Podcasts about works in progress

  • 93PODCASTS
  • 202EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1MONTHLY NEW EPISODE
  • Sep 4, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about works in progress

Latest podcast episodes about works in progress

River Terrace Church Sermons
Works in Progress

River Terrace Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 25:32


A sermon based on 1 Samuel 31

Chrisley Confessions
197. A Will to Defy, God is Your Peace, and We are All Works in Progress

Chrisley Confessions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 72:02


Todd and Julie discuss how everyone has a right to an opinion but we shouldn't treat opinions as fact. Todd gets a message accusing him of being too politically correct. Juile talks about the upside of adversity. They discuss what courtship was like in Todd's day and how social media is ruining dating for young people. Todd also talks about Nanny Faye and why he is at peace. Please support the show by checking out our sponsors! K12: At K12 dot com/podcast, you can explore curriculum and see success stories from some of the over two million families who've taken charge of their child's education Rothy's: Get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/CC Slotomania: If you're 21 or older you can join millions of players around the world. Download Slotomania, the #1 FREE slots game, on the App Store or Google Play Store and get one million free coins

The Anonymous Podcast
Spiritual Principle a Day - August 8th with Heather M. - Accepting Ourselves as Works in Progress

The Anonymous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 15:11


A commentary and discussion on the Spiritual Principle a Day Meditation. Contact Information: 919-675-1058 or facebook.com/groups/theanonpodcast

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca
We Are All Works In Progress

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 0:29


If you were to tell me that "your faith is a work in progress", I would agree that you have a biblical mindset. Philippians 1:6 reminds us that: "being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus." - Philippians 1:6I love the confidence that Paul is writing with to these Philippians Christians. While salvation from the penalty of sin happens at the moment a person accepts Christ, the process of becoming more like Christ is exactly that: a process. Paul is completely sure that this "sanctification" will continue in the lives of these believers. Since faith is a gift of God (Ephesians 2:8), we can rest assured that the gift of our salvation had nothing to do with us. We didn't deserve it so therefore we can't lose it. It is this realization that frees us to share about our failures and to be thankful to be a Christian. It's what allows us to accept rebukes, criticism and advice with humility. It is also what allows the church to welcome and accept all who would seek to know God, as we who were once far off have been brought near ourselves.

The State of Games
The One About Works in Progress

The State of Games

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 142:21


In this episode, Chris, Darrell, TC, and special guest Daniel Newman talk about upcoming projects – and some of the various adaptations and revisions that have been made, all for the sake of progress. All this, plus the works in progress at The Unpublished Games Festival, a rebuttal to our discussion on escape rooms in episode 181, how Time's Up: Title Recall is the best party game of all time, and how Compounded has been improved on Kickstarter!

Works In Progress
Mercedes Dorame: Making art on Tongva land

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 37:41


Native American Indigenous artist and UCLA alumna Mercedes Dorame will deliver the keynote address at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture's 2022 commencement on Saturday, June 11th at 4 p.m. This will be the first commencement ceremony to be held in-person since 2019. Dorame spoke to the UCLA Arts podcast Works In Progress about how her Tongva heritage informs her practice, which encompasses photography, sculptural installations, and sound art.

The End of the Day Podcast with Kari Watterson: Using Mindset Work to Live Your Best Life
Ep. 47 - Weekly 3: The Power of Perspective, Expanding Your Toolbox, We're All Works in Progress

The End of the Day Podcast with Kari Watterson: Using Mindset Work to Live Your Best Life

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later May 7, 2022 14:39


Welcome to this week's Weekly 3.The Weekly 3 is a series where I bring you three thoughts, tools, or concepts to help you on your journey, but in a condensed format so you can get what you need and move on with your day with renewed hope, determination, and commitment to your own personal growth.This week's topics:                                                                                                                                                             1.  The Power of Perspective;2.  Expanding Your Toolbox; and3.  We're All Works in Progress.Thanks so much for tuning in.------Original intro/outro music by JMW.------To learn more about what I do, my coaching philosophy, and how to work with me, email me at kari@kariwatterson.com or visit my website at https://kariwatterson.com.Have an area of struggle you'd love to work through? Book a free 90-minute coaching call and learn some tools that will help you change your life. Visit my website or follow me on Instagram (@_thisonelife) to learn more.------For more mindset tips, resources and insights, you can find me here:Instagram (@_thisonelife)LinkedInMedium

Change By Degrees
102: Works In Progress-ish

Change By Degrees

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 47:01


Welcome to another episode of Change By Degrees! In this episode, we discuss some of the works in progress we have. We also go on a few tangents (as usual) about college, work, and much more. We hope you enjoy and make sure to follow us on Instagram @_changebydegrees and leave us a 5 star review on apple podcasts!

Works In Progress
Australian Aboriginal screen-printed textiles at the Fowler

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 27:44


The Fowler Museum exhibition Aboriginal Screen-Printed Textiles from Australia's Top End invites us to explore more than 70 distinctive, screen-printed textiles made by contemporary artists at five Aboriginal-owned art centers across northern Australia. These textiles combine traditional cultural knowledge with contemporary production techniques to produce dazzling, unique fabrics. Their bold colors and striking patterns have inspired interior design, furnishings, and fashion apparel.  Joanna Barrkman, Senior Curator of Southeast Asian and Pacific Arts at the Fowler Museum, joins the UCLA Arts podcast Works In Progress to share stories about the artists and inspirations behind these textiles, on view at the Fowler through July 10.  

Works In Progress
Twenty years of Dance Camera West

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 26:05


Dance Camera West, the world-renowned dance film festival, marks its 20th anniversary this year. From March 24-April 2, the festival will screen the top films selected from a record of over 400 submissions from around the world, in a live in-person event at two Los Angeles venues.UCLA professors of choreography Lionel Popkin and David Roussève, who are board members of Dance Camera West, and the festival's executive and artistic director Kelly Hargraves join the UCLA Arts podcast "Works In Progress" for a conversation about the festival and the evolution of dance on film.

Works In Progress
AEDI in the Classroom

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 37:37


Classes rooted in AEDI – anti-racism, equity, diversity, and inclusion – are being taught across the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture. This winter quarter, two undergraduate Art studio classes – painting and new genres – are being taught as AEDI-themed courses. On this episode of the UCLA Arts podcast "Works In Progress," we spoke to faculty members Patty Wickman and Vishal Jugdeo as well as students about this shift and how students are responding in the classroom.

Bethany Covenant Church, Berlin CT
Works In Progress - February 27, 2022 (Ben Pease)

Bethany Covenant Church, Berlin CT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 22:45


Works In Progress - February 27, 2022 (Ben Pease) by Bethany Covenant Church

feliciabaxter
TNFro is Still Reading, Last Episode of Black History Month...No I am tone death you don't want me singing anything..

feliciabaxter

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 101:13


Sound edited by @BritonMedia This episode was edited and returned to me so fast I am posting late because I got distracted by a separate post on my marketing plan. But @BritonMedia was on point and I am grateful they reminded me why I started this podcast, Noah and team, mad respect!!   My heart is with the people of Ukraine and even Russia, they did not ask for this. Shame on you Putin. In this episode, the last of Black History Month, I endeavor to celebrate Black Excellence, Spoilers on ST Discovery, Social Media Round-Up, COVID Updates, General Shenanigans, and Not My Family Rewrite.   Check out Dale's Angels Inc Blog for notes from this episode and other subjects. Check Out CQM Portfolio Page Finished and Works In Progress by TNFro and contributors. All music in the podcast is credited and available for immediate streaming on iTunes or wherever you listen to music. (Insert html for iTunes playlist) Contact Us via LinkedIn: Dale's Angels Inc Twitter: @tvfoodwinegirl Instagram: @tnfroisreading Facebook: TNFroIsReading Bookclub YouTube Channel: TNFro Is Reading And Eating You know your girl is on her hustle, support the show by navigating to: Chattabooks...Latest releases to read Dale's Angel's Store...For Merch Promo Code: tnfro Writer's Block Coffee Promocode: tnfrocoffee Ship A Bag of Dicks Promo Code: tnfrogotjokes #BritonBuyersClub Don't forget to drop me a line at tnfroisreading@gmail.com comments on the show or suggestions for Chattabooks additions.

Works In Progress
Edgar Arceneaux on his new play “Boney Manilli”

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 26:21


Edgar Arceneaux is an artist-in-residence at UCLA's Center for the Art of Performance, where he is developing his work-in-progress "Boney Manilli," a live performance, exhibition, and single-channel film. On the latest episode of "Works In Progress," Arceneaux discusses his inspirations for the work, from 70's disco group Boney M. and 90's pop duo Milli Vanilli, to losing his mother to dementia. He also discusses his extensive research process, working on themes across an array of media, and seeking out artistic subjects that have “a level of unsettledness.” 

feliciabaxter
Episode 46...Daytona 500 Opening Day 2022...Yes, there are Black Nascar Fans and NASCAR Is very melanated.

feliciabaxter

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 32:30


MJ and Pit Bull Have Teams...Who Knew... All music in the podcast is credit and available for immediate streaming on iTunes or wherever you listen to music. (Insert html for iTunes playlist) Check Out CQM Portfolio Page Finished and Works In Progress by TNFro and contributors. Check out Dale's Angels Inc Blog for notes from this episode and other subjects. Contact Us via LinkedIn: Dale's Angels Inc Twitter: @tvfoodwinegirl Instagram: @tnfroisreading Facebook: TNFroIsReading Bookclub YouTube Channel: TNFro Is Reading And Eating You know your girl is on her hustle, support the show by navigating to: Chattabooks...Latest releases to read Dale's Angel's Store...For Merch Promo Code: tnfro Writer's Block Coffee Promocode: tnfrocoffee Ship A Bag of Dicks Promo Code: tnfrogotjokes #BritonBuyersClub Don't forget to drop me a line at tnfroisreading@gmail.com comments on the show or suggestions for Chattabooks additions. Or you can leave a brief message at the following link https://anchor.fm/felicia-marie-baxter/message. Non-trolley messages will be read on the show!

feliciabaxter
TNFro Is Reading and Celebrating Black Excellence, Social Media Round Up Watching and Eating, COVID Shenanigans, and Commenting on Just Stupid -Ish

feliciabaxter

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 75:07


I realize my social media habits are really connected to how I put together my podcast and I hope that not only are you entertained by what you hear on my podcast and what I post on my blog. My hope is my listeners may accidentally learn something and also have fun while you're doing it. In this podcast, I celebrate Black excellence my way. I celebrate it through the food world as well as black travel and the culture's influence in pioneering discoveries. I also give major props to those people that when they get restricted, they just build their own table and not wait for place at someone else's. They are more people like Tyler Perry than their are unlike him in spite of what the news will have you believe. Excelling where they are in spite of low expectations. Keep learning, Keep creating, life is too short for regrets... Check out Dale's Angels Inc Blog for notes from this episode and other subjects. Check Out CQM Portfolio Page Finished and Works In Progress by TNFro and contributors. All music in the podcast is credited and available for immediate streaming on iTunes or wherever you listen to music. (Insert html for iTunes playlist) Contact Us via LinkedIn: Dale's Angels Inc Twitter: @tvfoodwinegirl Instagram: @tnfroisreading Facebook: TNFroIsReading Bookclub YouTube Channel: TNFro Is Reading And Eating You know your girl is on her hustle, support the show by navigating to: Chattabooks...Latest releases to read Dale's Angel's Store...For Merch Promo Code: tnfro Writer's Block Coffee Promocode: tnfrocoffee Ship A Bag of Dicks Promo Code: tnfrogotjokes #BritonBuyersClub Don't forget to drop me a line at tnfroisreading@gmail.com comments on the show or suggestions for Chattabooks additions.

Unstoppable Authors
Episode 133: Writing Multiple Works in Progress

Unstoppable Authors

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 45:46


In this week's episode, Angeline, Holly & Julia discuss the hows and whys of juggling more than one writing project at once. They cover the benefits and challenges of doing so and share their top tips for managing the workload of multiple books or writing projects at once. See the full show notes at www.unstoppableauthors.com

The Missing Conversation
We're all works in progress, even our religious leaders (STR) - Episode 38

The Missing Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 27:37


No one feels totally comfortable being vulnerable — it's scary, and we might often think others might take advantage of what we're sharing from a place of trust. It's likely the same for even those in our communities who appear secure in their beliefs and selves — our religious leaders and ministers of faith.  In this episode of The Missing Conversation, Robert explores how sharing our insecurities, grief and anger can actually help us bond better with each other. When our religious leaders don't share their humanness from us, it prevents us from learning how they use a combination of divine values and human qualities as part of their wisdom, which guides them to take better care of themselves during challenging situations.  As humans, there are many, many things we still don't know. From not knowing what's in the depths of the ocean to what happens after death, the faith we have in God or the Universe keeps us grounded and helps us deal with the 'not-knowing'.  Indeed, sometimes our faith transforms into a staunch belief, one we begin to force upon others — despite their different thoughts, values, and attitudes. Most of us want to 'know' — we need assurance or understanding of what might happen to us. But this belief, especially with some religious leaders, robs them of their experience of humanness especially out in the open.  Being receptive to 'not knowing' brings us together more than we can imagine. Accepting our feelings and reactions of ‘not knowing' helps us have our best chance to move toward healing — the first step is awareness and wanting to find our sense of wellbeing. This understanding of our shared uncertainty and not knowing helps us better identify with other humans around us.  There is strength and clarity in admitting that you may not know what will happen — whether it's tomorrow or after death. And it takes courage too. Robert talks about how it could help us loosen the rigidity around the need to have a clear understanding or enlightened view that might make us think we're above being human. After all, our humanness is a major part of what keeps us connected to each other.  For religious leaders, this humanness has great potential value to help their congregations and followers live according to spiritual values, to embody the values and attitudes that serve not just ourselves but also other humans and the planet we're blessed with. Read the transcription and listen to this episode on The Global Bridge Foundation website.  

Works In Progress
'Destination Crenshaw' pays tribute to Black creativity and history

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 28:28


A cultural and economic corridor that's central to Southern California's Black community is getting a new look. Destination Crenshaw is a $100 million revitalization project that will bring public art, pocket parks and small business investment to 1.3 miles of Crenshaw Boulevard in South Los Angeles.Helping bring this project to life? UCLA faculty and alumni.On this episode of "Works In Progress," hear from two UCLA scholars who are advising the project, Darnell Hunt and Marcus Hunter, and two UCLA Department of Art alumnae who are creating public artworks for it, Maren Hassinger and Brenna Youngblood.

Healing Is Sexy
We Are NOT All Works In Progress!

Healing Is Sexy

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 6:55


SOCIAL CONTACT INFO IG: https://www.instagram.com/healingissexy/ TIKTOK: https://vm.tiktok.com/TTPdhVTmcY/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/healingislife/ Private FB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/856135225122515/?ref=share Website: www.healingissexylife.com Blog: https://dearblackpeople.blog Email: melwilliams@healingissexylife.com

Works In Progress
Reconnecting with nature through immersive exhibition “Ritual of Return”

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 15:20


Art and science students at UCLA want you to reconsider the human relationship with nature, even if it means shrinking you down to the size of an insect – or at least creating an immersive environment that helps shift your perspective to the scale of tiny creatures. This past fall, students from the Department of Design Media Arts (DMA) collaborated with environmental science, biology, and public policy students in the course “Introduction to Ecological Art and Justice.” The students staged an installation at Broad Art Center called “Ritual of Return,” which combined immersive video, audio, sculpture, and performance to make visitors feel fully embedded in a natural environment. Students also produced an illustrated booklet about the research and iteration that led to the final exhibition. "Works In Progress" host Avishay Artsy met with class instructor Erin Cooney, a lecturer and alumna of DMA; Leslie Foster, the TA for the class and a second-year graduate student at DMA; and Jen Hotes, an undergraduate student in the class. 

Transforming our community in Jesus' Name.
WORKS IN PROGRESS: Created For Influence | Pam & Dennis May - 16th January 2022

Transforming our community in Jesus' Name.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 19:42


Works in Progress Series | Dennis & Pam May

A Quilting Life Podcast
Finishing Works in Progress in 2022 and Favorite Sewing Room Hacks

A Quilting Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 43:05


In this episode, Sherri and Chelsi discuss how to best go about completing unfinished quilting projects in 2022. They share some of the specific projects they plan on completing this year and also give advice on how to best organize yourself in order to complete UFOs. They also discuss their favorite sewing room hacks and tips that help them be more efficient and productive in the sewing room. For complete show notes, pictures, and links to all of today's featured quilts and fabrics, visit the A Quilting Life Blog: https://www.aquiltinglife.com/2022/01/a-quilting-life-podcast-episode-46-show-notes.html/Good Hearted (Quilt on the Wall): https://tidd.ly/31diVxyGood Hearted Quilt Kit: http://shrsl.com/378i1Good Hearted Quilt Backing: http://shrsl.com/378i6Hearts at Home II (Quilt on the Table): https://tidd.ly/31Au3rRLittle Town: https://tidd.ly/3HK4GTTWarm Crochet Scissors: https://amzn.to/3f9VxYoAll People Quilt UFO Challenge Printable: https://www.allpeoplequilt.com/how-to-quilt/finishing/2022-ufo-challengeBest Tips for Works in Progress Blog Post: https://www.aquiltinglife.com/2020/04/best-tips-for-works-in-progress.html/The A Quilting Life Planner & Workbook: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1049181873/a-quilting-life-planner-and-workbook?click_key=c7b4005c205f117a1a2b580b86433022191c485e%3A1049181873&click_sum=a0d6518e&ref=shop_home_feat_2&frs=1&bes=1Christmas Decor Storage Bin: https://amzn.to/3zA1cAyVisit the A Quilting Life YouTube channel for more great video content: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmSR-jDR956ATQe30JHX87wEnjoy what you heard? Be sure to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts and your review could be read on the show!

Transforming our community in Jesus' Name.
WORKS IN PROGRESS: Created For Rhythm | Jarrod Risson - 2nd January 2022

Transforming our community in Jesus' Name.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 40:02


Works in Progress Series | Jarrod Risson

Bleav in The Comedy Bureau Field Report
Ep. 90: Sean Casey & Making Works in Progress

Bleav in The Comedy Bureau Field Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 91:59


At this side of the pandemic, there's a whole row of exciting new comedy venues that have popped up in the stead of all the ones that have closed, one of them being The Glendale Room, located in the vibrant streets of Downtown Glendale. This week's TCB Field Report has the founder of The Glendale Room, Sean Casey, chat with us about providing a crucial space that can be comfy for those on the rise in comedy or those with success, a place to be a "work in progress". On top of all of that, it might be the coziest venue in town with its bookstore vibe. Also, "hot" takes on comedy The Black List, CA's new universal indoor mask mandate, and more. Follow The Glendale Room @theglendaleroom on IG and Twitter. The Comedy Bureau @thecomedybureau across platforms and please, please support TCB via GoFundMe, Patreon, or on Venmo (@jakekroeger). Produced by Jake Kroeger Music by Brian Granillo Artwork by Andrew Delman and KT

Change By Degrees
087: Our Works In Progress

Change By Degrees

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 53:50


Welcome back to another episode of Change By Degrees! In this episode, we discuss our current works in progress! Not only that, we share our creative projects as well as discuss how our creative processes have changed since the pandemic, new methods for working on our stuff, and what we look forward to completing in 2022. Thanks for listening, and make sure to follow us on Instagram @_changebydegrees and review us on apple podcasts. See you next week!

51 Percent
#1688: Works in Progress: The Logan Nonfiction Program, Part Two | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 30:39


On this week’s 51%, we continue our conversations with the Carey Institute’s Logan Nonfiction fellows. Documentarian Tsanavi Spoonhunter previews her upcoming film, Holder of the Sky, on efforts to preserve treaty rights for native tribes in Wisconsin. And reporters Jillian Farmer and Cheryl Upshaw discuss their in-progress podcast, 50-Foot Woman, documenting life with the rare pituitary disease acromegaly. (more…)

51 Percent
#1688: Works in Progress: The Logan Nonfiction Program, Part Two | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 30:39


On this week's 51%, we continue our conversations with the Carey Institute's Logan Nonfiction fellows. Documentarian Tsanavi Spoonhunter previews her upcoming film, Holder of the Sky, on efforts to preserve treaty rights for native tribes in Wisconsin. And reporters Jillian Farmer and Cheryl Upshaw discuss their in-progress podcast, 50-Foot Woman, documenting life with the rare pituitary disease acromegaly. (more…)

51 Percent
#1688: Works in Progress: The Logan Nonfiction Program, Part Two | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 30:39


On this week's 51%, we continue our conversations with the Carey Institute's Logan Nonfiction fellows. Documentarian Tsanavi Spoonhunter previews her upcoming film, Holder of the Sky, on efforts to preserve treaty rights for native tribes in Wisconsin. And reporters Jillian Farmer and Cheryl Upshaw discuss their in-progress podcast, 50-Foot Woman, documenting life with the rare pituitary disease acromegaly. Guests: Tsanavi Spoonhunter, producer/director of Holder of the Sky; Jillian Farmer and Cheryl Upshaw, producers of 50-Foot Woman 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. Our producer is Jesse King, our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock, and our theme is “Lolita” by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. Follow Along You're listening to 51%, a WAMC production dedicated to women's issues and experiences. Thanks for joining us, I'm Jesse King. This week we're continuing our conversations with some of this fall's Logan Nonfiction fellows at the Carey Institute for Global Good. The program is currently remote for the coronavirus pandemic, so unfortunately fellows aren't getting their usual retreat at the Carey Institute's campus in Rensselaerville, New York - but its writers, filmmakers, podcasters, and photographers are still developing their projects and swapping advice through various online seminars and workshops. Tsanavi Spoonhunter spoke with me from Montana while filming her upcoming documentary Holder of the Sky. Spoonhunter is an American Indian reporter and filmmaker, and citizen of the Northern Arapahoe Tribe. Much of her storytelling focuses on Indian Country, including her latest documentary short, Crow Country: Our Right to Food Sovereignty, which has been screening at various festivals and venues. As she heads into the Logan Nonfiction Program, however, her focus is on Holder of the Sky. Tell me about Holder of the Sky. What is your focus with the film? So Holder of the Sky chronicles several tribes in the state of Wisconsin and their struggle to retain their treaty rights that were made with the government back in the 1800s - and how those treaty rights are still being challenged today, and what that looks like in present day. I focus on the Lac du Flambeau up in northern Wisconsin, the Oneida Nation, which is just outside of Green Bay, and then the Menominee tribe. For those who don't know, what are some examples of the treaty rights that you were examining in the film? Like what do treaty rights usually entail? Yeah, so a treaty right is a binding agreement between two sovereign nations. When the U.S. government started relocating tribes to reservations, that affected tribal life, their daily life. Tribes weren't able to go and access their traditional homelands for food or any of the things that they did. And so with those agreements, tribes were able to negotiate, "If I go on to a reservation, I'll be able to go off the reservation to hunt and fish anywhere that I want." That is an example of one of the tribes in Wisconsin that we're following: they were able to go out and practice their traditional spear-hunting rights. And then, you know, there was an uprising known as the Walleye Wars, and this is just one example in the film. Tribal members went off the reservation, and were hunting using a spearfishing tradition, and local, non-tribal folks got really upset, because they felt that tribes were given a privilege - that they were given more privileges than any other U.S. citizen, without really understanding the treaty rights and what tribes sacrificed in order to obtain that right to spearfish. I think that's a good example to highlight, you know about treaty rights in the United States. And it plays to the present day: we're following one character who was recently shot at last spring while he was spearfishing. Most of the tribes you're looking at are in Wisconsin. What brings you to Montana? So there's actually a national organization - it's evolved over time. But that event that I described earlier about the spearfishing, there was an organization called PAR - but today, it evolved, and it's called the Citizens for Equal Rights Alliance. And it's basically a group that challenges the rights of tribes. And so one of the leaders of that organization lives here in Montana. She was challenging the rights of another tribe that we're following in Wisconsin. I found the title Holder of the Sky from a creation story of the Oneida Nation in Wisconsin, and the Oneida Nation is probably one of the most powerful nations in the country. They were originally from New York, and they were moved to Wisconsin by treaty. And so they were given a certain acreage of land. Later on after that treaty, a non-native community wanted to establish a town on that land. And the tribe resisted, and they were like, "No, we do not want a town here. This is our treaty land." And the state said, "No, that's fine. They could start a town on that land." And so ever since then, there's always been some kind of strife between the two communities. But as of recently, it's gotten even worse over jurisdiction. The two communities are the Oneida Nation and the village of Hobart, and the village of Hobart is home to a lot of Green Bay Packers - it's a pretty wealthy suburb outside of Green Bay. And they're trying to expand on the tribal land. And the tribe is saying, "No, this is our land. We want to keep our land." But then Hobart is saying, "No, we were trying to buy land to expand." Elaine Willman is part of the Center for Equal Rights Alliance, which is the group that I had mentioned earlier that challenges the rights of tribes across the country. And so she was flown in to help with a jurisdictional issue that was happening between Oneida and Hobart. And so she's just a very interesting character. So yeah, we're here filming with her in Montana now. And she's actually doing some work against the Flathead Indian Reservation, but that's another subject. But she's still heavily involved with Oneida and Hobart relations. Tell me a little more about what's going on here, from both sides. What argument is the village of Hobart making to say that they should be allowed to expand? Because to me, obviously, I don't know a lot about the situation, but it looks like it should be pretty cut and dry. There's an agreement giving this land to the Oneida Nation. So it's theirs, right? Yeah, that's the thing, that's a good question. And that's what I'm hoping to answer in the film. Because when you look at it, and you learn about it, it's like, "This makes sense. Why are they resisting this?" Right? And with Elaine, that I'm talking to now, and the village of Hobart - their argument is that they want to expand, they want to build development, they want to have the tax base to have a better support for their communities. They just want more money, I guess. And with tribal communities, it's a whole different concept of land management. They don't see it as economic development. They care for their land, like, Oneida bought some land just so that it wouldn't be developed. So there's these different concepts of what land is between the two groups, I think, and that can get a little bit confusing for one to understand. Especially with Hobart, because they sit on the tribe's entire treaty land, it encompasses the village - I get it, you know. They're trying to build more, it was predominantly residential, and they want to build more business development. I mean, I understand. But at the end of the day, it's not right, given the promises that were made to these tribes back in the day. And it needs to be honored and upheld. On another note, I will say, is that CERA, the Citizens for Equal Rights Alliance - their whole mission is to terminate tribes. That's their whole thing. They're like, "We're one citizen. Tribal nations shouldn't get these extra rights. We should all be treated the same." And so there's just...there's a lot of misunderstanding, I think, thrown back and forth on each side. How common are disputes like these between Native communities and their non-native neighbors today? I mean, this was happening at the very beginning of our country, it has not gone away, but are these kinds of disputes ramping up over the past few years? And how is the way that they're taking place changing? You know, that's a good question. Because, you know, with the research I've done, it's always been there. And I think that a lot of times, issues revolving Indian Country and the conflicts that they're fighting don't get as much attention. And so it's very new to a lot of people, and even to myself. Talking to some of the experts about the Walleye Wars that I described earlier, they're like, "Oh, yeah, it was like a really big thing." And maybe it's because it was in the '90s, and I was, like, 10 years old, but I don't remember [it]. I've never heard of it until I came here, and it was like, "Oh, my God. This stuff is still happening." But it's not as overtly displayed as it was before in the past. It's more through litigation, it seems. For example, with Elaine, they're always in a battle. Something that I found in the research as well is that all of this was kind of strategic. I mean, this is a note that I need to explore a little bit further into, but they knew that border towns and these issues were gonna be, perhaps, detrimental to tribal communities. Putting non-native residences bordering them or on them...like, border towns are an issue in Indian Country. And so yeah, people experience a lot of racism and different things like that. In your reporting, what do you see as the biggest issue facing Native communities right now? Oh, gosh. I'm so just embedded [in this film]. I mean, I even moved to Wisconsin, so I feel just so detached from everywhere else. When I think about it now, though, racism is a long, lingering thing. Just that misunderstanding, and not being able to see the issue from both sides - it causes problems for tribal communities. Like with the Oneida Nation, it's just misconception. I feels like [that's] the most detrimental issue that Indian Country is facing right now. You know, you have a misconception of Indian casinos bringing wealth to these tribal communities. And you have Indians relying on federal government services. It's just an entire, like, snowball effect. And so I think that's the main issue. You're just getting started in the next session of the Logan Nonfiction Program. What do you hope to get out of it? Yeah, I met with my mentor of the program yesterday, and even it was only an hour, I was able to download so much information from her about the industry and about how my film can be more impactful. I suppose, like giving creative feedback, constructive feedback - and that was just an hour. And so I'm very excited to go into the Logan Nonfiction Program, because we have workshops set up with different industry folks, and then we're able to go in and workshop our own projects as a cohort. And so that's what I'm excited for. I'm excited to build community, and learn more about the industry. I know it's gonna benefit Holder of the Sky and so that's something that I'm really excited for. Our next guests are using the Logan Nonfiction Program to develop their podcast, 50-Foot Woman. Jillian Farmer is an award-winning journalist and creative writer based in the southern coast of Oregan, and Cheryl Upshaw is the former managing editor of The Humboldt Sun, Lovelock Review-Miner and The Battle Mountain Bugle in Nevada. They met during a brief stint as coworkers in Oregon before the start of the coronavirus pandemic. With 50-Foot Woman, they hope to increase awareness of a number of rare conditions and diseases — starting with acromegaly, a pituitary disease in which the body produces too much growth hormone. Farmer herself was diagnosed with acromegaly in 2018. How did you find out you had acromegaly? Farmer: I was likely born with the disease and the brain tumor that comes with it. I wasn't diagnosed until I was 29 years old, and the diagnosis saved my life. [The tumor] was about a centimeter away from what they said would make me just fall over. The tumor was so large, it was sitting on my cerebral arteries, and it was sitting on my eyes, it was sitting on my eyes. It was actually starting to make me go blind. My symptoms were incredibly severe, but because the disease is such a slow grow - and I've said this on the podcast, anyone who listens when we're finished, will hear this - but I've described it as kind of being like a frog in a boiling pan. You don't notice, and you start to explain away a lot of the symptoms because doctors have been treating the symptoms as symptoms - as they come up. I was lucky enough to have a dermatologist - and everyone has a different diagnosis journey - but it's not everyday that a dermatologist gets to diagnose the brain tumor, and a very rare disease. But she saved my life. They were able to do brain surgery, and it was transsphenoidal surgery through my nose. The podcast, the first season goes through the emotional journey and the medical journey. We're going to be talking to medical professionals, and we're also talking with other patients and how they've experienced their medical journey, both through the U.S. healthcare system and the Canadian healthcare system. So we're going to have a juxtaposing analysis of both. Because this is not only a very rare disease, but it has no cure. Every patient, they could see the tumor grow back. And the difficult thing about acromegaly is every inch you give the disease you cannot get back. And so if your levels get out of control - like your growth hormone, or your IGF-1, which are the big two that they look at - if they get out of control, you know, for me last year, I had a herniated disc. I had a few other things happen. And now it's something I have to be careful about, you know, not happening again. If you don't mind my asking - I just want to make sure that I'm understanding things a little bit better. So let's go a little more into what the disease does in the body and how it works. Being a pituitary disease, it's all hormonal, right? Upshaw: Yeah. And this is going to be the like, simplest version of it, because I don't remember all of the specifics on the scientific end. But essentially, your pituitary gland releases growth hormone. And then as it passes through the liver, a secondary hormone called IGF-1 is then released. And that's just a normal thing that happens with everyone. There's a normal amount of IGF-1 in every person's body. But with a person who has acromegaly, the amount of growth hormone and IGF-1 in their body is quite a bit higher. Jillian mentions in our podcast that when she was diagnosed, the normal person's IGF-1 count would be around 200. And for her, it was 1600. So you know, eight times higher. Once you hit puberty, it stops [affecting] the long bones of your body and starts doing it to your face and to the soft tissues. One of the soft tissues that it can affect is your organs, so your heart can be very dramatically affected, and it can be fatal in that way. Farmer: And this disease has also been known to cause colon cancer and breast cancer as well. Because it's the pituitary, I mean, that is the master gland that affects your entire body. So if something goes wrong with it to this degree, it affects your entire body. After my diagnosis, my doctors put me through a battery of tests to see exactly how affected I was, and to see if there was anything else that needed emergency attention, like, you know, potential heart disease or an enlarged heart. And thankfully, that was not something I had to deal with - but other patients do. For my case, and for the case of many acromegaly patients, but not necessarily all, is the tumor itself can produce growth hormone, too. And so you've got this big mass in your brain producing even more growth hormone. And that's why it's so important for them to cut that out, as well as the size of the tumor. The emergent part of it is also getting your levels under control, so it stops affecting your body. You mentioned earlier that acromegaly is hard to diagnose because the symptoms can creep up on you. What are the early signs of acromegaly? Farmer: In children, I had gigantism as a child. But I'm only 6'1" - we will talk about why I am not taller on our podcast, it's very complicated - but in children, they grow very fast. For example, when I was in third grade, I was as tall if not a little taller than my teacher, who was about 5' tall. One thing I also had as a child, which is something that adults with acromegaly need to look for, if they're not diagnosed, are swollen hands. My family called them, like, fleshy hands. The soft tissues, they swell with this disease, and so your face can get really puffy, your body just gets really swollen. That's what led to my herniated disk last year. Another common one is your teeth will start to move. I had perfectly straight teeth, and they're crooked now. A lot of patients actually get a gap in their front teeth or their bottom teeth. Another common one is the jaw, it will make the growth plates in jaws lengthen, and that'll make the jaw protrude. Unfortunately, it does disfigure you, it does change your face. I remember looking in the mirror thinking, "You know, I don't look...I don't look the same." And as an adult, you don't see that often. You don't have that issue. Like my mom, she stopped me at one point, and she just kind of grabbed me and looked at me and said, "You look different. You look different." And so I mean, that's a symptom. But one of my common symptoms that I had early on was skin issues. I got really big cysts, and that's what eventually led me to be diagnosed by my dermatologist. And so you've decided to make this podcast on your story here. What are you learning from speaking with other patients and medical professionals? Farmer: Yeah, we've already been able to speak with a woman in the United States who has become a huge advocate for bringing awareness to the disease, and her name is Jill Cisco. Upshaw: Jill Cisco is a really fascinating person to talk to in that, in addition to being a patient, she spends a lot of time talking to both doctors and other patients. A lot of what she does is bringing people together to discuss the disease. And I think that's a big thing that we've kind of been learning: because it is so rare, finding a community of like minded people who are suffering the same things is really valuable, because no one else gets it. Farmer: I still haven't met an acromegaly patient except you know, through our support group on Facebook. And the woman we spoke with in Canada, she talks about this as well. When she was able to meet her first accurate patient, yeah, you meet people who who get it. And it's a difficult disease to understand. Most people can only identify it through thinking of celebrities that have it, such as Andre the Giant, and the actor who played Lurch. For a woman with this disease, you can't really look to a celebrity who has it. I went on a journey after being diagnosed with trying to find a woman with this disease - because a lot of the symptoms are not flattering. They are often called by the medical world as "course features." As a woman, I really wanted to talk with other women about this, and some other issues that I had to face, things that can be embarrassing. And finding that support group was invaluable. Not only that, but after I found that group, Jill actually pointed me to a women-only acro support group. And that provides a really safe space for women with this disease to talk about this disease and how it impacts some more embarrassing topics and relationships. And there's also a support group for men with this disease to provide them a safe space to do the same. How are you doing now? Farmer: I am doing a lot better now. Of course, there are some things that the disease had done to me back in 2018, and up to 2018, that we're still dealing with. Like issues with my jaw. I was told recently that I've got arthritis of the jaw, and it's been giving me migraines, so they're trying to figure out what to do. I'm on treatment, and I will be on treatment for the rest of my life, to keep it under control. That is OK, like, you get used to it. And you're able to function a normal life and have like a normal lifespan - so long as the disease is kept under control. But right now, I am probably the healthiest I've been. I think a good scope of when I say that is I've had one doctor say to me, because I was likely born with a tumor, I don't even know what being healthy feels like. So for me to say I feel good? Like, yes, I do feel good. For a normal person, I don't know what that would look like. But for me, I am doing very well right now. Upshaw: And to that point, part of the reason we want to do this and help create awareness around acromegaly, and create awareness around the U.S. healthcare system, is despite the fact that that tumor is gone, she still has symptoms, she still needs care. And the U.S. healthcare system, and insurance companies in particular, have made it really difficult for her to receive that care. That actually does lead into one of my next questions. What does that treatment and monitoring look like, and as you're getting treatment and speaking with others, what are some of the differences you're noticing between having to navigate that in the U.S. versus in other countries? Farmer: One of the big ones is access to treatment. Some of these treatments are chemotherapies that treat you know, carcinoid tumors of the small intestine, for example. I'm on one of those, on a low dose. That treatment I get every six weeks. And that treatment, last I heard, was about $37,000 a dose. Last year, it was a bumpy journey keeping insurance due to many different reasons, and getting consistent treatment was difficult. When I got a steady insurance and things were approved, had to get this treatment through a specialty pharmacy, because I live remotely. And that's something we discuss also in the podcast, is how living remote can affect treatment as well. But dealing with a specialty pharmacy, and trying to get the first order, that copay was, I believe, about $3,000. That's a copay I would have had to pay every dose. They didn't ask my financial situation, they just said I can't afford it unless [I] have copay assistance. And to somebody who has an incurable, very rare disease, that was devastating. My husband and I had to have a very serious conversation if I could even get treatment, and what that could mean. Because in past experience, if I don't have treatment, say for two months, my levels could get out of control. And who knows what could happen. It's kind of like a Russian roulette game, you don't know what the disease will do next to the body and how it can end you up in the ER, or give you something else you can't roll back, something else that will then have to be addressed by specialists. And so thankfully, my doctors, though, are very aware of all of this. And they coordinated with a copay assistance program that they do for many, if not all, of the acro patients that they treat. And that has been taken care of. Without that copay assistance, I would not be able to afford my treatment. As it is, I meet my out-of-pocket max deductible every year, usually in January. But then in comparison, Cheryl, if you want to tell her about what we've learned from who we interviewed in Canada? Upshaw: Yeah, absolutely. So the woman that we spoke to in Canada, one of the things that she told us was, and it kind of blew my mind - she has a nurse that just drops by her house, I think it's once a week to give her her treatment. That's not an additional cost for her. It's just something that's provided, because she also lives remotely. So there's that. And it's not that Canadian healthcare is perfect, as she explained to us. It's not that she doesn't have to pay anything, but it's not as devastating to her. No one would ever say to her, "Give us $37,000 per month, or per six weeks, to get care." Farmer: The $3,000 copay per dose. That was not something that she faced either. Upshaw: No, she didn't have to worry about that. There is private insurance in Canada, there are things that she does have to worry about and work with. But basically, they work with the drug companies directly to make it a lot more affordable. And some of the patients that she's worked with, they don't have to pay anything, which is not something that we're hearing from American patients. Farmer: No, and it's very interesting. Like in the support group, a lot of patients in the United States go there seeking advice on how to deal with insurance or other issues caused by the American healthcare system. And patients internationally express amazement sometimes, because they don't face the same issues. Well, I feel like there's so many other things that I could ask, but we are running a little bit low on time. So I'm just going to have one more question for you. You're wrapping up your time with the Logan Nonfiction Program. How has that experience been? Farmer: It's been a very fun, very intense fellowship. And working with Cheryl has, I mean, I wouldn't have the interest in telling this story alone. It's a very difficult story, and to have a partner help navigate some of these more difficult conversations of, you know, facing death, dealing and thinking of death as an acro patient, and dealing with the potential hereditary aspect of this...And raising awareness for a disease people don't know about, that people in the medical world are very interested in also learning more about. I have a great partner in doing this. Hopefully, our goal is it's going to make an impact. Thank you for listening to 51%. 51% is a national production of WAMC Northeast Public Radio. That theme underneath me right now, that's “Lolita” by the Albany-based artist Girl Blue. The show is produced by me, Jesse King, and our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock. A big thanks to the folks at the Logan Nonfiction Program, Tsanavi Spoonhunter, Jillian Farmer, and Cheryl Upshaw for contributing to this week's episode. Until next week, I'm Jesse King for 51%.

Works In Progress
Dr. Thanh Neville: Life and death in the ICU

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 37:16


As we approach the end of 2021 and the second holiday season of the Covid-19 pandemic, many of us are tired, frustrated, and impatient to see transmission rates drop and restrictions further loosened.Meanwhile, our front-line medical workers are bracing themselves for a repeat of last winter's surge in hospitalizations, driven this year by the non-vaccinated.Dr. Thahn Neville is an ICU physician, researcher, and the current medical director of UCLA's 3 Wishes Program – which fulfills end-of-life wishes for hospitalized patients and their families – and a graduate of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Her research centers on improving palliative care for patients in the critical care setting. On Monday, Nov. 29, Dr. Neville will participate in the final session of this year's UCLA Arts public discussion series "10 Questions" to discuss the question, “How do we love?”On this episode of the UCLA Arts podcast "Works In Progress," Dr. Neville shares her thoughts on medical worker burnout, mandatory vaccinations, and politicizing the pandemic, and describes her perspective as a first-generation college student and the daughter of Vietnamese immigrants.

51 Percent
#1687: Works In Progress: The Logan Nonfiction Program | 51%

51 Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 31:08


On this week’s 51%, we speak with some of the writers and filmmakers in the Carey Institute for Global Good’s Logan Nonfiction Program. Documentary filmmaker Ilse Fernandez previews her upcoming film, Exodus Stories. And we also speak with reporter Deborah Barfield Berry of the USA Today. (more…)

Works In Progress
Arturo O'Farrill: Orchestrating connections through music

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:21


The composer, bandleader, and pianist Arturo O'Farrill has his hands full. The seven-time GRAMMY Award-winning jazz musician is a professor of global jazz studies at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music, where he is also the associate dean of equity, diversity, and inclusion.O'Farrill, the director of the renowned Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra, has just released the album "...dreaming in lions...", his debut on the legendary Blue Note Records label. O'Farrill is also working to open a permanent home for his orchestra in East Harlem.On Monday, Nov. 22, O'Farrill will participate in the UCLA Arts public discussion series "10 Questions" to discuss the question, “How do we sustain?”On this episode of "Works In Progress," O'Farrill talks about the power of music to overcome divisions and distances, the backlash he's experienced for expressing his political views, and how music has allowed him to give back to the community.

Works In Progress
Adam Bradley: The power and poetry of hip-hop

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 39:20


Rap and hip-hop are the most popular musical genres in the United States. At the end of 2017, Nielsen Music, which tracks music listenership, noted that the combined genre of R&B and hip-hop had surpassed rock to become the most-consumed style of music in the country. Hip-hop continues to grow and evolve, and Adam Bradley has been tracking its changes. He teaches English at UCLA and founded the Laboratory for Race and Popular Culture, known as RAP Lab. In his books, which include “Book of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip Hop” and “The Anthology of Rap,” he makes the case for rap's literary merit. On Monday, Nov. 15, he'll take part in the UCLA Arts public discussion series "10 Questions" to consider the prompt, “How do we build?” On this episode of "Works In Progress," Bradley talks about hip-hop's cultural significance, the value of working in collectives, and the need to make failure more acceptable.

Works In Progress
D'Artagnan Scorza: Education as a tool for justice and empowerment

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 34:28


In July of 2020, soon after the murder of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police along with the murder of many other Black men and women, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors established an anti-racist County policy agenda. They also created an executive director of racial equity position for Los Angeles County with a charge of creating a strategic plan to eliminate structural racism and bias in the county, and appointed D'Artagnan Scorza to fill that role.Scorza is a long-time justice activist who views education as a tool for civic and social empowerment. After getting a bachelor's degree in the study of religion at UCLA, he joined the Navy and served in Iraq, then returned to UCLA to get a PhD in education, while launching a nonprofit called the Social Justice Learning Institute. He served the Inglewood Unified School District as president of the Board of Education, and is the current president of the UCLA Alumni Association. He also created the Urban Scholars program to train students to be social justice youth leaders.On Monday, November 8th, he'll join the UCLA Arts public discussion series “10 Questions,” responding to the question “How do we change?” In this episode of "Works In Progress," Scorza talks about his journey of growing up in Inglewood, studying at UCLA, serving in Iraq, creating educational opportunities for underserved students, and promoting anti-racist policies at the county level.

Works In Progress
Safiya Noble: Decoding bias in our digital lives

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 45:08


The search engines that we use throughout the day, like Google and Yahoo, aren't just useful digital tools. They're also multi-billion dollar companies that track our browsing habits and sell that data to advertisers and marketers. They also invest heavily in developing artificial intelligence – highly complex algorithms meant to predict and manipulate our behavior. But just as humans have biases, so do the algorithms. And that has real-world implications that can lead to greater inequity, particularly against people of color and women. This is the subject of Dr. Safiya Noble's research. She's an associate professor of gender studies and African American studies, as well as founder and co-director of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry. Her bestselling book “Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism” helped popularize the current interest in AI bias. And she's a 2021 MacArthur “genius grant” recipient. She'll join the UCLA Arts public discussion series “10 Questions” on Monday, Nov. 1 to respond to the question “How do we fail?” In this episode of the UCLA Arts podcast "Works In Progress," Noble discusses the problems inherent to digital technologies and the collective power of individuals to change the culture of Silicon Valley.

Works In Progress
Diane White-Clayton: The healing power of music

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 35:39


Diane White-Clayton found her voice in the church. As a little girl in Washington DC, the church was central to her community. The classically trained singer and pianist studied music at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and at UC-Santa Barbara, where she received her masters and PhD.Music has brought her around the country and around the world, where she performs, conducts choral groups, composes original music, and leads workshops of gospel, jazz, and classical music. White-Clayton, popularly known as “Dr. Dee,” is now a lecturer in ethnomusicology at the Herb Alpert School of Music at UCLA. She also directs the African American Music Ensemble, is the Artistic Director of the Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers, and the Founding Director of the BYTHAX Ensemble.She'll join the UCLA Arts public discussion series “10 Questions” on Monday, October 25 to discuss the question “How do we heal?”In this episode of "Works In Progress," White-Clayton discusses her musical upbringing and the power of music to heal, uplift, and connect.

Works In Progress
Leroy Moore: Speaking out for disability rights

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 27:32


Leroy Moore is a writer, poet, community activist, and a hip-hop and music lover. He was born with cerebral palsy, and has dedicated much of his writing and activism to disability rights. He co-founded Krip-Hop Nation, a movement that uses hip-hop as a means of expression for people with disabilities.Moore is currently a doctoral student in linguistic anthropology at UCLA. He writes and delivers lectures and performances that reflect the intersections between racism and ableism, in the United States and abroad. His most recent book “Black Disabled Ancestors” came out in 2020.Moore will join the UCLA Arts public discussion series “10 Questions” on Monday, Oct. 18 to discuss the question “How do we remember?” In this interview with the UCLA Arts podcast "Works In Progress," he reflects on his life-long activism in racial and disability justice, and how hip-hop provided a platform for that movement.

Works In Progress
Luis Alfaro: Opening the doors to LA theater

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 34:53


Luis Alfaro is a celebrated and award-winning artist and writer. His plays, short stories, poems, and performances are often set in barrios like the Pico-Union district of downtown Los Angeles where he grew up, and tell stories about working class people and the systems that trap them – systems of poverty, incarceration, racism and homophobia. Alfaro is a MacArthur "genius" fellow, teaches theater at the University of Southern California, and was recently named the Associate Artistic Director of Center Theatre Group.On Oct. 11, Alfaro will join the UCLA Arts series “10 Questions” to help us answer the question “how do we connect?”He joined the UCLA Arts podcast "Works In Progress" to talk about how the movement for equity, diversity and inclusion is reshaping theater, how LA theater specifically needs to change to reflect the stories of its audiences, and how live theater will recover from the pandemic.

Works In Progress
Ping Ho: Healing through creative expression

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 34:32


The arts can heal and transform us. This is something that Ping Ho has been advocating since she founded the group UCLArts & Healing in 2004. It trains artists, educators, therapists, health care professionals, and community members to use visual art, movement, music and writing, in concert with mental health practices, to build social and emotional skills and foster self-discovery. These alternative health practices have gradually become more integrated in traditional health settings, and are now increasingly viewed as important tools for preventative care and for beginning the process of addressing more serious traumas and conditions. This work combines Ping's lifelong experiences in performing arts and her graduate education in counseling psychology and public health. Ping Ho will join the UCLA Arts event series “10 Questions” on October 4th to respond to the question “How do we begin?” She joins the UCLA Arts podcast "Works In Progress” to talk about the power of creative expression to improve social and emotional well-being. 

Works In Progress
Isaac Bryan: Advocating for political change

Works In Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 28:58


California Assemblymember Isaac Bryan ran in a special election earlier this year and won the California State Assembly seat representing the 54th District. The district includes a wide swath of West LA and South LA, including Westwood, Mar Vista, Culver City, Ladera Heights, View Park and Leimert Park.Prior to holding elected office, Bryan was a longtime organizer and educator, and the director of public policy at the UCLA Ralph J. Bunche Center for African-American Studies. He was also founding director of the Black Policy Project at UCLA.Bryan will be a featured panelist in the “10 Questions” public discussion series, presented by the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture, responding to the question “Who are we?” on Sept. 27. For this interview for “Works In Progress,” Bryan discussed his election, his policy priorities, and the centrality of the arts in his community.

Kral Space
Episode 80 | We Are All Beautiful Works in Progress

Kral Space

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 63:29


Covenant Truth Ministries - Jots and Tittles Bible Studies and Inspirational Messages

Continuing reading through the Bible today, we look at a passage from Romans 15 and understand the example Jesus gave as Paul instructs us concerning ourselves and other members of the body of Christ. www.covenanttruthministries.com

Derivative
Ep. 2 – Works in Progress: The Money Issue

Derivative

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 45:01


New Yorker Magazine June 7, 2021Yianni and Willie discuss all things MONEY in this week's big issue.0:00 Cover by Kenton Nelson10:54 The Go-Between by Rachel Monroe15:27 Fifty Less Punchy Ways to Leave Your Lover by Simon Webster16:09 Death of a Hospital by Chris Pomorski20:07 Cartoons21:31 Cool Story, Bro by Charles Duhigg27:16 Change Agent by Isaac Chotiner31:15 Fiction31:22 Investigating celebrity in "Who? Weekly" by Rachel Syme35:19 The beguiling love story of Olivia Rodrigo by Kelefa Sanneh27:48 "Cruella" by Anthony Lane41:28 A challenging crossword puzzle by Kameron Austin CollinsYou can find Yianni on all good and evil social media apps @yiannisines and you can find Willie at williepage.com.

The Alexandra Show: Authentic Beauty, Business and Beyond
Episode 18: A Mother's Identity, A Modern Take on Manners and How We Are All Works in Progress: A Conversation with Nicole Graev Lipson

The Alexandra Show: Authentic Beauty, Business and Beyond

Play Episode Play 60 sec Highlight Listen Later May 17, 2021 52:23


Episode 18: A Mother's Identity, A Modern Take on Manners and How We Are All Works in Progress: A Conversation with Nicole Graev LipsonJoin me and writer Nicole Graev Lipson we discuss her continual journey through her career and motherhood and some of the struggles that so many face.  Twitter: @NicoleGLipsonInstagram: @nglipsonhttps://nicolegraevlipson.com

Make Work Human
Human Works in Progress - Interview with Jordana Zeldin

Make Work Human

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2021 23:15


We are all works in progress. Messy Evolving Imperfect And it's time we stop hiding it. Drop the mask, and admit that none of us have all the answers. This is the utter human brilliance of Jordana Zeldin and her story of how she transformed how she lived, worked, and ran her business. She is a walking, breathing inspiration and an incredible sales coach who guides others to use their humanity to service clients. When we give ourselves permission to own that we have no idea what we're doing, we permit others to do the same. This is one tiny sliver of the depth of topics we discuss on this week's Make Work Human Podcast. Where to find Jordana: LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jordanazeldin/ Spriing Training Website: www.spriingtraining.com/

THE RAMBLINGS OF A CABLE GUY
Divorce Ain't Easy

THE RAMBLINGS OF A CABLE GUY

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 43:34


Divorce Is Hard and it's even harder after being separated 12 years. Yikes!We are all "Works In Progress" We have to allow our partners to be theirselves and not try and turn them into who we want them to be.  Still learning this thing called life at 49 and I'm ok with that. I believe most relationships can be fixed if the partners are willing to be open and vulnerable, 

THE RAMBLINGS OF A CABLE GUY
The struggle Is Real (We Are All Works In Progress)

THE RAMBLINGS OF A CABLE GUY

Play Episode Play 31 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 1, 2020 32:41


Life has it's struggles and with this pandemic it has made it much harder. Try not to let this troubled time dictate the rest of your life. We are all works in progress. The struggle is real, but don't allow it contol you or bring you down. Help is on the way. 

The Bluegrass BAMR Podcast
E 20: “We Are All Works in Progress” with Kim Priest

The Bluegrass BAMR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2020 59:01


Season 2 of the Bluegrass BAMR podcast kicks off with Kim sharing her story of returning to running. She shares her feelings about running later in life and provides insight to those who want to run but are not sure where to start. Kim also talks about her love of trail running and training her first 50K, The Knobstone Knockout! I hope you glean some life wisdom from this episode as Kim reminds us we are all works in progress. The Knobstone Knockout --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bluegrassbamr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bluegrassbamr/support

The Audacious Entrepreneur
05 What I've learned in my 1st 2 years (part 4 of 4) - Works in progress

The Audacious Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2019 28:20


In the final episode of the 4 part series, I'll tell you what processes we are set on implementing into the business, how we are going about starting them and why we feel it's an important step for us to take. 

OPB Politics Now
3 Works In Progress: Tolling, Baseball and BOLI

OPB Politics Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2018 21:58


We take a look at the political ramification of three works in progress: The push to toll several roads in the Portland region, the pursuit of Major League Baseball for Oregon and the Bureau of Labor and Industries' investigation of sexual harassment at the state Legislature.