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Best podcasts about deciding

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Latest podcast episodes about deciding

Woke & Wired - Expanded Consciousness and Entrepreneurship
210. Honoring The End Of The Tiny Cabin Journey: Holding A Big Vision, Channeling Creativity and Trusting Our Sacred Partnership – KSENIA AND ERIC BRIEF

Woke & Wired - Expanded Consciousness and Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 110:59


The Tiny Cabin chapter is coming to an end. In this episode, we revisit the best of previous episodes about the tiny cabin. I invite you to join me on a journey from buying the cabin in the Catskills, moving in, renovating, building our relationship and our businesses along the way, and now holding space for the next chapter of our lives. We discuss:  The story of why we moved from New York City to The Catskills How intuition – not logic – guided us to the tiny cabin and the land  Why we decided not to buy real estate in new york city  Financial considerations  How decluttering our lives played a role in this move How we got clear on what we were looking when we found the tiny cabin  How creating and fulfilling on visions works in our partnerships  The moment we knew that we were meant to live in the tiny cabin  The renovation journey Deciding to go nomadic for the winter The synchronicities that guided as every step of the way  What's next Related episodes:  185 Eric Brief: The Courageous Road to “I Am An Artist” and Finding Your Own Way On Social Media 129 Tiny Cabin and Life Update with My Love Eric Brief 87 Eric Brief – All About Crystals 74 Ksenia and Eric: We Are Going Nomadic! The Why, How and Where 56 We Bought A Tiny Home! Our Adventure From NYC to Upstate New York Episode sponsor: MUDWTR If we're connected on Instagram or TikTok, you've probably already seen me making my morning beverage with MUDWTR.  MUDWTR is a coffee alternative, but I LOVE drinking it WITH my coffee. I typically make a shot of espresso, froth some oat milk with MUDWTR and serve it hot or iced depending on the weather. MUDWTR has 4 adaptogenic mushrooms and Ayurvedic herbs. It's got functional mushrooms like lion's mane, chaga and reishi, plus spices like cinnamon and turmeric and it gives you the energy without the crash or anxiety or jitters because it has 1/7 the caffeine of a cup of coffee. To try MUDWTR, go to mudwtr.com and use code KSENIA to get 15% off your first purchase.  Connect with Ksenia:  kseniabrief.com Instagram @ksenia.brief YouTube Ksenia Brief TikTok @ksenia.brief Subscribe, rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Spotify Connect with Eric:  @ericbrief on Instagram @ericbrief on TikTok

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio
DK's Daily Shot of Penguins: This isn't about sentimentality

DK Pittsburgh Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 18:32


Deciding on whether or not to keep Evgeni Malkin and/or Kris Letang isn't about sentimentality. Hear award-winning columnist Dejan Kovacevic's Daily Shots of Steelers, Penguins and Pirates -- three separate podcasts -- every weekday morning on the DK Pittsburgh Sports podcasting network, available on all platforms: https://linktr.ee/dkpghsports Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Friends of Build Magazine
How Essential Craftsman Turned Blacksmith & Construction Experience into Purpose Driven Content Receiving Millions of YouTube Views with Nate Wadsworth

Friends of Build Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 64:19


Since 2016, Essential Craftsman has continued to build its brand largely through video content. Their videos have received tens of millions of views, inspiring hundreds of thousands of people to think differently about work, tools, and craftsmanship.Listen in as Nate shares the story behind Essential Craftsman and a behind-the-scenes look at the creation of its entertaining and educational videos. He breaks down common myths about building a strong brand and a large audience online, and explains why content creation is one of the best ways to inspire and provide value to the next generation of tradespeople.Topics Discussed:[01:56] The power of branding and marketing via video[09:48] Creating video content without being “tech savvy”[14:49] Why Nate and Scott started making training videos[22:12] Overcoming fear of criticism from putting out content[25:34] Nate and Scott's initial goal for their brand[31:16] Deciding which footage to cut and which to keep[33:43] How the next five years will look for Essential Craftsman[38:51] Why you don't need to be a big name to been seen as an authority[41:10] How to build your followership organically[45:42] About Reddit and dealing with internet hate[49:10] Inspiring young people to go into the trades[55:05] How Scott regards Nate's success[58:32] The rewards and challenges of working in a family businessConnect with Nate Wadsworth & Essential Craftsman:Website - https://essentialcraftsman.com/Podcast - https://essentialcraftsman.podbean.com/YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzr30osBdTmuFUS8IfXtXmgPodcast - https://essentialcraftsman.com/podcastInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/essentialcraftsman/Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Essentialcraftsman/Connect with Build Magazine:Website - https://rebrand.ly/bmwebInstagram - https://rebrand.ly/bmigwebFacebook - https://rebrand.ly/bmfbwebKey Quotes by Nate:I try to get the message across in the least amount of minutes as possible. I'm not interested in wasting people's time. I'm really not interested in entertaining them, per se. I'm interested in making valuable content.If I'm making good content and putting it out as often as possible, the road that we're on will lead somewhere good.It's not about becoming an influencer and getting your name far and wide. It's just about creating value for people.

Sincerely HER Podcast
Moving On | Note 549

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 2:26


Deciding if you are on the right path in life comes easy when everything seems to flow. Whether you see signs, omens, or have a gut feeling, don't underestimate the power of your intuition.   Join: https://sincerelytam.com/subscribe   Show notes: Visit SincerelyTam.com/Notes

The VFX Artists Podcast
Becoming a mother made me an efficient VFX Animator - Part 1 | TVAP EP35

The VFX Artists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 60:34


This week, we have the amazing Christina Mandia, animator at Cinesite London, giving us an insight into how she tackles her maternal role, whilst being a better, more efficient animator.Christina goes on to share some very important information on maternity leave pay for employees and freelancers through the government schemes, as well as employee entitlements. Some really useful info for employees and freelancers in any career.Christina's journey as a VFX animator, starts with an entry into the VFX industry as a runner, following the completion of an animator degree at Ravensbourne university, leading on to a progression into the matchmove department, and finally into the much anticipated department she'd always been aspiring for - animation.In this two-part episode, Christina shares her journey, her expertise advice as an animator & mother, and gives invaluable advice for aspiring animators and aspiring & existing parents in the working industry, more specifically, the VFX industry.We hope you find this episode useful as we did.Special thanks to Christina for kindly taking time out to share her experiences with us.Subscribe and turn notifications on to be alerted when part 2 comes out!Find Christina on:IMDBLinkedInAs always, if you liked this episode, please like, comment, subscribe and share!Listen to all episodes on our websiteChapters:00:00:00 Intro    00:00:38 How it all started    00:07:04 Becoming pregnant as an artist    00:09:23 Deciding to speak to HR at 26 weeks of pregnancy    00:16:33 Confronting HR and recruiters about pregnancy    00:17:29 Maternity leave and pay laws in the U.K.    00:20:36 iAnimate during maternity leave    00:28:22 WFH - Mother's opinion    00:35:15 School!    00:39:36 Prove yourself and know your worth!    00:43:56 Hesitancy & Pressure on women choosing between work and starting a family    00:56:24 Getting back into work after Maternity leave    

The Passionistas Project Podcast
Mountaineer and Cancer Survivor Lisa Thompson

The Passionistas Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 51:32


Lisa Thompson is a Mountaineer, cancer survivor, and sought-after speaker and coach. She worked for 25 years as an engineer and in leadership roles at technology companies. In 2008, she began climbing and has summited most of the most challenging mountains in the world, including Mount Everest and K2. She's completed the seven summits reaching the top of the highest peak of each of the seven continents. Through her company, Alpine Athletics, and other platforms, Lisa shares her message of strength and resilience with corporate and private groups worldwide. She is also the author of “Finding Elevation” which chronicles her path from novice climber to world class mountain. Learn more about Lisa. Learn more about The Passionistas Project.   Full Transcript: Passionistas: Hi, and welcome to the Passionistas Project Podcast, where we talk with women who are following their Passionistas to inspire you to do the same. We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and today we're talking with Lisa Thompson, a mountaineer, cancer survivor and sought-after speaker and coach. Lisa worked for 25 years as an engineer and in leadership roles at technology companies. In 2008, she began climbing and has summited most of the most challenging mountains in the world, including Mount Everest and K2. She's completed the seven summits reaching the top of the highest peak of each of the seven continents. Through her company, Alpine Athletics and other platforms. Lisa shares her message of strength and resilience with corporate and private groups worldwide. She is also the author of “Finding Elevation,” which chronicles Thompson's path from novice climber to world class mountain. So please welcome to the show. Lisa Thompson. Lisa: Great to be here. Thanks for having me today. Passionistas: We're really excited to have you here and hear your story. And, uh, we always like to start with the question. What's the one thing you're most passionate about? Lisa: Right now, I think this has changed over the years. I'm sure that's just the normal progression of a life, but right now I am most passionate about giving back to. Women in the communities that I love communities in Nepal and in Pakistan where I've, you know, really feel at home in the mountains and have spent a lot of time and have great memories there. And it's important to me to give back to those communities, especially the women. I recently started a nonprofit to support women in Nepal and specifically to support their education. It was shocking to me to learn that something like 58% of women in Nepal over the age of 15 have had. Zero education, none at all, which is just, you know, alarming on many levels. But in one regard, they're really the center of a Nepalese family and community. And the fact that there's been no formal education for so many of those women just felt like something that was, that I wanted to impact in a positive way. Passionistas: Where did you grow up and what was your childhood like? Were you always interested in, in, uh, climbing and being outdoors? Lisa: So I grew up in the great mountaineering state of Illinois, where the highest point I believe is 120 feet. And it's so predominant that it actually has a name. Whereas in most states, if that elevation would not be named, so I didn't grow up. Aspiring to be a Mountaineer. I didn't grow up learning or reading about, you know, sir, Edmond Hillary or other sort of pioneering mountaineers. And I wasn't even really that athletic, you know, looking back, I grew up in a small farming community, uh, called Lincoln in the very center of Illinois. You know, every kid sort of makes the, the softball team or the volleyball team. I think there were a couple years where I did not even make it. I was so uncoordinated and unathletic a and I didn't grow up really with parents who pushed me to Excel. You know, I think part of their sort of distance is what motivated me to prove myself and to, you know, you know, back then it was about getting their attention. Lots of time in therapy talking about that. But one of the positives of that I've realized is that it pushed me to really want to Excel and to push myself mentally and physically. And that translated first, you know, I'm still by my account, but only person in my entire extended family to graduate from college, which is sort of sad, you know, to me, but it pushed me to do things that were unexpected. In my community and with my family. And so, you know, going to college was sort of the first step in that direction. I studied engineering, you know, not because I was super interested in it, but because I felt like that seems hard and I can probably make a decent salary when I graduate. And so I was fortunate to get a job with Hewlett Packard right out of college as an engineer, then it was, you know, that was the mid-nineties. I was the only woman at my level. And that taught me a lot. I was certainly not prepared coming from. You know, a very sort of hardworking farming-oriented family. I was not equipped to be thrown into a corporate environment at that age. I was 24. And so there was a lot of sort of flailing and trying to understand dynamics and politics. And I was often the youngest person in the room, the only female in the room. And. Upon reflection. Um, there were definitely some missteps, some things that I just, frankly didn't understand, cuz I was ill-equipped to be in that kind of environment. But one very positive thing that came of that was that through that job, I eventually moved to Seattle, which is where I live today. And here. You know, mountaineering, we're fortunate to be surrounded by the Cascade mountains and the Olympic mountain range. So climbing and mountaineering and just being in the mountains is really part of the culture in Seattle. When I moved here, uh, for that job still with, you know, it wasn't any longer with Hewlett Packard, but it was a derivation of that company. All the men at my level would go climbing on the weekend. And so I had no idea, right? I no, like I'd maybe been camping with my family, but I didn't like know anything about mountaineering. I didn't know what a crampon was. I had no idea the equipment, the gear, the, the, you know, the sort of aesthetic of climbing, nothing. But these men, you know, would go out on the weekends and they would come back to the office on Monday and they had all. You know, incredible stories. And again, it wasn't that I aspired to be in the mountains, but I aspired to be a part of their group. And I wanted them so badly to see me, the only woman on their team as capable and strong. And I wasn't getting that in the office environment. So this seemed like a way to do that. And instead of doing the totally logical thing, which would've been to say. Like oh, climbing. That sounds really cool. Can I come with you or can you tell me more about it? I just got frustrated. I got mad and eventually just decided I was gonna go climb my own damn mountains. And I had no, I again had no idea what that meant, but I started really just hiking around my house in the cascades. And then eventually in 2008, I attempted Mount Rainier, which is the highest mountain in Washington. And after that I was, I was just hooked spite no spite I was hooked at that. Passionistas: Do they know what you've accomplished since then? Lisa: I've lost track of them. I could probably, you know, through a network, get back to them, but I don't, I don't know. Probably not and they probably don't even, you know, these weren't bad guys at all. It just, I think didn't occur to them to ask me to join. And so they probably would have no reason to wonder like, Hey, I wonder if that girl ever climbed any mountains. Passionistas: You started to do this as, you know, a recreational activity, but then at some point that obviously shifted and you started to set these goals for yourself. So what inspired you to climb Mount Rainier and then to take it further from there? Lisa: Yeah, there was something about, so I didn't summit Rainier. My first attempt, the weather sort of turned bad on our second day and retreated. And, and I was relieved in that moment. I was happy cuz I just, I. Again, no idea what I was doing. Although I was with, you know, I was with a guide company and I was safe and all that, but I really just mentally wasn't prepared to be on a mountain and to just feel sort of the vastness of that challenge. And so I went back the next year before I got back to the parking lot in 2008, I was sure I was coming back. I tend to look at climbs like projects. And so even after that first year, I was like, okay, these are, you know, my backpack needs to be lighter. I need to have, you know, not red boots and have my own boots and just little things like that, that I started to like to learn and to, to tweak and adjust what I knew and my gear and my knowledge of the mountain. So I went back in 2009 and summited, and there was a moment, you know, where I sort of it's dark out and you're, you know, you can't really. Appreciate where you're at on the mountain and the sort of vastness of everything around you and the risk of falling. And because all you can see in the dark is just this little tiny circle of light from your headlamp. And so there was a moment where I remember looking what would've been east and seeing the sun just slowly start to split the horizon from the earth and. Just seeing like colors that were so magnificent and awe inspiring and thinking. This is an incredible experience and such a, a daunting place to be that taught me so much, so much humility to be learned in the mountains. When I got to the summit, I just had this incredible sense of accomplishment that I hadn't found anywhere else. I hadn't really gotten it from my parents as a kid. I hadn't gotten it at work. I, you know, graduated from college, any accomplishment I had had in my life until that point hadn't made me feel that way. And I loved that. I still love that climbing is. Obviously a very physical pursuit, but there is an enormous mental challenge that comes with climbing, you know, in any discipline of climbing. And I really loved that combination and I loved the idea of setting. Lofty goal and working hard and accomplishing it. And so I was completely hooked at that point. In two, I was 2009 and ready to just, I did, again, didn't know a lot about what to climb next, but I was sure that I was gonna keep doing it. Passionistas: You know, you were kind of inspired to do it by this being in this male dominated world. When you got to climbing, were there a lot of other women who were in doing what you were doing? Lisa” No. In fact, I, in the beginning was gonna name my book, the only girl, and it has changed. This is, you know, the late 2000s. It is getting better. You know, there's more diversity that the only, and first all black team summited Everest last month, which is incredible to see. And I was fortunate to play a small role in coaching them. So it's changing the dynamics, the face of, of people who enjoy the mountains is changing. But then I was. I don't always is maybe a strong word, but 95% of the time, I was the only woman on the team. And, you know, I was used to being in male dominated arenas, so that wasn't unusual for me, but I think it, you know, being an intense environment like climbing, just sort of heightened all of the challenges that come with that and made them much more potent. And it took me a long time to realize. Or to think about how I showed up in those roles. There was always the, like people doubted and people would say, oh, it's cute. I think you're gonna climb Mount Everest. That's a whole other conversation, but what I tended to think about myself and how I showed up in those situations. And at first I would just be one of the guys, I mean, so much so that they would undress in front of me and not even like, consider that there was a woman standing next to them. On Everest was the first time that I, that just didn't feel authentic to me anymore. It didn't feel right to laugh at crew. That were often, you know, demeaning to women. It didn't feel right to overlook little comments that just didn't sit well with me anymore. And so that was the first time. And there's a moment. And I talk about it in my book where I, you know, all men and I sort of separated myself from them for a minute because it just, I needed to feel like a woman and I needed to feel like myself in that environment. And, you know, at the time it. We're sort of arguing back and forth about my opinion about something versus theirs. But I realize now that it was me sort of stepping into my own strength and my own sort of persona as a woman and saying like this isn't okay anymore. And I'm not gonna just, you know, sit here and let it happen without saying anything. It's still challenging. It's getting better. But yeah, there were a lot of moments there just being, the only woman was a challenge for me. Passionistas: Do you think there are certain qualities that you, as a woman bring to a climb that's different than the male energy of a, of a climb? Lisa: And again, generalizing. Right. But I, I'm fortunate now that I get to coach mountaineers and I coach men and women. Um, and I, you know, I can see those nuances, even as I'm coaching them, women are much more interested in like the mental side. Of taking on a challenge, like a big mountain and making sure that they're very well rounded in their preparations. They wanna make sure that they're understanding the route. You know, they know where the challenges will be and that mentally they have the tools to get through them. And men generally, again, not always the case, but often just like they wanna like train and work hard and do all the runs and all the hikes and all the preparation climbs. And don't often sort of step back and say, There's a whole other side of this. There's a whole other, you know, facet to climbing big mountains. And, you know, my experience is that when you look at everything holistically is when you're the most prepared and when you're the most successful. And I think even on the mountains, you know, it's tough, there's difficult situations. And I find that women often add just a little bit more compassion to those situations. A little bit more empathy. and sometimes that's what you need to get through something that's difficult. So there's my experience. Yeah. There's a big difference between what men and women bring to those situations. Passionistas: So you, you have the successful Mount Rainier climb in 2009. What happens next? And how do you kind of plan where you go next? Lisa: Yeah, so I didn't do a lot of planning. I just knew, I knew I wanted to keep climbing more challenging things and there's, you know, back in the eighties, I believe it was a couple of mountaineers society. It would be really cool to climb to the highest peak of every single continent. And so I thought, okay, I'll just start doing that. You know, I don't know what to do. I picked the easiest, one of those, which was in Russia, a Mount called Elbrus and was successful there. So I thought, okay, well, Keep sort of on that track and climbing in the cascades as well, sort of, you know, like thinking, okay, I wanna be more independent and learn different skills, like building anchors and self-arrest and rope management. And so I, I would take excursions on the weekends locally to do those things. And then about once a year I would climb something big somewhere else in the world. And I was on that track and I had sort of decided. Mount Everest was kind of the next logical thing for me to climb just in terms of skill and difficulty. And at the time I felt like, oh, Everest is so commercial and there must be more interesting mountains in the Himalaya to climb. And so I had decided, and this really is a big moment. I think, in any mountaineers' career I had decided I was ready to climb in the Himalaya. So, you know, the Himalaya is this huge mountain range that bisects Asia and. It's special for a lot of reasons, but one is that. Most of the highest mountains in the world are there. And when we say high, in terms of mountaineering, we're talking about any mountain that's higher than 26,000 feet or 8,000 meters. And there's only 14 of those in the world. And so I, in 2015 thought, okay, I think I'm ready. Like I'm ready to try an easy one and just see how it goes. So. I picked that mountain, which is called Montes SL. And I was just beginning to prepare for it when I was diagnosed with cancer, you know, we, we've already established that. I'm a very stubborn person and I was a little cocky, you know, I was 42 years old. I thought and, and an athlete, like I ate organic vegetables. I wore my seatbelt. I floss my teeth. Like I, all those things that you are, you are taught to believe will keep you healthy. I thought I was doing it turns out I had a tremendous amount of stress in my job, which is, you know, like looking back and sort of analyzing how my body could get reacted that way to an external thing. It probably was a lot of stress at work, but nonetheless, I was diagnosed with breast cancer at the beginning of 2015. I was determined. Not to let cancer dictate my priorities so much so that I sat with my surgeon and said like, is there any way we could just postpone this whole cancer thing? Like, can we just like, how much could those tumors really grow in eight months? Like I just go do this climb and I'll come back and then you can do whatever you want with my body. When I get back and she very compassionately said that that would be a full hearty decision. I always remember that she used that word. And so I was very fortunate that I was able to get rid of the tumors in my, uh, breast with a bilateral mastectomy from which I did at the beginning in April of 2015. And I was, I mean, determination. Isn't a big enough word for how focused I was on getting my body ready to still travel to Nepal and attempt Montes SL. That autumn. And so I went, um, I was not, I was not a hundred percent. I had all, you know, all my doctors, all my care, healthcare providers knew what I was up to. They all thought I was a little bit crazy, but I had their support to be there. And. You know, their cell phone numbers, if anything went weird. And luckily it didn't, I didn't summit Manaslu in 2015, there was an avalanche above our camp. And, you know, the team felt that it just wasn't safe to continue. So we all turned around and I, I firmly believe that mountains and, you know, nature teaches us things. And so. When I got home, I, you know, I just sort of did some reflection about that climb. And I think sometimes you learn the most when you're not successful when you don't summit. But I realized that, you know, life is so fragile and that it's up to us. Each of us to define the lives that we will live. And so I became determined then to sort of reprioritize my life. My pause, my corporate career actually got a divorce and I decided to climb Mount Everest at that point. And, uh, went back to Nepal in 2016 to do that. Passionistas: So talk about that. Talk about preparing for that and you know, and the mental preparation, especially. Lisa: I learned a lot on Monte SL again, you know, success doesn't always mean you, you gain the most from a situation. And so I learned what my body was capable of. I knew that if I was healthy and trained, that I could be even stronger. And so I, I started working with a sports psychologist to really dig into the mental aspects. I was still a little bit unsure about what my body could do, you know, I, I, and I had. Probably four more surgeries before I went to Everest for reconstruction. So I depended a lot on a sports psychologist to just help me understand why Everest was important to me, what my body was capable of. To give me some really important tools that I use still today when things get difficult in the mountains to have something to focus on and to sort of rationalize what's going on around me and break it down into manageable chunks. So that was hugely helpful. I worked with a, a climbing coach as well to get me ready. You know, it was a very tumultuous time in my life as I was preparing to climb the most difficult mountain that I had climbed to that point. I was in the middle of getting a divorce. I wasn't sure I wanted to keep working. My dog died. Like all these, just so many things happened and looking back. It felt like just a really big reset, like the universe sort of saying, like, you know, that was your life then before cancer, and this is your chance to find your life after cancer. You know, that really is a big gift. I always think that cancer, I am grateful today in the moment I was not, but today I'm grateful for cancer because it showed me so many things about priorities and what life is about and how I want to spend it. I know that there's a book worth of conversation to be had, if not more about actually climbing Mount Everest, but kind of in general, what was the experience like? Passionistas: What was the biggest challenge that you faced in, in the midst of that experience? Lisa: Yeah, so climbing a big mountain, like Everest, I'll just provide a quick sort of background as to how it even. You know, it's, those mountains are so big, right? Your, your body could not possibly function. Even if you're breathing supplemental oxygen. It's not as easy as just walking to base camp and then starting to climb. There's a whole process of a climatization. Where you start at one camp climb to the next highest camp and then return to that first camp. And then you repeat that process gradually moving up the mountain, and that allows your body to change physiologically, to build more red blood cells so that you can survive at those higher elevations. And so for me on Everest as I was going through that process, I really felt in sync with the mountain in contrast to K2, which I'm sure we'll talk about in a little bit, but I really felt like things just went smoothly. I felt like the mountain and I were working together and that we sort of [00:23:00] shared a level of respect. That, you know, ultimately ultimately allowed me to be successful, but that doesn't mean there weren't difficult moments. I recall climbing from camp three to camp four and it had been very, very windy. So, you know, hadn't slept at all the night before was lying in a very cramped tent. That was my side of the tent was actually can levered over the side of the mountain because it, you know, it was so steep. And, you know, a lot of emotional, like, is it too windy? You know, are we gonna have a chance to summit? We need to descend. And then it's a very quick decision by our team to like, we look, it looks like we have a window. We're gonna go up. I had sort of envisioned like having this moment to like get ready. And that was none of that. It was very rushed and harried and chaotic. And I, I walk out of the tent and I clip into the fixed rope with my, with my harness. and it was so incredibly windy that it kept blowing me over. And I remember these moments of just hearing the wind coming towards me from my left side, and then just lying face down on the ice to let it pass me by before I could continue. And that luckily subsided after, I don't know, a couple of hours or something. And, and then. I got to what I knew was gonna be the easiest part of that day, which is sort of a flat section that curves to the left towards a rock feature called the yellow band. And the yellow band is about 25 degrees. So it's not super steep. It's limestone. It would actually be fun to climb it at sea level, but as I'm walking towards it, I realize that I'm moving so slow and I'm actually. Like I get distracted by someone's glove, rolling down the ice. And my friend came up from behind me is like, what, you know, what do you what's going on? And I was like, I don't know. I just, I just wanna like lay down and I had run out of oxygen. So my brain and my, my muscles were not getting the oxygen that they needed to continue. I had a couple, I had a decision to make, I had a few choices in that moment. I could have turned around and gone back to camp three and said, you know, my climbs over or looked for more oxygen. I could have sat there in the snow and asked someone, probably a Sherpa to bring me more oxygen where I could have kept going. And. Those first two options just didn't feel right to me. And so I continued climbing. I will never forget. So climbing this relatively, you know, at sea level, easy section of rock and telling myself to just focus on the climber ahead of me and to never let him outta my sight, like just, he's not gonna get outta my site no matter what it takes. And I don't know how long it took me. I, you know, everything got really fuzzy at that moment. And I was still safe. I still had people around me and people knew that I didn't have oxygen, but I, that made that situation made me realize that we are so much stronger mentally than we believe or that, that we give ourselves credit for, because my body was literally like, it didn't have the gas that needed to continue. And it was just, I think my mind is pushing me, just willing myself forward to get through that situation. And the best feeling in the world. Like I hope nobody has to experience that, but I can't tell you how sweet it is to not have oxygen and have oxygen. Like, as soon as I got a fresh bottle, it was like, the world was right again. So a challenging moment. But like I said, I think mountains teach us things and you know, it taught me that I sort of have this untapped tool in my, you know, mental capacity that I really. You know, even now I feel like there's so much more potential to hone that skill of being mentally strong. Passionistas: We're Amy and Nancy Harrington and you're listening to the Passionistas Project Podcast in our interview with Lisa Thompson. To learn more about her adventures and get a copy of her book, “Finding Elevation,” visit Lisaclimbs.com. We'd like to take a moment to share a special announce. We'll be hosting the third annual Power of Passionistas Summit, this September 21st through September 23rd, 2022. The three-day virtual event is focused on authentic conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion. This unique gathering of intersectional storytellers and panelists harnesses the power of our rich community of passionate thought leaders and activists to pose solutions to the problems plaguing women today. Early bird tickets are on sale now at bit.ly/2022PowerofPassionistasTickets. We'd like to thank our sponsors — Melanie Childers, Natural Born Rebel, The Ossa Collective, Tea Drops, Aaron's Coffee Corner, Flourishing Over Fifty, Edith Espanola, Mermaid's Garden, Sara Fins Coaching, and Tara McCann Wellness. Now here's more of our interview with Lisa. That process of getting in tune with the mountain and going back and forth to the different camps. How long does that take? Lisa: It takes about a month, maybe six weeks. It just depends on weather and how fast people are moving People climbing in sort of the standard style climbing, big mountains and 8,000 meter peaks. Usually it takes about six weeks to, to two months to, to do that. So it's a long time. Passionistas: In 2017, you actually won an Emmy for something related to the Everest climb. Lisa: Right? So we, so this is totally serendipitous. So the expedition leader is named Garrett Madison He had endeavored to capture our climb in virtual reality, you know, technology has changed a lot since 2016. And so the way we did it was to strap all these GoPros sort of in a sphere and then carry that on a wand up the mountain and thereby, you know, create this 360 degree view. Of our climb. And then later some very smart people stitched that together and actually made it a virtual reality film, which is called capturing Everest. And, you know, I didn't know that was gonna happen when I signed up for that climb. There were, you know, a lot of. Sort of deals made and, and it just happened to be purchased by sports illustrated, um, and turned into this really cool documentary that later won an Emmy, not for my acting prowess, surprisingly, but for just the technology. It was the first time that anyone had captured virtual reality footage in that kind of an environment. You can find it on the sports illustrated website and on their app. And it's really, it's really fun if even if you don't have a headset, you can watch it in 360-degree video with your phone. And I will tell you, it will make you dizzy. Like even me having been there, it is very, very real to watch people, you know, climbing or walking across the ladder or climbing a steep part of, of the, the mountain. So I feel. You know, never in my life, if you've said like you could win an Emmy, I would like never thought that. So it was a really, really cool experience and cool to be able to just share that in a very tangible way, with cool technology, to people who, you know, may never endeavor to climb. But now get to have a little bit of a taste of what it's like. Passionistas: So that same year in 2017, you, um, became the first all American women to summit K2. So how did that differ from climbing Mount Everest and what unique challenges did you face on that? Lisa: Yeah. So it was 2017. I, I endeavored to go to K2 for the first time. My team actually fell apart. And so I didn't climb that mountain that year. I went back in 2018 and in 2017, the first American woman did summit. And I felt like, you know, I, I, this is still an important climb for me. It's something. I think being the first is very cool. I think not being the only is even cooler. And so it was important to me to just sort of continue showing what women could do in the mountains. So K2 is the second highest mountain in the world. It's about 800 feet shorter than Mount Everest. K2 is in Pakistan. It's on the border between China and Pakistan. Most people, like if I'm at a dinner party and you know, someone finds out that I've climbed Everest, they get super excited and they wanna know what that's like, and I'll say, yeah, but I climbed this other mountain called K2, which is actually like really, really hard. And they're like, yeah. But tell me about Everest. Did you see any dead people? So most people don't even know. You know, not even heard of K2, it's in a much more remote part of the world. For example, you know, the, the walk to Everest space camp is, you know, in a lovely valley, there are tea houses. There are commercial helicopters. There is an emergency room at Everest space camp. There is none of that. In the Karakoram mountain range in Pakistan, you are farther from any kind of definitive medical care that you'll probably ever be in your life. And that, you know, would involve a Pakistani army helicopter ride to a small hospital in a remote village. So it's, it's much more remote. The weather on K2 is also much more fickle. So it's, you know, known for just monster storms that sort of whip out of nowhere, dump a lot of snow. Cause avalanches. K2 is also steep from like the second you leave base camp. It is just unrelentingly steep and it is also known for a lot of rock fall. So you can imagine that my family was super excited to hear about me. Deciding to climb this mountain, I had just, you know, beat cancer. My father was diagnosed with cancer when I was climbing Mount Everest and, and died about a month after I got home. And so I sort of promised him that K2 would be the last, really dangerous mountain that I climbed. I was very determined to give it a go in 2018. And, and I was so fortunate that. Everything aligned, you know, the, I had a great team, the weather was decent and we were able to make it work. And, and, you know, and I mentioned earlier that I felt very in sync with Mount Everest and on K2. I felt every day like that mountain was trying to kill me, you know, in the form of rock falls in the form of other climbers dying. I just never really felt like I was in sync with that mountain. And there was a moment where again, climbing steep rock much steeper than the rock I describe on Everest. It's a section of the route called the Black Pyramid and it's at 25,000. And so in this moment I'm wearing a down suit. I'm actually breathing bottled oxygen because the climbing is so difficult and I'm attached to a rope. And that section of the mountain is sort of really like chunky, just unstable rock and there's snow and ice. And I wanted to quit. Like I wanted to just turn around. I fantasized about like reversing my direction on the rope and I thought I could be. Back at base camp in a couple of days, and I could get a helicopter to Islamabad and I could take a proper shower and like eat, you know, I'd really just let, like all the things my sports psychologist told me not to do. I just really let that real like play out. I wanted to turn around and I remember, you know, from somewhere there was a voice in my head that said, is this all you were capable of? And I realized that it was not all that I was capable of, that I was, you know, I was frustrated and I was tired and I was mad at myself, but I was capable of more. And so I kept just. Putting one hand above the other one foot above the other. And I knew that would be the hardest point in the mountain. And once I got past that, you know, the, the rocks were relented and it was more snow, which is my comfort zone, but there were many, many moments where I wanted to quit. So then what did that moment feel like when you finally reached the. So I remember climbing. So a couple days after that scene that I described with the Black Pyramid and we attempted the summit and, you know, the night before the summit, you're sort of, you're laying, I was laying in a tent with two other men in the middle position wearing my down suit boots. Like you don't really sleep. You just sort of lay there for a few hours, like waiting and breathing bottle oxygen. I had this sort of like checklist in my mind of like making sure that I had food in the right places, on my, down, in my down suit that I had like turned on my GPS device, like going through all those sort of pre-flight checklist things. And then we, we left for the summit and it's dark out and I knew the climbing initially would not be. The steepest part. I knew it would be a little bit chill for a bit, and then it was gonna get steeper. And I had, you know, that sort of pre-flight checklist. I had put new batteries in my headlamp. And as I'm climbing, I realize that the batteries are about are dying. They're dimmer than everyone else is. And I say, I'm fine. I have a, I have a spare set. It's close to my body. So they're not frozen. I stop, you know, with thick gloves, like fumble around, finally get the batteries in there. Good. Keep climbing, catch up with my team. And it happens again. And I don't have a spare and I can't expect anybody else to give me their spare. They're sort of, you know, they're sort of ethic and climbing that. You need to be self-sufficient up there. You can't rely on anybody else. And so I remember screaming at the guy in front of me, Rob Smith, a fantastic guy from Ireland, and he gave me his spare batteries. You know, it's very delicate exchange, right? If you can imagine we're in these thick gloves, we're on the side of a mountain, it's dark. And I just remember him like pushing that battery into the palm of my glove. And I remember thinking if you dropped this, that's it. The reason it was, I mean, obviously it was important to see, but we were about to cross, what's called the bottleneck traverse on K2, which is, you know, it's actually flat, but it's about, it's less than one boot width. And so you're walking and there's like two miles of air beneath you. And so you cannot make a mistake there. You obviously cannot have compromised vision there. And so literally without Rob's help, I would not have. I wouldn't have made it. And that moment, you know, several hours later, I got to the summit and I remember it was it's light out now and I'm climbing by myself and it's, it's very, um, unconsolidated snow. So I'm sort of take one step and, you know, I'm, I'm putting my boot print in other people's path. So there's a little sort of steps there and sometimes they would just break and you would just slide down and, you know, it's just incredibly frustrating and you exert a lot of energy. But I looked up and I saw where the snow met the horizon. I saw bright colors and I thought, that's it. Like those are other peoples standing there at the summit. And more than anything, I wanted to cry in that moment. But I was like, do not cry. Like you you're not there yet. And just to sort of bring things full circle I had, after my father died, I had, you know, carried his ashes to like every mountain. Sprinkle them on the top. And it was a very, you know, just peaceful sort of full circle moment to spread the last of his ashes on the summative K2, which is, you know, he never in his life could have imagined traveling to Pakistan. So it was fun to just sort of, not only to have him with me, but to be able to share that with him as well was really special. Passionistas: What is the coming down like physically and emotionally? Lisa: So, I'm glad you asked that question, Amy, because most people and I was very, very conscious of writing about this in my book because the summit is halfway like it is literally halfway and more mountaineering accidents occur on the dissent. Then then climbing up and that's because you're tired. Many people push beyond what they're capable of. You're you know, just logistically you're facing away from the mountain. Oftentimes gravity is not working in your favor. And so the dissent to me is very. Harrowing like it's I very consciously at the top of, at any big mountain do not celebrate because it is, you're not done. There is still a lot more work to do. And on K2 in particular, you know, we talked a little bit about like that moment on Everest, where I felt like I was sort of stepping into my own strength and on K2, I'm [00:41:00] descending, very steep ice face and. There are ropes there. And one rope is meant for climbers coming up. There are still some climbers ascending, and the other rope is meant for climbers who are descending. Another climber had, uh, started to ascend the rope that I was about to use to go down. And I scream at him. You know, he's very, he's far down the slope. He can't hear me. He's just sort of laying there. And I sort of looked, my friend Garrett was next to me and he recommended that I descend. Using not the most secure technique, a, a technique arm wrapping where you wrap the rope around your arm and you, um, you're connected to that rope with a safety carabiner. It's locked, but you lean forward and just walk face first down the mountain. And I had done it many times, but, but I, it just didn't feel right. To do it then. And I didn't even, I don't even know where this voice came from, but I just told him no, like I'm not, that's not how I'm gonna do that this today. And so I, you know, set up my repel device, which takes longer, is much safer, but you know, takes longer repel down to this man who's laying face first and the ice, not, he wasn't response, he was alive. I could, you know, he was alive. He did survive by the way, just before I get too far in the story. But he wasn't responsive to my, you know, yelling at him, trying to get him to move. And so I had to execute this very, very delicate sequence of moving my gear, you know, establishing a safe anchor, moving my gear around him on what I know, because I, you know, study this mountain intimately is. The place on that mountain where most people have died and thankfully it went well and he survived and, you know, I was able to continue, but that was a moment that, to me, that just underscores that [00:43:00] the dissent is so in some ways more important than the ascent in terms of difficulty. And that, that moment looking back, or I said to my friend, Garrett, like, that's not how I'm gonna do this today. I really felt like was pivotal in terms of me, sort of, this is a man that I've climbed with for years. I've always trusted him. He knows my capability. And so for me to just, you know, take a different tact, I think was, you know, just more of me, like stepping into my own voice and strength in the mountains, which is a good feeling. Passionistas: Can you compare for us the fear that you faced being diagnosed with cancer versus the fear you faced on a mountain like that? Lisa: Knowing how dangerous it is and if those are different and if you have the same or different tools to deal with both. Yeah, that's an awesome question. They feel to me like somatically, they feel very different. I feel like different kinds of fear. When I was diagnosed with cancer, I felt completely unprepared to deal with that scenario. It was not anything that I ever thought I would have to encounter or deal with in my life. And I felt out of control. I felt like, you know, my body was, had turned against me initially. I, you know, before I had a team of people to support me, I felt alone. And without like a path or a, you know, a guide to get me through this situation. And luckily that changed and I found incredible healthcare. It felt much scarier to be diagnosed with cancer in the mountains. I feel like, you know, I have, I understand what I can control and I have the skills to get myself through it. And I think fear for sure in the mountains. I, I believe that a little bit of fear is a good thing because I think that it keeps you focused. It keeps me alert to what's going on around me. If the weather's changing, if the route is changing, if. You know, someone climbing above me that doesn't look super safe, that little bit of fear sharpens my awareness too much fear. I think in the mountains and in fighting cancer can be stifling. And I think it can actually, you know, sort of stop you from progressing. But that's a, a really important question because they, for me are very different flavors of fear. Passionistas: So what's the next big challenge for you? Lisa: Yeah. So we talked about it a little bit in the beginning. I don't endeavor. I don't have any desire to climb anything more challenging than K2 in my life, but I do wanna keep climbing and it's become more important to me to give back to the communities, particularly in Nepal and in Pakistan, where I have just learned so much about myself and gotten so much from them personally. So I wanna, I wanna start to give back to those communities and in particular to the women who, who live in those communities. So along with some female mountaineering friends of mine, we were setting up a philanthropic climb for this fall to a mountain called Cholatse which is in, uh, Nepal. It's about 6,800 meters. It will not be the hardest mountain we've ever climbed. But the point is that we just wanna show that anything is possible when women support one another in the mountains. And so to us, that means. That our team will be fully comprised of women. I don't know if that's ever happened before. I think there've been some all women's climbs that maybe had support from men, but, and not that we don't like men, but like we just wanna show that women can do everything in the mountains that a man can do. And so we're building that team. We're super lucky to have a great, uh, Nepalese uh, climbing leader. Pasang Lama. She's helping us create a team of all women to, to cook, to carry loads, to plan, to do everything. And we just think it's an incredible sort of opportunity to raise some money for at least one, depending on how, how fundraising goes maybe more, but we want to. We're soliciting input for Nepalese women who have some educational related goal in their life. So if they wanna learn a trade, if they wanna open a tea house, um, if they weren't wanna learn about economics, like we want to be able, we wanna be the catalyst that helps that woman learn those skills so that she can better not just her life. But I think, you know, that sort of has this trickle-down effect and has the potential to positively impact generations. So. I'm, you know, just beyond excited to be a part of this team and we'll see where it goes. We'd love to do it, you know, multiple years, but we're all, you know, just we're dedicated and excited to, to climb with a purpose now. Passionistas: So what inspired you to write your book "Finding Elevation"? Lisa: I had always wanted to write, which I studied engineering in college, you know? I felt like I was very far away from that as, as an adult, but as a kid, I had a desire to write. And in my twenties, I tried out different topics. You know, none of them just sort of seemed to fit. And then when I was diagnosed with cancer, I really relied on journaling to, to get me through that and to be this, you know, sort of outlet for everything that I was feeling. And. Probably two years of journaling, I sort of realized that there were a lot of things that I had encountered that seemed to translate to other people. You know, that if I could share what I had learned, the hard way with another woman that maybe, you know, she would have an easier path than I did. And so it became really important for me to share. Um, and, and, you know, at the time I thought this will just be about cancer. And then as I continued to climb and I continued to learn more about myself and what I'm capable of and how to overcome obstacles, how to find your voice. Most of that through K2, it, it just really turned into a much bigger project than just journaling. . What was the thing you learned about yourself from writing the book that maybe surprised you the. I think I learned a lot about my childhood when I was writing. Um, I, and I, you know, I spent a year studying memoir at the university of Washington, and I remember like my, there was nothing about my childhood in, in an early draft. And my instructor was like, you can't leave that out. Like that's a part of, and I was like, yeah, but it wasn't, you know, it wasn't super, like, it's kind of painful for me. I really don't wanna put it in here. Um, and of course it, you know, needs to be a more balanced story, et cetera, etcetera. And so by me sort of digging through that, I realized, you know, this sort of these traits that I have today and where they came from. And there was a lot of therapy in there as well. And it made me realize that, you know, something that. Because I said, my parents, you know, were not very reliable. They weren't always around. And, and that made me a very independent person. Um, there's certainly some downsides to that, but I think there's, I think there's always a silver lining. There's always some positive. Outcome, even of bad situations. And we often just have to look a little bit harder, like, you know, dig a little bit deeper to find them. But those I think are, you know, the real nuggets and like where, where we really learn why we are the way we are. Passionistas: Thanks for listening to our interview with Lisa Thompson, to learn more about her adventures and get a copy of her book, finding elevation, visit LisaClimbs.com Please visit ThePassionistasProject.com to learn more about our podcast and subscription box filled with products made by women owned businesses and female artisans to inspire you to follow your Passions. Double your first box when you sign up for a one year subscription. Remember to sign up for our mailing list, to get more information about the Power of Passionistas Summit at bit.ly/2022PowerofPassionistasTickets. And be sure to subscribe to the Passionistas Project Podcast, so you don't miss any of our upcoming inspiring guests. Until next time stay well and stay passionate.

Tough Girl Podcast
Kelda Wood - First female adaptive athlete to summit Aconcagua and row solo across the Atlantic Ocean!

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 63:58


Kelda started her sporting career playing netball at a national level as a teenager. Sport very quickly became the thing that defined who she was and the person she wanted to be. Her real passion lay with horses and her ultimate goal was to ride for her country and represent Great Britain at the Olympics.  Unfortunately, after a serious leg injury in 2002, Kelda's hopes of competing at an international level seemed to have disappeared. The leg injury had a huge impact on her life, leaving her no longer able to run or play many of the sports that meant so much to her. This had a huge impact on her confidence and self-belief, and she spent nearly 10years fighting to accept who she was.  In 2002 she decided to climb Kilimanjaro, and this proved to be the start of a new direction in life. She returned and began retraining as an outdoor instructor. As a result of the dramatic effect the outdoors had on her own mental and physical recovery, Kelda decided she wanted to help others facing similar challenges to herself, and this led her to set up the charity Climbing Out.   Kelda went on to represent Great Britain in Paracanoe and competed at the 2015 World Cup and the 2016 World Championships. The ultimate goal was the Rio Paralympics.   Unfortunately she just missed out on selection for Rio, but she went on to join an Adaptive Team attempting to climb Aconcagua, the highest mountain in South America at 7,000m.    On the 19th January 2017 she became the first recorded adaptive female to summit the mountain.   In summiting, Kelda found many of the answers she'd been searching for since her injury and this inspired her to attempt a solo row of the Atlantic. After 76 days unsupported at sea, Kelda became the first adaptive person to ever solo row any ocean.   But the challenges didn't stop there. 12 months ago Kelda was diagnosed with breast cancer. She decided to set herself the goal of completing a triathlon as motivation to push through her recovery.    She completed her first triathlon just 4 months post mastectomy and went on to complete 2 further triathlons last year, including the Snowman Triathlon, known for being the toughest triathlon in the country. She now has her sights set on completing a half ironman in 2022.   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Subscribe so you don't miss out.    To help increase the amount of female role models in the media. Sign up as a patron!  www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast.    Show Notes Who is Kelda Being based in Shropshire  Her 4 legged family Her early years and her passions for sports  Playing netball at a national level Her dream of wanting to ride at the Olympics Hanging around the local stables Getting her first horse at 16 The riders who inspired her Being in an accident with her horse Dealing with the trauma after the accident The start of her resilience journey at 21 Losing her confidence and going back to riding too soon Moving away from horse and going travelling to Australia  Getting into eventing and gaining her confidence The accident that changed her life completely Trying to be the person she was before the injury Feeling like a failure Learning acceptance  Deciding to climb Kilimanjaro and why that was the start of her recovery Not being able to get the mental health support that was needed Table legs….  Video resources to help with resilience Being dumped… Lessons from climbing Kilimanjaro Needing to change her attitude and focus more on what she could do Deciding to retrain as an outdoor instructor Figuring out how to get sport back in her life Aiming for the para-olympics for 2016  Meeting Martin Hewitt - Adaptive Grand Slam  “It's not about saying I can't, it's about saying how can I” How can I make it possible to climb Aconcagua? Figuring out the how Advice for people who are feeling like a failure The importance of being honest with yourself Being brave enough to try Being judged by people and why it doesn't matter Deciding to solo row the Atlantic Finding peace on the mountain Fundraising for Climbing Out and wanting to raise £50K Advice regarding sponsorship Being super clear on her WHY 3 questions about the row The challenge of the solitude while out on the row The challenges of 2020/2021 Being diagnosed with cancer and having a single mastectomy Wanting to get back to normal and feel like herself again Getting back into exercise and following a routine again Why you have to try Training for 4 triathlons in 2022 Challenging the belief that she had that she couldn't run Swimming after a mastectomy Doing an half Ironman in June 2022 Connect with Kelda Final words of advice - Keep Moving   Social Media Website: Climbing Out Instagram: @kelda_wood Facebook: @ClimbingOutCharity Personal: www.facebook.com/kelda.wood Twitter: @ClimbingOut_  

Subject Matter
S6 EP10: Why Tailoring Content to Your Local Audience Matters

Subject Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 3:53


Deciding on what content to put out can be overwhelming. But there's one rule you can follow to make sure your content always lands. Tell local stories. In this quick dive, Ben shares his wisdom on why it's important to choose highly relatable stories, some real life examples of great local storytelling, and how you can get into the mindset of your listener. If you're a creator looking to get into audio or want to grow your existing podcast, this is five minutes you won't want to miss. Follow Ben: Twitter:https://twitter.com/benbradbury ( twitter.com/benbradbury)

Wholly a Woman
Episode 116: Preparing myself for birth | Dr. Emily, natural family planning pharmacist

Wholly a Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 37:17


On this week's episode, Dr. Emily shares what she has been doing during her pregnancy to prepare herself for birth. This includes:-Deciding where to birth and who to have on her birth care team-Working with pelvic floor physical therapy during pregnancy-Birth preferences-Birth affirmations-Following positive Instagram accounts: @christianhypnobirthing, @alexiathedoula, @brightearthdoulas, @amybizalwellness What did you think? I want to hear from you!Email me: emily@nfppharmacist.comInstagram: @nfppharmacistFacebook: NFP Pharmacist

Underdog Empowerment
Ep: 336 - Designing the Future of Fatherhood

Underdog Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 60:57


Larry Hagner didn't have the easiest childhood. It was plagued by an absent father, an alcoholic mother, and abusive partners. At age 4, Larry thought his mom just hadn't found his dad yet. What would follow was a stream of toxic men that were physically, mentally, and emotionally abusive.  Discovering his biological dad through chance at the age of 12, Larry's elation would be short lived.  Deciding it was too much for him at the time, Larry's dad abandoned him again, sending Larry into a deep depression.  Struggling through high school, things would finally start to change for Larry when he went away to college. Marrying his college sweetheart, Larry vowed to be the father and husband he never knew growing up.  Instead he found himself operating at arm's length, convinced this way he couldn't mess anything up too bad.  Through chance yet again, Larry ran into his father.  The two rekindled their relationship and Larry realized his father was just like him, just a man that had made mistakes and was trying to figure it all out.  Larry realized parenting, marriage, life, it's all hard for everyone.  Thus, the Dad Edge Podcast was born to help men learn from other's journeys Show Notes: https://underdogempowerment.com/larry-hagner   Get More Involved:  Leave A Review & Subscribe On iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/underdog-empowerment/id1373572178 Free A-to-Z roadmap on launching a top-shelf podcast: https://underdogempowerment.com/roadmap Access Our Top Resource Recommendations: https://underdogempowerment.com/resources/ Subscribe On YouTube: https://underdogempowerment.com/youtube  

Worship Center Audio Podcast
Pastor Beau Eckert at Worship Center: To Whom Would We Go?

Worship Center Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 38:57


Jesus came to this earth and performed many miraculous signs and wonders so that we would know he is the Son of God, has the power to save our souls, and so that we would put our faith in him. It can be easy to get wrapped up in looking to Jesus for what he can do for us and how he can solve our temporary problems. But, Jesus didn't come to this world to solve temporary problems; he came to deal with our biggest, eternal problem – Jesus came to save us from eternal separation from God. Deciding to follow Jesus doesn't mean that he will keep us healthy, wealthy, and wise. Following Jesus means we have the hope of an eternity in his presence and a God who promises never to leave or forsake us.

Duke Loves Rasslin
Scotti Sparks & Jeremy Prophet : Duke Loves Rasslin Week 333

Duke Loves Rasslin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 45:29


Scottie Sparks is an Independent Women's Wrestler who grew up idolizing Melina and Naomi/Trinity Fatu. Deciding to take a chance and live her dream, Scottie packed up and left her home of Ohio to move and train down in Florida. In this exclusive interview, listen as Scottie details her journey including what keeps her motivated, goals for the rest of 2022 and even a hilarious sidebar regarding her feelings on #SkylineChili. Scottie is an incredibly talented and multi-layered individual that will keep you engaged during this conversation. Jeremy Prophet is pound for pound the best active Canadian Wrestler not currently signed to a major company. WHY? Why have we not seen more of Jeremy and his fellow Canadians wrestle in the United States? What is the #BretHart Scale and where does Jeremy Prophet land on it? There is also information regarding the Lutte Academie and how YOU can help support Jeremy winning a special competition that has a grand prize of an opportunity to move to Atlanta Georgia and train at the Nightmare Factory! *Duke Loves Rasslin can be heard on your favorite podcast apps including Spotify, Apple Podcasts, iHeart Radio App and other leading podcast apps!*Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/dukelovesrasslin. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WEMcast
Race Across America with Dan Richards

WEMcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 27:11


In this conversation we talk with Dan Richards around the transcontinental Race Across America 3000-mile race, making it longer and more gruelling than the tour de France and one of the toughest bike races in the world. In May 2009 Dan Richards lost his right arm, shoulder and part of his neck in a motorcycle accident whilst in the military. Dan has gone on to navigate the highs and lows of rehabilitating and adapting his life for the better. Dan has found his passion for elite cycling and has ridden in the Invictus games amongst other high-performance events. Dan Richards isn't just a normal run of the mill kind've guy! From a young age he knew, within his heart of hearts that he was joining the British Army! Leaving home for the very first time at 17 years old, that is exactly what he did. Posted to Afghanistan in Sept 2007 before trekking through Northwestern Nepal and The Trans Himalayan Plateau, Dan had aspirations to train as a Farrier with his regiment - The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery. Dan's career would come to an abrupt end when, on the 31st May 2009, he was involved in a collision with The Central Reservation on London's A41. Deciding upon needing something else to do, he picked up a bike and began throwing himself into cycling. It was atop a hill in Verdun, France in 2016 that Dan decided that “I'm going to be a cyclist” and subsequently set the goal for and competed at the 2018 Sydney Invictus Games. Using the games as his “line in the sand” Dan's life has taken a dramatic turn from where it was once was! Being forced into a change situation and adapting to it has, as Dan say's, “probably made me a better person” Dan is currently part of an 8 man getting ready to take part in the worlds toughest bicycle race; the Race Across America. Looking back on his life, Dan sights and stands by unequivocally that losing his arm and shoulder is the greatest thing to have happened to him.

Tech Leader Talk
Lessons from a Serial Entrepreneur – Rob Whalen

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 33:46


On today's episode, I'm talking with Rob Whalen about his experience at several technology companies including the company he co-founded, PTO Exchange. As a serial entrepreneur, Rob discusses when he believes it's time to “switch” to a new opportunity.  He also talks about how his degree in accounting gives him an edge as an entrepreneur. I love hearing stories about how new business ideas come about.  When working with inventors, I always want to hear about how the inventors came up with a particular invention. During our discussion, Rob shares how a meeting at his house generated the idea behind PTO Exchange.  Anyone listening to this episode can do the same thing! Rob also talks about how his current company found its first customers and how they needed to make some changes early on to attract their “real” target customers. “I look at money as someone's time that they worked to make that money.” – Rob Whalen Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - Testing demand for a product before launching the company - Deciding when to “switch” to a new entrepreneurial opportunity - How the idea for PTO Exchange came about - The importance of failing  - How PTO Exchange helps companies attract and retain employees   Connect with Rob Whalen: LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/rob-whalen-1287077/ Website:  https://www.ptoexchange.com/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

Your Data Driven Podcast
Ep42 Andre Lafond On Deciding To Follow The Dream To Race Indycars

Your Data Driven Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 50:50


Andre Lafond is a future star Indycar driver currently racing Formula Ford here in the UK. In this show we discuss what it takes to make that decision to go all in on a career driving racing cars. We talk about the role of coaching and how to give the most useful driver feedback to your engineers and crew. Andre Lafond also gives us some surprising tips about how he uses mountain biking to help with his mental, as well as physical, preparation. [4:00] What does it take to commit to becoming a professional racing driver? [14:50] How different are karts and racecars? [23:01] How can you learn from watching other drivers? [31:52] Tips for working with engineers or your support crew [38:33] What is the different between a coach and an instructor? -- Links mentioned in the show: - Follow Andre Lafond's progress here - https://andrelafondracing.com/ -- Perfectly setup your racecar. Master data analysis. Drive faster @ www.yourdatadriven.com Get Ahead of the Curve - Weekly motorsports wisdom you can read in 5 minutes, for free --> https://yourdatadriven.ck.page/3d029366d9

The WinAtLife Podcast
How after nearly 2 years of TTC, tapping helped us realise what we truly wanted with Greta Zukoff and Theresa Piela

The WinAtLife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 65:45


If you've followed me for a while you'll know that Craig and I have been on a TTC journey for nearly two years.What a roller coaster it has been! In this episode Craig and I get deep and personal and share how after nearly two years Greta and Theresa helped us move past the fear of judgement, failure and what we thought we should to do, to actually doing what truly made us happy

Pixel Pals
Episode 31: Deciding the Best RPG of All Time

Pixel Pals

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 49:11


In this episode Zach and Zanadood answer the age old question: What is the best RPG of all time? We had a blast discussing some of the best game sin this genre and hopefully our pick doesn't make too many people mad. As always, new episodes every Wednesday and make sure to leave us a nice review! Next week Zach is gone so it will be a Zanadood + Guest episode! Stay hyrdated and don't be too hard on yourself!

Hoopsfix Podcast - British Basketball with Sam Neter
Retiring on top – with Jo Leedham-Warner – Ep. 109

Hoopsfix Podcast - British Basketball with Sam Neter

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 58:18


For episode 109 of the Hoopsfix Podcast, we do a special with British basketball legend Jo Leedham-Warner, who has announced her retirement from playing professional basketball.An 11-year career that reads like a fairytale, Leedham-Warner is coming off an undefeated season in the WBBL where she was named MVP after returning to play following giving birth.A London 2012 Olympian, EuroCup champion, WNBA draft pick and the NCAA Division 2 all-time leading scorer to name a few, Jo will go down as one of the all-time greats out of the UK and in this hour episode we look at her decision to retire and her final season in the WBBL.Timestamps:00:00 Intro02:46 Making the decision to retire and how she feels about it05:20 Having had a month to reflect on it since the end of the season06:46 How important it was to have done a season after becoming a mother07:52 How difficult it was playing after being a mother10:53 How the club managed having a player with a newborn13:33 The first practices of the season after time off to give birth16:47 How important it was for Jo to finish her career on top18:53 Has Mark or the club tried to persuade her to come back20:06 Not collecting the MVP trophy before the WBBL Final21:30 Jo's mentality and where it comes from25:52 The shock win over her former club Bourges  29:15 Frustration with the wider British public/media and own club not caring about what her and the team were doing33:50 The amount of media that British basketball misses out on from not having a dedicated PR person36:18 The WBBL not bringing Jo out for the final post-game presser at the WBBL Playoff Final37:33 What she would do as the CEO of the WBBL39:59 Deciding on whether to go back to school next to study psychology43:45 Whether she would want to be involved with British basketball from a federation or club standpoint45:36 How many conversations she had with the federations while being back in the UK to capitalise on her presence51:35 What her career highlight is53:19 Favourite coach54:32 How she wants to be looked back on as a player55:05 Advice for the next generation 

On Point
Never Apologize for Having High Standards with BG (R) Rebecca S. Halstead '81, Founder and CEO of STEADFAST Leadership

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 44:22


This episode features an interview with General Rebecca S. Halstead  ‘81, Founder and CEO of STEADFAST Leadership, a leading consultancy company she founded after serving for 27 years in the Army. She retired from the military as a Brigadier General. Becky specializes in inspirational and motivational speaking, developing leader training programs, leader coaching and mentoring. Becky has provided hundreds of keynote speeches and leadership training to the corporate and academic sectors at both national and international engagements. Becky entered West Point in 1977 with just the second class of women, and was the first person from her hometown to graduate from the academy. She was also the first female graduate of West Point (‘81) to be promoted to General Officer in 2004. Becky served and commanded in combat as the first female Commanding General at the strategic level of leadership in Iraq. In 2007 she received the National Women's History Project award for “Generations of Women Moving History Forward”.In this episode of the WPAOG Network Podcast, Becky talks about how she enjoys being a leader and why she sees herself as a role model for both men and women. Becky explains how her time at West Point and in the military provided her with many important skills and experiences that are transferable to the work she does today advising businesses on how to be better. She also gives insight on some of her proudest moments in the military and why it is important to be an honest, open, and direct mentor to help others succeed in the military and life thereafter. -----------"You should be comfortable wanting to surround yourself with really good people. I mean, I worked for some bosses who they were intimidated by other people that were good and I'm like, I pray to be surrounded by great people, right? Like, I mean, I'm not intimidated by other people being better, smarter, faster than me. I want them on my team. But I also want people on my team that think differently, you know, I don't want my team to look just like me. And I had a great boss who said to me, just don't surround yourself with little Becky Halsteads. I was like, what's wrong with little Becky Halstead sir, you know? And he says, you think about it, you'll figure it out. And then I did. Because you know, if I were to just choose all women to work for me and you know, all white women to work for me, then I wouldn't get the diversity of thought and experience and culture and all the rest of that. So it's like no pick people who think differently than me to surround me to challenge my thinking, to challenge our way ahead, you know, and then I have to be wise enough and smart enough to discern what's best if I'm the one that's in charge to move us forward." - BG (R) Rebecca S. Halstead-----------Episode Timestamps(01:45) BG (R) Rebecca S. Halstead's Background(03:00) Deciding to attend West Point(05:05) Experiences at the academy(06:15) Mentorship(10:30) Significant achievements(13:38) Early promotions(15:49) Being a Role Model and Leader(18:10) BG (R) Rebecca S. Halstead's proudest achievement(26:15) Valuable lessons learned(30:00) About STEADFAST Leadership(31:10) Remaining active in the West Point community(38:05) Transitioning leadership(41:05) BG (R) Rebecca S. Halstead's book-----------LinksRebecca S Halstead's LinkedInIan Faison's LinkedInIan Faison's TwitterWest Point Association of GraduatesOn Point Podcast

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu
DO THIS Every Morning To Destroy Laziness & Quickly GET OUT OF A RUT! | Dr. Rangan Chatterjee

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 65:11


As you know, it's my mission to help teach you how to build the MINDSET and SKILLS that will help you live an extraordinary life - and over the last few months I've been working hard behind the scenes to help create a brand-new tool that will help you do that. It's called Kyzen - and I am proud to announce that I will be bringing it to the world later this year to challenge you to empower yourself and accomplish greater things in life. To learn more, join my Discord at http://impacttheory.com/discordBig goals require DISCIPLINE. By it's very nature, discipline requires you to do hard things - and that is a skill you can LEARN. I'm teaching my process to build Ironclad Discipline in a new workshop - you can register at discipline.impacttheory.com!On today's Episode: When you are unhappy, you may find yourself constantly seeking approval from others, scared to take risks, and hyper focused on the things you don't have or lack in life. You may unconsciously have habits that are keeping you from being happy, and after this episode you know what you can do to start living with more happiness and intention.Dr. Rangan Chatterjee is a physician that focuses on successfully treating illness with progressive medicine while taking a 360 approach to health. He's written multiple books on how to feel better, lose weight, better manage stress and live a happy life. In this episode he's sharing practical things you can do right now to stop living an unhappy life.Happiness is a skill we can improve and get better at. It doesn't have to be overly complicated, and it is super critical to your outlook on life, your relationships, and the state of your overall health. Struggling with health and happiness and not seeing the connection between the two is a mistake we've all made for too long.Let's get practical and answer these simple questions and thought exercises today:What are 3 things you could do this week that would truly make you happy and content? What are 3 things you would wish you have done on your deathbed and regret not doing?Think about the values that encompass who you are and write them down.Deciding to live with intention and making the conscious decisions you need to make in order to live a better, happier, and healthier life is free, and it's the most valuable thing you can do right now for you and the people you love.Check out Dr. Chatterjee's latest book, Happy Mind, Happy Life: https://amzn.to/39ytbbu SHOW NOTES:0:00 | Introduction Dr Rangan Chatterjee0:23 | Why You're Not Happy7:55 | How To Live In Alignment26:35 | Gain Perspective Today41:52 | Take Control of Your Life48:14 | Will You Regret Your Choices55:41 | Create Happy HabitsQUOTES:“A lot of us don't know who we are anymore. A Lot of us don't know what life we're wanting to live. A lot of us are living unintentional lives where we're essentially asleep.” [4:30]“Us not acting in alignment with who we really are is a huge stress on the body.” [9:04]“Your dreams won't make you happy, [...] unless you're intentional about them.” [11:43]“You can be happier than you currently are, [...] I think you can have success and happiness. I don't think you have to choose between the two.” [24:02]“Even if you're consuming killer, uplifting, inspirational content all the time, even that's problematic. You have to be able to sit with your own thoughts.” [32:23]‘We're so disconnected from our bodies and our innermost thoughts, we're so up here in our head, moving forward, learning new things, consuming more and more and more that actually, we're not listening to the signals that our body is sending us.” [36:58]“We see the world through the state of our nervous system.” [39:49]“Every single behavior in our life serves a role, it's there for a reason, and often we try to change the behavior without understanding what role it plays in our life.” [58:17]“Happiness, mental well being, the way you think about the world, [...] is more important than your lifestyle because many of our lifestyle behaviors or lifestyle choices are downstream consequences from the way that we see the world.” [1:04:20]Follow Rangan Chatterjee: Website: https://drchatterjee.com/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDnwlb3IQDPJtFysPUJbDFQ/videos Twitter: https://twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Podcast: https://drchatterjee.com/blog/category/podcast/

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu
DO THIS Every Morning To Destroy Laziness & Quickly GET OUT OF A RUT! | Dr. Rangan Chatterjee

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 65:11


As you know, it's my mission to help teach you how to build the MINDSET and SKILLS that will help you live an extraordinary life - and over the last few months I've been working hard behind the scenes to help create a brand-new tool that will help you do that. It's called Kyzen - and I am proud to announce that I will be bringing it to the world later this year to challenge you to empower yourself and accomplish greater things in life. To learn more, join my Discord at http://impacttheory.com/discordBig goals require DISCIPLINE. By it's very nature, discipline requires you to do hard things - and that is a skill you can LEARN. I'm teaching my process to build Ironclad Discipline in a new workshop - you can register at discipline.impacttheory.com!On today's Episode: When you are unhappy, you may find yourself constantly seeking approval from others, scared to take risks, and hyper focused on the things you don't have or lack in life. You may unconsciously have habits that are keeping you from being happy, and after this episode you know what you can do to start living with more happiness and intention.Dr. Rangan Chatterjee is a physician that focuses on successfully treating illness with progressive medicine while taking a 360 approach to health. He's written multiple books on how to feel better, lose weight, better manage stress and live a happy life. In this episode he's sharing practical things you can do right now to stop living an unhappy life.Happiness is a skill we can improve and get better at. It doesn't have to be overly complicated, and it is super critical to your outlook on life, your relationships, and the state of your overall health. Struggling with health and happiness and not seeing the connection between the two is a mistake we've all made for too long.Let's get practical and answer these simple questions and thought exercises today:What are 3 things you could do this week that would truly make you happy and content? What are 3 things you would wish you have done on your deathbed and regret not doing?Think about the values that encompass who you are and write them down.Deciding to live with intention and making the conscious decisions you need to make in order to live a better, happier, and healthier life is free, and it's the most valuable thing you can do right now for you and the people you love.Check out Dr. Chatterjee's latest book, Happy Mind, Happy Life: https://amzn.to/39ytbbu SHOW NOTES:0:00 | Introduction Dr Rangan Chatterjee0:23 | Why You're Not Happy7:55 | How To Live In Alignment26:35 | Gain Perspective Today41:52 | Take Control of Your Life48:14 | Will You Regret Your Choices55:41 | Create Happy HabitsQUOTES:“A lot of us don't know who we are anymore. A Lot of us don't know what life we're wanting to live. A lot of us are living unintentional lives where we're essentially asleep.” [4:30]“Us not acting in alignment with who we really are is a huge stress on the body.” [9:04]“Your dreams won't make you happy, [...] unless you're intentional about them.” [11:43]“You can be happier than you currently are, [...] I think you can have success and happiness. I don't think you have to choose between the two.” [24:02]“Even if you're consuming killer, uplifting, inspirational content all the time, even that's problematic. You have to be able to sit with your own thoughts.” [32:23]‘We're so disconnected from our bodies and our innermost thoughts, we're so up here in our head, moving forward, learning new things, consuming more and more and more that actually, we're not listening to the signals that our body is sending us.” [36:58]“We see the world through the state of our nervous system.” [39:49]“Every single behavior in our life serves a role, it's there for a reason, and often we try to change the behavior without understanding what role it plays in our life.” [58:17]“Happiness, mental well being, the way you think about the world, [...] is more important than your lifestyle because many of our lifestyle behaviors or lifestyle choices are downstream consequences from the way that we see the world.” [1:04:20]Follow Rangan Chatterjee: Website: https://drchatterjee.com/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDnwlb3IQDPJtFysPUJbDFQ/videos Twitter: https://twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Podcast: https://drchatterjee.com/blog/category/podcast/

Balance & Thrive
How Much I've Invested in My Coaching Biz

Balance & Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 49:20


If you've ever wondered *exactly* how much money I've invested in working with business coaches over the years, you'll DEFINITELY want to listen to this episode!I've already discussed many of the biz investments I make each month – paying my team members and other people who support my business, different platforms I use, etc. – but I've NEVER publicly discussed my business coaching investments in such a candid way… until now.Today I'm sharing why I began working with my first business coach, the results I saw, how it changed my life… and, yes, the money I paid her. I'm also diving into what I learned from a not-so-great biz coaching experience and discussing why I've been with my current biz coach for 3 years now – even though the investment STILL feels scary!In this episode, I cover:The journey that led me to hire my first business coach [3:40]Following the woman I would eventually hire to help me save my business – and the mental gymnastics I went through for months to justify NOT hiring her [8:40]How my husband reacted when I told him about the business coaching program I was interested in and why we decided to make the investment [15:00]The ways my business (and life) changed after hiring my first biz coach and implementing her strategies and advice [18:15]Joining another business coach's mastermind, why it didn't work for me and the important lessons that experience taught me [20:25]The business coaching program that helped me create my group fitness coaching program and what I realized about investing in my biz (hint: it was SO worth it) [24:00]What happened when I took a break from working with business coaches [26:40]Deciding to begin working with the woman who is still my business coach today – even though the investment was WAY out of my comfort zone [28:45]Why choosing to work with my current coach was one of the best decisions of my life to date [33:20]The spiritual and energetic power generated when you invest in yourself and how you show up differently when you put a significant amount of money on the line [35:05]The dollar amount I've invested in business coaching for my online coaching biz and why it's all been 100% worth it [38:10]How my experiences with business coaches helped uncover my own passion for biz coaching [40:00]Why I decided to record this episode and what I hope you take away from what I've shared [41:35]The ways my Fitness Coaching Business Accelerator can help you if you're a new or aspiring online fitness coach [45:25]Connect with Lynette:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lynettemarieh Coaching With Impact Facebook group (my free business coaching group!): https://www.facebook.com/groups/coachingwithimpact Fitness Coaching Business Accelerator: https://fcbaprogram.com

Tales from the Journey
Practicing Presence, Facing Forward, and Writing an Aligned Ending

Tales from the Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:13


In this episode, I'm closing out season two with an important conversation about practicing presence, facing forward, and writing ourselves into an aligned storyline. This conversation is about seemingly simple topics, but I promise they're incredibly potent, no matter where you are inside your present journey. In fact, nearly two decades into my own healing and growth work, I recently had to remember the power of presence for myself, and it became such a transformational experience in so many ways. Plus, you can't face forward into what's supposed to come next if you're not here now. I know you're going to gain so much from this conversation, and I'm also sharing some exciting announcements about our upcoming second podcast launch! What to listen for: Launching our newest podcast and other goodies Where to follow me and my updates in the meantime The importance of presence and my own reminder to practice it Feeling silly after doing so much growth work “It has been so healing and has produced such incredible shifts so rapidly. The pace at which I have been getting clarity, getting downloads, feeling more like myself, feeling happier and more aligned and fulfilled and creative and healthy and all these things has just been so accelerated.” Navigating the times when presence is most difficult Grief and trauma are full body experiences This isn't about bypassing the more challenging emotions Holding our vision for the future while engaging with this moment The best ways to practice presence and how it assists our healing Facing forward into what's next and why presence is essential “Facing forward, facing into what it is that we want, this involves presence. This involves being here now and orienting ourselves towards things that we say that we want.” Idealizing the past even when we want change Orienting to ourselves in time and space Don't beat yourself up when you're hooked into the past The visual metaphors that guided my healing “I would close my eyes in this little movie would play. And after I had clawed my way out of the depths of grief and trauma, clawed my way out of this deep dark well, I remember turning away from the well and facing in a different direction. And so we're doing that energetically. We are reorienting ourselves, our whole selves towards the things that we want, even if they're small.” Identifying what you want and orienting towards it What it means to write yourself into a storyline that feels aligned Using our meaning making skills productively How to look at what happened in a way that frees you to move forward The truth about “everything happens for a reason” Deciding how you want to be shaped and how the story will unfold Resources: Grab a copy of, What Really Happened? Break Free from Interpretation and Make the Impossible Happen, along with other products and books in the online shop. Access our free workbook for how to make the impossible happen, and our powerful 8-part Journey Mapping™ sampler program and begin uncovering the purpose of your path at www.TalesFromTheJourney.tv/Free/. Read my memoir, Unravel: Rising Up and Coming Back from a Season of Living that Damn Near Killed Me at www.TheUnravelBook.com. Tales from the Journey™ is a Stephenie Zamora Media Production.

Bravo for the B-side Podcast
Doctor Carver – Episode 132

Bravo for the B-side Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 96:55


Deciding it was time for a horror film, we jumped in to Doctor Carver. Disappointment comes in all forms, and this film managed to pretty much deliver on all of them. We knew what we were getting into, as director Louisa Warren brought us Leprechaun Games which was just terrible. Filled with inconsistent editing, mind-numbing repetition of the moral message in the plot, lazy effects, and a ham, the lessons here are what not to do when making a film. Lots of those lessons within. Doctor Carver can be found on Tubi.

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
263. An Interview with my Father Walter Peterson

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 92:38


This past Sunday was Father's Day. In this episode, I discuss my family history, relationships, growing up, learning to read and write, raising children, and marriage with my father Walter Peterson. —Links— Try our new writing app, Essay: https://essay.app Or take the Understand Myself personality test: https://understandmyself.com —Chapters— [0:00] Intro [1:00] The story of the 3rd floor  [3:32] Family settling in Saskatchewan [8:57] Breaking 10 acres [10:42] Jordan's grandfather [12:00] Walter's school caboose  [12:57] His childhood [18:38] Growing up on a farm [23:14] Wood-gathering & feeding workers [25:04] Typical clothing [26:48] Was it a happy childhood? [27:45] Farm chores [29:20] Walter's grandfather [36:18] His grandmother & learning to read [42:19] Joe Rogan & touring [44:13] Spending time with grandpa [44:52] Walter's dad [45:55] Moving out [49:02] Raising kids now vs. then [55:12] Walter's mom [57:40] His sisters [58:41] His old friends  [1:00:24] Walter's reading, writing, & going to school [1:03:00] Jordan skipping school [1:05:21] Jordan's great grandfather's band & the guitar he made Jordan [1:07:14] Walter meets his wife  [1:12:30] Deciding to be a teacher  [1:15:10] Marrying age & ceremony [1:16:57] Why family matters & Walter's best years [1:18:27] Walter on Jordan's childhood [1:19:48] Jordan's early memories of reading with his Father [1:24:08] The most challenging part of marriages [1:26:06] Jordan's mom [1:26:35] Personality & Jordan's parents [1:28:18] Current restrictions [01:29:07] Walter's best relationships #FathersDay #Personality #Childhood #Canada #Family Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locations Unknown
EP. #62: Shawn Higgins - Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest - Oregon

Locations Unknown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 64:13


October 14, 2016.  A father, son, and uncle went on a routine hunting trip in the Oregon wilderness.  Deciding they could cover more ground, the group split up and planned to meet back at their truck later in the day.  When the father didn't return, his son set out to find him only to go missing as well.  Join us this week as we discuss the strange disappearance of Shawn Higgins.   Thank you to Athletic Greens for supporting this episode:   Athletic Greens is going to give you a FREE 1-year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase. All you have to do is visit (https://athleticgreens.com/EMERGING). Again, that is (https://athleticgreens.com/EMERGING) to take ownership over your health and pick up the ultimate daily nutritional insurance!   New Patreon Shout Outs: Charissa Lomonico, Jen Thompson and, Juli Bailey   Episode suggestion shout out: Fransisco Espinoza   Want to help the show out and get even more Locations Unknown content!  For as little as $1 a month, you can become a Patron of Locations Unknown and get access to our episodes two days before release, special Patreon only episode, free swag, swag contests, your picture on our supporter wall of fame, our Patreon only Discord Server, and discounts to our Locations Unknown Store!  Become a Patron of the Locations Unknown Podcast by visiting our Patreon page.  (https://www.patreon.com/locationsunknown)   Want to call into the show and leave us a message?  Now you can!  Call 208-391-6913 and leave Locations Unknown a voice message and we may air it on a future message!   View live recordings of the show on our YouTube channel: Locations Unknown - YouTube   Want to advertise on the podcast?  Visit the following link to learn more.  Advertise on Locations Unknown   Learn about other unsolved missing persons cases in America's wilderness at Locations Unknown.   Follow us on Facebook & Instagram.  Also check us out on two new platforms - Pocketnet & Rumble.   You can view sources for this episode and all our previous episodes at: Sources — Locations Unknown

Whiskey & Whitetails
Ep. 078: Flaming shots and Saddle Hunting Options

Whiskey & Whitetails

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 61:13


Gus and Matt sit down and make bourbon inspired vanilla shakes for national vanilla shake day, try out some flaming shots, discuss poor decisions in with firearms and what they want out of saddle hunting this coming season. Topics Discussed: Making a milk shake with Jim Beam Bourbon Cream for National Vanilla Milk Shake day. Our annoyance with unnecessarily long YouTube videos. People getting their feelings hurt over our bourbon reviews. Deciding what kind of tree saddle we're both interested in. Matt's deep dive into String Theory. Some ridiculous videos of people NOT handling “flaming” shots very well at bars. Our very own flaming shot, the Sim Morrison…a flaming American with Bud light, Jack Daniels and Jim Beam Bourbon Cream. Tasting a Nulu barrel pick from our Patron, Kyle! Some very poor examples of gun safety. A review of some awesome videos of people falling out of tree stands and another guy getting attacked by a goose. The trouble with both dentists and mechanics. Matt's trick to getting cheap allocated bourbon. Blind cat videos. Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/whiskeyandwhitetails Instagram - @whiskeyandwhitetails Facebook - @whiskeyandwhitetails Twitter - @whskywhitetail Website & Store - www.whiskeyandwhitetails.com YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUX9-ft9bLcrNMUMREwj4Dw/featured MORE: We'd like to extend a special thank you to everyone who has supported us along this journey so far. We've done a lot in a short time and have so much more we're excited to do still. We must give a particularly BIG shoutout to our growing Patreon Community! If you enjoy our content, consider giving us a 5 star rating on your favorite podcast app, leave us a review, and tell a fellow whiskey or whitetail/hunting enthusiast about our show. We'd be beyond grateful for the support.  Make sure to stay up to date on everything we're doing through our Instagram, where we're most active. Visit our website to check out our latest journal posts about hunting, whiskey and cigars and our shop for our latest barrel made products. Also please subscribe to our YouTube and select the notification bell to make sure you get all the weekly videos and video podcasts from Whiskey & Whitetails.  Last but not lease, please consider joining our Patreon community where you'll get exclusive access to Patreon only content, early access to other content, prizes, giveaways, a voice in what content we create, live streams, expand our ability to bring you EVEN MORE awesome content as well as a community of awesome whiskey and outdoor enthusiasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Temple Baptist Church - Fort Worth
The Power of Pre-Deciding | Trevor Cochrane | June 19th, 2022 - Audio

Temple Baptist Church - Fort Worth

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 38:25


Welcome to the Temple Baptist Church - Fort Worth podcast! We exist to guide people to life change in Jesus Christ. For more information visit templebaptistchurch.net.

Single Mom’s Conversations
Deciding Your Roll & Playing Your Position

Single Mom’s Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 22:12


In this episode we will be talking about boundaries and playing your position. Taking on to many rolls will deplete your energy. Our babies need us, we cannot be everything to everyone. If you would like to support the podcast Cash app $keynasmc

Bulls Talk Podcast
Debating the 18th pick and deciding which player will be here to win a championship

Bulls Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 42:58


The NBA Draft is next week and the Bulls still currently own the 18th pick. If they had to use the pick, who would you want them to take? K.C. Johnson, Rob Schaefer, and Tony Gill discuss who might be available and who they think the Bulls should select. Later in the pod, the guys play a game where they decided which Bulls player, coach, or executive will be around when the Bulls win their 7th championship.(8:10) - Who will the Bulls take 18th overall?(20:25) - Remembering the 1998 Bulls championship(24:13) - Will He or Won't He be a Bull when they win their 7th franchise championship?(40:00) - Thoughts on if the Bulls could have traded for Christian WoodSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Too Tall Sports Podcast
Mike Guardabascio - Sports Writer, Podcast Host, Long Beach Sports Historian

Too Tall Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 48:30


"Too Sense" Segment - The Warriors are 1 win away from their 4th title in 8 years. Game 6 is Thursday in Boston and we'll see if they can get it done on the road or close it out on Sunday in a Game 7 at home... Lots of things to appreciate about this team and I go into it during this opening monologue... Interview: Mike Guardabascio - Sports Writer, Podcast Host, Long Beach Sports Historian  We Discuss: - Mike's upbringing in Long Beach, CA - A great story how he high-fived Michael Jordan on the set of Space Jam - Going to Long Beach Poly for High School and what it was like in the 90's - Deciding to stay home and go to Long Beach State - The Golden Era of LB St. Baseball in the early 2000's - Writing books about Football and Basketball in Long Beach - Long Beach Poly's history in sports - How great the Pro Basketball Summer League was back in the day there - This year's Poly high school class with 42 Athletic Scholarships! - Co-hosting a popular NBA podcast - "Jenkins and Jonez" - Starting "The 562" - a non profit local media outlet And much more! FOLLOW Mike:  - Twitter: @guardabascio - @562sports - Jenkins and Jonez Podcast  Don't forget to Follow Me and SUBSCRIBE, LIKE and COMMENT on the Too Tall Sports Podcast: https://linktr.ee/tootallsportspodcast YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOT1dawh_079qckq7OmFHAQ Instagram: @tootallsportspodcast Tik Tok: @tootallsportspodcast Twitter: @TooTallSports Facebook Group: Too Tall Sports Podcast Apple Podcasts: Too Tall Sports Podcast Spotify: Too Tall Sports Podcast Pandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/too-tall-sports-podcast/PC:52128 https://www.vegassportsadvantage.com?ref=tootall Email: tootallsportspodcast@gmail.com

Double Teamed with Cami and Niki
Poly Break-Ups ft. Poly Pages

Double Teamed with Cami and Niki

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 63:22


Today, Cami and Niki welcome, once again, Claire Louise Travers, who runs the podcast, research hubs, and events for Poly Pages - an academic non-monogamous podcast and platform, focused on the texts which have shaped polyamorous community and culture.   In the first season, Claire talked about rich and insightful resources about the poly world. Today, we dive into poly breakups. We get to look at how non-monogamous and polyamorous people deal with multiple breakups and failed relationships, what can be learned from them, and why we all need a good set of friends who can view poly breakups as a new beginning. AND, it's okay to be with yourself from time to time when you need to heal and recuperate, ‘hoe' phase included of course! Just keep it healthy!      Listen Up: 00:00 Intro 01:21 Experience with polyamorous breakups 05:20 Handling a partner that is going through a breakup 10:03 Shifting relationships around 16:21 You are going to change during the relationship 22:55 Suppressing yourself to make something work 26:23 Deciding to have children is different for men and women 36:51 Some people would blame being polyamorous for the breakup 41:02 Operating your relationships from a place of fear 48:23 “We hoe phase from a place of healthiness.”   52:40 Have a primary partnership with yourself 01:00:13 For anyone going through a poly breakup…   Connect with Claire on: Instagram TikTok Poly Pages Poly Pages Podcast   Follow Us on: Instagram TikTok Twitter Patreon YouTube Website

Office Hours with Dorm Room Fund
Connor McEwen, Engineering Lead at Uniswap Labs

Office Hours with Dorm Room Fund

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 26:06


Andrew Xu and Daniel Aboul-Hassan speak with Connor McEwen (@connormcewen) from Uniswap Labs! Uniswap allows people to swap, earn, and build on the leading decentralized crypto trading protocol. (0:32) - Introduction (1:22) - What led Connor to join Dorm Room Fund (2:52) - Deciding whether or not take a gap year during college (4:24) - Important lessons learned from returning to school (6:11) - Experience launching makeBU (8:48) - Being on the engineering side & what people on the Business and Engineering sides can learn from each other (10:55) - How Connor approached joining a large company vs. startup (14:20) - Is Connor a Bitcoin millionaire? (14:30) - Connor's funny story about mining Bitcoin (15:31) - How to land an engineering role at an attractive startup (18:10) - 2013 startups vs. 2022 startups (20:06) - Hottest Web3 take (21:43) - How should engineers working at early-stage startups view fundraising? (23:31) - Staying up to date in the crypto space -- Get in touch with Connor! Twitter: @connormcewen LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cmcewen/

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How to Start, Grow, and Sell a Video Marketing Agency to Pursue Other Goals

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 19:23


What is the life cycle of a video marketing agency? How can you transition from accidental agency owner to something else in order to fulfill your goals? What does life look like after you sell your video marketing agency? Today's guest hadn't seriously considered selling until he stepped back to realize the bigger picture. He remembered his original goals and realized there were other projects he wanted to focus on. This guest shares the way he started and grew his agency into something a team member actually wanted to buy. He also shares how he created a smooth transition for the buyer and decided what is next in his entrepreneurial journey. Doug Dibert is the founder and creator of Magnfi, a video software platform, and also the founder of Crossing River, the video marketing agency he recently sold. Like most agency owners, he fell into the business by accident when he started making wedding videos and soon turned that into a business. However, as Doug grew his agency he started thinking about selling and pursuing his filmmaking passion. In this episode, we'll discuss: How to differentiate your video marketing agency. Knowing how and when to sell your agency. Finding the right buyer for your agency might be easier than you think. Sponsors and Resources E2M Solutions: Today's episode of the Smart Agency Masterclass is sponsored by E2M Solutions, a web design and development agency that has provided white label services for the past 10 years to agencies all over the world. Check out e2msolutions.com/smartagency and get 10% off for the first three months of service. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Starting a Video Marketing Agency Doug went to film school and actually started using the school's equipment to do paid jobs. He mostly worked filming weddings and got inspiration from a class on documentaries to try to apply those techniques to his wedding videos. So he took the material he filmed at one of those weddings and made a small trailer video. He posted it to social media and went to sleep. The next morning, he had thousands of views, shares, and messages from brides asking if he could do the same for their wedding. After a while, he also started getting requests from businesses that wanted to invest in video marketing. This is how the agency was born. They produced videos for businesses all over the world and focused on small to medium-sized businesses. Then the '08 recession hit and the agency lost all its marketing clients. Thankfully, the wedding video business stayed strong so the agency stayed afloat and also started to do videos for social media. Video is such an important tool and every company should utilize it. Back then, Doug had a hard time standing out among big video production companies. He thought about how to differentiate himself and concluded that instead of being a video production company they would focus on video marketing strategy. Their services went beyond creating video content. It included helping clients optimize their YouTube channels and animate their logos. They especially focused on creating content around the client's strategic goals. The word got out and they became the go-to video marketing agency for businesses. Creating a Platform to Systematize Video Content Creation Back in 2015, Doug rejected a few clients who wanted to film videos on their phones and send them to the agency to be turned into professional-looking video content. He didn't see the potential at the time. Later Doug realized 90% of his clients wanted videos shot and edited the same way. He got the idea to create a platform to systematize video content creation. Simple videos like testimonials, “about me” videos and expert tips are the core of what every business needs to see some real growth. With this in mind, Doug set out to create this platform for low-cost video content creation. His goal was to satisfy 90% of clients' needs and, in case they wanted something more personalized, they would pay an extra fee for those services. Seeing the Bigger Picture and Deciding to Sell Your Agency Doug's big goal when he started was to make movies. The opportunities to create videos for companies came by chance and the agency started to grow. He had people willing to invest in him as an entrepreneur who wanted to see if he was able to grow a business, so he focused on that. The shift in his mentality came from having a business coach who helped him see the bigger picture. He learned you have to continuously open your mind to new possibilities or you will remain stagnant. When his coach realized he wanted to make movies, she asked “why not next year?” He had been thinking about growing the agency more and delaying selling a bit longer. However, thanks to his coach he started thinking --  “why not next year?” Back then he was stuck being the hands-on agency owner who wanted to do everything. This shift encouraged him to start hiring people to replace himself and focus on what he did really well. He hired amazing talent, built a great team, and started to focus on the business aspect of the agency instead of the creative aspect. Finding the Right Buyer Might Be Easier Than You Think In his case, Doug had no strategic team or advisors come in and help him prepare to sell. It was actually one of his editors who expressed interest in buying the agency. After looking into the agency's recurring revenue, clients, assets, etc, the editor decided to buy. They also paid cash, so there was no finance clause or several payments over a period of time. In the end, the entire process from the conversation to selling the agency took about 3 months. Doug also mentioned he was building a video editing platform and agreed to refer video production clients to the agency. In the end, he ended up staying at the agency for another year. He presented the new owner as his new partner so he could start building relationships with the clients. Continuing his work at the agency and having other projects also helped Doug find purpose and fulfillment. Overall, the transition after selling your agency can be hard. You may expect to feel euphoric and end up thinking “what do I do now?” This is why you should always dedicate time to think about your life after the sale. Do you want to travel and rest? Maybe start another business? Or just focus on other projects? Whatever it is, knowing that there's something else will help you avoid the emotional fallout that comes right after selling your agency. Want the Support of Amazing Digital Agency Owners? Do you want to be around amazing agency owners that can see you may not be able to see and help you grow your agency? Then go to the Digital Agency Elite to learn all about our exclusive mastermind.

Parenting Your Sensitive Child
Ep. #53: The Next Layer: Looking Beyond Behavior

Parenting Your Sensitive Child

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 6:48


Deciding to leave the ways of the past in the past (spanking, timeouts, or any other reward/punishment system) and forge a new path forward is the first step towards a new way of parenting, but it's definitely not the last. Forging your own path forward is not easy, simple, or straight-forward. It is multi-faceted and layered. Not hard, necessarily, but definitely on-going. Today we're talking about one of the layers that you find once you make the decision to opt out of punishments, and that is the need to look beyond behavior. So many parents try on new strategies, but still measure them by the same old standards: if their child's behavior isn't changing, they decide what they're doing isn't working. We need to shift the focus away from the behavior and start looking at what's underneath it. And we need to take the time to consider what other measures we can use to guide ourselves and our decision-making. How will you know if it's working if behavior isn't the measure?

Acting Business Boot Camp
Episode 183: Procrastination and the Actor

Acting Business Boot Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 23:29


The first tool when dealing with procrastination-- awareness. Using your mind to govern your brain.  And I'm going to put a challenge to you. Whatever day you're listening to this podcast, I want you to see if you can separate yourself just a little bit from your procrastination. Put your hand directly on your face. You can't see; you cannot be aware. But then, when you remove your hand from your face about a foot, well, you're in a place to observe your hand. You can see the lines. You can see the veins. And that is the place of power when starting to look at changing something.  Becoming aware of when you procrastinate and how you procrastinate. Take your emotions out of your to-do list.  The second part of change is acceptance. Accept how you procrastinate. Then we move to action. This is when you need to start asking yourself, how bad do you want it? "Do something today that you'll thank yourself for a year from now." One of the things that I started to look at was the difference between how I was spending my time and how I wanted to spend my time. What are the real goals that you want to be looking and want to be achieving? Time management course that I am teaching on June 21st and June 28th. Empowering questions: What do you want to be spending your time on? What do you actually want to be spending your time on? And I think one of the biggest parts of procrastination for me is that my next steps are vague. So if my next steps are vague, I'm not going to do it.  How do you create a goal? If your actions are vague and your goals are vague, guess what? The universe is going to give you a whole buttload of vague. Deciding what you want, why you want it, and how, and then how to make that specific. You need an ego-proof way of making sure that stuff got done. The huge thing about "shoulding" all over yourself is that it takes up your energy. And that energy is the energy you need to get your goals done. Get life to work for you instead of against you.  Don't procrastinate. Procrastination is really understanding why. What makes you tick? And I think the more we understand how we tick and how we operate, the better. We understand ourselves as actors and how we act.  

Glamour Farms The Podcast
014: Multitasking Motherhood with Kristin Winchester

Glamour Farms The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 43:09


Mamas, get ready! Kristin Winchester or KNW as we affectionately know her is chatting on today's episode all things motherhood. Kristin is a twin mama and is spilling ALL. THE. THINGS! Topics this episode covers… - Deciding to switch from full-time corporate to full-time SAHM - Tips and tricks to help daily life run smooth - Why water can save any day … And so much more! Shop our website: https://glamourfarms.com   Connect with The Podcast on IG: http://instagram.com/glamourfarms.thepodcast/   Connect with Glamour Farms on IG: http://instagram.com/glamourfarmsboutique/   Connect with Haley on IG: http://instagram.com/haleyklockenga/   Connect with Kristin on IG: https://www.instagram.com/kristinwinchester 

Pardon My Stash
Deciding What to Knit / Pattern Pet Peeves

Pardon My Stash

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 32:51


Drea talks about the Covered Bridge Farm in Oregon. The cast discuss what your different factors could be in making a decision on what project to put on your needles or hook next. Then, the conversation starts getting into what kind of pet peeves with patterns we have.Find more content at pardonmystash.com or join us on Patreon!

The Business of Authority
Dealing With Critics

The Business of Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 38:02


The difference between getting critiqued by your email list, social media types and your intimates.How to think about criticism from your circle and use it to benefit the revolution you're leading.When to unplug or take steps to protect your mental health.Deciding whether your critics are coming for you (to be helpful) or at you (to tear you down a peg).When receiving criticism can be a form of deep care (and how to keep the right kind coming).Quotables“I think people (critics), are a little bit more thoughtful in email than social media.”—JS“Just breathe. Walk away from the keyboard...”—RM“When somebody on my list sends me one of these sort of polite pushback kinds of things, they're usually right.”—JS“I have unfollowed and blocked (social media critics) for my mental health because I don't need somebody who's just gonna go around trolling.”—RM“Where do you get your canary in the coal mine when you actually are wrong, or you actually have too shallow of an understanding of something that's much deeper?”—JS“I can feel if they (critics) are coming for me or at me—and I take critical feedback really well from the people that I know are for me.”—RM“You have to consider the messenger. When someone on my list pushes back, I'm like ‘this feedback is totally valid because you are the person I made it for.'”  —JS“It's so valuable to have somebody tell you when you're doing something that they perceive differently than you do.”—RM

Pulling Curls Podcast: Pregnancy & Parenting Untangled
Decluttering Your Kitchen -- Episode 145

Pulling Curls Podcast: Pregnancy & Parenting Untangled

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 6:58


Deciding what you really need and don't need in your kitchen is so important and hard! Let's talk about decluttering the kitchen. Big thanks to our sponsor The Organized Home -- if you want a simple way to help organize your home for your family it's the course for you! In this episode Questions to ask yourself about decluttering the kitchen: How big is it How often are you using it Can something else do the same job? Do you have room for it? Other things that might interest you My original kitchen organization episode. Kitchen organization Kitchen organization hacks Producer: Drew Erickson

Wholehearted Coaching: The Podcast
117 | Surrendering to your Intuition with Liana Naima

Wholehearted Coaching: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 56:58


Deciding not to do something isn't a failure. It's not a mistake and there's a strong chance that what it really means is you know yourself so well that deep down you truly know what's best for you.  In the second interview of the Courageous Conversations series, I can't wait for you to hear the story of Liana Naima who has shifted, pivoted, and returned home to herself all with grace. This isn't a story of failure or mistakes. It's one of following the path of your dream, seeing where it takes you, and checking in with yourself if this is actually what you want.  Liana Naima is a beloved and loving educator and spiritual wellness practitioner specializing in an array of healing arts, such as mindfulness meditation, energy healing, and breath work. Her practice is rooted in intuitive knowledge that trusts in the innate wisdom of the body. She creates brave containers for people to confront energetic blockages with curiosity and care. Her playful spirit makes the healing process enjoyable, operating from the heart, she invites people to meet her there for heart-centered transformations of the mind, body, and spirit. Find the full show notes at https://www.wholehearted-coaching.com/podcast/surrender-to-intuition-liana-naima Sign up to get your FREE 7-day guided journal with 45 prompts that will transform your life! wholehearted-coaching.lpages.co/reclamation  Join the Wholehearted Community on Instagram  Connect with Liana Naima: Follow Liana on Instagram: @liananaima  Follow Liana on Twitter: @LianaNaima  Liana's Website: www.liananaima.com

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber
TCF598: The Long & Short of It - Decision Wheel

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 7:44


What is the biggest decision you have ever made in your life? Was it marriage, a career change, or buying a house? Or are you considering making a life-changing decision but hesitating to do so?   Tune in to Tim and Greg as they talk about making the important decisions in life, and then get out there and take a chance on yourself!   In this episode, we talk about…  The deed decision wheel Deciding on a career change and the right time to take action for it Thinking about the steps needed to get there before you take action   Resources:  Greg Dempsey, GC with Stonehill Builders - https://stonehillbuilders.com/    Tim Cutroni, Pond Builder with New England Aquatic Landscapes - https://iloveponds.com/    Download The Contractor's Guide to Spotting a Cheap Prospect BEFORE They Waste Your Time and never hear “we need to think about it” again! https://thecontractorfight.com/cheap/    == Join us in BATTLEGROUND == Everything your contracting business needs in one comprehensive program with three main focus areas: Leadership, Communication, and Numbers. For more info check out: https://TheContractorFight.com/Battleground    == Order your free copy of Tom's book Winning the Contractor Fight (Just pay to ship) == https://thecontractorfight.com/book    == Connect with other contractors building stronger businesses in The Contractor Fight: https://thecontractorfight.com/facebook    == Grab the Gear == https://gear.thecontractorfight.com/    == Find Us on Social Media == YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TomReber  Instagram: https://thecontractorfight.com/ig 

The Freelance Fairytales
Deciding What to Do If Too Many Things Interest You

The Freelance Fairytales

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 20:23


I can relate to this one more than you all know. It's something I struggle with weekly. I want to learn and do so many things that I'm not sure I'll have enough time here on earth to do it all. Nevertheless, in this episode, I go over the plight of being interested in too many things, and how to identify where to focus your time and attention in the interim. Being too scatterbrained can be a detriment to making freelancing, or any side hustle, successful - here to help!Need freelancing templates? Want to see my questionnaires? Check out my new PDFs: https://www.alexfasulo.com/products-4Tcdg.

The Happy Rant
Episode #393 - Pastoring Through Crises

The Happy Rant

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 48:06


In this episode of The Happy Rant Ronnie and Barnabas, sans Vegas-going Ted, wander to and fro through a variety of topics. Or really just one: leading a church during times of cultural crisis. They discuss:1. Deciding what to address with the congregation2. Handling contentious cultural moments from the pulpit3. Differences between a small church in a small town and a larger church in a big city4. Navigating contentious cultural issues among leadership teams

For The Love Of Money
631. The Difference Between “Wanting” And “Deciding”

For The Love Of Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 11:41


Our recent trip to Italy is the perfect metaphor for wanting something versus deciding to do something. Lori and I break down the layers of decision that it took for us to actually follow through and take this vacation, plus something really valuable that we learned from our friends about deciding to have a good life. We think it's important to put markers in your year and create memorable experiences for yourself, even if it's something local. Listen in to hear our reflections about our time on the Amalfi Coast and how we're committing to getting outside of our element at least once a week from now on.    IN THIS EPISODE, WE TALK ABOUT: The difference between wanting a good life and deciding to have a good life Why things will never slow down unless you plan for them to slow down Surrounding yourself with positive reinforcements to solidify your decisions Practicing integrity and following through with your decisions Budget-friendly ideas for how to get outside of your normal life   RESOURCES Text DAILY to 310-421-0416 to get daily Money Mantras to boost your day.    CONNECT WITH LORI Follow Lori: @loriharder Follow Lite Pink: @drinklitepink Follow Earn Your Happy: @earnyourhappy Follow Girlfriends & Business: @girlfriendsandbusiness Listen to Girlfriends & Business Listen to Earn Your Happy   CONNECT WITH CHRIS Follow Me: @chriswharder Visit My Website: https://chrisharder.me 

It's The Bearded Man
199. Changing Directions : Trust Your Gut, Ask For Help, Have Patience In Deciding & Believe In Yourself

It's The Bearded Man

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 21:25


I've been considering putting the show on pause for a few months and it feels like time to do that. I need to create space to put more time and energy into new creative ideas that I have that will really take my career to the next level. Change is scary, doing this podcast twice a week is comforting… and I know this is what needs to happen. Today we're doing to dive into 5 reminders for changing directions.     Change is scary. Sticking to the same routines is easy. But when something deep down inside us is telling us we need to make a change, we need to do just that. It's a calculated decision and not something we normally decide overnight but if it feels right, we must do it. 5 reminders for changing directions 1 : Trust your gut when making a change. There's no need to worry about the past, future or what people might say about us making the change. Get present and lean into what you feel is the right thing to do.  2 : Ask for help when you need it. When considering going through change in your life or while in the process, ask for assistance from those who you think could help. We don't need to make this a solo mission, it's better to have people alongside us.' 3 : Have patience in deciding. This is a case by case scenario for how long to wait before taking action but I challenge you to be calculated and thoughtful when making changes. Timing is everything.  4 : Believe in yourself. So long as you're making the decision to make a change, it will always be the right decision because you made it. 5 : Pick up where you left off. If things don't work out or we want to change back to where we were at previously, we can do that. If that's not possible, that's okay too. Now we're on another adventure of figuring it out.      Challenge for the listeners Take 10mins in the next 24hrs and consider what changes you've wanted to make in your life but have yet to do so. I would love and be honored if this was the episode that inspired you to take that first step     Questions from the SDI Community  Troy : Noticed easing into a routine is much easier than full tilt  Nick : Have the opportunity for the job in a field I dreamed of but now that it's real it scares me a bit     Get hydrated with Liquid I.V.! Use my promo code “THEBEARDEDMAN” for 25% off every order Liquid-iv.com       FREE Habit Growth Guide! Sign up for the Stay Dialed In Newsletter! You wanna help blow this podcast up? GREAT! Here's how: Leave a 5 star review on the podcast app with your hot take of the show Share out the episode on your IG story tagging me @Bobbbaaaay —- Follow The Bearded Man! TikTok : @Bobbbaaaay Instagram : @Bobbbaaaay YouTube : @BobbyHobert Twitter : @Bobbbaaaay Website : ItsTheBeardedMan.com 

Earn Your Happy
899. The Difference Between “Wanting” And “Deciding”

Earn Your Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 10:44


Our recent trip to Italy is the perfect metaphor for wanting something versus deciding to do something. Chris and I break down the layers of decision that it took for us to actually follow through and take this vacation, plus something really valuable that we learned from our friends about deciding to have a good life. We think it's important to put markers in your year and create memorable experiences for yourself, even if it's something local. Listen in to hear our reflections about our time on the Amalfi Coast and how we're committing to getting outside of our element at least once a week from now on.    IN THIS EPISODE, WE TALK ABOUT: The difference between wanting a good life and deciding to have a good life Why things will never slow down unless you plan for them to slow down Surrounding yourself with positive reinforcements to solidify your decisions Practicing integrity and following through with your decisions Budget-friendly ideas for how to get outside of your normal life RESOURCES Sign up for The Spritz newsletter at litepink.com! Text PODCAST to 310-496-8363 for updates and a chance to be featured on the show!   CONNECT WITH LORI Follow Lori: @loriharder Follow Lite Pink: @drinklitepink Follow Earn Your Happy: @earnyourhappy Follow Girlfriends & Business: @girlfriendsandbusiness Listen to Girlfriends & Business   CONNECT WITH CHRIS Follow Chris: @chriswharder Visit Chris' Website: https://chrisharder.me  Listen to The Chris Harder Show

The Dave Ramsey Show
Your Sports Betting Addiction Is Not Cute (Hour 2)

The Dave Ramsey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 40:09


Dave Ramsey & Dr. John Delony discuss: Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters with Dr. Meg Meeker, Why sports betting isn't cute, it's a dangerous addiction, Deciding to sell a business. Support Our Sponsor: NetSuite: https://bit.ly/2WBLh5c Want a plan for your money? Find out where to start: https://bit.ly/3nInETX Listen to all The Ramsey Network podcasts: https://bit.ly/3GxiXm6

The Dave Ramsey Show
Dealing With a Payday Loan Nightmare! (Hour 3)

The Dave Ramsey Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 39:50


John Delony & George Kamel discuss: Taking a tax hit to convert your IRA, The dangers of payday loans, Deciding to start a business or work for someone else, Should you take a year off to travel. Want a plan for your money? Find out where to start: https://bit.ly/3nInETX Listen to all The Ramsey Network podcasts: https://bit.ly/3GxiXm6

The Dave Ramsey Show
I Just Graduated Med School Debt Free and My Parents Gave Me $40K! (Hour 3)

The Dave Ramsey Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 40:41


George Kamel discusses: How to convince your spouse to buy a brand-new car, Deciding between paying the house or investing, Learning how to budget after college, What to do with a large cash gift, What to do when a renovation goes over budget. Want a plan for your money? Find out where to start: https://bit.ly/3nInETX Listen to all The Ramsey Network podcasts: https://bit.ly/3GxiXm6