impact that you're driving for a company.What mattered was the impact, the output. Similarly, remote work tended to favor autonomy over administration. Again, this idea that didn't matter exactly how you got from Point A to Point B. You had the autonomy to figure that out. And similarly, flexibility over rigidity. So, let's keep these cornerstones in mind throughout the presentation. And consider that even those cornerstones sound kind of resoundingly positive, all of us at face value are like, yes, I love being graded on my output. I love being graded or given the autonomy to figure out how I deliver that output. And I love being given flexibility. But let's just keep those in mind and consider that they're not always strictly positive. All right, so let's dive into the first example in the book, Give and Take. Obviously, these books are very in depth and I only covered one small sliver of them in this presentation. But the key takeaway from Give and Take is that Adam Grant, he's a professor at Wharton, amazing writer as well. He talks about three different types of individuals. So, Givers, Takers, and Matchers. All you need to know about them for the purpose of this presentation is that givers basically believe in this world as a positive sum game. Meaning they believe in mutually beneficial situations. They're willing to give without expecting anything in return. Takers are kind of the opposite of that. They think zero sum game. I'm sure you can imagine or conceptualize people in your life that you've encountered that really are trying to get ahead at the expense of other people.Now matchers fall somewhere in the middle. They basically believe, or kind of function off of this idea of reciprocity and fairness. All right. So with that in mind, the question or sorry, before I even get to the question, something I want to mention is that the whole premise of Adam Grant's book is a little surprising in that most people would expect that given Takers and Matchers and Takers in particular, their approach to life in terms of kind of utilizing other people to get ahead or prioritizing their own growth over other people, you would expect those people to be the most successful.Now, interestingly enough, he found that Givers were both at the very top of the spectrum of success, and the very bottom. You can notice two different types of Givers here. One is selfless. One is, is otherish. All you need to know here is that Otherish Givers are Givers but have found a way to prioritize their own needs.So really interesting that Givers not only elevate other people, but they are actually the most successful on their own. So, this is kind of a summary or a quote from Adams, which basically says they succeed in a way that creates a ripple effect, enhancing the success of others around them. You'll see that the difference lies in how Giver success creates value instead of just claiming it.So, in general, I think the obvious takeaway here is that we want more Givers at our organizations. Now the question becomes, and this will be a repetitive question throughout, is this the same with remote work. Or how does this change with remote work? Some of the sections here are based on actual data sources.This one, not so much. This is me more hypothesizing. And what I've come to in terms of my many years leading teams, interacting with teams, being individual contributors on teams is that because if we remember the cornerstones of remote work, we prioritize output. We prioritize impact. That which in remote, all that matters is that impact, right?Are you delivering value? Are you worth your salary? Are you hitting your KPIs. In person when you're in an office? All that stuff matters. But it's also weighed against certain unspoken things, unspoken rules, like the amount of time you're spending in the office. Whether you're on time for things, whether you stay late to help another employee in general, everyone knows who the team players are in an office.That's not always true when you work remotely. I think if you've worked remotely over the last couple months, especially if you were in an office before, you can probably resonate with this idea. In remote, there's a couple thing, other things that I want to know. This idea of staying on longer to, you know, as a Giver, let's say you're helping other people.That's super difficult to quantify because when you're working remotely again, our work life and our lifeline blend together. So, it's actually hard, if I were to ask anyone on this call, how many hours did you spend this week working remotely? I think a lot of people would struggle to actually quantify that.So then layering on, am I working extra? Am I not working enough? It's really hard to kind of parse that out. Additionally, if you support someone. Let's say I have a friend and her name is Sally at work. And she says, Hey Steph, can you help me with this project? And it actually takes like, you know, five hours out of my day.I end up helping her. All of that work for better or for worse is hidden online. Sally knows about it. But everyone else at work, didn't see me stay late to help Sally. They didn't see the output of that work. They didn't see the Giving behavior. And so, in addition to this, KPIs in general, when you work remotely by nature of trying to ascertain that output of people, tends to be more individual. You even hear people use terms like manager of one when they're working remotely.And in general, the idea that I'm trying to get across here is that by nature, when you're working remotely, because there are so much emphasis on output and impact, which has many positives, basically takes away the recognition that you typically get in an in-person environment of these Givers, and what happens is these Givers end up burning out, they become more of those selfless givers that you saw at the tail end. Instead of the Otherish givers that were the most successful individual. And something I want to call out here is that regardless of intentions, morals, or values, and what I'm saying here is it doesn't matter if someone's a good person or bad person. That's not what I'm trying to ascertain. Bad incentive structures result in bad behavior, no matter how good of a person you think you are. So, what's the takeaway here? Again, I'm trying to go through this quickly, so I won't go through everything. But the idea here is that you still won't have a water cooler. In the office, which almost acted like, you know, animals in the wild. There's like a certain hierarchy and there's a kingdom and, and it kind of regulates things, right. You just subtly, but it does. You don't have that anymore with remote, or at least it's not created without intentionality. And so, there are a couple quick things that you can do. The first thing is just ask your team very simply who helped you this week? Who did you work with? Where did you put in extra hours? Where did someone else put in extra hours for you? You must ask this because it will not be surfaced as naturally as in the office. The second thing is build KPIs to incentivize teamwork. This is a little harder to do because again, when you work remotely, you're trying to ascertain output. But think about how you can do this to incentivize teamwork. So, you're not kind of encouraging people to act more as Takers versus Givers. And then finally create an environment where you're not just recognizing good behavior or giving behavior, but you're actually rewarding it.So, some companies like GitLab have actually started things like micro bonuses, where in addition to the bonus structures or the compensation structures that you get from your boss, other people around you can actually reward you based on your giving behavior. Because that's really important. You're not just recognizing it in like kind of shout outs or things like that, but you're actually rewarding this behavior. So, you're incentivizing people to continue doing it. The final thing I want to call out is that you can do as much as you can once you have people at an organization to incentivize giving behavior. But you can also kind of integrate this into your hiring process. Which means bringing in people who are more naturally Givers.So, Adam Grant mentions in his book. This is directly from Give and Take where he, during the hiring process asks this question, can you give me the names of four people whose careers you have fundamentally improved? And the idea here is that people who are Givers tend to mention either people at the same level as them or below them in terms of the people that they've helped.And it's a natural response. Of course, this is again, not quite scientific versus Takers, tend to mention people that are above them. That they've helped, because again, there's this nature of people who are Takers, trying to get ahead and using things like status to get ahead. So, something to keep in mind as well as you're hiring.So, the second example that I want to go through is from Algorithms to Live By. Again, excellent book. This is a book where basically they take principles from software development or software engineering and use it to help us think through problems that are outside of that scope. So, things like Cashing Theory or Kneeling or making intractable problems tractable.The one that I want to talk about today is Game Theory. So, in Game Theory, I'm not going to go into depth, but it's this idea that within a game, there are certain rules. And within those rules, they incentivize people to act a certain way. And once a game is predefined, you tend to get to this equilibrium where all the players individually are acting their own best interest.But sometimes the kind of aggregate of those actions actually may result in outcomes that are worse for everyone. Again, depending on the rules that were set for that game. And this equilibrium that I'm specifically talking about is called the Nash Equilibrium. And it's this idea again, there's this kind of long definition and talks about a stable state.The idea here is the Nash Equilibrium is within an environment within a game. It's the outcome or the optimal state, where there's no incentive for any individual to deviate. Now, this may not sound super actionable. So let me give you a precise example of what I'm talking about. So, with remote work, a lot of remote first companies tend to go with unlimited vacation.And I think this is something that probably more companies will end up moving towards as well. But something you keep in mind here is the Nash Equilibrium of unlimited vacation approaches, zero days. And the reason for this it's a little counterintuitive because you think unlimited vacation sounds amazing. Sounds like a great perk. Well, what happens with unlimited vacation is that people look to be perceived as more loyal, more committed, more dedicated than their peers. And therefore, they look to take just slightly less vacation than their peers. And what happens is a cascading effect, which approaches zero.This is actual data from Buffer's Data Remote Report from 2019, where you can see in blue, the amount of vacation offered, and then in orange, the amount of vacation that was actually taken. So, you can see around 30, 35% of people had unlimited vacation. And if you look at how that's actually distributed, most of the people who had unlimited vacation took anywhere from no vacation to two weeks' vacation. Versus the people who had, you know, six weeks, five weeks, four weeks were likely to actually take that amount of vacation.So, what is my point here? Well, in Game Theory is this idea where basically you have a game and then those rules are set for the game. And then you just see what behaviors actually emerge from those given set of rules. Well, I think with remote work, we have to be a lot more intentional about not just kind of throwing rules out there, again, kind of redefining our box and, and not just taking a box that already exists. And you can do that through Mechanism Design, which is kind of flipping that script and saying, what are the behaviors that we actually want and what rules do we need to establish to actually generate those behaviors? So kind of again, reversing the question and figuring out what behaviors you want to incentivize. And then figuring out what rules need to be in place to actually achieve that.As I mentioned, the box has changed, the game has changed. So, here's a couple examples of things that people struggle with from the same report, when they're working remotely. It's things like unplugging, loneliness, distractions, culture, and communication. If you were to ask the same question to people who are working in an, in an office, these would not be the case, which shows us the game has changed. The problems have changed. The things that we're solving for have changed and therefore you must come up with rules or incentives so that people act in their own best interest. So again, you're thinking backwards. You're asking the question, what are the KPIs that you need to actively design to encourage people to, for example, have a work life balance outside of just the freedom to define their own. And this is really important because it sounds counterintuitive to say a I'm actually going to define more rules. Because flexibility sounds like a great perk or sounds like a great thing to have. But actually, you can help your employees in certain situations to actually help them again, this idea of building their own box.Something I want to call out here is again, is Wall Street, which is again, the most like capitalist type environment there is, has mandatory off hours. So that brokers don't push themselves to their Nash Equilibrium, which would be the sleepless equilibrium, where they're constantly trading. So, you have to think backwards and figure out how to design an environment that people succeed in.Quick couple examples before we move on to the third example. The third book are things like a minimum vacation policy, mandatory days that they must take off, allowing people to take back their calendars and actually block off significant parts so that they're not encountering what people call Calendar Tetris. I like this example from Keith, I don't know Keith personally, and this was pre COVID.But basically, he decided to close his office on Friday. Simple things like this, where he basically said it's a mandatory weekend. You are not allowed to work, even though it seems strange in a digital environment. And I'm giving you 50 bucks to go eat at your favorite restaurant. So, think about how you are intentionally designing systems for your employees.Finally, third example that I'll breeze through is the Four Tendencies. And I'll caveat this example with this quote directly from Gretchen Rubin, the author that says the happiest, healthiest, most productive people aren't those from a particular tendency, but rather the people who have figured out how to harness the strengths of their tendency, counteract the weaknesses, and build lives that work for them.So, what is the Four Tendencies? It's this idea that there as it sounds like four tendencies. Upholder, Obliger, Questioner, and Rebel. Now these two highlighted in green are not highlighted, because they're the best. As Gretchen said in that quote, it's just that they're they are the most common. Now the Four Tendencies is basically a two-by-two framework, which identifies how people respond to expectations or accountability.So, do they readily meet outer expectations? Do they readily meet inner expectations? Do they resist both of them or do they kind of fluctuate towards or air towards one or the other? So, I personally am a Questioner. I resist outer expectations and I meet inner expectations. To give a quick example, if I wanted to get fit, having a gym buddy as an outer expectation expecting me to show up that actually wouldn't help me. And that actually is something that I've tried to do throughout my life. Hasn't worked. Meanwhile, something like actually understanding the science behind why I should be fit or kind of convincing myself that my identity, or I want to be the type of person who, you know, respects their health. That works for me. So as a Questioner, I meet inner expectations. I resist outer expectations.Now I did a poll on Twitter a while ago, got around 400 votes from people who had been working remotely again, pre COVID. And it was interesting to see that the most popular tendencies among this again, non-scientific poll were Questioners and Rebels, and I thought, huh, that's interesting.If you remember questioners and obligers for the most common in the overall population with remote workers, or at least those who sought out remote work. Where questioners and rebels with the, the familiarity or the common thread here is that they both resist outer expectations. I thought that was really interesting.And I think that relates to this idea that there's a level of self-selection or misalignment with outer expectations of society, of people trying to at least identify their own work norms, identify their own vision or how they can actually build something, build their own box. And this isn't again, mean that they're more successful or less successful.It's just perhaps that they actively sought out this type of environment. Now, what's the takeaway here. This is a brief section compared to the other two, but it's the idea that people actually respond differently to inner and outer accountability. We used to have everyone in an office and that didn't necessarily work with everyone.Now we have everyone remote that doesn't necessarily work for everyone. So, I think the idea here is that leaders need to actually learn past, just the high level this person is good at these skills. This person is good at these skills. This is my top player. This is my, you know, less valuable player. And more so think about how to tailor their leadership stylers to figure out how to motivate their employees. Whether they're in a remote environment or not. But especially if you're in a remote environment, how do you incentivize, if we just quickly go back, how do you incentivize Upholders and Obligers when Questioners and Rebels tend to naturally seek out this environment?And on the flip side, if you're in an office, how do you naturally incentivize Questioners and Rebels so that they're motivated when Upholders and Obligers may more naturally fit into those traditional environments. So just something to consider. Right. This is the final slide I have, and I know we're running out of times, but the idea here is just, again, there are certain things or certain ways that humans tend to interact in, in an person environment.And they don't necessarily act the same ways in a remote environment. And in particular, they may not even act in ways that benefit themselves all the time. So, we must as leaders, if you're leading a team, if you're leading a company, It's good to consider some of these things and figure out A: How do I encourage Giving through discovering, hiring, promoting, and acknowledging and rewarding as I said before Givers. How do I select incentives or develop the right systems so that we're using Mechanism Design and not just throwing people into a game and hoping that they choose the best outcomes that are best for them or best for everyone?And then finally, how do we actually learn about our people past the face value in terms of their skills and figure out how to harness their unique strengths, whether they're in an in-person environment or a remote environment. If you want to find me, or if you have questions, happy to answer them now, but you're also welcome to email me or DM me on Twitter and that is it.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  Also don't miss IO2022 - Innovation Accelerated in Sept, 2022.

    RBC Disruptors
    The 10-Minute Take: Layoffs rock the tech sector

    RBC Disruptors

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 10:58


    How have job cuts changed the fierce war for talent in tech?  In this edition of Disruptors: The 10-Minute Take, co-host Trinh Theresa Do explores the wave of uncertainty that's hit the sector, how firms should be rethinking their strategies and what it all means for tech workers. She's joined by Anthony Mouchantaf, Director of Venture Capital at RBCx to offer advice for navigating the months ahead.To learn more about RBCx and its offerings, visit www.rbcx.com

    Fintech Marketing Strategy Hour: The Performance Marketing Podcast for Fintech Brands
    Creating Systems to Fail with Confidence, with TripActions VP of Marketing Doug Pullman

    Fintech Marketing Strategy Hour: The Performance Marketing Podcast for Fintech Brands

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 27:45


    When there's a need for speed, you've got to fail fast. And in an industry like fintech where speed is required to win, you also need to fail smart. VP of Marketing at TripActions Doug Pullman teaches us how.  The fintech TripActions is a travel & expense management company. TripActions helps companies save money traveling. Not only can you book travel through their platform, but you can also take advantage of their dynamic policy AI. Doug talks us through why it's so important to fail fast in fintech, but even more critical HOW to make mistakes with confidence by strategically planning for them - both financially and culturally.  There are so many tip tricks and trends in marketing, but nothing's more important than learning from other marketers' success and mistakes. You're not going to want to miss this knowledge share episode.TripActions: https://tripactions.com/ Doug Pullman: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dougpullman/Connect with Crue:TwitterLinkedInYouTubeFacebookInstagramWho's Crue:Crue: Fintech Marketing by Envisionit is a performance marketing agency for fintech brands. Our dedicated unique abilities team helps fintechs turn complex challenges into transacting customers. With 11 years of success driving growth for fintech businesses, Crue understands the speed of the industry, and the complexities its marketers face. We speak the language so you don't waste time.Connect with Crue at yourcrue.com.

    Der Gründerszene-Podcast
    So finanziert ihr euer Startup – ganz ohne VC-Geld

    Der Gründerszene-Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 32:45


    Venture Capital ist der ultimative Weg zur Startup-Finanzierung? „Nein“, sagt Paul Becker. Er erklärt euch, auf welchen verschiedenen Wegen ihr an Kapital kommt.

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
    Cybersecurity Venture Capital Report, Week Of Jun. 27, 2022. WCYB Digital Radio.

    Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 2:14


    The Cybercrime Magazine Podcast brings you weekly cybersecurity business reports that air each day on WCYB Digital Radio, the first and only 7x24x365 Internet radio station devoted to cybersecurity. Our host Zack Hack keeps you on the cutting edge of cyber with a rundown of the latest cyberattacks, hacks, data breaches, and more. Don't miss an episode! This week's VC report is sponsored by Evolution Equity Partners, an international venture capital investor partnering with exceptional entrepreneurs to develop market leading cyber-security and enterprise software companies. To learn more, visit https://evolutionequity.com.

    Podcast – Software Engineering Daily
    Technical Venture Capital with Tim Tully

    Podcast – Software Engineering Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 53:29


    Venture capital investment has continued to flow into technology startups.  No one builds technology from scratch.  There are cloud services, software libraries, 3rd party services, and software platforms that modern entrepreneurs must adopt to build their products efficiently and quickly.  These layers of infrastructure are a key area for many investors. Tim is a partner The post Technical Venture Capital with Tim Tully appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

    Software Engineering Daily
    Technical Venture Capital with Tim Tully

    Software Engineering Daily

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 45:21


    Venture capital investment has continued to flow into technology startups.  No one builds technology from scratch.  There are cloud services, software libraries, 3rd party services, and software platforms that modern entrepreneurs must adopt to build their products efficiently and quickly.  These layers of infrastructure are a key area for many investors. Tim is a partner The post Technical Venture Capital with Tim Tully appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

    Go To Market Grit
    CEO Clari, Andy Byrne: Machine Learning and Human Feeling

    Go To Market Grit

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 62:42


    Clari CEO Andy Byrne says he never wants to look back and see that he put more into his work than his family. But that doesn't mean he can't learn a thing or two from running a 600-person multi-billion dollar business: Inspired by business books, he and his wife Julie set goals, methods and OKRs for their family, and even asked their kids to grade them on how well they were hitting their targets. “I feel like our job is to help our families realize their fullest potential first, and then work is second,” Andy says.In this episode, Andy and Joubin discuss buying homes in San Francisco; leading a company when you have tragedy in your personal life; Man's Search For Meaning; internal vs. external expression; machine learning in enterprise; the “golden triangle” of reps, managers and execs; Andy's legendarily effective board meetings; how constraints create opportunity; and the metrics of marriage.In this episode, we cover: How luck makes you look smart (04:47) The “dark year” in Andy's life and coping with negative stimulus (09:51) Reframing seemingly huge problems as moments in time (16:27) How Clari helps CEOs and CROs answer “the most important question in business” (22:45) Getting from product fit to go-to-market fit (27:14) Leading a 600-person company, and Andy's fiduciary duty to their families (33:49) Actually, the CEO is not “the loneliest job in the world” (41:14) Managing through — and leaning into — a market downturn (45:00) Why Andy and his wife run their marriage like co-CEOs (49:24) Living your life with intention (56:00) Links: Connect with Andy Twitter LinkedIn Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: grit@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

    Breakfast Business
    Thanks Plants raises venture capital

    Breakfast Business

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 7:19


    Plant-based sausage maker Thanks Plants has raised funding for growth in the rapidly expanding meat alternatives industry. Aisling Cullen, co-founder of Thanks Plants joined Gavin this morning on the show.

    Irgendwas mit Recht
    IMR130: Interdiszipläre Zusammenarbeit, Fintech & digitales Investieren

    Irgendwas mit Recht

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 34:43


    In der heutigen Folge von Irgendwas mit Recht tauscht sich Marc in mit Manuel Numrich aus. Manuel ist Partner bei der Kanzlei Boege Rohde Luebbehuesen, einer multidisziplinären Kanzlei, die sowohl Steuerberater, Wirtschaftsprüfer als auch Rechtsanwälte vereint. Dort ist er als Rechtsanwalt schwerpunktmäßig in den Bereichen Gesellschaftsrecht, Venture Capital und Transaktionsberatung tätig. Neben Fragen zum beruflichen Werdegang und der aktuellen Tätigkeit von Manuel dreht sich das Gespräch viel um das Thema "New Work". Wie können Kanzleien flexible Arbeitsbedingungen für ihre Angestellten sicherstellen? Hat sich durch die Corona-Pandemie die Arbeit im Home-Office bewährt? Inwieweit haben sich die Arbeitszeiten und das Mindset in Kanzleien während Manuels Karriere verändert? Welche Bedürfnisse stellt der juristische Nachwuchs z.B. an familienfreundliche Arbeitsmodelle? Außerdem berichtet Manuel davon, mit welchen Fragestellungen er sich im Arbeitsalltag täglich beschäftigt, welche Branche er besonders gerne berät und welche Besonderheiten die Arbeit in einer multidisziplinären Kanzlei bietet. Ihr seht: einschalten lohnt sich! Viel Spaß!

    Mobility Pioneers
    Stephan Wöllenstein (CEO VW China): «Anhui ist der Pacemaker für VW in China»

    Mobility Pioneers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 35:49


    Stephan Wöllenstein arbeite seit 27 Jahren im VW Konzern und leitet seit drei Jahren das China-Geschäft. Im Mobility Pioneers Podcast spricht er über Volkswagens neues und drittes China Joint Venture sowie> Gewinnen gegen BYD & Co durch Lokalisierung> Chinas Mobilitätsstrategie: Elektrisch, vernetzt und unabhängig> Transfer von Technologien aus China in den VW KonzernStephan Wöllenstein: linkedin.com/in/stephanwoellensteinJürgen Stackmann: linkedin.com/in/juergenstackmannBjörn Bender: linkedin.com/in/benderbjoernIMO-HSG: imo.unisg.ch00:00 Willkommen & Vorstellung02:59 VWs Erfolgsrezept für China & aktuelle Zahlen + Fakten06:21 Wie VW über die letzten 40 Jahre in China erfolgreich wurde09:35 Gewinnen gegen BYD & Co durch Lokalisierung13:28 Chinas Mobilitätsstrategie: Elektromobilität, Vernetzung, Unabhängigkeit19:56 Zusammenarbeit mit chinesischen Technologiekonzernen22:07 Transfer von Technologien aus China in den VW Konzern24:18 Venture Capital für Auto-Startups und Innovationsdrang in China29:11 Ziele für VWs drittes Joint Ventures in China33:34 Der Dreischritt aus Entscheidung, Umsetzung und Optimierung33:55 Stephans Maßnahme für einen Mobilitätsplan34:18 Wesentliche Unterschiede der deutschen und chinesischen Mobilitätspolitik34:44 Abschluss

    Scale Up Your Business Podcast
    Why You Should Be Planning Your Exit Now

    Scale Up Your Business Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 15:06


    In this episode, I have two big announcements to share. As you know, I always talk about: Scaling up. Scaling your business in order to live life on your terms. Knowing your identity. You can only scale a business to the level of your identity. Continuing your education. Keep learning. Pushing yourself to grow. Even when it's uncomfortable. I am a man of action and continue to follow these examples, too. So, I'm excited to announce: I went back to school! I'm proud to announce that I am officially a "Certified Exit Planning Advisor." My second announcement. Well, that has much more to do with YOU! I want to offer something special just for you. As you know, it's my mission to help business owners create high-value businesses. This episode offers an extension of my mission— a way for me to give back to you. You won't want to miss this announcement. Are you ready? Download and listen to the full episode! DETAILS FOR UPCOMING WORKSHOP Name: How To Scale Your Business For An 8-Figure Exit. Date: Thursday June 30th, 2022 Time: 11:30AM PST | 2:30PM EST | 7:30PM UK  Registration Page: https://www.scaleupmastermind.com/live-workshop KEY TAKEAWAYS If you can create a business that can be run without you, it makes it far more viable to sell. This gives you the option to hold onto it without the operational side, but also gives you a valuable asset. Owner readiness is the preparedness of a business owner to be able to exit their business, either now or at some point in the future. 66% of the American business market is owned by baby boomers. There is a huge wealth transfer imminent. Statistics also say that only around 25% of businesses actually sell BEST MOMENTS 'The hallmark of a valuable company is one that can be run without you' 'That gives you the ultimate leverage' 'An owner who is ready with an attractive business greatly increases the odds that the business will survive a transition' VALUABLE RESOURCES Scale Up with Nick Bradley: scaleup.vip/podcast Scale Up Your Business, coaching/consulting: https://suyb.global To download a free gift from Nick - The 5 Reasons Why Your Business Will Never Get To 8-Figures ... How To Fix It Fast! - https://www.scaleupmastermind.com/free-guide1 Take the SUYB Predictable Growth Assessment™, to measure your current business performance and show you where to focus next to get to where you want to be: https://scaleup.vip/PredictableGrowthAssessment ABOUT THE HOST  Nick Bradley is a renowned entrepreneur, investor, speaker, and business growth expert. His background is growing and scaling Venture Capital and Private Equity backed businesses, across the UK, the US, and further afield. Over the last decade, he has completed 117 acquisitions and 25 business exits with a combined valuation of over $5bn dollars. His “Scale Up Your Business” podcast, which ranked #1 on iTunes' business charts, has more than 350k downloads in over 130 countries. His mission is to help business founders build valuable businesses and create life-changing exits so they can realise freedom, wealth, and impact. CONTACT METHOD Nick's Facebook page: https://scaleup.vip/FB Nick's LinkedIn: https://scaleup.vip/LI Nick's Instagram: https://scaleup.vip/IG Scale Up Your Business, coaching/consulting: https://suyb.global We help business founders scale their business to a life-changing exit within 36 months. Please feel free to get in touch if we can assist. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Alex Hammer Podcast
    Venture Capital - How to Most Successfully Pre-assess Startup Execution, Scalability and Vision

    Alex Hammer Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 15:38


    Venture Capital - How to Mist Succession Pre-assess Startup Execution, Scalability and Vision

    FNO: InsureTech
    Ep 182 – American Family Ventures Managing Director, Katelyn Johnson

    FNO: InsureTech

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 46:17


    Lee and Rob talk with return guest Katelyn Johnson, Managing Director at American Family Ventures. American Family Ventures has been a prominent venture capital firm with a focus on insurance innovation, fintech, data/analytics, IoT, and cyber security. They've had the privilege and opportunity to support and assist many insuretech and innovations that have come to insurance. Join Lee, Rob, and Katelyn as they discuss what's been happening in insuretech, the VC space, the economic impact on VC, Katelyn's next baby, and more! Learn more about American Family Ventures at https://www.amfamventures.com. Like what you hear on FNO: InsureTech? Know someone who would be a great guest for the podcast? Let us know: Email our Technical Producer at amuya@alacritysolutions.com.

    Equity
    All this startup news, and we didn't even talk about Juul

    Equity

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:27


    Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch's venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines.Today Natasha and Alex were on the mics, kicking back and riffing through the biggest technology stories of the week. Our dear Mary Ann was off this week, but will be back in short order.What did we get into? A bevy of blistering bromides, naturally:Accel has a new $4 billion fund, focused on the late-stage, which is at once a pile of duckets and a fascinating timing for such a large capital vehicle.FalconX doubled its valuation in a new round, which was also a huge pile of money at an odd moment in time.Oh, and Suze Orman was also on the show today, in spirit and story.From there we noodled on the big changes at Brex, the latest in executive turnover, and why the metaverse actually had some good news this week?All in all it was a good time and we are back Monday!Equity drops every Monday at 7 a.m. PDT and Wednesday and Friday at 6 a.m. PDT, so subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Overcast, Spotify and all the casts

    WHERE’S THE FUNDING?!
    S4 Ep.6 How Resilient Ventures Is Transforming Venture Capital for Black Entrepreneurs with Keith Daniel and Tom Droege

    WHERE’S THE FUNDING?!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 35:08


    Keith Daniel and Tom Droege are intentional about funding Black entrepreneurs and bringing more equity to venture capital. They stop by WHERE'S THE FUNDING? to discuss inequalities in the VC ecosystem, whether the VC model is suitable for Black entrepreneurs, and what they are doing to create access to funding for Black founders.Through Resilient Ventures, the co-founders, have built a reputation of action and integrity. Their early-stage venture fund exists to show that VC can be a good model for Black founders if it is done differently, and by differently they mean more equitably. Black entrepreneurs often do not have the opportunity or privilege to raise friends and family rounds and often grow slower (despite being in business for a while) because they do not have the opportunity to raise funding to scale and grow.

    Software Lifecycle Stories
    Techie turned investor with Abhay Havaldar

    Software Lifecycle Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 42:00


    In this episode, Abhay Havaldar shares his story and experiences related to:Starting his IT career with a role in  testing software and going on to play other roles of marketing support and salesProduct management and support with a dealing room packageAlways willing to experiment and joining a venture capital firm - Draper InternationalEarly stage investing, General Atlantic, India - and a boutique investment firmWhy he got into ITHow he positions an IT solution to a prospective clientHis experience of product management, explained in today's terminology, as Software as a ServiceHis experience with developing software solutions under a contract and the benefit of listening skills to add context to contractsThe power users wield in product led growth modelsHis starting out being a venture capitalist as a partner directly with the legendary Bill DraperHis approach of investing in the plan first, than the market opportunity that is forecastThe importance of evaluating all risks and being humbleHis thoughts on scaling startups and the Powerlocker model adopted by his formHis views on reviews by investors in the context of fundraising and context of goalsHow he approaches theme based investingHis approach to learning from othersBeing wrong is a great time to learnHis experience and perspectives on the social sectorThe importance of being comfortable with storytelling, particularly for entrepreneursExperienced Board Member with a demonstrated history of working in the venture capital and private equity industry. Skilled in Corporate Finance, Venture Capital, Investment Banking, Strategy. Strong business development professional with a MSc (Sloan Fellow) focused in Business Administration and Management, General from London Business School.https://www.linkedin.com/in/abhay-havaldar-a4a46523/

    POP
    The Ultimate Crypto Bear Market Survival Guide

    POP

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 34:29


    The crypto market has been going through a rough patch lately - one in a series of crypto winters (also known as bear markets) taking place in the last few years.As an investor, you're probably wondering how long this bear market will last and, more importantly - how bad will it get?In today's episode, crypto experts and bear market veterans Bryan Myint and Graham Friedman share their predictions for 2022, the do's and don'ts of investing in a crypto winter, and hedging strategies for active investors - the ultimate guide to surviving the crypto bear market.Tune in to find out more!

    How to B2B a CEO (with Ashu Garg)
    How to Hire People Better Than Yourself (Ashutosh Garg, Founder & CEO of Eightfold)

    How to B2B a CEO (with Ashu Garg)

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 26:26


    On this episode, it's Ashu Garg vs. Ashu Garg. Our guest is his good friend Ashu Garg, who also goes by Ashutosh. Ashutosh is the founder and CEO of Eightfold, an AI-powered talent-acquisition and -management platform, where our Ashu is a board member and early investor in the company. In this conversation, the two Ashus trace Eightfold's not-always-easy path from altruistic mission to Silicon Valley unicorn. They spend much of their time discussing how to hire the best people. And CEO Ashu shares everything he wished he knew at the beginning of his startup journey.

    Chain Reaction
    How web3 creators can make the most of the crypto crash (with Latashá)

    Chain Reaction

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 44:04


    Welcome back, this week Anita and Lucas discuss the $258 billion Dogecoin lawsuit facing Elon Musk, how crypto collectible lovers are partying through the pain at the NFT NYC event and how some DAOs are showing the dark side of digital democracy.In their interview this week, Lucas and Anita got the chance to talk with musician and visual artist Latashá. In addition to creating crypto art, Latashá is the Head of Community at NFT startup Zora which recently raised a big round of funding. We talked with her about how the downturn will impact crypto creators and what web3 really has to offer artists.Subscribe to the Chain Reaction newsletter to dive deeper: https://techcrunch.com/newslettersHelpful links:https://techcrunch.com/2022/06/16/dogecoin-investor-sues-elon-musk-tesla-and-spacex-for-258-billion/https://techcrunch.com/2022/06/20/afropolitan-raises-2-1m-to-build-a-digital-nation-backed-by-balaji-srinivasan/https://techcrunch.com/2022/06/21/magic-eden-raises-130m-hitting-unicorn-status-at-1-6b-valuation/https://twitter.com/regiscake/status/1539338847829782528?s=20&t=gxtu5vdu6FyYcGw-LpT_bg

    The Get Together
    What is the Steppyness of It?

    The Get Together

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 46:47


    The world is a changin' and we're noticing a really interesting shift from customer to community in our Live Digital Work. All Together Now 1.0 had customers who want an event that our Live Digital delivers, All Together Now 2.0 saw us creating Live Digital experiences that execute the events and that generate marketing yummyness that can be used to grow who comes to future events. All Together Now 3.0 is the next logical step - we're building strategies to engage communities who love brands – and, of course, those strategies yield events and marketing. In order to better understand and define this future, we're taking it all the way back to Internet 1.0, message boards and flat websites as we track the history of how we interact on the internet. We also spend a stupid amount of time on the Meisner method of acting training, the brilliance of this season of Barry and Magic the Gathering. We were feeling spicy.

    Female VC Lab
    E055: Edith Yeung: Race Capital

    Female VC Lab

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 12:55


    Race Capital invests, builds, and partners with exceptional founders building market-transforming companies. They work side by side with our founders as early as possible, every step of the way. They have successfully built our own companies from small to big, from nothing to IPO, and want to help others do the same.

    The Bad Crypto Podcast
    What in the World is Going On with Bill Tai

    The Bad Crypto Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 56:27


    Inflation. Crypto crashes. Currency wars. Land wars. Star Wars. These are crazy times and it's said in an insane society the sane man must appear insane. Whether or not we are sane or insane is up for debate, but we think today's guest at least appears sane. Wait, does that mean he is insane? We don't know, but what we do know is that Bill Tai is a really interesting guy. As an incredibly successful venture capitalist who has help fund many unicorns, his take on today's current events is quite valuable. He may not be the science guy, but he is Bill Tai, and he's with us today on episode #617 of The Bad Crypto Podcast.  Full show notes: badco.in/617 SUBSCRIBE, RATE, & REVIEW: Apple Podcast: http://badco.in/itunes Google Podcasts: http://badco.in/google Spotify: http://badco.in/spotify FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: @badcryptopod - @joelcomm - @teedubya Facebook: /BadCrypto - /JoelComm - /teedubyaw Facebook Mastermind Group: /BadCrypto LinkedIn: /in/joelcomm - /in/teedubya Instagram: @BadCryptoPodcast Email: badcryptopodcast[at]gmail[dot]com Phone: SEVEN-OH-8-88FIVE- 90THIRTY DISCLAIMER: Do your own due diligence and research. Joel Comm and Travis Wright are NOT FINANCIAL ADVISORS. We are sharing our journey with you as we learn more about this crazy little thing called cryptocurrency. We make NO RECOMMENDATIONS. Don't take anything we say as gospel. Do not come to our homes with pitchforks because you lost money by listening to us. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are investing it. We will never "pump or dump" any cryptocurrencies. Take what we say with a grain of salt. You must research this stuff on your own! Just know that we will always strive for RADICAL TRANSPARENCY with any show associations. Support the show: https://badcryptopodcast.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Zaprojektuj Swoje Życie
    Ludzka strona funduszy venture capital - Maciej Małysz - Inovo Venture Partners

    Zaprojektuj Swoje Życie

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 63:28


    Trzeci muszkieter Inovo Venture Partners zawitał do audycji Zaprojektuj Swoje Życie. Macie Małysz zrobił w ramach Inovo już 40 inwestycji. W dzisiejszym odcinku nasz gość demistyfikuje fundusze VC, opowiada o największych wyzwaniach branży i dzieli się osobistymi doświadczeniami z pracy ze startupami.Posłuchaj rozmów z Partnerami Inovo:

    The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing
    Patrick Chun (Juxtapose) - What is an inception stage investment firm, why it's less risky than modern venture capital, how he recruits CEOs to lead each business he incubates

    The Consumer VC: Venture Capital I B2C Startups I Commerce | Early-Stage Investing

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 29:16


    Our guest today is Patrick Chun, Founding Partner of Juxtapose. Juxtapose is an inception stage investment firm. Some of the companies that they founded include Tend, Care/of, and Dayforward. Their process for how they build companies is pretty unique for this show. We discuss their model, why their model is less risky than traditional venture capital, and his process for finding the right CEO to lead each business. Without further ado, here's Patrick. What is Juxtapose? What was the initial insight or prior experience that influenced your decision to found it? Why did you choose to found it? Why do you believe your model is less risky than traditional venture capital?You are incubating When you say do the work, what do you mean? What's your process identifying an observationTrue verifiable fact in the world When your Lots of observation How many observations do you have a week Insights you can pull off of an observation On-demand dispatch Track 500-1000 observationsTalk about 50-100 What's your process for building businesses step by step – from the ideation stage to creating beta products / product is in market? Recycled and reentered the funnel 4-6 months How do you think about timing as well? Obsolete assumptionYou can never have an investor home When do you bring on an experienced CEO and team? How do you think about that process?What are qualities you'd like to see from the CEO? From 0 to 10 at what stage is the company in when you bring on a CEO? How do you source “Michael Jordan” CEOs? If they are the Michael Jordan's, what typically get them excited to join the company - since I'm sure they get alot of offers to lead different teams?Can it be difficult to attract since these companies are still small? How do you hire the team? Once a company has a CEO, how do you think about the role of Juxtapose moving forward with the business?The best supporter of the company from 0-200 people Is the shift from operator to more of board member/observer type role? Do you ever get the itch to become a CEO of one of your companies? How do you approach hiring for your studio? Are you looking for people who have operational experience or more investor experience since it seems the studio model is at the intersection of both? What are the challenges with the studio model? What can get overlooked? What are the shortcomings of the venture studio model or what do studios tend to struggle with? Was there a prior experience that led you to want to build a different type of firm than traditional VC? What's one thing you would change about venture capital? What's one book that inspired you personally and one book that inspired you professionally?4,000 weeks Oliver Burkman What's the best piece of advice for founders?What is it that people will see in the market and if you're right

    MaML - Medicine & Machine Learning Podcast
    Vineeta Agarwala - Venture Capital, a16z, and the MaML space

    MaML - Medicine & Machine Learning Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 43:13


    Dr. Vineeta Agarwala is a general partner at a16z, physician, adjunct clinical professor at Stanford, previously at Google Ventures, Flatiron Health, having received her MD/PhD at Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute. Many thanks to Ashlea Kosikowski from 1AB Media for making this episode happen! Follow us on twitter: @TheMaMLPodcast Host: David JH Wu @davidjhwu Producer: Aaron Schumacher @a_schu95 Design: Saurin Kantesaria

    Scale Up Your Business Podcast
    Oliver Burkeman On The True Value Of Time Management

    Scale Up Your Business Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 48:17


    Oliver Burkeman is the author of The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking (2012), Help! How to Become Slightly Happier and Get a Bit More Done (2011), and a new book, Four Thousand Weeks, about making the most of our radically finite lives in a world of impossible demands, relentless distraction and political insanity. Oliver joins Nick this week to talk about why time management is the key to unlocking our true potential and productivity, and why mastering it will provide the key to success and scale in whatever we do. KEY TAKEAWAYS The world is filled with infinite possibilities, and yet we as creatures are finite. The only way to make the best of our time is to come to the realisation that we are going to miss out on much the world has to offer. Many think that pushing for more gets you further, and that can be meaningful, so long as we temper our ambitions to realise that not every opportunity can be taken. You should make decisions as part of a practice, and see it as something you should get better at. If you're stuck, then look for some decision to make that makes the process irreversible, and make it! Habits we implement for our own self care must be conceptualised as such. If we become too focussed on the practice itself, instead of what we are trying to achieve with it, then we become far too future-focussed, which is detrimental. BEST MOMENTS 'We swim in infinity pools of possibilities' 'That's a recipe for being more busy, more stressed and less focussed' 'You can build this muscle' 'I 'm more interested in the achievement of the habit, than what the habit is trying to provide' VALUABLE RESOURCES Scale Up with Nick Bradley: scaleup.vip/podcast Scale Up Your Business, coaching/consulting: https://suyb.global To download a free gift from Nick - The 5 Reasons Why Your Business Will Never Get To 8-Figures ... How To Fix It Fast! - https://www.scaleupmastermind.com/free-guide1 Take the SUYB Predictable Growth Assessment™, to measure your current business performance and show you where to focus next to get to where you want to be: https://scaleup.vip/PredictableGrowthAssessment Oliver Burkeman - https://www.oliverburkeman.com ABOUT THE HOST  Nick Bradley is a renowned entrepreneur, investor, speaker, and business growth expert. His background is growing and scaling Venture Capital and Private Equity backed businesses, across the UK, the US, and further afield. Over the last decade, he has completed 117 acquisitions and 25 business exits with a combined valuation of over $5bn dollars. His “Scale Up Your Business” podcast, which ranked #1 on iTunes' business charts, has more than 350k downloads in over 130 countries. His mission is to help business founders build valuable businesses and create life-changing exits so they can realise freedom, wealth, and impact. CONTACT METHOD Nick's Facebook page: https://scaleup.vip/FB Nick's LinkedIn: https://scaleup.vip/LI Nick's Instagram: https://scaleup.vip/IG Scale Up Your Business, coaching/consulting: https://suyb.global We help business founders scale their business to a life-changing exit within 36 months. Please feel free to get in touch if we can assist. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Forward Thinking Founders
    830 - Mai Shimada (Isha Health) On Unlocking Your Mental Health With Ketamine

    Forward Thinking Founders

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 11:25


    Mai Shimada is the founder of Isha Health. Isha Health enables online ketamine assisted therapy with a team of licensed clinicians.Hiring problems? Check out Recruit.so. Thanks for sponsoring this episode.★ Support this podcast ★