Podcasts about world federation

Notion of a single common political authority for all of humanity

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Best podcasts about world federation

Latest podcast episodes about world federation

OPENPediatrics
"Tripledemic: What We Know So Far and What to Expect Going Forward" by Dr. Paul Offit

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 22:37


In this World Shared Practice Forum podcast, Dr. Paul Offit discusses the viruses causing the so-called “tripledemic.” Dr. Offit reviews the virulence, transmission, and vaccine potential related to Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). He shares current knowledge about the epidemiology and pediatric vaccination rates related to the Influenza A outbreak. Lastly, Dr. Offit gives an update on COVID-19 in the pediatric population, including details on current variants, the effectiveness and impact of the bivalent vaccines, and what to expect in the future. Upon listening to this presentation, learners should be able to: - Describe the surge of RSV infections observed in 2022, with likely causes - Explain the process of strain selection for the yearly Influenza vaccine - Summarize available data relating to the efficacy of the bivalent COVID vaccine Published: January 23, 2023. Citation: Offit P, Daniel D, Burns JP. Tripledemic: What we know so far and what to expect going forward on RSV, Influenza A, and SARS-CoV-2 in Children. 01/2023. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://soundcloud.com/openpediatrics/tripledemic-what-we-know-so-far-and-what-to-expect-going-forward-by-dr-paul-offit Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open-access and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News
Financial Statements and What Really Matters | AWM Insights #140

AWM Insights Financial and Investment News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 13:43


Does evaluating financial statements for publicly traded companies lead to better returns? This may seem like a simple question on the surface, but understanding the magnitude of the question is important. There are roughly 60,000 publicly traded companies worldwide according to the World Federation of Exchanges. A company, like Apple, generates a summary of financial performance in a document called a 10K that has 80 pages, 1000's of data points, and countless footnotes to qualify the data (as different companies report on metrics in different ways.) That information is also mainly backward-looking, and only relevant for a short amount of time in our ever-evolving world. What you are left with are billions of numbers that don't relate to each other. Also, there has been no proven method of using any of these figures for consistent returns.All of this may seem stressful (and it is), but it can also be harmful if it takes attention away from the most important elements in your financial life, your structure and plan. Focusing on your plan, lifestyle, and the factors you can control will lead to far more benefits than looking at Apple's Commercial Paper holdings.Have questions for an upcoming episode? Want to get free resources, book giveaways, and AWM gear? Want to hear about when we release new episodes? Text “insights” or the lightbulb emoji (

OPENPediatrics
"Laryngeal Cleft" by Dr. Reza Rahbar and Dr. Jessica Laird-Gion for OPENPediatrics

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 15:42


This podcast discusses the pre-operative, operative, and post-operative considerations for patients undergoing laryngeal cleft repair including: anatomy and pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, pre-operative evaluation, anesthetic management, operative approach, and post-operative care. Upon viewing this presentation, participants will be able to: - Describe the anatomy and pathophysiology of a laryngeal cleft - List the common symptoms that a patient may exhibit with various types of laryngeal cleft. - Explain the approach used to diagnose a laryngeal cleft. - Describe the common preoperative evaluation for laryngeal cleft surgery. - Explain the anesthetic management plan for repair of type 1 and type II laryngeal clefts. - Describe the operative approach for repair of type 1 and type II laryngeal clefts. - Anticipate the post operative considerations following repair of type 1 and type II laryngeal clefts. Initial Publication: January 19, 2023 Citation: Laird-Gion J, O'Halloran A, Soohey R, Rahbar R, Watters K, Wolbrink TA. Laryngeal Cleft. 01/2023. Online Video. OPENPediatrics. Soundcloud link: https://soundcloud.com/openpediatrics/laryngeal-cleft. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Elevate Your Brand
Elevate Your Brand with Michael Ashley Schulman of Running Point Capital Advisors

Elevate Your Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 30:07


As chief investment officer and a founding partner of Running Point Capital Advisors, Michael Ashley Schulman is responsible for Running Point's global macro outlook, research, investment strategies, asset allocation, portfolio management, and impact and social assessments across public and private investments. He has also effectively consulted for the World Federation of Exchanges in Paris, the Colombian Financial Exchange, and several high-tech firms, and has presented at forums and conferences in California, New York, Malaysia, Argentina, and Spain. Michael has an MBA from MIT Sloan, a CFA designation, and a BA in Economics from UC Berkeley; he has served on the advisory board of an impact fund and several venture start-ups, and is a past president and board member of the CFA Society of Orange County. In his spare time, he enjoys art and adventure travel, including kayaking the Stockholm archipelago and mountain biking in Mongolia to raise funds for underprivileged Mongolian children. You can follow him at https://rbtrage.medium.com/ and at https://www.linkedin.com/in/rbtrage/. Laurel Mintz, founder and CEO of award-winning marketing agency Elevate My Brand, explores some of the most exciting new and growing brands in Los Angeles and the US at large. Each week, the Elevate Your Brand podcast features an entrepreneurial special guest to discuss the past, present and future of their brand.

OPENPediatrics
Research Trends in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Current and Emerging Areas of Interest

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 15:01


In this World Shared Practice Forum podcast, Dr. Robert Tasker continues highlighting research trends from his position as Editor-in-Chief of the Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Journal. Dr. Tasker presents notable articles from 2022, shares a look into upcoming topics and themes for 2023, and provides his perspective on how academic journals such as PCCM are evolving to meet the needs of modern readers and clinicians. Following this podcast, listeners will be able to: - List some of the prominently featured and shared articles from Pediatric Critical Care Medicine for the first half of 2022 - Identify topics and areas of active research interest within the field of pediatric critical care medicine - Discuss approaches to increasing engagement with an academic publication, including content curation, online presentation, and uses of alternative formats such as podcasting Articles referenced: •2:17 Nellis ME, Karam O, Valentine SL, et al. Executive Summary of Recommendations and Expert Consensus for Plasma and Platelet Transfusion Practice in Critically Ill Children: From the Transfusion and Anemia EXpertise Initiative-Control/Avoidance of Bleeding (TAXI-CAB). Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(1):34-51. •2:27 Smith HAB, Besunder JB, Betters KA, et al. 2022 Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines on Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation, Neuromuscular Blockade, and Delirium in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients With Consideration of the ICU Environment and Early Mobility. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(2):e74-e110. •3:16 Dewan M. I Cannot Let It Go. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(3):214-215. doi:10.1097/PCC.0000000000002862 •4:16 Mazer MB, Bulut Y, Brodsky NN, et al. Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children: Host Immunologic Responses. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(4):315-320. •4:36 Kozyak BW, Fraga MV, Juliano CE, et al. Real-Time Ultrasound Guidance for Umbilical Venous Cannulation in Neonates With Congenital Heart Disease. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(5):e257-e266. •5:34 François T, Sauthier M, Charlier J, et al. Impact of Blood Sampling on Anemia in the PICU: A Prospective Cohort Study. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2022;23(6):435-443. Publish date: December 22, 2022. Citation: Tasker R, Daniel D, Burns JP. Research Trends in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Current and Emerging Areas of Interest. 12/2022. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://youtu.be/tcn-MQ_jHv4. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

OPENPediatrics
"Understanding Pain Behaviors of Nonverbal Children with Intellectual Disability" by Jean Solodiuk

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 37:54


In this podcast, Dr. Jean Solodiuk reviews approaches to the recognition and assessment of pain in children with intellectual disability. Dr. Solodiuk describes ways to define and measure pain in an individualized fashion, discusses collaborative approaches to pain management involving caregivers, and illustrates these principles using case examples. After this podcast, listeners will be able to: • Recognize the sources of complexity in defining the pain experience in children with intellectual disability • Apply an individualized approach to describing pain behaviors and severity for medically complex patients • Develop strategies to include caregivers in the assessment and management of pain Articles referenced: •2:00 McCrea RT, Tanke DH, Buckley LG, et al. Vertebrate Ichnopathology: Pathologies Inferred from Dinosaur Tracks and Trackways from the Mesozoic. Ichnos 2015;22:3-4,235-260. •8:31 Melzack R, Wall PD. Pain mechanisms: a new theory. Science. 1965;150(3699):971-979. •34:40 Morse BL, Solodiuk JC, Greco CD, Mauskar S, Hauer J. Initial Validation of GRASP: A Differential Diagnoses Algorithm for Children With Medical Complexity and an Unknown Source of Pain. Hosp Pediatr. 2020;10(8):633-640. Initial publication date: December 22, 2022 Citation: Solodiuk J, Perez C, Daniel D, Wolbrink TA. Understanding the pain behaviors of nonverbal children with intellectual disability. 12/2022. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. soundcloud.com/openpediatrics/understanding-pain-behaviors-of-nonverbal-children-with-intellectual-disability. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

TechTalk Healthcare
The "LEGEND" w/ guest: Dr. Lou Sportelli, DC

TechTalk Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 71:08


As one of their most outstanding guests, Dr. Jay and Brad talk with the "Legend" Dr. Lou Sportelli, DC. This is an episoide that you will not want to miss! Dr. Sportelli has been President of NCMIC Group, Inc. since 1995. Dr. Sportelli served as President of the World Federation of Chiropractic (WFC) from 1998 to 2000 and also served as chairman of the board of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) from 1989 to 1990. Dr. Sportelli serves as Director of NCMIC Group, Inc. Dr. Sportelli serves as on the advisory board of The Chiropractic Report newsletter, and has been a trustee of the Palmerton Hospital since 1992 and the newly merged Blue Mountain Health Systems board since 2004. [1 A noted author, Dr. Sportelli has written an educational booklet, "Introduction to Chiropractic", which is a widely used patient education publication. He has co-authored a text used in many chiropractic colleges entitled "Professional Chiropractic Practice: Ethics, Business, Jurisprudence & Risk Management", as well as the Chiropractic Forms and Sample Letters book.

PCTY Talks
Staying Ahead of HR Compliance Requirements with Emily Dickens

PCTY Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 21:21 Transcription Available


Are you staying ahead of compliance requirements? Let's face it, it's not always easy to keep up with all the latest changes in the law. But if you don't stay on top of things, you could find yourself in big trouble. Join Emily Dickens and host Shari Simpson as they talk about the complexities of the compliance landscape and how to stay informed. Guest: Emily Dickens, Chief of Staff, Head of Government Affairs and Corporate Secretary, SHRM A lawyer by training, Emily is a business executive currently working for the world's largest human resources association. She speaks nationally and globally on issues related to work, workers and the workplace. Emily oversees administrative services, board relations, executive office, global outreach, and government/external affairs. Additionally, she represents the organization on the boards of the World Federation of Personnel Management Associations (WFPMA), the North American Human Resources Management Association, and the National Foundation for Women Legislators (NFWL). Mentioned in the episode: Emily Dickens: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emily-dickens-shrm/ SHRM Multi-State Comparison Tool: https://www.hrconnection.com/Home/tabid/5246186/language/en-US/Default.aspx

Pathways 2 Prevention
Peace Inn: Every Human is Blessed with the Opportunity for Greatness

Pathways 2 Prevention

Play Episode Play 16 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 43:22 Transcription Available


Pease Inn….. A House of Peace and Tranquility for Substance Use and Mental Health DisordersToday we are speaking with Asia Ashraf from Pakistan, who has been serving in the field of drug addiction/mental health disorders treatment and rehabilitation for the last 17 years. Asia received her Masters in Applied Psychology from Punjab University, completed a one-year fellowship in Substance Abuse, Education, Treatment, Policy and Prevention from Virginia Commonwealth University, USA (2015-2016) as a Hubert H. Humphrey Alumna. She is a Global DDR trainer and national trainer UTC for the UNODC and Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Program and is internationally certified addiction professional (ICAP-II) from GCCE, Sri Lanka. Asia is currently serving as Director Rehabilitation and Consultant Psychologist at Greenfield Hospital of Psychiatry where she provides counseling, relapse prevention training, capacity building of addiction professionals and orientation sessions for volunteers and mental health trainees. She is also a core team member of Gender Working Group by World Federation against Drugs (WFAD) to specifically address the illicit drug use among women, gender based violence and its correlation with illicit drug use and access to health care, treatment and recovery services for women. Asia is a prevention leader; she launched the first Recovery Club - an open, free, safe space for persons in recovery at Islamabad, Pakistan. She recently founded a virtual platform with the name of Peace Inn, A House of Peace and Tranquility for the treatment and rehabilitation of Substance use and mental health disorders!Asia was gracious enough to take time out of her busy schedule to share her story with us all while imparting a great deal of wisdom and lessons learned! It was an honor to speak with her and we hope you enjoy this episode. Episode Links:https://peaceinn.pk/https://www.facebook.com/peaceinn.pk/https://www.linkedin.com/in/asia-ashraf-122478121/ https://instagram.com/peaceinnbyasia?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= https://colombo-plan.org/ https://www.unodc.org/https://wfad.se/https://www.facebook.com/greenfieldhosphttps://www.instagram.com/greenfieldhospital/Drug Free America Foundation Links:WebsiteFacebookInstagramYouTubeTwitter

President’s Podcast
World Federation of Chiropractic with Dr. John Maltby

President’s Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 11:10


Dr. McDonald discusses the World Federation of Chiropractic with the latest president of WFC, Dr. John Maltby.

Frontline IB: Conversations With International Business Scholars

Wayne F. Cascio is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the Business School of the University of Colorado Denver, where he served as a member of the management faculty from 1981 to 2020. A former area and consulting editor of the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS), he has published more than 200 articles and book chapters, and 33 books, including Managing Human Resources: Productivity, Quality of Work Life, Profits (12th ed., 2022), Investing in People (3rd ed., 2019 with J. Boudreau and A. Fink), and Applied Psychology in Talent Management (8th ed., 2019 with H. Aguinis). In 2016, by a vote of 90 countries, he received the George Petitpas [Lifetime Achievement] Award from the World Federation of People Management Associations. In 2020 he received the inaugural Ulrich Impact Award from the HR Division of the Academy of Management for his research that links theory to practical applications, and he was also inducted into the Australian HR Institute's Hall of Fame. In 2022 he received the Distinguished Service Award from the University of Colorado Board of Regents for his service to the state and to the nation. Visit https://www.aib.world/frontline-ib/wayne-cascio/ for the original video interview.

Myers Detox
Top 10 Benefits of Healing Infrared Pads with Robby Besner

Myers Detox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 46:26


Dear friend and inventor, Robby Besner, joins the show to talk about all the incredible benefits that you can get from using full spectrum infrared heating pads. Robby recently developed an infrared heating pad that has been shown to help with so many health conditions, like pain, inflammation, stress, sleep, blood circulation, improved HRV, and much more. Infrared heating pads are key if you suffer from acute injuries, old injuries, chronic pain, a variety of chronic disease, or are just looking to detox and help your body recover from everyday stressors. Lots of great infrared topics covered in today's episode so make sure to tune in if you've been interested in investing in an infrared heating device!   On today's podcast, you will learn: How infrared wavelengths help our body heal. The major differences between infrared heating pads and traditional heating pads. The major health benefits of using an infrared heating pad. Robby's line of amazing infrared healing pads. How infrared pads help reduce stress and improve HRV. How they improve sleep and your sleep cycles. Why Robby added Jade stones to his healing pads.   Robby Besner's Bio: Rob Besner, PSc.D, CEO and Chief Science Officer of Therasage, has always been an advocate of natural health and wellness. Graduating from Boston University in Pre-Med, Engineering, Psychology and Business, he continued onto post graduate work at Case Western Medical School and Holistic Medicine.  After many years of illness, Mr. Besner's daughter was diagnosed with Lyme disease. This began his mission to find alternative, holistic and homeopathic avenues of treatment. He discovered the natural healing effects of infrared frequencies and began developing specialized devices and applications to help his daughter with her health challenge.  When he saw the positive results, he felt compelled to share what he had discovered, and formed Therasage.com, recognized as the leader in integrated Infrared technology. Therasage has built a reputation with the healthcare community and mainstream public by educating and creating special cutting edge applications and protocols. Robby is a professor for the World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies, annual contributor at the World Committee on Infrared, a member of the Education Committee of the Hippocrates Health Institute, a presenter at many medical, integrative, and anti-aging health conferences, a contributor on podcasts, on-line summits, radio and TV shows around the world. He's a best selling author and considered a leading scientist in the field of Integrated InfraRed technology. He continues to research and develop new applications to bring the power of healing with nature to the world. You can learn more about Robby and the products he developed at  

Deep Breaths
S5 Ep. 14: What a wonderful world

Deep Breaths

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 18:37


In today's episode, we discuss some recently published guidelines in the journal Anaesthesia regarding the provision of environmentally sustainable anaesthesia.  Feel free to email us at deepbreathspod@gmail.com if you have any questions, comments or suggestions. We love hearing from you! And don't forget to claim CPD for listening if you are a consultant or fellow. Log us as a learning session which you can find within the knowledge and skills division, and as evidence upload a screenshot of the podcast episode.  Thanks for listening, and happy studying!  Resources for today's episode: Principles of environmentally-sustainable anaesthesia: a global consensus statement from the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists 

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano
"Marketers promote industry standards to combat greenwashing This article is part of our special report Self-regulation for sustainability: Combatting greenwashing in ads. As greenwashing undermi

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 8:46


"Marketers promote industry standards to combat greenwashing This article is part of our special report Self-regulation for sustainability: Combatting greenwashing in ads. As greenwashing undermines trust in sustainability claims, marketers are looking into ways to self-regulate to promote credibil" "--START AD- #TheMummichogblogOfMalta Amazon Top and Flash Deals(Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://amzn.to/3CqsdJH Compare all the top travel sites in just one search to find the best hotel deals at HotelsCombined - awarded world's best hotel price comparison site. (Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://www.hotelscombined.com/?a_aid=20558 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets."""" #Jesus #Catholic. Smooth Radio Malta is Malta's number one digital radio station, playing Your Relaxing Favourites - Smooth provides a ‘clutter free' mix, appealing to a core 35-59 audience offering soft adult contemporary classics. We operate a playlist of popular tracks which is updated on a regular basis. https://smooth.com.mt/listen/ Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/themummichogblogdotcom END AD---" "ity. As public attention towards the climate crisis grows, consumers are increasingly seeking out verifiably sustainable products. As the EU begins to address false environmental labels, the advertising industry is looking at how it could self-regulate. If the EU's climate goals are to be met, the marketing industry must play a part in promoting both sustainable products and practices. That was the consensus reached at the event on Responsible Marketing for the Green Transition, hosted by the European Advertising Standards Alliance on Wednesday (16 November) to mark the organisation's 30th anniversary. The push for more trustworthy climate action within the industry comes amid similar efforts at the EU level, where the Commission has recently introduced several initiatives designed to enforce specific standards regarding green claims in advertising. Speakers at EASA's event, however, emphasised that, while an important component, legislation alone would not be enough to ensure a more responsible turn within the sector and that broad self-regulatory efforts, particularly those that encompassed digital platforms, would also be vital for success. Greening and greenwashing “We have a duty to step up as marketers” to contribute to reducing emissions and reaching climate goals, said Stephen Loerke, CEO of the World Federation of Advertisers. Companies should not see this as a restriction, he said, adding that “we want to get brands to embrace the climate transition as an opportunity” beyond the planetary and social benefits of an increased focus on genuine sustainability. In the three decades since the founding of EASA, which advises standards bodies and advertising organisations on self-regulatory action, “what has changed is the urgency of the green transition and the need to ensure that consumers are on board”, said the EU Justice Commissioner Didier Reynders. However, greenwashing is high in prevalence, as is consumer concern about it, he added, meaning that trust in environmental claims, in general, is being eroded. This comment was echoed by MEP Biljana Borzan, who told the event's audience that “we live in a jungle of unsubstantiated environmental claims”, for which further regulation is needed. Legislation and self-regulation Recent years have seen the rollout of several initiatives by the European Commission to address the issue of unsubstantiated and false claims, with comparable action also being undertaken at a national level in many countries. Among them, the importance of substantiation is outlined in both the European Green Deal and Brussels' 2020 Circular Economy Action Plan, and in March this year, the Commission pu

OPENPediatrics
"Research Trends in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Editor's Perspective"

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 20:28


In this World Shared Practice Forum podcast, Dr. Robert Tasker discusses trends in research over the past year from his position as Editor-in-Chief of the Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Journal. Dr. Tasker shares his views on some of the most active areas of research in the field of pediatric critical care medicine in 2022 and provides an insider's look at many metrics relating to the PCCM Journal itself, including impact factors, subscribership numbers, and Altmetric scores. Upon listening to this presentation, learners should be able to: -Identify diverse areas of active research interest within the field of pediatric critical care medicine -Describe the reach and impact of the journal Pediatric Critical Care Medicine within the field of pediatrics, and within medicine more generally -Interpret Altmetric scores to better understand the global reach of a published work Publication date: November 18, 2022. Citation: Tasker R, Daniel D, Burns JP. Research Trends in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Editor's Perspective. 11/2022. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://youtu.be/EnOz15CTiEI. Articles referenced: Jonat B, Gorelik M, Boneparth A, et al. Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children Associated With Coronavirus Disease 2019 in a Children's Hospital in New York City: Patient Characteristics and an Institutional Protocol for Evaluation, Management, and Follow-Up. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2021;22(3):e178-e191. (11:39) Capasso L, De Bernardo M, Vitiello L, Rosa N. Ultrasound Options for Measuring Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter in Children. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2021;22(5):e329-e330. (12:40) Staveski SL, Pickler RH, Khoury PR, et al. Prevalence of ICU Delirium in Postoperative Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2021;22(1):68-78. (13:42) Ozment CP, Scott BL, Bembea MM, Spinella PC; Pediatric ECMO (PediECMO) subgroup of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network and the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO). Anticoagulation and Transfusion Management During Neonatal and Pediatric Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Survey of Medical Directors in the United States. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2021;22(6):530-541 (14:05) Rimensberger PC, Kneyber MCJ, Deep A, et al. Caring for Critically Ill Children With Suspected or Proven Coronavirus Disease 2019 Infection: Recommendations by the Scientific Sections' Collaborative of the European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2021;22(1):56-67. (14:47) Additional references: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine journal: https://journals.lww.com/pccmjournal (06:42) Pediatric Critical Care section of Frontiers in Pediatrics journal: https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/pediatrics/sections/pediatric-critical-care (06:59) Journal of Pediatric Critical Care: https://www.jpcc.org.in (07:06) Critical Care Medicine journal: https://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal/pages/default.aspx (07:20) Pediatric Pulmonology journal: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10990496 (07:28) Atlmetric: https://www.altmetric.com/ (16:42) Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open-access and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Talking Taiwan
Ep 212 | Dr. Mark Chen: Advocate for Taiwan in Both the U.S. and Taiwan Part 1

Talking Taiwan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 49:35


A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   1979 was a crucial year for Taiwan. In January of that year the United States changed its diplomatic recognition from Taipei to Beijing and in December of that same year the Kaohsiung Incident happened. Speaking with my guest, Dr. Mark Chen, for this episode made me realize that there are many people to thank for the important work that they did back then to safeguard Taiwan and the people of Taiwan.   Dr. Mark Chen (陳唐山 ) has spent much of his life dedicated to doing advocacy work for Taiwan both in the U.S. and in Taiwan. Listeners of this podcast may recall his name being mentioned in episode 199 when I spoke with Gerrit van der Wees about the Taiwan Relations Act.   When the United States formally recognized the communist People's Republic of China and severed its diplomatic relations with Taiwan in 1979, Mark Chen and others reached out to U.S. congressmen and senators to express the concerns of the people of Taiwan. As a result, he and several others were invited to testify in front of the U.S Congress as the Taiwan Relations Act was being drafted. The act passed in April of 1979. Later that same year when the Kaohsiung Incident happened on December 10th Dr. Chen and overseas Taiwanese were galvanized to call for further investigation into the matter and to put international pressure on the Kuomintang government to release those charged and arrested in connection with the Kaohsiung Incident.   Dr. Chen also shared how the advocacy work being done for Taiwan at the time led to the formation of FAPA (the Formosan Association for Public Affairs) in 1982. This year marks the 40th anniversary of FAPA.   In part one of my interview with him we focus on the work he's done for Taiwan in the U.S.- which started when he was a student at the University of Oklahoma.   Dr. Chen has been the president of the Taiwanese Association of America, World Federation of Taiwanese Associations, and the Formosan Association of Public Affairs.   In part two of my interview with Mark Chen, we'll talk about his work in Taiwan as an elected official and public servant, and his current work as the chairman of the Prospect Foundation.   Here's a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode: How the education Dr. Chen received when Taiwan was ruled by the Japanese influenced him How the arrival of the Kuomintang in Taiwan in 1945 at the end of World War II was without the consent of the Taiwanese people and changed things overnight for the people of Taiwan How the Chiang Kai-shek Kuomintang government was focused on retaking China at the time and a lot of this rhetoric ended up being taught in schools The impact of the 228 massacre on the people of Taiwan How subject matter taught in schools changed under the Kuomintang How Mark and many of his peers were able to study in the U.S.  with the financial assistance of scholarships How an exit visa was needed to be able to leave Taiwan which was still under martial law at the time His involvement with Taiwanese student groups as a university student was forbidden by the Kuomintang government in Taiwan at the time Why his Taiwan passport was confiscated after sending it to the Taiwan embassy in Houston to be renewed; making him stateless When an ad about the 228 massacre that was to run to the University Oklahoma newspaper was denied publication, Dr. Chen who was a young student at the university, appealed directly to the university's president who agreed to publish the ad When the U.S. cut its official relationship with Taiwan in 1979, Taiwan was known as “Free China” under the rule of the Chiang Kai-shek government, as opposed to “Red China” which refers to the People's Republic of China How Dr. Chen and others in the Taiwanese American community worked to inform members of the U.S. Congress about the importance of the U.S. maintaining a relationship with Taiwan, and understanding the perspectives of the Taiwanese people How Dr. Chen was blacklisted for being involved with organizing Taiwanese student organizations not allowed to return to Taiwan for father's funeral How Dr. Chen, Peng Ming-min and others were invited to testify to the U.S. Congress about on behalf of the people of Taiwan that there should be freedom and democracy in Taiwan, this formed the basis for the Taiwan Relations Act On January 1, 1979 U.S. President Jimmy Carter switched the U.S.'s diplomatic recognition from Taiwan to the People's Republic of China How Dr. Chen asked the American Institute in Taiwan office in Washington D.C. to investigate the Kaohsiung Incident which happened on December 10, 1979 Dr. Chen was the chairperson of the World Federation of Taiwanese Associations when he personally went to visit the chairman of Amnesty International in London to appeal of their help in calling for the release of those arrested due to the Kaohsiung Incident How Dr. Chen and others informed U.S. Senator Edward (Ted) Kennedy about the Kaohsiung Incident and what was happening in Taiwan at the time What led to FAPA (Formosan Association for Public Affairs) being established in 1982 When U.S. President Jimmy Carter officially recognized the People's Republic of China, the annual 20,000 immigration quota that the U.S. had allotted for Taiwan would switch over to China, Dr. Chen, Chai Trong-rong and others started lobbying for the immigration quota They reached out to Senator Ted Kennedy, Senator Claiborne Pell, Congressman Jim Leach and Congressman Stephen Solarz, about the immigration quota and a bill was passed that allowed the U.S. to allot Taiwan an annual immigration quota of 20,000 The success of recovering the U.S. immigration quota for Taiwan led to the idea to form FAPA (Formosan Association for Public Affairs) FAPA was modeled after AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee) The first president of FAPA was Chai Trong-rong and Dr. Mark Chen was the second   Related Links: To view all related links for this article, click link below: https://talkingtaiwan.com/dr-mark-chen-advocate-for-taiwan-in-both-the-u-s-and-taiwan-ep-212/

OPENPediatrics
Pediatric Behavioral-Mental Health: Anxiety

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 17:25


This podcast discusses pediatric anxiety and how to approach and support a patient who suffers from a possible anxiety disorder. The authors review the guidelines and tools used for diagnosing anxiety disorders and discuss treatments. Initial Publication: November 9, 2022. Dholakia A, Ngo A, Chase B, Wills K, Blackburn K. Pediatric Behavioral-Mental Health: Anxiety. 11/2022. Online Video. OPENPediatrics. https://learn.openpediatrics.org/learn/course/internal/view/elearning/5300/pediatric-behavioral-mental-health-anxiety. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user.For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24
Korea 24 - 2022.11.08

KBS WORLD Radio Korea 24

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022


Korea24 – 2022.11.08 (Tuesday) News Briefing: The National Police Agency's special investigation team on the Itaewon crowd crush disaster raided 55 government offices on Tuesday, including the office of the Police Commissioner General Yoon Hee-keun. (Eunice Kim) In-Depth News Analysis: North Korea has rapidly escalated its provocations in recent weeks, launching dozens of missiles of various types. Meanwhile, speculation remains that the regime may be gearing up for its long-anticipated seventh nuclear test. We speak to Markus Schiller, a leading expert on North Korean missiles and the founder of Munich-based consulting company ST Analytics, to assess the current state of North Korea’s missile and nuclear capabilities. Korea Trending with Diane Yoo: 1. Former President Moon Jae-in is set to give up a pair of dogs gifted by North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, and their puppy, citing a lack of support from the Yoon administration. (문 전 대통령 풍산개 반납 vs 파양 논란) 2. The theme park, Everland, has won the Award of Garden Excellence by the World Federation of Rose Societies for its rose garden. (에버랜드, 국내 최초 세계장미회가 꼽은 ‘최고 장미원’에 선정) 3. The moon is set to turn a coppery shade of red Tuesday night, due to a total lunar eclipse phenomena dubbed “blood moon.” (200년 안에 없을 ‘특급 우주쇼’…오늘 밤 ‘붉은 달’을 주목하라!) Touch Base In Seoul: Veteran rugby coach Charles Louw took charge of the South Korean national men's rugby team in early 2021 and he has been dubbed the "Rugby Hiddink" for the transformative impact he has had. He joins us via video call to tell us more about how he decided to come to Korea and what he hopes to achieve for South Korean rugby. Morning Edition Preview with Walter Lee: - Tomorrow’s Korea Herald features a report by Yim Hyun-su on the issues that foreign travelers are having with the Korea Electronic Travel Authorization (K-ETA) system. - In tomorrow’s Korea Times, Kwak Yeon-soo writes on Korean director Park Chan-wook being honored by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA).

OT & Chill
Episode 61 – Conversation With Kit Sinclair

OT & Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 44:10


Episode 61 – Conversation With Kit Sinclair In this episode, I speak with Kit Sinclair. Kit is an Occupational Therapist based in Hong Kong who has dedicated her life work to the profession. Kit has been involved in the development of the profession in Asia and other parts of the world. She has also been part of the World Federation of Occupational Therapy at different level including Presidency. In the episode, we discuss her work and also her part in creating learning modules for Disaster Management & Preparedness and work with displaced people in Occupational Therapy. Kit refers to WFOT Learning for modules about disaster management and working with displaced people if you want to learn some more. If you have any feedback on this episode or you would like to be a guest on a future episode, please drop an email to “otandchill@gmail.com” or DM via Twitter (@OT_Chill) or Instagram (otandchill). Please rate and review this podcast to help it get noticed by others. Also share it with colleagues and friends. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/otandchill/message

Let's talk trade by WTO
Trade Goals: Footballs (S5 – Ep2)

Let's talk trade by WTO

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 32:32


Footballs are an indispensable item in the global value chain of the beautiful game.  Manufacturing, distributing and selling the balls is a complex international business.It is difficult to pinpoint where in the world a ball is actually made because the sourcing of raw materials, the design and the production happen in different countries. But one thing is certain: WTO agreements play an important role in easing trade in footballs.WTO experts Roy Santana, Michael Roberts and Úna Flanagan trace the global value chain of footballs from the Servette Football Club in Geneva via Herzogenaurach, Germany to Sialkot, Pakistan. Stopovers in Uganda and Uruguay show how international standards ease trade.We talked to:Philippe Senderos, Sporting Director of Servette FC, GenevaQasim Malik, Vice President of the Sialkot Chamber of Commerce, PakistanNouman Butt, CEO of Capital Sports, Sialkot, PakistanGerardo Cal, Guide at the Estadio Centenario Football Museum in Montevideo, UruguayRobbert de Kock, President and CEO of the World Federation of the Sporting Goods Industry, SwitzerlandGeorge Opiyo, TBT National Enquiry Point, Uganda National Bureau of StandardsOliver Hundacker, Senior Director of product operations at Adidas, GermanySpecial thanks to Arshad Nawaz, Intern at the WTO Institute for Training and Technical Cooperation (ITTC)Links:One match, two balls. The 1930 World Cup in Uruguay featured two footballs with different designs in the final match:Photo of the ball team Argentina used in the first half of the final of the 1930 World Cup in UruguayPhoto of the ball team Uruguay used in the second half of the final of the 1930 World Cup in UruguayAbout the famous Wembley goal — or “Hurst's overtime goal” — in the final of the 1966 World Cup between England and Germany:England v Germany (1966): The Most Controversial World Cup Final Learn more about rules of origin:Rules of origin explainedLearn more about Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT):Technical barriers to trade explainedVideo "Let's Talk Product Quality"Learn more about tariffs:Tariffs explainedVideo "Let's Talk Tariffs"

Become your own Superhero
Vera Sharav - a dire WARNING From A Holocaust Survivor

Become your own Superhero

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 61:10


A public advocate for human rights is the founder and president of the Alliance for Human Research Protection (AHRP) which serves as an information resource and public interest watchdog organization whose goal is to unlock the walls of secrecy in biomedical research and bring accountability to that endeavor. AHRP Infomails have a wide following: they are read by physicians and scientists, public health officials, journalists, lawyers, and patient advocacy organizations.Her advocacy achievements include: suspension of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pesticide experiment (CHEERS) on children; complaint led to two federal investigations on the use of children in foster care as guinea pigs in experimental AIDS drug and vaccine trials; suspension of smallpox vaccine on children; suspension of “violence prediction” experiment that exposed 6–11 year old NYC boys of color to fenfluramine ; opened a public debate about the ethics of relapse-inducing experiments in schizophrenia patients. Organized families and victims of unethical research to join her in testifying before the National Bioethics Advisory Committee (NBAC) — re: unethical experimentation on mentally disabled psychiatric patients; those testimonies led to a prize-winning series in the Boston Globe, “Doing Harm: Research on the Mentally Ill” — ultimately resulting in the shutdown of 29 clinical trials at the National Institute of Mental Health (1999).Mrs. Sharav served on the Children's Workgroup of the National Human Research Protection Advisory Committee where she was the sole dissenter objecting to expanded use of children in high risk medical experiments. She has testified before public policy advisory panels including, the Institute of Medicine — against human pesticide experiments; against prison drug research; numerous FDA hearings, against misuse of psychotropic drugs for children.She has been an invited presenter at various professional and academic forums: World Federation of Science Journalists, London; National Academy of Sciences Policy Fellow program and National Public Health Association re: screening for mental illness; Consumers Institute for Medicines and Health, Stockholm — re: America's overmedicated children; Columbia University; NY Hospital, Cornell; U.S. military medical ethics forum; University of Texas.Her recent peer-reviewed publications include: Medical Ethics and Contemporary Medicine in Vaccine Epidemic Edited by Louise Kuo Habakus and Mary Holland, JD (2011); Screening for Mental Illness: The Merger of Eugenics and the Drug Industry, Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry (2005); Conflicts of Interest in Biomedical Research Harm Children With and Without Disabilities,” Journal of Disability Policy Studies (2004); “The Impact of FDAMA on the recruitment of children for research,” EHPP (2003); “Children in Clinical Research: A Conflict of Moral Values,” American Journal of Bioethics (2003); The ethics of conducting psychosis-inducing experiments,” Accountability in Research (1999).Support the showYour host is Laban Ditchburn aka "World's Best Courage Coach". Have you read Laban's book? Bet on You - (it's awesome!). Bet on You - Paperback, Kindle and Audiobook (in my voice!). I love to connect in person, but until then you'll find your favourite social media via the link below! https://linktr.ee/LabanDitchburn

Down To Business
Stephan Loerke, CEO of the World Federation of Advertisers

Down To Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 12:44


The World Federation of Advertising connects the world's biggest brand owners in more than 60 markets, bringing together tens of thousands of brands at local level. Together, they create a global network that offers a unique source of leadership, expertise, and inspiration. Every year there is a dedicated conference for all of the National Association Councils (NAC's) around the world and this year Stephan Loerke, CEO of the World Federation of Advertisers is leading the conference right here in Dublin. He joins Emmet Oliver to discuss.

OPENPediatrics
"Sudden Infant Death Syndrome" by Dr. Richard Goldstein for OPENPediatrics

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 45:27


October is Sudden Infant Death Syndrome awareness month. Dr. Richard Goldstein, director of the Robert's Program on Sudden Unexplained Death in Pediatrics, provides an overview of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), including historical perspectives, definitions, current understanding of potential etiologies, and emerging research. Additionally, Dr. Goldstein offers practical tips for speaking with caregivers about SIDS. After this podcast, listeners will be able to: -Learn the historical background of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) -Describe key terminology regarding SIDS and Sudden Unexplained Death in Pediatrics -Identify some of the proposed mechanisms related to SIDS -Present practical advice for speaking with families and caregivers Publication date: October 21, 2022. Articles referenced: • Goldstein RD, Kinney HC, Guttmacher AE. Only Halfway There with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2022;386(20):1873-1875. (0:44) • MacDorman MF, Rosenberg HM. Trends in infant mortality by cause of death and other characteristics, 1960-88. Vital Health Stat 20. 1993;(20):1-57. (2:40) • Mitchell EA, Thach BT, Thompson JMD, Williams S, for the New Zealand Cot Death Study. Changing Infants' Sleep Position Increases Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1999;153(11):1136–1141. (2:48) • Haynes RL, Frelinger AL 3rd, Giles EK, et al. High serum serotonin in sudden infant death syndrome. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(29):7695-7700. (17:20) • Kinney HC, Haynes RL, Armstrong DD, et. al. Abnormalities of the Hippocampus in Sudden and Unexpected Death in Early Life. In: Duncan JR, Byard RW, eds. SIDS Sudden Infant and Early Childhood Death: The Past, the Present and the Future. University of Adelaide Press; 2018. (19:09) • Koh HY, Haghighi A, Keywan C, et al. Genetic Determinants of Sudden Unexpected Death in Pediatrics. Genet Med. 2022;24(4):839-850. (22:50) • Miller MB, Huang AY, Kim J, et al. Somatic genomic changes in single Alzheimer's disease neurons. Nature. 2022;604(7907):714-722. (30:45) • Warland J, O'Leary J, McCutcheon H, Williamson V. Parenting paradox: parenting after infant loss. Midwifery. 2011;27(5):e163-e169. (36:10) • Kinney HC, Richerson GB, Dymecki SM, Darnall RA, Nattie EE. The brainstem and serotonin in the sudden infant death syndrome. Annu Rev Pathol. 2009;4:517-550. (42:01) Additional references: • Back to Sleep campaign: https://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov/act... • https://www.childrenshospital.org/pro... • https://undiagnosed.hms.harvard.edu/ • https://www.broadinstitute.org/ • https://medicine.uiowa.edu/humangenet... • https://www.genomeweb.com/informatics... • https://med.nyu.edu/departments-insti... • https://www.australiangenomics.org.au.... • https://ojrd.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13023-021-02089-5 Citation: Goldstein R, Daniel D, Wolbrink T. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. 10/22. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://youtu.be/pu-gnSCHDhw. Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

High Truths on Drugs and Addiction
Episode #95 High Truths on Drugs and Addiction with Mark Parrino on Methadone Clinics

High Truths on Drugs and Addiction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 89:48


Methadone Clinic give methadone, but can they use other medications to treat addiction or assist with other drugs such as methamphetamine? Listen to the conversation with our nation's leader of opioid treatment programs, Mark Parrino. Mark W. Parrino, MPA President, American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence, AATOD Mr. Parrino has been involved in the delivery of health care and substance abuse treatment since 1974. He received both a Baccalaureate in Psychology (1974) and a Masters in Health Policy, Planning and Administration (1982) from New York University. Mr. Parrino served as the Director of the Gramercy Park Medical Group, an outpatient methadone treatment program, from 1980 to 1994. He also served as President of the National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. (NDRI). Mr. Parrino served as the Chair of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) Consensus Panel for State Methadone Treatment Guidelines, the first Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) published for national distribution. Currently, Mr. Parrino is the President of the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence (AATOD) and continues to be responsible for the development and implementation of the Association's organizing initiatives. He also serves as the Vice President of the World Federation for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence (WFTOD).

Our Hen House
International Cooperation on Behalf of Animals w/ Dr. James Yeates & Jessica Bridgers

Our Hen House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 57:54


The World Federation for Animals (WFA) is a new membership organization that seeks to harness the collective strength of the animal protection movement to advocate for the inclusion of animals in global policy making. This week, CEO Dr. James Yeates and Policy Director Jessica Bridgers join us on the podcast for a conversation about how the organization is spearheading this global… The post International Cooperation on Behalf of Animals w/ Dr. James Yeates & Jessica Bridgers appeared first on Our Hen House.

TNT Radio
Lord Christopher Monckton on The Marc Morano Show - 15 October 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 55:28


GUEST OVERVIEW: Christopher Monckton, Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, was Special Advisor to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher from 1982 to 1986. Christopher Monckton, Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, has held positions with the British press and in government, as a press officer at the Conservative Central Office, and as Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's policy advisor. Lord Monckton was Special Advisor to Margaret Thatcher as U.K. Prime Minister from 1982 to 1986. On leaving 10 Downing Street, he established a successful specialist consultancy company, giving technical advice to corporations and governments. For his work on the climate, Lord Monckton, who was Nerenberg Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, has been presented with numerous honors, including the Meese-Noble Award for Freedom, the Valiant-for-Truth Award of the Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow, the Santhigiri Ashram Award, and the Intelligence Medal of the Army of Colombia. Lord Monckton has authored numerous papers on the climate issue for the layman, as well as for leading peer-reviewed scientific journals. He established in a paper for the World Federation of Scientists that CO2 has a social benefit, not a social cost. He was also a co-author of the paper that showed the claim of “97% scientific consensus” about climate change to be false (the true figure is 0.35).

I Hear Things
ESPN Nears Large New Partnership With DraftKings & 6 Other Stories

I Hear Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 9:51


This week: ESPN to potentially partner with DraftKings, Podcasting unions make headlines, Netflix confirms two independent measurement companies, advertisers reflect on 2023 spend, and two new podcasting hosts arrive in the US. ESPN Nears Large New Partnership With DraftKingsManuela: Last Thursday Ed Hammond and Crystal Tse of Bloomberg covered an anticipated deal between ESPN and sports-betting firm DraftKings. According to an update to the piece, DraftKings' stock rose as much as 8.8% in response to the news on Friday. “ESPN has already invested heavily in sports gambling, though it has steered clear of taking actual bets. The broadcaster has betting-related shows such as Daily Wager and marketing deals with DraftKings and Caesars Entertainment Inc. where links to the sportsbooks are integrated into ESPN's website. Disney also acquired a stake in DraftKings as part of its acquisition of Fox's entertainment assets in 2019.”Disney has long avoided gambling in pursuit of upholding its wholesome family image. As Bloomberg points out, none of the Disney cruise ship fleet have casinos aboard, nor are Disney characters licensed to slot machine manufacturers. Clearly, their attitudes appear to be changing as they search for a sports betting partner for ESPN.Sean Russo, Research Manager of Magellan AI, offered this when asked about the growth of sports betting and adjacent categories: “As of August, the Fantasy Sports industry is up 22% year to date, although historically spending in the industry has peaked in September. Last year spend more than doubled between August and September, primarily driven by brands like Fanduel and DraftKings”  ESPN is a major podcast network and sports betting, as well as its cousins like fantasy sports, continue to climb in popularity. If this deal comes to fruition, it could be a big deal indeed. Podcasting gains new union, hears from two recently affected by Spotify layoffs. Shreya: In this first segment we have two stories fitting in a theme of organized labor in podcasting. Last Tuesday, Audacy's Pineapple Street Studios announced last Tuesday that roughly 75% of their proposed bargaining unit signed up to officially join WGA East. Ashley Carman reported for Bloomberg: “The employees said they're looking for increased transparency around pay, rights to their intellectual property, protection against favoritism at work and improved health insurance, according to the letter.”Later in the week, the utility of unionizing was highlighted when Spotify pruned their walled garden. Last Thursday Tech Crunch's Lauren Forristal reported on Spotify canceling multiple shows at once from two of the four Spotify in-house content production companies. Three podcasts from Gimlet and eight from Parcast are either canceled effective immediately or set - in the case of Horoscope Today - scheduled to end in the second quarter of 2023. Spotify also announced this would cause “less than 5% of layoffs of Spotify's podcast staff.”  Last Friday both the Gimlet Union and Parcast Union took issue with that number in an official letter posted to Twitter.  “Yesterday, Spotify blindsided both Gimlet Union and Parcast Union with at least 38 layoffs across their studios. Spotify has said in the press that these layoffs constitute less than 5% of people working on original podcasts. That number is misleading. The reality is that each bargaining unit organized with the Writers Guild of America, East has lost about 30% of its members. These are not small cuts, they are massive restructurings.”  The two unions go on to highlight Spotify's internal reasoning for canceling the podcasts was due to low listenership, which the unions argue was in large part due to decisions made by Spotify itself.  “Their decision to make most of Gimlet's and Parcast's shows Spotify Exclusive caused a steep drop in listeners - as high as three quarters of the audience for some shows. Yet the company did little or nothing to staunch the bleeding. Shows languished without marketing support, and teams were not given clear audience goals to meet.”  Netflix strikes measurement deals ahead of new ad-supported tier Manuela: On Monday Garett Sloane, writing for AdAge, reported on some updates to the ongoing story of Netflix prepping for the launch of their ad-supported tier. As covered in the September 8th episode of The Download, details were scarce about the tier beyond its possible price point and the streamer's CPM goals. “... Netflix has been asking for high prices for its ad inventory, at least $60 CPMs—cost per thousand views—while only offering limited targeting possibilities and no third-party measurement, according to people familiar with the situation.” Now Netflix has announced they're working with both Integral Ad Science and DoubleVerify to act as that third-party measurement. A measurement executive speaking to Sloane anonymously believes implementation of the two services should be relatively easy for Netflix. Netflix signing two big-name third-party companies to give credence to their measurement stands as another example of why a certain podcasting platform's decisions come off as odd. Spotify, when in a similar position of needing brand safety and ad measurement as Netflix, chose to not only work with one third-party company, they strongly inferred the partnership intended to create a proprietary brand safety tool. Surveyed advertisers discuss where they'll potentially spend differently in an uncertain 2023.  Shreya: Much talk has been had about the uncertainties of how things will look in the future as the economy has a will-they-won't-they relationship with a recession. This Wednesday MarketingBrew's Ryan Barwick brought some numbers to the table that demonstrate just how uncertain the industry is. The following numbers are the result of a survey of 43 advertisers run by the World Federation of Advertisers and their media research company Ebiquity. 41% expect to keep their 2022 budgets, though as Barwick says in the article: “29% said they expect a decrease in their budget. The remaining 29% said they expect to see an increase.”While 43 might seem like a small sample size for a survey, it's worth noting those companies account for $44 billion in ad spend. 28% said they'd increase performance advertising, while 21% aim to increase their share of brand advertising. 40% of respondents would up their share of flexible or biddable buys. ““With uncertain times ahead, it's clear that brand advertisers seek more tactical agility in terms of trading and shifting budgets throughout the year, versus annual upfront commitments,” Ruben Schreurs, chief product officer at Ebiquity, wrote to Marketing Brew.”  New Podcast Hosts Cross the Atlantic Manuela: Two new podcast hosting services have hit the US markets this week. First: podcast recording and editing application Alitu has announced Alitu Hosting, making the service all-in-one. According to Jacob Anderson, head of Growth at Alitu: “We started building Alitu four years ago with one mission in mind: to offer the clearest path to sharing your voice and making an impact on the world, making no compromise over control and creativity. Whether that's making one person laugh, or lifting an entire community, we want to offer the help you need to achieve your purpose.” This Tuesday French hosting service Ausha announced the rolling out of their service in the US on their official blog. Quick Hits: Recommended Weekend Reading Shreya: Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week: Platforms used for listening to podcasts in Poland in 2022 by Statista. We make a point of discussing podcasting performance around the globe. With that in mind, here's a snapshot of data showcasing what podcast consumption looks like in Poland. Acast Talks Layoffs, It's U.S. Moves, The Ad Market, And Why It's Selling ‘The Heart.' by InsideRadio. Coverage of Acast's recent earnings call, including higher-ups talking through their strategies, layoffs, and revealing Acast only sold 28% of their ad inventory in 2021. In the interest of clarity, it's worth keeping in mind InsideRadio is owned by competitor iHeartMedia.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Tom Webster are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied
ESPN Nears Large New Partnership With DraftKings & 6 Other Stories

Sounds Profitable: Adtech Applied

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 9:51


This week: ESPN to potentially partner with DraftKings, Podcasting unions make headlines, Netflix confirms two independent measurement companies, advertisers reflect on 2023 spend, and two new podcasting hosts arrive in the US. ESPN Nears Large New Partnership With DraftKingsManuela: Last Thursday Ed Hammond and Crystal Tse of Bloomberg covered an anticipated deal between ESPN and sports-betting firm DraftKings. According to an update to the piece, DraftKings' stock rose as much as 8.8% in response to the news on Friday. “ESPN has already invested heavily in sports gambling, though it has steered clear of taking actual bets. The broadcaster has betting-related shows such as Daily Wager and marketing deals with DraftKings and Caesars Entertainment Inc. where links to the sportsbooks are integrated into ESPN's website. Disney also acquired a stake in DraftKings as part of its acquisition of Fox's entertainment assets in 2019.”Disney has long avoided gambling in pursuit of upholding its wholesome family image. As Bloomberg points out, none of the Disney cruise ship fleet have casinos aboard, nor are Disney characters licensed to slot machine manufacturers. Clearly, their attitudes appear to be changing as they search for a sports betting partner for ESPN.Sean Russo, Research Manager of Magellan AI, offered this when asked about the growth of sports betting and adjacent categories: “As of August, the Fantasy Sports industry is up 22% year to date, although historically spending in the industry has peaked in September. Last year spend more than doubled between August and September, primarily driven by brands like Fanduel and DraftKings”  ESPN is a major podcast network and sports betting, as well as its cousins like fantasy sports, continue to climb in popularity. If this deal comes to fruition, it could be a big deal indeed. Podcasting gains new union, hears from two recently affected by Spotify layoffs. Shreya: In this first segment we have two stories fitting in a theme of organized labor in podcasting. Last Tuesday, Audacy's Pineapple Street Studios announced last Tuesday that roughly 75% of their proposed bargaining unit signed up to officially join WGA East. Ashley Carman reported for Bloomberg: “The employees said they're looking for increased transparency around pay, rights to their intellectual property, protection against favoritism at work and improved health insurance, according to the letter.”Later in the week, the utility of unionizing was highlighted when Spotify pruned their walled garden. Last Thursday Tech Crunch's Lauren Forristal reported on Spotify canceling multiple shows at once from two of the four Spotify in-house content production companies. Three podcasts from Gimlet and eight from Parcast are either canceled effective immediately or set - in the case of Horoscope Today - scheduled to end in the second quarter of 2023. Spotify also announced this would cause “less than 5% of layoffs of Spotify's podcast staff.”  Last Friday both the Gimlet Union and Parcast Union took issue with that number in an official letter posted to Twitter.  “Yesterday, Spotify blindsided both Gimlet Union and Parcast Union with at least 38 layoffs across their studios. Spotify has said in the press that these layoffs constitute less than 5% of people working on original podcasts. That number is misleading. The reality is that each bargaining unit organized with the Writers Guild of America, East has lost about 30% of its members. These are not small cuts, they are massive restructurings.”  The two unions go on to highlight Spotify's internal reasoning for canceling the podcasts was due to low listenership, which the unions argue was in large part due to decisions made by Spotify itself.  “Their decision to make most of Gimlet's and Parcast's shows Spotify Exclusive caused a steep drop in listeners - as high as three quarters of the audience for some shows. Yet the company did little or nothing to staunch the bleeding. Shows languished without marketing support, and teams were not given clear audience goals to meet.”  Netflix strikes measurement deals ahead of new ad-supported tier Manuela: On Monday Garett Sloane, writing for AdAge, reported on some updates to the ongoing story of Netflix prepping for the launch of their ad-supported tier. As covered in the September 8th episode of The Download, details were scarce about the tier beyond its possible price point and the streamer's CPM goals. “... Netflix has been asking for high prices for its ad inventory, at least $60 CPMs—cost per thousand views—while only offering limited targeting possibilities and no third-party measurement, according to people familiar with the situation.” Now Netflix has announced they're working with both Integral Ad Science and DoubleVerify to act as that third-party measurement. A measurement executive speaking to Sloane anonymously believes implementation of the two services should be relatively easy for Netflix. Netflix signing two big-name third-party companies to give credence to their measurement stands as another example of why a certain podcasting platform's decisions come off as odd. Spotify, when in a similar position of needing brand safety and ad measurement as Netflix, chose to not only work with one third-party company, they strongly inferred the partnership intended to create a proprietary brand safety tool. Surveyed advertisers discuss where they'll potentially spend differently in an uncertain 2023.  Shreya: Much talk has been had about the uncertainties of how things will look in the future as the economy has a will-they-won't-they relationship with a recession. This Wednesday MarketingBrew's Ryan Barwick brought some numbers to the table that demonstrate just how uncertain the industry is. The following numbers are the result of a survey of 43 advertisers run by the World Federation of Advertisers and their media research company Ebiquity. 41% expect to keep their 2022 budgets, though as Barwick says in the article: “29% said they expect a decrease in their budget. The remaining 29% said they expect to see an increase.”While 43 might seem like a small sample size for a survey, it's worth noting those companies account for $44 billion in ad spend. 28% said they'd increase performance advertising, while 21% aim to increase their share of brand advertising. 40% of respondents would up their share of flexible or biddable buys. ““With uncertain times ahead, it's clear that brand advertisers seek more tactical agility in terms of trading and shifting budgets throughout the year, versus annual upfront commitments,” Ruben Schreurs, chief product officer at Ebiquity, wrote to Marketing Brew.”  New Podcast Hosts Cross the Atlantic Manuela: Two new podcast hosting services have hit the US markets this week. First: podcast recording and editing application Alitu has announced Alitu Hosting, making the service all-in-one. According to Jacob Anderson, head of Growth at Alitu: “We started building Alitu four years ago with one mission in mind: to offer the clearest path to sharing your voice and making an impact on the world, making no compromise over control and creativity. Whether that's making one person laugh, or lifting an entire community, we want to offer the help you need to achieve your purpose.” This Tuesday French hosting service Ausha announced the rolling out of their service in the US on their official blog. Quick Hits: Recommended Weekend Reading Shreya: Finally, it's time for our semi-regular roundup of articles we're calling Quick Hits. These are articles that didn't quite make the cut for today's episode, but are still worth including in your weekend reading. This week: Platforms used for listening to podcasts in Poland in 2022 by Statista. We make a point of discussing podcasting performance around the globe. With that in mind, here's a snapshot of data showcasing what podcast consumption looks like in Poland. Acast Talks Layoffs, It's U.S. Moves, The Ad Market, And Why It's Selling ‘The Heart.' by InsideRadio. Coverage of Acast's recent earnings call, including higher-ups talking through their strategies, layoffs, and revealing Acast only sold 28% of their ad inventory in 2021. In the interest of clarity, it's worth keeping in mind InsideRadio is owned by competitor iHeartMedia.  The Download is a production of Sounds Profitable. Today's episode was hosted by Shreya Sharma and Manuela Bedoya, and the script was written by Gavin Gaddis. Bryan Barletta and Tom Webster are the executive producers of The Download from Sounds Profitable.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Josh Poertner - Silca

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 102:09 Very Popular


In this week's episode, Randall has Josh Poertner on to talk aerodynamics. In a wide-ranging conversation, the two touch upon Josh's time as Technical Director at Zipp, involvement in the development of computational models for rotating wheels, early collaboration with Cervelo founders Phil White and Gerard Vroomen, founding and leadership of the product brand Silca and The Marginal Gains Podcast, and ongoing consulting work with elite athletes and teams. Silca Website  Marginal Gains Podcast Episode Sponsor: Logos Components  Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Silca - Josh Poertner [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the show, I'm handing the microphone back to my co-host Randall Jacobs. Who's got Josh Portner, the CEO of Silka on the shout out a wide range in conversation about the sport and high performance. Many of you may be familiar with the storied Silka brand. It's been around for close to a hundred years. But josh took over back in 2013 with a mission of merging the highest quality materials and craftsmanship with cutting edge design and manufacturing When you visit the Silca website, you notice a tagline, the pursuit of perfection, never settling, always improving. And I think that embodies how Josh approaches the sport. . So I'm excited to pass you over to Randall to dig into this conversation. Before we jump in i want to thank this week sponsor logos components Yeah, I've been itching to get back on a set of six 50 B wheels, and I've been waiting for my logo's components, wheels to arrive. They literally just arrived last night and I'm super stoked. But yet disappointed because I have to go away for the weekend and I won't be able to actually ride them until sometime next week. I chose the Atara six 50 B model. As you know, I'm sort of big on the big tires, big fun philosophy. So I've been eager on my unicorn, which I've been riding on a 700 SEASET for a while now. To get into the six 50 bees again and see what a six 50 by 50 combined with that rock shock fork is going to yield for me on the trails here in Marin. You guys may remember. Me sitting down with Randall, talking about what makes a great gravel wheel set and everything that went into these logos component wheels. I encourage you to go back to that conversation because whether or not the logo's wheel set is for you or not. I think Randall does an excellent job of teasing out. All the various considerations. You should be having when considering buying a gravel wheelset, It is no small expense when getting into a carbon wheel set, but the team at logos has endeavored with their direct consumer model. Uh, to make it as affordable as possible and make them as durable and high performing as anything out there on the market. I written wheels designed by Randall for the last three years. So I'm super excited. To see his latest vision come to fruition. With these new wheels and I'll have them underneath me soon enough. I encourage you to check them out@logoscomponents.com. Randall's also an active member of the ridership community. So if you have questions for him, feel free to join us over there at the ridership and connect with other riders. I seen people paying that their wheels have arrived so you can get some real, real people answering your questions. About whether they're enjoying the wheelset and how they perform, et cetera. And I'll have more on this in future additions. At this point. I'm going to hand the microphone over to Randall. And i hope you enjoy this conversation with josh [00:03:30] Randall: Josh Portner, thank you for joining us on the podcast. This is a conversation I've been looking forward to for quite some time. Some deep bike nerdy is probably about to ensue, so, uh, let's dive, let's hope. Dive right into it. [00:03:43] Josh: Well, thank you for having me. Always, always up for some deep bike. Nerdy. I like that. [00:03:49] Randall: So a number of our listeners will already know who you are, but just give folks a high level summary of what you do now. [00:03:55] Josh: Oh gosh. So I own Silca, um, or I own Arrow Mind, which, uh, owns the Silca brand and trademark, um, and, and all that that entails. And then we also have a, uh, we own Marginal Gains, which is a podcast and a YouTube channel. And, um, Yeah, our goal is to, a mind works with a lot of pro riders, pro teams, world tour teams. Um, you know, we do everything, Excuse me. We do everything from, you know, performance consulting, uh, modeling, uh, you know, setting up our record attempts for people or, or helping them design our record attempts. Um, you know, we do tire pressure work with pros. We do equipment choices for teams. We think some of the most interesting stuff we do, um, is around where like, uh, teams or national federations don't trust the equipment they're getting from somebody. And they'll come to us and say, you know, the, you know, bike brand X says that this does this, and our writers don't think so. Can you tell us what's true? And. We'll find a way to make that happen. So we, we've had some pretty interesting ones of those with, uh, particularly around the Olympics with the national federations. You know, no, nobody wants to have another Under Armor speeds skating suit, uh, situation, , right? Where all the, all the athletes think something is true and therefore it becomes true and, and nobody knows. And so, um, you know, so we do a lot of that. Arrow mind does that, essentially. And so that's a lot of the performance work I was doing in my old world. I was technical director at ZIP for almost 15 years. Um, and, and then Silca is the product arm of the company. Uh, that's probably how, you know, most people know us. You know, we make pumps and tools and, and, but we also make a lot of crazy things that people look at me and go, Oh, where the hell did that come from? Well, that probably came from some project or another. We did it in the Arrow Mind side of the business, Um mm-hmm. . So that's how we've gotten into sealants and lubricants and 3D printing and, and all sorts of other craziness. Right? That's sort of how the one flows into the other. And then, you know, Marginal Gains is a podcast and, and YouTube channel where we talk about it all and, and we, we typically with a, a team or a company have like a two year. Secrecy period on a technology. And then after that we can do something with it and, and talk about it and tell the story. So, you know, it's always, it's always fun to go through those periods where like, Oh, thank God we can talk about that now, . Cause you know, we're talking about it internally all the time. And, and you're like, Oh, can we put that in the podcast? I don't know. So, so that, that's what I do now. We, I, I play with bikes basically. [00:06:34] Randall: Very, very cool. And, um, when you talk about the consulting work you do, is this kind of full stack performance consulting, is it very a focused, is it all technical sides, including say, like bearing drag or, or things like this? Is it, um, obviously positioning falls into Arrow Nutrition. Like where, where do you, ooh, where does your domain physiology start? [00:06:57] Josh: And I draw the line at physiology, you know, there's a whole, there, there are people who are, are like my equivalent in that world. And, and my God, I can never even dream to. You know, clean their shoes. So, um, no, you, you need someone to talk physiology, you know, And I'll, I'll pull my phone out and we'll call Allen Li or somebody, you know, Yeah. With a bunch of contacts. But, uh, you know, Alan's one of my favorite go-tos for things like that and be like, Oh dude, I've been over my head help . You know, [00:07:21] Randall: he, he's, um, he's actually been on the pod before, but Craig interviewed him, so I might bring him on in the future to do, you know, my, my more kind of nerdy type of interview. Alan's great. Yeah, no, [00:07:31] Josh: he's, he's a lovely guy. He's a lovely guy. And, and I just love, I mean, he, you know, like I find myself pretty quickly sometimes getting into places where people's eyes just glaze over, like, what the hell is this guy talking about? And, you know, I love that Alan can do that to me in about 30 seconds, you know, we're talking about the stuff that he does. You're like, Oh, whoa, shit, way over my head way. I, I didn't even recognize the last four words that you used in that sentence, . And, uh, so it's, it's awesome to be able to be surrounded by people with that. But no, you know, we. The stuff that they come to us for. I mean, you know, when I left sip and started soak, of course everybody and their brother, you know, came and said, Oh, design us a wheel. I'm like, well, like I can't do that for a couple years. But also I'm kind of just done with that, you know, like I've lived that life. I, you know, it, it was fun. But, you know, we, we continually updated wheels for 15 years, but it, it really is kinda like doing the same thing over and over again, you know? And, and so it just wasn't fun for me. So, you know, they'll come and say, um, you know, help us design this cockpit, or we, we do a lot of, with our, our in-house, uh, 3D titanium printing, we do a lot of custom cockpits for, uh, teams, riders, things like that. You know, where we laser scan the rider, get the position, lock that down to the wind tunnel, design the part, 3D print it, um, you know, stuff like that, that, that's really exciting. We, we'd get a lot of, you know what, um, You know, help us optimize for this time trial at the tour or the Olympics or whatever, where, you know, what tires should we run and we can, we have systems and tools and, and spreadsheets and a million other things that we can, um, Yeah. Help, help them determine. And then a lot of times we, you know, we get companies coming to us, um, really just wanting to know, like, you know, if, like, which of their sponsor products should they use and when should they go off sponsor? You know, you'll see that a lot at like, the tour where, excuse me. Um, you know, like they, they ride the sponsor correct product, you know, 98% of the time, and then they're gonna sneak it in here or there when it's really critical. So, you know, what, what are those really critical points? And then, you know, if, if they're gonna risk getting in trouble or outright get in trouble, like it needs to be worth it, right? And so they might come to us with like, okay, you know, we need. I need a time trial tire for this rider for this day. You know, what should we do? And, and we'll help him with that. But yeah, you know, if you, if you were a, a brand, uh, or a world tour team there, or approach our athlete that wanted to go to the win tunnel, you know, you might pay us to come along. Um, a lot of what I do too is kind of fun is just act as like a fly on the wall in these team to sponsor interactions. You know, I think I was probably at half a dozen wind tunnel tests last year where I really had pretty much nothing to contribute other than being the neutral third party in the room, um mm-hmm. you know, so that everybody was comfortable that everybody was. Comfortable . [00:10:26] Randall: Well, I would imagine there's a mix of the, uh, the political, if you're talking about, you know, what should be using our own sponsors gear versus slipping something else in all the way to, um, balancing the competing goals of say, like comfort and pure power output on the bike versus aerodynamics. Um, if you're talking about a time trial position. Yeah. [00:10:47] Josh: Oh yeah, for sure. And, and I think even down to, you know, and I think as much as we love to talk science and testing and, and try to be as scientific as possible, I mean, this stuff is really, it's emotionally hard. It's politically hard. It's, you know, companies will bring new equipment in, they're with their engineers. I mean, those guys and girls want that stuff to work so bad. And you know, sometimes you just see things coming out where, Oh yeah, that's clearly faster. And you're like, Well, actually, the way I would interpret that is it's probably about. The same, um, or mm-hmm. , you know, let's, let's rerun that test or, um, you know, it's always, I don't know, it, it, they, they like, people like to get themselves in these loops where, you know, Oh, we did this and it's 10 seconds faster and it's that, And I feel like back in the, you know, when I was with zip, we did this a lot during the Lance Armstrong area and he was writing our disc and, and we were coming in as consultants for the first probably five tours or whatever. And um, you know, every wind tunnel test you'd get to the end and they would have this chart that's like, we just made him 90 seconds faster. And it's like, look guys, that. There is no 90 seconds faster. I mean, you know? Mm-hmm. like, like that is not gonna happen. You know, you, you just did a whole bunch of stuff that's not sustainable that he can't hold his head like that. Mm-hmm. that helmet tails gonna come off the back, you know, I mean, cuz he, people do things like, Oh, oh, the helmet tail moved, rerun. You're like, Yep guys, when you ride in the real world, like the tail's gonna move. Like you don't, you know, people like to, they select data, um, without even realize they're selecting data. And so, you know, it is, it's just good always to have a third party in the room. Um, you know, it's kinda like funny story, you know, back to, you know, my zip days, how Firecrest came about, you know, Firecrest was literally the name of the prototype that, that kind of blew all of our minds. And the reason the prototypes had weird bird names was that we had to double blind them across engineers because you just didn't want anybody. Kind of, you know, having an effect on their product, right? I mean, we all, you know, we all fall in love with our children, right? . And, and in this world, like you, you can't love your children. Um, and you have to be willing to kill them when they're not good. And, um, you know, we would do this double blind thing where we would like assign them all a number and then we would assign bird name, these bird names a number, and then we would randomize it and then they would get all put up. And then nobody really knew whose idea was what, when you were in the tunnel. Um, that's necessary, right? Cause you're, you know, you can be your own worst enemy at that stuff. I think we've, you know, we've all been guilty of that a time or two in our lives. But, uh, you see it all the time, particularly in these performance, um, improvement coaching type things where, you know, people just wanna will something into existence even when it's not. Yeah. [00:13:38] Randall: Well, and I can see, um, you know, the marketing oftentimes has it much more, uh, presented, much more like a, you know, this is just, it's physics. It's more, it's more exact, it's more, um, it's more controlled. And, um, there are competing variables, particularly when you have, you know, a monkey in the middle. You have to, this, this, you know, this animal needs to be comfortable. This animal needs to be fueled, This animal needs to be able to control this machine through a varied environment. And that varied environment may be varying in real time if weather changes or things like this. Um, and so there's just all these competing interests. And so when you see, you know, I often laugh at like, You add up all the different arrow benefits that, you know, different companies claim for components and you should be doing. Right. Right. You know, you might be looking at, um, uh, relativistic effects potentially at some of the speeds you'd be able to achieve. Uh, Jen, just like how, how many watts can be saved. Totally. Being a little bit facetious there. [00:14:37] Josh: Yeah. No, no, it's totally true. I mean, and I still have this photo somewhere, I think I even showed it a couple years ago on social media. But as this, this really great photo that I love that ended up, um, on the wall at the Texas A and Wind tunnel, but it's me with next to Lance Armstrong, um, in the, what became the Nike Swift spin suit, um, that had been flown down there from, you know, Seattle. And it's, uh, oh God, the guy in from his book college or whatever he calls him, and then a guy from Nike, so it's the four of us. And I'm kind of standing there like doing, you know, like pointing at something on his back and it, like, a college student took it for the school newspaper and then they had him autograph it and it ended up on the wall. And so like, Oh, that's me. You know, it's kind of funny. But, but the real story there was that suit, you know, they were paying like 3000 bucks a meter for this suit. They'd been putting it on a mannequin in the tunnel. I mean, it was gonna save three minutes per 40 k. And you're just sitting like going, guys, like, I, I mean, just quick doing the math, like three minutes for Lance Armstrong, you know, like the guys already, That's not possible. And, and of course we get it. We put it on him. Um, the whole thing, you know, it, it's, it's cool, it's fancy, it was very red and it does nothing. I mean, it literally, we were, and the Nike people are there and they're like, Oh, that's not possible. It, it can't do nothing like whole. Let's run it again. Okay. Now get 'em out of it. Put 'em in the normal suit. Run that one. You're like, it, it just doesn't do anything. And, and they just kept going. Well run it again. Well do this. Let's, let's close pin it up. Let's tighten it. Let's, do, you know, I mean, I bet we, we lost two hours trying to make that stupid thing look like it would do anything. You know, And again, it's, it's just people being people and we've all done it. But [00:16:21] Randall: I hear like something of stages, of, stages of grief. Like, you have your baby and like first it's denial, and then you, then you have bargaining. Yeah. Yes. Put so much into this. Yeah, that's exactly, [00:16:32] Josh: that is exactly what it is. And, and you know, the, the crazy reality with that one was, you know, three months later at the tour, they launched it anyway, and they said it saved three minutes and he , you know mm-hmm. . And we, we. It, you know, I just had to laugh. I mean, I remember, you know him, you know, winning whatever one of the time, trials by like a minute and like going, No. So Nike's essentially saying he would've lost that time trial by two minutes had it not been, had he not been wearing that suit. Come on guys. Um, yeah. [00:17:00] Randall: Well, and I think that, that maybe that's, um, you know, headline number one from this interview is don't believe everything you read, especially if it's coming from a party, has a financial interest in it. [00:17:10] Josh: That is true. That is true. Yeah. I, I, I tell don't, don't even believe yourself. Right? I mean, truly like you, you are a bad, um, a bad predictor of things and, and you're a bad feeler of things and nobody wants to admit that. Um, but it's just true. You know, that's, I've been preaching that gospel for, for years. But, you know, I mean, 90, I, I would say 90% of the things you. That you feel when you're on your bike. Total, total crap. Um, and, and we know that cuz we, we've done blind testing with riders. I mean, like unbelievable world class rider. And if you blind them to what they're actually riding, they can't tell you almost any Yeah. Um, you know, all that perception, but still, but the stories away, the [00:17:56] Randall: stories we tell ourselves are powerful. There is a strong placebo effect. Oh, for sure. Uh, for sure. But it has to be acknowledged that that is the placebo. And if you actually had those beliefs about things that had genuine benefits, you would get both, You would get the actual [00:18:11] Josh: benefits. Yes. The, the most powerful thing in the world is a placebo that actually works. Right. , where you get, it's like a, it's a double whammy benefit. Um, and so yeah. That, that's where, you know, I mean, in a nutshell that's a lot of what, you know, I've made my career doing right, is trying to help, help sway people towards the, the, the placebos that, that actually do have a, a, a benefit for them. [00:18:34] Randall: So this has the conversation going in a slightly different direction than I was anticipating, which I'm really enjoying. So I've been, I've been diving into this lecture series from this guy Robert Sapolsky at Stanford. It's on, um, the, uh, uh, behavioral biology, and it's looking at all the different ways in which studies go wrong. And so there's like, you know, beliefs about something, uh, for a long period of time, you know, eminence, people in the field, uh, promulgate these, you know, these ideas. And then it's shown that, you know, the study was, was not, uh, taken, uh, done properly or what have you. And so I'm curious, let's dive more into things that go wrong in the study of aerodynamics and, um, maybe kind of the edge of, say, human performance where interfaces with aerodynamics [00:19:17] Josh: Hmm, ooh. Interest. So, I mean, a, a good. I would say career defining for me, example of that was, um, you know, we, from like 2009 to 2012, we were really all in on developing, uh, CFD for the, for bicycle wheels. And it, it just wasn't working right. Everybody was talking about it and showing papers, and, but I mean, it just, the reality was like the CFD just never looked like the wind tunnel. The curve shapes were different. The data was, we're, we're talking It [00:19:47] Randall: wasn't mid, mid [00:19:48] Josh: nineties, right? Oh, no, Mid, mid late two thousands. Yeah. Like mid, late, late [00:19:53] Randall: thousands. Okay. Yeah. And you're not using, you're having to develop something ground up or you're having to, uh, adapt something from Desso or, or one of these bigger [00:20:02] Josh: vendors. Yeah, So I think the question at the time was, you know, how do you, how do you really properly model the spinning wheel in, in flow that's also translating, right? And you look at. You know, all the CFD stuff with aircraft, um, you know, there's no rotational flow, you know, and then you look at, there's special models that people have built to look at, like, um, turbine jet, turbine engine combustion or whatever. But those are incredibly unique. And they're also, you know, there's RO flow rotating, but in a different access and Yeah. [00:20:36] Randall: The F1 guys perpendicular access. [00:20:38] Josh: Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And so, and then you got the F1 guys who weren't really modeling, um, they were modeling the rotation of the wheels, but they were doing it by modeling a rotational component at the surface of the tire. So you were, you weren't essentially like spinning the wheel, you were just saying, Oh, there's a induced rotation a about this surface. Um, which has been in the, the solvers forever. So [00:21:02] Randall: in interesting, this is taught because the, those wheels are traveling so quickly, especially the top of the wheel. If you're doing 200 miles an hour, the top of the tire is traveling at 400. And so you're having sign significant turbulence at that interface, right? Well, [00:21:15] Josh: and you, you have like Magnus effect, right? You're actually getting pressure differential top to bottom, um, you know, from , the direction of the wheel spinning. And so, you know, we, we could do stuff like that pretty accurately, right? You know, you could look at the, you know, a rotating baseball and, and predict the direction that's gonna curve. I mean, things like that were possible. But, you know, every single, and, you know, my God, I used to get, I still do occasionally, but I, I used to probably get 20 PhD papers a year from kids all over the world. Um, you know, Oh, what do you think of my paper on, you know, CFD of bicycle wheel? And we're like, Oh, it's beautiful pictures, but your data's crap. Um, . And it just wasn't figured out. And, and in 2009, I, I met a guy, Matt, uh, Godo, who's a triathlete, but he also worked for a company called FieldView. And they had built all of the CFD automation for, uh, Red Bull F one, um, and probably half the F1 grid, but his, his big account was Red Bull. Um, and he, I met him at Interbike and he had a paper that he was working on. He said, I think, I think I might have figured this out, but I really need to be able to like, Like, build a wind tunnel in the computer and then look at it so we can directly compare them back and forth. And, and so we, we did that. We published a paper at the a I a, which was at MIT that year, and it went over really well and people liked it. And we published another paper the next year, um, at, at the a i A conference. And that went well. And then we got this big grant, like an $80,000 grant from Intel, um, to really tackle this problem. Cause the, the head technologist at Intel at the time was a guy, uh, Bill Fry Rise, and one, one of the coolest guys I ever met. Um, you know, the kind of guy who, whose resume just has like a five year period that says like Los Alamos , like, [00:23:01] Randall: okay, you're cool. You know? Yeah. Yeah. Not, not allowed to talk about it. What do you do? Yes. Uh, yes, exactly. . But, [00:23:08] Josh: uh, but he was a cyclist and he was some senior, somebody at Intel. And, and, um, And they, they gave us this money and we, we, we really went hard at this and we ended up developing a, essentially all of the little nuance details. Uh, we did it in star ccm. We post processed it in field view. I think we processed it on like a thousand cores, which for 2010 was, you know, a lot. Right. [00:23:33] Randall: Um, and these are, these are, um, CPUs and not GPUs for that era. Right. A lot of the stuff of that era GPUs now, right? [00:23:40] Josh: Yeah. Yeah. I remember we, yeah, I mean, that was the beginning of, uh, that was the beginning of the cloud. It was pretty cool, like 2008, 2009, people were still traveling. I remember at one point in that process there was discussion that like, we might have to travel, um, to, Oh God, what is it? The, the university over there in Illinois had a huge, had like a 1200 core machine and they're like, Okay, we, we might have to go there and, and buy, you know, two days of time. And then as that was happening, cloud. Kind of the beginnings of cloud was there. And I remember we, we met a guy who had a cloud thing, and they had just been bought by Dell. And, uh, we were at a conference and he's like, Oh, no, you know, with our, our thing, What was that called? But, uh, with our thing, you, you can just do it like up in the ether. We're like, Whoa. You had never heard of that before. Yeah. Um, it was just exciting times and, and, uh, but, but we, you know, had this great team. We pulled it together. I mean, that's really where Firecrest came from, right? It was, it was largely designed using, um, Hundreds of iterations of capes predicted to be fast, uh, using this cfd. And, and ultimately we won. We, we became like, I think the first non university and non-governmental group to ever win a, uh, uh, innovation excellence award from the Supercomputing Society. So it was pretty cool. Salt Lake City's like this huge super computing conference and you know, it's like darpa, this and university of that. And it was like these four guys from this bike brand and, you know, was, uh, it was a pretty cool experience. But, but in that, so that's like a huge tangent. No, [00:25:17] Randall: no, this is, this is great. And, and just to take a, uh, stop for a second, CFD computational Fluid Dynamics software that is used to model complex multi-variate systems where there's second order effects and, you know, fluids and, and things like this. So anyone who's not, uh, who's not with us on that, like complicated software for complicated system models, in your [00:25:39] Josh: ideal world, it's like a wind tunnel on your laptop, right? In the, in the George Jetson's version of things. It, it's the wind tunnel on the laptop. And in the reality of things, it's kind of more like, eh, it's about as good as guessing most of the time. But, but, but sometimes it's really good at finding certain really specific things. So I won't, uh, I won't knock it too hard, but why the thing I wanna [00:25:59] Randall: dive in a little bit [00:26:00] Josh: here. Oh, go ahead. Yeah, yeah. Well, let me, so let me finish the, the thing that we discovered in this process that was super cool. Um, was that once we had all of these transient, we were solving for all these transients, um, and we really started looking at not just like the, you know, the, the side force or the yaw force or you think of um, you know, the whole thing with like wheels and handling, right? This all came out of this project cuz you could, you could predict the steering torque on the wheel, which, you know, none of the balances being used to test wheels at the time even had torque sensing, right? You had drag side force and lift, but none of them had the rotational components in there. And so that for us at first was like, oh shit, we've never thought about torque cuz we weren't measuring it. Right? It's sort of one of those, yeah, like you've biased your study all along, but then the big one was looking at the predicted, um, data and there were all of these, uh, harmonic effects. and we kind of looked at each other and we're like, Oh my God, every wind tunnel you've ever been in, Right? The first thing everybody discusses is, you know, what's the, what's the, the time across which you're taking the data and at what frequency? And then you're averaging that data, right? Cuz we're all after a data point. And you could look at the tunnel data and the CFD data, and when you pulled them out of their point form into their wave form, essentially you could see the harmonics kind of lined up, the frequencies match when, oh shit, we've been averaging out a really important piece of data for 30 years. You know, this harmonic thing is big. Like what's your, [00:27:39] Randall: your standard? So it's operating on a, it's operating on a frequency that is smaller than the sample rate. Or how [00:27:46] Josh: was it essentially? Essentially we were just idiots and we were just, we were just time averaging the all of that out. Right. I mean, it's, you know, if you need to Okay. Any wind tunnel you, you went to in the world and be like, Oh, well, we'll take, we here, we take data for 30 seconds at, you know, whatever, a hundred hertz, 60 hertz, 120, or whatever it is, and then we'll, we'll take an average. Oh, okay. That, that's fine. Got it. You're averaging out in there is real, um, uh, like amplitude changes, uh, largely due to vortex shedding is, as it turns out with bicycle wheels. But a lot of that high frequency handling stuff, particularly as wheels get deep, um, , sorry, I'm in, uh, I'm in our studio, which is off of our kitchen and somebody's lunchbox just, just leapt off of the top of the [00:28:34] Randall: refrigerator. Um, yeah, sometimes I'll have a niece or nephew come in screaming, so No worries. Yeah. So, but, [00:28:39] Josh: uh, but no, we, we realized there, there was a, a. About a factor of five difference in amplitude between wheels in terms of that, those oscillating effects. Right. Which typically it's just, it's generally vortex shedding. And the CFD can predict that really well, right? Where your little pressure builds up, sheds off, sets off a counter rotation that sheds off. Um, but as a, as a cyclist, you, you feel that as the wheel, you know, kind of oscillating left to right. Um, and we, and let's, let's for 20 years, you know, [00:29:12] Randall: Yeah. So you're just taking the, the lump, you know, 30 seconds averaged out data and saying, Okay, it gives you this amount of benefit and you're not seeing those. Um, I mean, really what we're talking about is, uh, you know, instability that may. Or, you know, otherwise result in, in control issues on the bike. And I want to take a moment to just like, define some terms, uh, because not, you know, many of our listeners are not overly technical. Um, but uh, I think some of these concepts are easy enough to get your head around, like, so, you know, describe at a very high level you're talking about vs. So, you know, maybe describe lader flow and flow attachments and vortices sheddings. How, how does this, how does this, uh, how can you understand this without a, a technical background? [00:29:59] Josh: Oh, those are awesome questions. Okay. So Lader LaMer flow is kind of what you. What the, the world wants you to think of in the wind tunnel. You see the wind tunnel picture and they've got like the, the 10 lines of smoke and they're all kind of flowing together cleanly and beautifully. That's, that's meant to, to evoke lam or flow, right. That if you were to drop a, a smoke or a particle in there, that they would all flow in lamini, you know, like sheets of paper. Um, yeah. Uh, so, so [00:30:29] Randall: it's going in a straight line. Smooth, [00:30:31] Josh: controlled, Predictable, yeah. Flow. And it, it follows the contours of the thing that it's flowing against. So, [00:30:38] Randall: so kinda like water flowing down a river sort of thing. It's not perfectly laminate, but it's all going roughly in the same direction. And there's not a lot of water [00:30:46] Josh: in a pipe disturbance, you know, would be in a pipe better example, presumably pretty laminate, right? And then you start to add stuff, you know, water in the river. Now you're, you're, you know, you've got a rock and now all of a sudden there's a disturbance and it starts to swirl. Um, and so you, you get into, you know, more complicated types of flow. I, I think the, the big ones, you know, for us to think about are, you know, most, so most drag that we deal with comes from, um, uh, pressure related things. So you either have like the, the high pressure on the front of the rider, right? The wind that you're pushing into this when you stick your hand out the car window, right? The mm-hmm. the air you feel hitting your hand, you know, that's, uh, that's a pressure drag, uh, in the positive direction. And then you have the flow, the vacuum in the back. Yeah. The flow will detach off of the object and that'll create a vacuum behind. And so that's a suction drag, um mm-hmm. . And then when you have something like vortex shedding, it's when, uh, the, the. Description I ever have for vortex sheddings. If you've ever driven an old car with, uh, like the metal antenna on the hood, you know, at some speed on the highway, that antenna starts vibrating, oscillating sideways, which is like the last thing on earth you think it would do, right? Like your brain's like, well, it should just keep bending backwards with speed. Mm-hmm. , why is it going sideways? Well, that's that you get this thing where you have a little, uh, a little curl of flow will kind of detach more on one side than the other, and that creates a side force. Mm-hmm. . But in doing so, the suction that that has now left behind will pull a similar vortex from the opposite side. Mm-hmm. . And that creates an opposite side force. And so you get these, see an oscillation, you get these oscillations and uh, you know, that's, it's huge in architecture and mm-hmm. , it, it's why you see so many of those super tall buildings or kind of have pyramid shapes or might have some sort of like, feature that spirals down them to, to kind of break that up. I, I live [00:32:46] Randall: in Boston. We actually have, um, a skyscraper here that was flexing so much, the windows were popping out. This is, you know, decades ago. And, you know, it's still, you know, they have this like funnel of air that's going through there and just the nature of the shape of it and how air gets funneled in, it was causing enough torsion to, um, you know, cause window de bonding. Um, so yeah. That's crazy. Uh, so then, you know, think applying this to the bike and particularly a wheel, um, you know, this is the biggest effect is, is presumably your front wheel where you're having this oscillation, this shift in pressure from one side to the other at a very high, high level, um, that's causing instability. It's making it so that you may lose control of the bike. It's not predictable. [00:33:34] Josh: Yeah. Correct. Correct. And, and the, the other thing we learned through CFD that it was doing, which is not obvious until you think about it, but so you think of the. So you might have, say it that the trailing edge of the front half of the rim, you're, you, you set up a little vortex shedding situation. Mm-hmm. . Um, and so you've got a little side force, but it's kind of at the, the trailing edge of the rim there. Right? So it's got a little bit of leverage on your steering, but the other thing that's happening is that alternating attachment and detachment of flow, um, changing the side force, but you're a side force at an angle. So there's a lift component, right? Which is how the drag is being reduced. And as that happens, what, what's also now changing is what we call like the center of pressure. And the center of pressure. You think of like the wheel from the side, like, like the sum, the aggregate of all the, the arrow forces on that has a center point about which it's balanced. It's kinda like a center of mass. Um, you know, so it's, it'd be center of pressure. Well, that center of pressure when you have. Shedding happening somewhere that's now moving forwards and backwards and very [00:34:40] Randall: rapidly [00:34:41] Josh: as well. Potentially, Yeah. Rather rapidly. I mean, and, and when you really look, look in on it, it, the frequency actually can be quite close to, um, the, uh, speed wobble frequency, right? Which is somewhere in that like three to four hertz range. Uh, which also happens to be really close to the frequency of human, uh, shivering, which is kind of cool's why you're more likely to, to speed wobble when you're really cold. Um, [00:35:05] Randall: and not everyone just push will have experienced speed wobble. But if, you know, if this is basically your, you, you hit a certain resonant frequency of, of the frame based on the frames geometry, uh, the head tube angle, the what are the factors that go into that, [00:35:20] Josh: Uh, it's top tube stiffness is big and so, yeah. Yeah. And it's actually this speed wobble's. Interesting. It's. It starts as a residency issue, but it's really a, it's a hop bifurcation and, um, a hop B. Okay. And so, yeah. And so what you have in a hop, uh, bifurcation is you essentially have two st two stability, um, would be the best way to think of it. And you are jumping from the one to the other. And so like, right up until that, so the [00:35:48] Randall: system wants to be in one state or the other, but not in the middle [00:35:51] Josh: and there's no middle. Right. And, and what's, what's so cool, like, like early in, um, uh, early in covid, you know, we were all talking about this, you know, what is it the are not value, the, you know, like if it's above or below one. And when you, you line that out that are not, when are not crosses one, it's a hop bifurcation that looks just like the speed wobble, bifurcation, I mean the graph. It's amazing how like, cool those things, you know, mathematically you're like, Oh yeah, that's exactly the same as this. It's just here, it's in a, you know, you get the exact same graph if you're looking at, um, Uh, wing flutter in an aircraft, uh, in the wing tunnel. Mm-hmm. , similar bifurcation problem, but yeah. So you, you, you have essentially two states and the system can get tripped from one end into the other. And in the one the bike is stable and wants to go straight, and in the other it wants to oscillate because each oscillation mm-hmm. is setting up the, the counter oscillation. Um, and so like, it, it's, you know, in resonance it's more of like a runaway you, you think of like the, how that's tradition. Yeah. It amplifi forcing. Yeah. It, it just keeps growing and growing and growing. Um, and in this one it just, it, it, it's not growing and growing, but it just trips you into this spot where like it's really bad. Um mm-hmm. and it will just shake the crap outta you at the front end. And um, and in fact motorcycles quite [00:37:07] Randall: scary. The high performance motorcycles will sometimes have a steering damper for this very reason. Um, because you'll, yeah, you'll get these speed wobbles. And so the damper is essentially making it so there's some exponentially increasing resistance. Um, I, I know you know this, I'm explaining it for our, our audience just in, you know, cause again, I wanna keep bringing it back down to earth, but, you know, having just like your, your suspension, you don't just have a a just a spring, you have some sort of damping circuit so it doesn't feel like a pogo stick. Um, which is a related effect. Um, but, uh, very cool. And are not for our listeners as well. [00:37:47] Josh: Funny. I hadn't thought about that. I haven't thought about that in like two years as we were talking like, Oh, I remember now. That was, uh, yeah. Yeah, that was, uh, But what or not was the, um, Oh shit. It was the. The contagion ratio or whatever, like how, how many people, each person would transmit to mm-hmm. And so if it's, which makes sense, right? If every person's gonna transmit it to 1.1, it grows. If you're gonna transmit it to 0.8, it, it dies. Um, [00:38:12] Randall: so the analogy here is that, that the increasing amplitude of that, you know, those pressure differentials, sending it to the, the system to one state or the other and causing that increasing oscillation, Is that a exactly correct characterization? [00:38:26] Josh: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Like you, you can take it right up to a line, um, and you don't have a problem. And then as soon as you cross the line, you're in a different state. Mm-hmm. . And, and that's where I think, you know, speed wobble for those of you who've experienced it or chase tried chasing it on a bicycle, um, you can solve it sometimes with like, the stupidest stuff. Um, you know, one of the, the common ones is to just put a little bit of like, um, like, like a heavier bar tape or a little bit of lead weight in like your, um, Uh, your plugs. Mm-hmm. . Mm-hmm. . You can oftentimes change it with a tire pressure or a different tire cuz you can add just enough damping at the contact patch. Um, that it just pushes it up high. You know, if, if, cause typically what people will find is like, Oh, it's, I'm totally fine. Then I hit, you know, 38.5 miles an hour and all hell breaks loose. Well. Mm-hmm. , you change the mass at the top of the system a little bit and maybe you've now pushed that point out to 45 miles an. but if you never go 45 miles an hour, you've affected, that's not a problem. Right? Yeah, yeah. Like, oh yeah, I [00:39:28] Randall: fixed it. I think another example that people may have experienced too is like, uh, sometimes you'll have an issue with your car that, you know, won't notice except that certain speeds and it's because of those speeds. There is some, you know, oscillation that's happening. If it's a tire and balance or something in your drive train or the like. Um, you know, I've, I once had a vehicle that was really good up to 60 and then like 60, 61, it was problematic and then it would smooth out a bit after that and it was just like this wobbling effect that would balance out beyond that, that speed. Um, alright, so then bringing things back down to earth. Um, this is delightful by the way. I, I could do this all day, . Um, and I, I hadn't quite appreciated. Um, the, the basic r and d and like basic science and tool building that you were involved in. Uh, so. That's, its its own topic. That's probably not one for, for a podcast of this particular [00:40:22] Josh: def. Yeah. I, I will say on that, I think that's the part that I think never, you know, the marketing never really tells that side of the story cuz it's just too complicated. Yeah. But if you're, if you're out there and you're, you're into this stuff, like that's the fun stuff. Like, I love launching product and, and the product itself. But like, that crazy journey to get there is usually like, that's where all the fun is happening. And, and, and typically cuz we're, you know, you're doing it wrong, like 90% of the time you're like, you know, it's just can be months or years of like, we suck, you know, this doesn't work, we're getting our sasses kicked. And then you, you know, if you persevere long enough, you will come out the other end and it's like, wow, we, we needed all that stuff. Like, we needed to get our heads handed to us over and over again, or we never would've figured this stuff out. Um, Yeah. I really, really enjoy that part of, um, of, of technology development or whatever you wanna call it. [00:41:16] Randall: Yeah. Basic, like real basic r and d right down to building the tools that you need to do the r and d you want to do, um, Right. . Yeah. Very cool. And obviously like the compute power and the, the algorithms available and, you know, the switch to GPUs and all these other things that have, um, changed since you were developing that make it such that today's models are both vastly more powerful and still yet trivial in complexity relative to the system itself. [00:41:44] Josh: Yeah, totally. [00:41:46] Randall: Yeah. Um, well let's dive into some more practical topics. So let's talk about like, alright, so a lot of our listeners we're the Gravel Ride podcast, right? So thinking about that particular experience, um, what should, what are, what is worth, um, a gravel rider thinking about. Uh, with relation to arrow. Uh, so things that can be done that will improve aerodynamics, but then not take away from the ride experience that a lot of riders are after, particularly when they're going to grab, you know, they wanna be comfortable, they wanna have a good time, they wanna have good control over a variety of different terrain and so on. So what are the arrow? Um, and, and they don't wanna look silly, so they might not be, want wanting to wear a skin suit or something like that. Not that it looks silly, but, but you know, a more, a more serious enthusiast type of rider. Uh, what are the Yeah, what are the things to think about? [00:42:36] Josh: Oh, gosh. That's, that's a good question. Um, I mean, I think it really depends on, on what. Th the particular rider, you know, is after, I mean, are you, are you racing? Do you wanna go fast? Do you wanna not get dropped? Mm-hmm. , um, you know, do you need to carry stuff? I mean, I would say one of, one of the big ones that I, I just see and, and you know, we, we make a ton of stuff in our company and one of, one of them being bags. And, you know, we're constantly accused of not making bags that are big enough. And so I've been on this mission for a couple years of like, you know, what is in there, , Like Really? Mm-hmm. what's in there. Yeah. And it is amazing to me just how much crap people are carrying. You know, you, you open some of these monster seat bags, it's like, man, just because you bought it doesn't mean you need to fill it or use it. Um, you know, it, and, and absolutely there's, there's like time and place for it. But, um, you know, I. Some of the stuff like that, like, Oh, okay. You've, you know, do you, you show up on the local gravel right here and you know, people look like they're, they're almost like bike packing, like mm-hmm. , you just don't need, you know, it, it's a 40 mile loop, you know, that starts and ends at a bike shop. Like, you, you don't need to bring a bike [00:43:49] Randall: shop with you. Well, you, you need your coffee grinder, you need your, your mini stove and you need your neuro press. Yeah, Yeah. Um, different experience. You know, let's assume that we're going after like a performance rider who's, um, like doing, doing, you know, a hundred, uh, a hundred mile events than they're, they're training for it and they wanna squeeze out more performance, um, out of their existing setup. Or they're considering, you know, what bike to get, what wheels to get, what, um, how to set it up, even considering bike fit. Yeah. Or, you know, clip on arrow bars and the, like, what are the different things that people can do and what are the compromises and so on. [00:44:24] Josh: Yeah. I mean, the, I, I think certainly for gravel. The one clear cut, no compromise. Better all around product that I can just always recommend is like a, an arrow top drop bar. I mean, it is amazing how much faster those things are than round section bars. I mean, any really, you know, like pro vibe or the zip fuca or whatever, you know, there's, I think every company makes one. It's that big, you know. Oh, it's hu I mean it like wind tunnel speeds. It's a flattop bar can be like 28 to 30 watts. I mean, it's nuts. Yeah. Cause you're, you're replacing round covered in tape with something that's like pretty thin and shaped Well, sure. Or it can be massive, but, but the, [00:45:05] Randall: I didn't, cuz the cross sectional areas is not that big compared to, you know, the rider and the, the rest of the bike and so on. Some [00:45:12] Josh: No, it's, it's, well and in gravel it has the double effect of being, you know, shaped or ized in the direction that is also gonna add compliance, right? Yeah, yeah. And, and comfort. And so you, you know, it's one of the few products I can really look at and go, okay, that thing is more arrow and more comfortable and has more service area for your right. I mean, better all around. Um, that's a pretty easy one to, to go with. And, and similarly, you know, if you've, you've got the money. I mean some of these, the, the integrated cockpit solutions that are out there are even faster, right? Cause it's just even less. Stuff in the wind. Um, so let's talk you, let's [00:45:48] Randall: talk about that. That's big, a big serviceability compromise and, and you know, fit can be a concern with that too cause it's harder to swap components and so on. How much of that is coming from, um, simply not having the cables running into the down tube? Like, can you get the vast majority of those benefits with cables coming out from, say, underneath the bar? If they're tucked in on the bar or even coming out from the bar and dropping underneath the stem into the, the headset from there? [00:46:14] Josh: Yeah. Yeah. My, my rule of thumb for cables that I always use cuz it's so memorable is, um, You know, Greg Lamond versus Fon in the 89 tour time. Mm-hmm. , So 2020 kilometer time trial. Um, the eight second gap, there was more or less equivalent to Fons ponytail, Right. As we, we loved to joke about a cyclist, but was also the equivalent of one number two pencil length worth of cable housing. So, and [00:46:46] Randall: this is, and this is true even if the cable housing is say, in front of the head tube, so it's going to be disturbed by the head tube anyways, cuz you're getting the drag off of it. Be, you see what I mean? Like, so I, I'm trying to hone my understanding of the [00:46:59] Josh: Yeah. I mean, you think, Yeah. So I, I would think, uh, good way to put that would be that, Yeah. Putting, putting a slow. Crappy thing in front of a smooth thing, you're, you're still getting the drag of the slow, crappy thing. Yep. Um, and you may actually be worsening the flow, um, on the arrow thing. So Yeah. Got it. Absolutely. Still, you still have that effect. Um, you know it, and it's hard to say, you know, in some cases, you know, it's, it's close enough or it's just in like the goldilock zone where it's a good distance away where you're like, Ooh, we can kind of make them disappear. And they become, you know, uh, a almost like the cable isn't there, but that's not typically what we see. And typically, you know, you, you throw a bike in the wind tunnel with that and then you rip the cables out and you run it again and you're, every time it's like, Oh shit. Big difference. Difference. You've, in [00:47:50] Randall: terms of watts, like a few watts here, like, so, so the handlebar is the big one, you said as much as 30 watts at wind tunnel speeds, which granted gravel riders generally are, are, we're [00:48:00] Josh: not going that miles an hour. But you, Yeah, you we're out for a long time. Yeah, but you are out there for a long time, so you don't have the speed. But yeah, you, you definitely have the, the, the potential time saving. So, yeah, I, you know, hidden cables. I agree with you. Total pain in the ass. And, you know, my God, I've spent a career working on world tour bikes and, and you know, Ironman, world champion bikes and things like that. And I, I feel everybody's pain, you know, people are always like, Why is the industry doing this to us? Like, like, Well, cuz you want it and cuz it works. I mean there's no, like, it, it's a pain in the ass, but it works. Mm-hmm. . So anywhere you can get rid of cable. get rid of cables, um, you know, skin suit. I have to say not everybody loves it, but man, it can be a huge, huge difference. Uh, I mean, you look at, you know, we were just out at lead, uh, Leadville and Steamboat, and you know, all the top. Guys at Leadville and skin suits now, cuz it, it makes that big of a difference. Um, arrow bars can be huge and, you know, I think that's, that's one I I think everybody's got their own sort of flavor that they like. But, you know, to me, like for gravel, a stubby, a stubby bar that has functional pads mm-hmm. , um, really can be worth it just because it's a different hand position and it, it's enough that it, it's effectively changing your, kind of, your whole torso position and it, it, it's just giving you a, a break all around. Right. It's different pressure points in your shammy for the time that you're using it. It's different, you know, muscles in your back. Um, I think there's a good, this is the, the extent of my physi physiological knowledge, but I, I think it's good to, to mix things up. Um, like that. I, I know a lot of people have kind of gone to these super. Narrow, stubby, I don't even know what you call 'em. Like semia bars that Yeah, [00:49:46] Randall: mini arrow bars. [00:49:48] Josh: Nowhere to put your, nowhere to rest your weight. And, and it just feels like everybody I know using those is constantly complaining about their wrists, you know? Um, and so I, I, again, not a physical, but the change [00:50:00] Randall: in the change in frontal area, um, is that just an unmitigated benefit or are there circumstances where you can reduce frontal area and, you know, have a negative result within the realm of, you know, changing a Roger's position? [00:50:16] Josh: Yeah, you know, a lot of it depends on your, your baseline and, and how good you are. Positionally, I think, you know, when, you know, we do a lot of position training with top athletes and you know, the. The best place you can be that's not an arrow bar is on the hoods with level forearms. Mm-hmm. , right? Like that's the, and and ideally with relatively narrow bars, [00:50:37] Randall: so, and perpendicular upper arms as well, presumably, [00:50:40] Josh: or give or take. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean it is, it's, you're gonna roughly get there depending on what the rest of the position looks like and, you know, obviously different body shapes and whatnot. But yeah, I mean, you think horizontal forearms are keeping that pretty much out of the wind. Mm-hmm. , Um, and, and they are also keeping it, it's just hard to hold that position, um, with, in a way that you're also still opening your chest. Because, you know, you were really trying to keep air from getting blocked up under the chest. And when you get a rider doing that, they just always kind of form, which I say always, I'm sure there's some counterexamples out there, but they, they almost always, um, kind of adjust their back and their shoulders in a way that they kind of turtle their head a little bit. You know, the head comes down and you're just kind of now pushing more air up over the body and less down into it. Um, but from there, arrow bars are almost always an improvement, right? Cuz you're narrowing the arms, um, you know, you're tightening things up even further and now you're pushing more flow around the sides, um, and less into the chest and less into the hips. And there's some physiological things. You know, people, you know, wide hips, big hands, certain shoulders, certain back shapes, right? That's why we go to the tunnel, you know, it's, it. 90% of the time, you could look at somebody and go, Oh, do this, this, and that, but man, 10% of the time it looks good and you run it and you're like, That's not good, We can just find a different solution. Um, [00:52:10] Randall: yeah. So air bars are huge. Another thing that we're starting to see is, uh, so BMC has their new cas uh, uh, line. They went with a super narrow, uh, handlebar, so narrow at the hoods, and then, you know, flare at the bottom. Uh, that seems like another thing that again, is, Well, I mean, on the one hand, yeah, you're getting narrower, but on the other hand, you're also closing up the chest and maybe, you know, you're not getting as much oxygen, like air turnover or something. Or like, are there issues where I, so [00:52:38] Josh: I, I have been beating the narrow handlebar drum for 25 years. Um, you know, I am yet to actually see or be told by a real physiologist that that whole. Oxygen lung thing that we were all told as juniors is true, is an issue. Um, yeah, I I've just, yeah, we've just never, I mean that, that I know of and I'm sure somebody out there will say, Oh, here's a paper. But, you know, I, I know whenever we've studied it, looked at it, we've looked at it with athletes, I mean, look at what's happening at the world tour. A lot of that is, you know, we've been beating that drum. I'm starting to see that for years, and people are doing it and they're winning. Um, so, you know, and I wonder [00:53:17] Randall: why aren't we seeing it with extreme flare as well, like a compound flare at least, so that you can still keep a, you know, a reasonably vertical lever position because then you could go even narrower and have, um, still have the leverage for the descending and so on. Is that a [00:53:32] Josh: tradition thing? Yeah, I, yeah, I think some of it's that. I think some of it is just, you know, how far do you really wanna push the uci? Um, [00:53:42] Randall: you know, oh, the UCI cares about the flare in your bars. [00:53:46] Josh: Oh, they will. Yeah. I mean, I mean, I think there are actually rules putting some limits on that, but yeah, at some point it's gonna look funny enough that you're gonna draw attention and they're gonna go, Wait a minute. Um, and, and you know, we've, we've [00:53:58] Randall: seen them, I've got a 28 centimeter wide bar with huge flares on there, and I've got specially made levers that come off of it so that I can actually still touch them from the job. [00:54:07] Josh: We have seen it with, I, I can't remember the name of that bar, but I think it's out of Belgium or something. But it's got like, you know, uh, 180 millimeters of reach, um, super narrow with long, and you can kind of lay your forearms. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I remember seeing that and they quickly were like, Nope, that's out. Um, so I, you know, I think we just, people are, people are cautious. I think the, the setups that are working now, um, are very largely built around that, uh, three T track bar. I can't remember what it's called, but, uh, I know. You know, it's got that kind of cool like wing, like gulling shape to it, but it's super narrow, arrow tops, um, relatively vertical, uh, drops. But, but that's a bar that the ucis allowed for years, right? And so I think that as a, you know, when, when conversations are happening behind closed doors, that's the kind of thing of like, Oh, well this looks enough like that, that if they call us out, we, we go in there and be like, Well, it looks a whole lot like this thing that you've allowed for 20 years. Um, you know, we, we have tons of those conversations. Yeah. So, so I, you know, I, I think, but I, I will say, I, I think too, that's where, um, you know, a lot of people might look at the pro tour and things that they're writing. Oh, well if this worked, they'd use it. You know? I mean, that was what people told us when we were building zip in the early days. Well, if they worked, the Pro Pros would ride it. I'm like, Yeah, but they. They don't know what they're, they don't believe in aerodynamics. You know, they, the pros, they don't riding [00:55:34] Randall: super skinny tires at super high pressures cuz they felt faster for a long time, even though, you know, at least, well, you know this better than than I do. I mean, the data has been saying for quite some time that it's more efficient. Never mind the accumulated fatigue that you get when your body's just being, you know, rattled at, you know, high frequency over the course of many hours. [00:55:56] Josh: Yeah, yeah. No, it's, you know, that I would say they're quite often the last, at least as a group to change. Right. But you, you are seeing it now. I mean the, you know, and, and, and you know, the team like Nios hiring a guy, hiring Dan Bigham to come in and, you know, you, you are seeing some changes, right? Uh, that when teams are bringing full-time people like that in, um, we are gonna start moving the needle there, but it's still a delicate dance with the. With the UCI and, and all the sport governing bodies, right? Nobody, You hear it all the time. Nobody wants a repeat of the whole fna. Uh, I don't follow swimming, but I was the technical, uh, committee director for cycling at the World Federation of Sporting Good Industries. And, uh, at the time when FNA Band banned all of the super tight, uh, swimming suits, and it was just a cluster, right? I mean, they just came out and said, Nope, you've pushed it too far. We're done. And if the whole industry was sideways with like, we've invested millions of dollars in this and the records are breaking, and people wanted and on and on and on, and they just said, Nope, you're done. And, uh, I think it took them five years to under undo all that damage. You know, I mean, you just wanna [00:57:11] Randall: something parallel with running too with, uh, carbon fiber insoles and like what is, what is allowed in terms of the amount of spring that can be delivered and so on. Um, Yeah, I, I see, I see them showing up on my local run. And, um, I might have to get a set just to keep up with the people I used to beat, to keep up with [00:57:29] Josh: It's totally true. [00:57:31] Randall: Uh, that's, I mean, that's, that's, to some degree, that's the nature of the game. And that's why in, in significant part, that's why the gear is as good as it is right now is because, you know, people are looking for, as you would say, those marginal gains. Um, yeah. Um, I wanna dive in. So, uh, I want to put, bring in a few, uh, listener questions. Uh, so we posted in the ridership that you were gonna be coming on, and so we had some folks asking questions there. Probably the biggest one that came up was, um, talking about, you know, we've, uh, Craig and I brought up the rule of 1 0 5 or 5% on the podcast before, but, you know, citing, citing it, it's not a deep understanding, uh, at all. So tell us about how that emerged in. How it applies. Um, you know, particularly in the gravel scene where you're looking at tires that are much bigger. Um, and I mentioned, uh, earlier that, you know, specialized as a video for their reval wheels where they're running a a 42 mill tire on i, I think a 35 or less external rim, and they're claiming some arrow benefit. Does that seem plausible? Is there, uh, given, given, given what you have seen in the wind tunnel and in your modeling? [00:58:41] Josh: Yeah. Um, yeah, it's totally plausible and I guess, we'll, we'll start with rule of one. Oh, so rule 1 0 5 was really, you know, I, I realized pretty early in my career that you had to come up with sort of rules of thumb for things or nobody would listen to you Mm-hmm. and, you know, spent two years traveling Europe trying to sell Arrow. Sell World Tour or pro tour at the time, uh, directors and team owners on aerodynamics and you know, I mean literally got thrown out of every single team, team over there. Uh, I mean, it was just, we just got laughed out of the room. Just imagine [00:59:20] Randall: any of those team directors could have just adopted it at that time and had this huge advantage and didn't, [00:59:26] Josh: uh, that was, I mean, I always said, you know, Uli at srm, thank God, you know, he was developing his thing. And when I walked in to pitch Reese, um, he was alrea

Off The Cuff with Danny LoPriore
Mental Health in the Middle East with Ally Salama

Off The Cuff with Danny LoPriore

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 51:55


While the United States still has a lot of work to do in destigmatizing mental health, the Middle East is much further behind us.  This week I spoke with Forbes 30 under 30 Social Entrepreneur, speaker, podcaster, the founder of EMPWR MAG, and The Middle East's Mental Health Ambassador, Ally Salama.  Ally has made it his life's mission to destigmatize mental health in the Middle East, but in addition to the cultural stigma, there simply is not enough awareness.   "We fear what we don't understand, you know.  Mental health in the states, you have hundreds of millions of dollars in media and advertising being spent on awareness. Because they know, the West really knows the price, the burden that mental health has on economies." - Ally Salama (3:04)   Ally came from a prestigious family in Egypt, and accomplishments were very important in his upbringing.  Because of his father's job, Ally had lived in several different countries before even turning 18.  Despite having great success in swimming, singing, and academics as a adolescent, he never really felt fulfilled and didn't understand why.   “I always knew I was different, but I'd never understood that it could make me feel alienated.” - Ally Salama (18:06)   Through all of Ally's ups and downs in life, his determination and upbringing taught him a lot about success and how to never stop learning, improving, and growing.   “Action breeds confidence, and then confidence, if you don't really work on it, you lose it.  And that comfort makes you less confident because that comfort comes from consistent action from you being always at that cusp of your comfort zone.”            - Ally Salama (11:10)   In This Episode (2:17) Mental health for young people in Egypt. (6:52) Ally's early upbringing and his relationship with his parents  (10:54) Feeling complacent once getting to comfortable or too confident  (11:53) Ally's educational background  (12:56) Ally's background in professional swimming  (16:16) Ally's mental health issues as a kid and teen (19:26) The struggles Ali faced when moving around the world as a child (22:36) Coming from a privileged family and learning how to give and help others (27:00) The darkest point of Ally's life when he was clinically diagnosed with depression (30:13) How dogs help with mental health  (32:45) Ally's grandfather being diagnosed with Cancer and how it affected his family (34:30) How Ally started EMPWR MAG (40:28 )The people Ally looks up to the most  (44:06) Ally's 5 year plan  (46:19) The mental health stigma for younger Egyptian kids    Our Guest Ally Salama is a Forbes 30 Under 30 recognized social entrepreneur, an ex-pro athlete, #1 Apple charting podcaster, and The Middle East's Mental Health Ambassador. He founded empower-mag.com, the first mental health magazine in the Middle East, winning Harvard's top 7 most impactful social initiatives in 2019, earning recognition from the World Health Organization & the World Federation for Mental Health. He currently hosts Apple's #1 Charting Youth Leadership Podcast “Empathy Always Wins”- the world's exclusive leadership and mental wellbeing podcast focusing on empathy.    Resources & Links Off The Cuff https://www.offthecuff.fm/ https://www.youtube.com/c/OffTheCuffwithDannyLoPriore https://www.instagram.com/1and1otc/ https://www.instagram.com/dannylopriore/ Ally Salama https://www.instagram.com/allysalama/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/allysalama/ https://www.allysalama.com

HRchat Podcast
World Mental Health Day with Margarida Rafael, Workzinga

HRchat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 27:37


According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), nearly one in five U.S. adults lives with a mental illness. But it's not just in our personal lives that we should be concerned about mental health. We spend the majority of our days, and our weeks, at the office. And unfortunately, work can get a bit stressful sometimes.  This means that supporting mental health in the workplace is no longer a perk but a necessity. Today is World Mental Health Day. The theme of 2022's World Mental Health Day, set by the World Federation for Mental Health, is 'Make mental health and wellbeing for all a global priority'. Our returning guest today will help shine a light on the impact that poor mental health can have in the workplace. Margarida Rafael is the Head of Psychological Sciences at Workzinga, a job search and hiring platform emphasizing company culture fit. Margarida works as a researcher and assessment content creator. She continues to see patients in her own private practice for therapy and psychological assessments.Her clinical experience in administration and development of a variety of psychological tests culminated in a full-time dedication to research in the industrial and organizational field. Questions Include:So today is World Mental Health Day. Why is it important to have a day to recognize and take stock of our mental wellbeing and the mental health of those around us? Is there a stigma around sharing one's mental health?Should employees feel empowered to be open about any mental health problems/issues? What about the perception many have that admitting vulnerabilities will mean one doesn't get the job/gets overlooked for that promotion? Workzinga, in part, helps with the culture fit in the recruitment process. How can employers demonstrate to candidates that they support the physical and mental well-being of their employees? Can you offer some practical tips? Candidate questions to ask employer around support? answer includes: "what do you do for self-care?"What does it mean for the employer brand if a company can demonstrate it really cares for the mental and physical wellness of employees? Is it the job of managers to lead by example and share their own vulnerabilities? Can this lead to more authentic relationships? How can leaders and employees spot colleagues suffering from stress, anxiety and other mental health issues? If you enjoyed this interview you may also want to check out other HRchat episodes with Margarida and some of her colleagues including Dan Hunter. We do our best to ensure editorial objectivity. The views and ideas shared by our guests and sponsors are entirely independent of The HR Gazette, HRchat Podcast and Iceni Media Inc.

Mi365's podcast
7 Steps To Improve YOUR Mental Health - World Mental Health Day

Mi365's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 41:05


7 Steps To Improve Your Mental Health On World Mental Health Day World Mental Health Day is happening TODAY. The theme for this year, as set by the World Federation for Mental Health, is ‘making mental health and wellbeing for all a global priority'. I am challenging YOU to look after ‘Number 1' when it comes to your mental health and learn how to manage yourself better.

OPENPediatrics
ECMO Anticoagulation and Thrombosis by Dr. Christina VanderPluym for OPENPediatrics

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 28:22


In this World Shared Practice Forum podcast, Dr. Christina VanderPluym, Co-Director of the Stroke and Cerebral Vascular Center and Medical Director of the Cardiac Anti-thrombosis Management and Monitoring Program at Boston Children's Hospital, discusses emerging concepts in managing anticoagulation of extracorporeal support devices, with a focus on reducing complications such as hemorrhage and thrombosis. She shares her views on the therapeutic offerings currently available for anticoagulation in pediatric mechanical circulatory support, as well as insights into her own clinical practice, along with data from the pediatric ventricular assist device population. Upon listening to this presentation, learners should be able to: - Describe the current state of anticoagulation therapy and monitoring in pediatric extracorporeal support - Compare the advantages and limitations of heparin and bivalirudin for pediatric anticoagulation - Identify areas of future promise in the field of pediatric anticoagulation for extracorporeal devices Articles referenced: • Ghbeis, M. B., Vander Pluym, C. J., & Thiagarajan, R. R. (2021). Hemostatic Challenges in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine-Hemostatic Balance in VAD. Frontiers in pediatrics, 9, 625632. https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2021.625632 • VanderPluym CJ, Cantor RS, Machado D, et al. Utilization and Outcomes of Children Treated with Direct Thrombin Inhibitors on Paracorporeal Ventricular Assist Device Support. ASAIO J. 2020;66(8):939-945. doi:10.1097/MAT.0000000000001093 (13:45) • https://www.fda.gov/drugs/postmarket-drug-safety-information-patients-and-providers/fda-drug-safety-communication-update-follow-public-health-alert-about-changes-heparin-sodium-usp (18:05) • Thompson K, Alred J, Deyo A, Sievert AN, Sistino JJ. Effect of New Heparin Potency on Activated Clotting Time during Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: A Retrospective Chart Review. J Extra Corpor Technol. 2014;46(3):224-228. (18:20) Additional resources: • www.actionlearningnetwork.org (26:49) Publication date: September 22, 2022. Citation: VanderPluym C, Daniel D, Burns JP. ECMO Anticoagulation and Thrombosis. 9/2022. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://youtu.be/y4f8NiDJp0g. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open-access and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

What's in a Song
The Healing power of songwriting and the power of vulnerability with music therapists Suzanne Hanser and Heather Woods

What's in a Song

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 62:52


In this episode, I talk with Dr. Suzanne Hanse.  The Founding Chair Emerita and Professor of Music Therapy at Berklee College of Music. She is President of the International Association for Music & Medicine and Past President of the World Federation for Music Therapy and the American Music Therapy Association. She teaches a course for Berklee Online, Music Therapy Techniques for Wellness:  https://online.berklee.edu/courses/music-therapy-techniques-for-wellnessYou can find her blog: Music Strategies for Wellbeing on  http://www.suzannehanser.com/And singer songwriter Heather Woods.  Heather is a music therapist that has served oncology patients for nearly 10 years. Heather is passionate about sharing the power of the arts to facilitate mindfulness, self-compassion, and joy, and offers evidence-based creative programs to encourage empowered and authentic self-care.  http://www.heatherwoodsmusic.comThe power of vulverabilityWriting what you care aboutHolding space for other peopleQuestions to ask a patient or cowriterhttps://www.scarletkeys.comhttps://www.instagram.com/skeys2021/https://www.amazon.com/Craft-Songwriting-Music-Meaning-Emotion/dp/0876391927/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2PP55NU6E9ST6&keywords=the+craft+of+songwriting&qid=1659573139&sprefix=the+craft+of+songwritin%2Caps%2C153&sr=8-1Engineer: Peter Sykes https://www.petersykesmusic.comThe show's theme song "What's in a Song" was co-written with Otto GrossRecorded and performed by Otto Gross: @OttoGrossProduction (instagram)@OttoGrossMusic (Youtube, facebook, TikTok)https://biglink.to/ottogrossmusic

OPENPediatrics
Utilizing Mindfulness as a Stress Reduction Tool by Erin Quinlan & Jennifer Schlebusch

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 25:12


In this podcast, Erin Quinlan and Jennifer Schlebusch share their knowledge on mindfulness, and how it can be utilized as a stress reduction tool for nurses and their patients. They review different methods of mindfulness, including Reiki, and how to incorporate these tools into the hospital setting. Following this podcast, learners will be able to: 1:36 Define Mindfulness 2:12 List the types of mindfulness 12:55 Perform a breathing technique for stress reduction 14:43 Define Reiki and explain how it is used at the bedside Publication date: September 16, 2022 Articles Referenced: • Zaccaro A, Piarulli A, Laurino M, et al. How Breath-Control Can Change Your Life: A Systematic Review on Psycho-Physiological Correlates of Slow Breathing. Front Hum Neurosci. 2018;12:353. 7:15) • Jabs H, Rubik B. Detecting Subtle Energies with a Physical Sensor Array. Cosm. Hist. 2019;15(2), 171–192. (15:16) • Bat N. The effects of reiki on heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and stress levels: A pilot randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled study. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2021;43:101328. (20:51) Additional References: • Rubik B. The Biological Field with Beverly Rubik (video). 2017. https://www.newthinkingallowed.org/. • Kabat-Zinn, J. Full Catastrophe Living. Bantam Books; 2013. • Chiesa A, Calati R, Serretti A. Does mindfulness training improve cognitive abilities? A systematic review of neuropsychological findings. Clin Psychol Rev. 2011;31(3):449-464. • Demir Dogan M. The effect of reiki on pain: A meta-analysis [published correction appears in Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2021 Aug;44:101423]. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2018;31:384-387. • Jain S, Mills PJ. Biofield therapies: helpful or full of hype? A best evidence synthesis [published correction appears in Int J Behav Med. 2011 Mar;18(1):79-82]. Int J Behav Med. 2010;17(1):1-16. • Lee MS, Pittler MH, Ernst E. Effects of reiki in clinical practice: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials. Int J Clin Pract. 2008;62(6):947-954. • Lipinski K, Van De Velde J. Reiki: Defining a Healing Practice for Nursing. Nurs Clin North Am. 2020;55(4):521-536. • Lipinski K, Van De Velde J. Reiki, Nursing, and Health Care. Nurs Clin North Am. 2020;55(4):505-519. • Miles P, True G. Reiki--review of a biofield therapy history, theory, practice, and research. Altern Ther Health Med. 2003;9(2):62-72. • Wetzel, WS. Reiki healing: a physiologic perspective. J Holistic Nursing.1989;7(1): 47-54. Citation: Quinlan E, Schlebusch J, DeGrazia M, Steadman J. Utilizing Mindfulness as a Stress Reduction Tool. 9/2022. Online Podcast. OPENPediatrics. https://youtu.be/D4mCptzkDcw. Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Central Line by American Society of Anesthesiologists

Dr. Jannicke Mellin-Olsen, past president of the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists, joins Dr. Striker to talk about World Patient Safety Day and patient safety more broadly. Dr. Mellin-Olsen shares her story, thoughts on how anesthesiologists can make a difference, medication safety tips, information about World Patient Safety Day's background and plans, and more. Recorded September 2022.

OPENPediatrics
"Approach to Abdominal Pain" by Patricia Stoeck, MD

OPENPediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 14:44


In this podcast, the learner will learn how to approach patients with abdominal pain including recognition of important historical features, physical examination findings, and pertinent laboratory testing and imaging studies. Please visit: http://www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user.For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu

Food Safety Matters
Ep. 126. Blum, Keener: The Poison Squad and the Fight for Food Safety Legislation

Food Safety Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 106:21


Deborah Blum, Director of the Knight Science Journalism program at MIT and the Publisher of Undark magazine, is a Pulitzer-Prize winning science journalist, columnist and author of six books, most recently, The Poison Squad, a 2018 New York Times Notable Book. That book, as with all her recent books, focuses on influential moments in the history of science. She has worked as a science columnist for The New York Times, a blogger for Wired, and has written for other publications ranging from The Wall Street Journal to Mother Jones, The Guardian to Lapham's Quarterly. Her work has been anthologized in Best American Science Writing, Best American Nature Writing, and Best Science On-Line. Before joining MIT in the summer of 2015, she was the Helen Firstbrook Franklin Professor of Journalism at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, a position she held for 18 years. Previously, she worked at five different newspapers, including as a staff science writer for The Sacramento Bee, where she won the Pulitzer in 1992 for her reporting on ethical issues in primate research. She received her A.B.J. from the University of Georgia in 1976 and her M.A. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison's School of Journalism in Mass Communication in 1982. Deborah is a past president of the National Association of Science Writers and a former board member of the World Federation of Science Journalists. She serves on the advisory boards of the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, Chemical and Engineering News, Spectrum, The Scientist and the MIT Museum. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a lifetime associate of the National Academy of Sciences, both in recognition of her work in public understanding of science. Larry Keener, C.F.S., P.A., P.C.Q.I., is President and CEO of International Product Safety Consultants Inc. (IPSC), based in Seattle, Washington. IPSC is a global leader in providing food safety and food technology solutions to the food processing industry for a broad client base of Fortune 500 food companies, academic research institutes, and government agencies. IPSC is engaged in the conformity, risk assessment, and food safety verification business. Larry is an internationally regarded microbiologist and process authority in the food industry. His areas of expertise range from applied food microbiology to the development and application of novel preservation technologies including: high pressure processing (HPP), microwave, pulsed electric field (PEF), high-powered ultrasound, atmospheric plasma, and low-energy electron beam technology. He is a past president of IFT's Nonthermal Processing Division. Larry is a 2013 Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), a board-certified food scientist (International Food Science Certification Commission), and a 2018 recipient of an International Union of Food Science and Technology's (IUFoST) lifetime achievement award for his work in microbiology and food safety. He is a two-term past president of Tuskegee University's Food and Nutrition Sciences Advisory Board. Larry is also a 2022 inductee into the George Washington Carver Society. He has received numerous other awards and honors, and he has published more than 100 papers on subjects related to food production and food safety science. Larry is a frequently invited speaker to food industry, business and scientific conferences, workshops, and seminars. He is also a member of the Editorial Advisory   Board of Food Safety Magazine. In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Deborah [04:18] about: The shocking discoveries Deborah made about food safety in the 19th century while writing her book, The Poison Squad, which chronicles the passage of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act How the unregulated food industry's prioritization of profits over public health led to food being one of the top ten causes of death during the latter half of the 19th century, which is also sometimes referred to as the period of the “Great American Stomachache” The different kinds of risk associated with food in urban versus rural environments The issues of adulteration and the lack of labeling requirements in the 19th century The questionable ethics of the Hygienic Table Trials that were conducted by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Chief Chemist Dr. Harvey Wiley, in an effort to convince industry, regulators, and the public that the compounds being added to foods were harmful to human health The impacts that Dr. Wiley's experiments had on public perceptions of food safety and the progression of U.S. food regulation, and the role that media played in disseminating Dr. Wiley's findings How behind-the-scenes relationships between food industry regulators, politicians, and the scientific community may weaken the law, both in present day and the 19th century Deborah's biggest revelation from researching and writing The Poison Squad—a grim case of formaldehyde in milk. We also speak with Larry [59:42] about The Poison Squad from industry's point of view, including conversations about: Possible reasons why the food industry neglected to ensure the safety of substances it was adding to food products in the 19th century, including a lack of technical capability and regulation Changes in regulations and public sentiment around food safety over the last century, and how the general approach to food safety has been guided by discordant views among different stakeholder groups How the antagonism that occurred at the highest levels of the federal government during the events chronicled in The Poison Squad set in motion a series of events that gave passage to future food safety legislation The successes that scientifically minded food safety advocates in the U.S. have made since the enactment of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act, and improvements that need to be made regarding international harmonization Results that can arise from the friction between industry's need to turn a profit versus the drive to do right by consumers, as well as the economic value of ensuring food safety versus cutting corners. 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