Podcasts about Function

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Best podcasts about Function

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Latest podcast episodes about Function

GOLF SMARTER
GYRA Golf: A Neuroscience Approach to Golf's Mental Game | golf SMARTER #844

GOLF SMARTER

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 72:40


844: Dr Izzy Justice is a sports neuroscientist and inventor of the ground-breaking technology The Brain Trackman™ and the GYRA Golf App who has authored 8 books over the course of 30 years on the topic of Emotional Intelligence. In this episode we talk whether muscle memory actually exists, the Brain Trackman, neurohacks, and his teenaged son who is an accomplished golfer. We also learn about his Top 5 discoveries about the brain during golf, and get some tips and drills on how not to let your brain take over and ruin the rest of your round. Learn more at https://GyraGolf.comThis episode is brought to you by mygolfingstore.com/golfsmarter home of Eagle Eye Rangefinder. Golf Smarter listeners get 50% of the usual price and pay only $129!! Eagle Eye Rangefinder has all the premium features you need, like slope technology, an 800-yard range and a “flagpole lock” vibrating sensor. Take advantage of this limited time offer now at https://MyGolfingStore.com/golfsmarter Golf Smarter listener Rich has created a PDF that he'd like to share that breaks down the four parts of Tony Manzoni's Single-Pivot Swing. Find it at https://www.golfsmarter.com/tony-manzoni-introduces-us-to-the-single-pivot-swing-his-1st-appearance-on-golf-smarter-from-2010/This week on Golf Smarter Mulligans we talk to Jack Sims, a long time, successful golf instructor and entrepreneur who realized that so much of what he was teaching his golf students was also applicable to business!  Be part of the podcast and introduce our next episode! Write to GolfSmarterPodcast@gmail.com and we'll assign you an episode number and a brief script to record for the intro of the show. For your effort get to choose a great prize including a year's subscription to Dynamic Golfers, Tony Manzoni's Lost Fundamental video, or more!

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Is It Permissible to Use A Mukse Type Item on Shabbat To Perform A Permissible Function

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 6:33


The Shulhan Aruch presents the Halachot of Mukse in Siman 308. A utensil whose primary function is for Melacha, such as a hammer, is called a "Kli She'melachto L'isur." Such a utensil may me moved for only two purposes. First, "L'sorech Gufo"-using it for a permissible function. For example, using a hammer to crack nuts. Second, "L'sorech M'komo"-for its place. The hammer is in the way and one needs its place. The Poskim discuss whether one may use the hammer to crack nuts, even if he can use a "Kli She'melachto L'heter," a utensil meant for permitted actions, such as a nutcracker. The Mishna Berura (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933) is strict. He rules that it is only permitted to use a hammer L'sorech Gufo, if there is no other means available. He brings a proof to his opinion in his Sha'are Sion. The Kaf HaHaim concurs with the Mishna Berura. On the other hand, Hacham Ovadia, in his Halachot Shabbat, clearly holds that once the Hachamim permitted using it, the leniency applies even if there is a better solution available. He marshals a long list of Poskim who are lenient. He also brings proof that Maran himself is of this opinion: If a garment is hung to dry on a rod, Maran permits either removing the garment from the rod or the rod from the garment. The rod is a "Kli She'melachto L'isur," and yet Maran permits moving it, even though there was another option of removing the garment from the stick. The Menuhat Ahaba (R. Moshe Levi, Israel, 1961-2001) in Vol. 1 and in Tefila L'Moshe takes this one step further. He argues that even if the alternative is immediately available, it is still permitted to take the "Kli She'melachto L'isur" instead of the "Kli She'melachto L'heter." There is absolutely no difference between them. Accordingly, one may take the hammer to crack the nuts even if the nutcracker is on the table, in front of him.Rav Moshe Feinstein (Russia-New York, 1895-1986) in his Iggerot Moshe (Vol. 5) makes a sort of compromise. He rules that if the nutcracker is immediately available, then of course he should use it. However, one does not have to trouble himself whatsoever to bring the "Kli She'melachto L'heter." For example, if he can bring a nutcracker from a neighbor's house. He says that even the Mishna Berura would be lenient in that case.The conclusion of the Sepharadic Poskim is that one may use the hammer in any event. However, if the nutcracker is immediately available, it is better to take the Mishna Berura's position into account and use it, since there is no difference.SUMMARYOne may use a hammer to crack nuts, even if he can bring a nutcracker. If the nutcracker is immediately available, it is better to use it, rather than the hammer.

Turn Your Soul On! Radio
Improve Mitochondrial Function & Energy with Chaz & Kristi of Onus IV

Turn Your Soul On! Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 41:37


MICRONUTRIENT TEST SPECIAL: with Dr Brandy Victory ~ Get $200 off by mentioning this show! ______________________________________Want more energy?  Want to turn your aging process around? Then listen in! Chaz & Kristi with Onus IV share with you the benenfits of NAD+ and IV therapy and how it may help you turn your aging process around.  Ready For Yours? Mention this show or Dr. Brandy Victory and get 15% off any service at Onus IV!

Everyday Wellness
Ep. 210 Understanding the Thyroid's Effect on Your Hormones, Weight Loss Resistance and Metabolic Function with Amie Hornaman

Everyday Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 60:24


I am delighted to connect with Dr. Amie Hornaman today! Dr. Amie, a.k.a The Thyroid-Fixer, is a woman on a mission to optimize thyroid patients around the world and give them their lives back using her proprietary transformational program: The FIX Method. She is also the founder of the Institute for Thyroid and Hormone Optimization.   When she was in her twenties, Dr. Amie did competitive fitness modeling. She had to work extremely hard to get herself in shape to compete in shows. While preparing for one of the shows, she started gaining weight instead of losing, so she went to the doctor. She ended up seeing many different doctors, all of whom misdiagnosed her. She continued searching until she eventually found a functional integrative practitioner who did the right tests, saved her life, became her mentor, and changed the entire trajectory of her career! In this episode, Dr. Amie and I dive into thyroid health, the role of specific lab testing, and why checking reverse T3 is so important. We discuss molecular mimicry, weight-loss resistance, and why women need to check testosterone. We also talk about the controversy around iodine and discuss low-dose naltrexone, and the use of berberine, chromium, and inositol. I hope you gain as much from this episode as I did! IN THIS EPISODE YOU WILL LEARN: How did Dr. Amie become so passionate about the thyroid? Some of the tests that traditional healthcare providers are not doing, that Dr. Amie commonly requires for her patients. It is possible to have an autoimmune thyroid issue and have negative antibodies. Dr. Amie discusses the role of reverse T3. Some common clinical reasons individuals tend to struggle with high reverse T3. Dr. Amie talks about molecular mimicry and explains how gluten can impact the thyroid, exacerbate autoimmune disorders, and cause a leaky gut. Why some people did not feel any better following a gluten-free diet when the gluten-free diet first came out. Eating less processed foods is generally the best way to support your physical health and maintain metabolic flexibility. Some potential causes of weight-loss resistance in women. For many women, testosterone is the missing link. Problems with the Women's Health Initiative Study. Dr. Amie shares her thoughts on iodine, LDN, and berberine. Bio: Dr. Amie Hornaman, a.k.a The Thyroid-Fixer, is a woman on a mission to optimize thyroid patients around the world and give them their lives back using her proprietary transformational program: The FIX Method. She is also the founder of the Institute for Thyroid and Hormone Optimization.  After her own experience of insufferable symptoms, misdiagnoses, and improper treatment, Dr. Amie set out to help others who she KNEW were going through the same set of frustrations and who were on the same medical roller coaster.  She grabs your hand, gives you answers about your health that no one has told you, and gives you the actual tools and personalized treatment to fix you. What makes her program unique is the extra support and accessibility that you can't find anywhere else. That's the transformational journey. With a focus on optimizing thyroid and hormone function, and thus optimizing her patients, Dr. Amie looks at you as a unique individual and not JUST a lab value. She examines all factors that tie into thyroid dysfunction and thyroid symptoms and FIXES you to give you your life back.  Connect with Cynthia Thurlow Follow on Twitter, Instagram & LinkedIn Check out Cynthia's website  Connect with Dr. Amie Hornaman On her website On Facebook and Instagram On YouTube On the Thyroid Fixer Podcast   Books mentioned: Estrogen Matters: Why Taking Hormones in Menopause Can Improve Women's Well-Being and Lengthen Their Lives -- Without Raising the Risk of Breast Cancer by Avrum Bluming and Carol Tavris The XX Brain: The Groundbreaking Science Empowering Women to Maximize Cognitive Health and Prevent Alzheimer's Disease by Lisa Mosconi

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Do You Know How Crypto's Nose-dive Will Even Hurt Your 401K?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 83:25


Do You Know How Crypto's Nose-dive Will Even Hurt Your 401K? Hey, it looks like if you did not invest in "Crypto," you were making a smart move! Wow. We got a lot to talk about here. Crypto has dived big time. It's incredible. What's happened? We get into that and more. [Following is an automated transcript] Hi everybody. Craig Peterson here. Appreciate your joining me today. Spend a little bit of time with me. It's always a fun thing to do thanks for coming in. And Thanks for sticking around.  [00:00:29] Crypto currencies. It's a term for all kinds of these basically non-government sanctioned currencies. [00:00:39] And the idea behind it was I should be able to trade with you and you should be able to trade with me. We should be able to verify the transactions and it's nobody's business as to what's happening behind the scenes. And yet in reality, Everybody's business because all of those transactions are recorded in a very public way. [00:01:03] So crypto in this case does not mean secret or cryptography. It's actually referring to the way the ledgers work and your wallet. And in fact, the actual coins themselves, a lot of people have bought. I was talking with my friend, Matt earlier this week and Matt was saying, Hey, listen I made a lot of money off a crypto. [00:01:29] He's basically a day trader. He watches it. And is it going up? Is it going down? Which coin is doge coin? The way to go? Because Elon Musk just mentioned it. Is it something else? What should I do? And he buys and sells and has made money off of it. However, a lot of people have. And held on to various cryptocurrencies. [00:01:51] Of course, the most popular one. The one everybody knows about is Bitcoin and Bitcoin is pretty good stuff, bottom line, but 40% right now of Bitcoin investors are underway. Isn't that incredible because of the major drop-off from the November peak. And this was all started by a problem that was over at something called Terra Luna, which is another cryptocurrency now. [00:02:22] Already that there is a ton of vulnerable vol a ton of changes in price in various cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin being of course a real big one where, we've seen 5,000, $10,000 per Bitcoin drops. It really is an amazingly fluid if you will coin. So there's a number of different people that have come out with some plans. [00:02:47] How about if we do like what the us dollar used to do, which is it's tied to a specific amount of gold or tied to a specific amount of silver. And of course, it's been a while since that was the case. President Nixon is the one that got us off of those standards. Having a gold, for instance, back in your currency means that there is going to be far less fluctuation and your currency means something. [00:03:16] See, the whole idea behind currency markets for government is yeah, you do print money and you do continue to increase the amount of money you print every year. Because what you're trying to do is create money for the. Good product services that are created as well. So if we created another million dollars worth of services in the economy, there should be another million dollars in circulation that's the basic theory. [00:03:46] Monetary theory, really boiling. Down now of course, already our government is printed way more than it. Maybe should have. It is certainly causing inflation. There's no doubt about that one. So they're looking at these various cryptocurrencies and say what can we do? How can we have a gold standard where the us dollar was the currency the world used and its value was known. [00:04:10] Having a stable currency is incredibly important for consumers and businesses. The business needs to know, Hey, listen, like we signed a three-year contract with our vendors and with our customers. And so we need a stable price. So we know what's our cost going to be, what can we charge our customer here? [00:04:30] Can the customer bear the price increases, et cetera. The answer to most of those questions of course is no, they really can't is particularly in this day and age. So having a. Fixed currency. We know how much it's worth. I know in two years from now, I'm not going to be completely upside down with this customer because I'm having to eat some major increases in prices. [00:04:55] And as a consumer, you want to look at it and say, wow, I've got a variable rate interest rate on my mortgage. And man, I remember friends of mine back in the eighties, early eighties, late seventies, who just got nailed by those. They had variable rate interest loan on their home because that's all they could get. [00:05:14] That's all they could afford. So the variable rate just kept going up. It was higher than credit cards are nowadays. I remember a friend of mine complaining. They had 25% interest and that's when they lost the house because 25% interest means if you have a hundred thousand dollar loan, you got $25,000 in interest that year, let alone principal payments. [00:05:36] So it, it was a really. I think it was really hard for people to, to deal with. And I can understand that. So the cryptocurrency guys. I said, okay, let's tie it to something else. So the value has a value and part of what they were trying to tie it to is the us dollar. That's some currencies decided to do that. [00:06:00] And there were others that tried to tie it to actual. Assets. So it wasn't just tied to the dollar. It was okay. We have X dollars in this bank account and that's, what's backing the value of our currency, which is quite amazing, to think about that. Some of them are backed by gold or other precious metals. [00:06:24] Nowadays that includes a lot of different metals. This one coin called Terra Luna dropped almost a hundred percent last year. Isn't that amazing. And it had a sister token called Tara USD, which Tara Luna was tied to. Now, this is all called stable coin. The idea is the prices will be staying. [00:06:46] And in the case of Tara and Tara USD, the stability was provided by a computer program. So there's nothing really behind it, other than it can be backed by the community currencies themselves. So th that's something like inter coin, for instance, this is another one of the, there are hundreds of them out there of these cryptocurrencies. [00:07:13] Yeah. The community backs it. So goods and services that you can get in some of these communities is what gives value to inter coin money system. Now that makes sense too, right? Because the dollar is only worth something to you. If it's worth something to someone else, if you were the only person in the world that had us dollars, who would want. [00:07:36] Obviously the economy is working without us dollars. So why would they try and trade with you? If you had something called a us dollar that nobody else had, or you came up with something, you made something up out of thin air and said, okay, this is now worth this much. Or it's backed by that. [00:07:56] Because if again, if he can't spend it, it's not worth anything. Anyhow, this is a very big deal because on top of these various cryptocurrencies losing incredible amounts of money over the last couple of weeks, We have another problem with cryptocurrencies. If you own cryptocurrencies, you have, what's called a wallet and that wallet has a transaction number that's used for you to track and others to track the money that you have in the cryptocurrencies. [00:08:29] And it's pretty good. Function or feature it's hard for a lot of people to do so they have these kinds of crypto banks. So if you have one of these currencies, you can just have your currency on deposit at this bank because there's a whole bunch of reasons, but one of the reasons is that. [00:08:50] There is a run on a bank, or if there's a run on a cryptocurrency, currencies have built into them incredibly expensive penalties. If you try and liquidate that cryptocurrency quickly. And also if there are a lot of people trying to liquidate it. So you had a double whammy and people were paying more than three. [00:09:13] Coin in order to sell Bitcoin. And so think about that and think about much a Bitcoin's worth, which is tens of thousands of dollars. So it's overall, this is a problem. It's been a very big problem. So people put it into a bank. So Coinbase is one of the big one called Coinbase, had its first quarter earnings report. [00:09:37] Now, this is the U S is largest cryptocurrency exchange and they had a quarterly loss for the first quarter of 2022 of $430 million. That's their loss. And they had an almost 20% drop in monthly users of coins. So th that's something right. And they put it in their statement. Their quarterly statement here is to, WhatsApp. [00:10:07] Here's the real scary part Coinbase said in its earnings report. Last Tuesday that it holds. $256 billion in both Fiat currencies and cryptocurrencies on behalf of its customer. So Fiat currencies are things like the federal reserve notes are U S dollar, okay. Quarter of a trillion dollars that it's holding for other people think of it like a bank. [00:10:36] However, they said in the event, Coinbase we ever declare bankruptcy, quote, the crypto assets. We hold in custody on behalf of our customers could be subject to bankruptcy proceedings. Coinbase users would become general unsecured creditors, meaning they have no right to claim any specific property from the exchange in proceedings people's funds would become in accessible. [00:11:06] A very big deal. Very scary for a very good reasons. Hey, when we come back a website, no, you go, you type stuff in my email address, do you know? You don't even have to hit submit. In most cases, they're stealing it. [00:11:23] I'm sure you've heard of JavaScript into your browser. This is a programming language that actually runs programs right there in your web browser, whether you like it or not. And we just had a study on this. A hundred thousand websites are collecting. Information upfront. [00:11:40] Hi, I'm Craig Peterson, your chief information security officer. This is not a surprising thing to me. I have in my web browser, I have JavaScript turned off for most websites that I go to now, Java script is a programming language and then lets them do some pretty cool things on a webpage. [00:12:02] In fact, that's the whole idea behind Java. Just like cookies on a web browser, where they have a great use, which is to help keep track of what you're doing on the website, where you're going, pulling up other information that you care about, right? Part of your navigation can be done with cookies. They go on and on in their usefulness. [00:12:23] Part of the problem is that people are using them to track you online. So like Facebook and many others will go ahead and have their cookies on the other websites. So they know where you're going, what you're doing, even when you're not on Facebook, that's by the way, part of. The Firefox browsers been trying to overcome here. [00:12:48] They have a special fenced in mode that happens automatically when you're using Firefox on Facebook. Pretty good. Pretty cool. The apple iOS device. Use a different mechanism. And in fact, they're already saying that Facebook and some of these others who sell advertiser in from advertisers information about you have really had some major losses in revenue because apple is blocking their access to certain information about you back to Jarvis. [00:13:24] It's a programming language that they can use to do almost anything on your web browser. Bad guys have figured out that if they can get you to go to a website or if they can insert an ad onto a page that you're visiting, they can then use. Your web browser, because it's basically just a computer to do what while to mine, Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies. [00:13:51] So you're paying for the electricity for them as your computer is sitting there crunching on these algorithms that they need to use to figure out the, how to find the next Bitcoin or whatever. And you are only noticing that your device is slowing down. For instance, our friends over on the Android platform have found before that sometimes their phones are getting extremely hot, even when they're not using them. [00:14:18] And we found that yeah, many times that's just. Bitcoin miner who has taken over partial control of your phone just enough to mind Bitcoin. And they did that through your web browser and JavaScript. So you can now see some of the reasons that I go ahead and disable JavaScript on most websites I go to now, some websites aren't going to work. [00:14:40] I want to warn you up front. If you go into your browser settings and turn off JavaScript, you are going. Break a number of websites, in fact many of the websites that are out there. So you got to figure out which sites do you want it on? Which sites don't you want it on? But there's another problem that we have found just this week. [00:15:00] And it is based on a study that was done as reported in ARS Technica, but they found. A hundred thousand top websites, a hundred thousand top websites. These include signing up for a newsletter or making a hotel reservation, checking out online. You probably take for granted that you nothing happens until you hit submit, right? [00:15:25] That used to be the case in web one dot O day. It isn't anymore. Now I want to point out we, I have thousands of people who are on my email list. So every week they get my insider show notes. So these are the top articles of the week. They are, usually six to 10 articles, usually eight of them that are talking about cybersecurity, things of importance. [00:15:51] The whole radio show and podcasts are based on those insider show notes that I also share with the host of all of the different radio shows and television shows that I appear on. It's pretty, pretty cool. So they get that, but I do not use this type of technology. Yeah. There's some Java script. [00:16:11] That'll make a little signup thing come up at the top of the screen, but I am not using technology that is in your face or doing. What these people are doing, right? So you start filling out a form. You haven't hit cement. And have you noticed all of a sudden you're getting emails from. It's happened to me before. [00:16:31] Your assumption about hitting submit, isn't always the case. Some researchers from KU Leuven university and university of Lu sane, crawled and analyze the top 100,000 websites. So crawling means they have a little robot that goes to visit the web page, downloads all of the code that's on the page. [00:16:55] And then. Analyzed it all so what they found was that a user visiting a site, if the user is in the European union is treated differently than someone who visits the site from the United States. Now there's a good reason for it. We've helped companies with complying with the GDPR, which are these protection rules that are in place in the European union. [00:17:21] And that's why you're seeing so many websites. Mine included that say, Hey, listen, we do collect some information on you. You can click here to find out more and there's some websites let you say no. I don't want you to have any information about me where you collect information, just so that you can navigate the site properly. [00:17:39] Okay. Very basic, but that's why European union users are treated differently than those coming from the United States. So this new research found that over 1800 websites gathered an EU users' email address without their consent. So it's almost 2000 websites out of the top 100,000. If you're in the EU and they found. [00:18:07] About well, 3000 website logged a U S users' email in some form. Now that's, before you hit submit. So you start typing in your email, you type in your name and you don't hit cement. Many of the sites are apparently grabbing that information, putting it into the database and maybe even started using it before you gave them explicit permission to do. [00:18:36] Isn't that a fascinating and the 1800 sites that gathered information on European news union users without their consent are breaking the law. That's why so many us companies decided they had to comply with the GDPR because it's a real big problem. So these guys also crawled websites for password leaks and made 2021, and they found 52 websites where third parties, including Yandex, Yandex is. [00:19:11] Big Russian search engine and more we're collecting password data before submission. So since then the group went ahead and let the websites know what was happening, what they found because it's not necessarily intentional by the website itself. It might be a third party, but third-party piece of software. [00:19:33] That's doing it. They w they informed those sites. Hey, listen, you're collecting user data before there's been explicit consent to collect it. In other words, you, before you hit the submit button and they thought, wow, this is very surprising. They thought they might find a few hundred website. In the course of a year now they've found that there were over 3000 websites really that were doing this stuff. [00:20:01] So they presented their findings that use neck. Oh, actually they haven't presented them yet because it's going to be a useful. In August and these are what the cold leaky forum. So yet another reason to turn off JavaScript when you can. But I also got to add a lot of the forums do not work if JavaScript's not enabled. [00:20:23] So we got to do something about it. Maybe complain, make sure they aren't collecting your. Maybe I should do a little course on that once you can figure out are they doing it before I even give them permission? Anyhow, this is Greg Peterson. Visit me online, Craig Peter, som.com and sign up for that. No obligation insider show notes. [00:20:44] We are shipping all kinds of military equipment over to Ukraine. And right now they're talking about another $30 billion worth of equipment being shipped to what was the world's number one arms dealer. [00:21:00] I'm looking right now at an article that was in the Washington post. And some of their stuff is good. [00:21:07] Some of their stuff is bad, I guess like pretty much any media outlet, but they're raising some really good points here. One of them is that we are shipping some pretty advanced equipment and some not so advanced equipment to you. To help them fight in this war to protect themselves from Russia. [00:21:31] Now, all of that's pretty common. Ultimately looking back in history, there have been a lot of people who've made a lot of money off of wars. Many of the big banks financing, both sides of wars. Going way, way back and coming all the way up through the 20th century. And part of the way people make money in war time is obviously making the equipment and supplies and stuff that the armies need. [00:22:03] The other way that they do it is by trading in arms. So not just the supplies. The bullets all the way through the advanced missile systems. Now there's been some concerns because of what we have been seen online. We've talked about telegram here before, not the safest webs, app to use or to keep in touch. [00:22:28] It's really an app for your phone. And it's being used by. Ukraine to really coordinate some of their hacker activities against Russia. They've also been using it in Russia to have telegram that is in order to communicate with each other. Ukraine has posted pictures of some of the killed soldiers from Russia and people have been reaching out to their mothers in Russia. [00:22:57] They've done a lot of stuff with telegram. It's interesting. And hopefully eventually we'll find out what the real truth is, right? Because all of a sudden hides in the military, he uses a lot of propaganda, right? The first casualty in war is the truth. It always has been. So we're selling to a comm country, Ukraine that has made a lot of money off of selling. [00:23:22] Then systems being an intimate intermediary. So you're not buying the system from Russia? No. You're buying it from Ukraine and it has been of course, just as deadly, but now we are sending. Equipment military grade equipment to Ukraine. We could talk about just that a lot. I mentioned the whole Lend-Lease program many months ago now teams to be in the news. [00:23:50] Now it takes a while for the mainstream media to catch up with us. I'm usually about six to 12 weeks ahead of what they're talking about. And it's so when we're talking about Lynn Lee sent me. We're not giving it to them. We're not selling it to them. We're just lending them the equipment or perhaps leasing it just like we did for the United Kingdom back in world war two, not a bad idea. [00:24:16] If you want to get weapons into the hands of an adversary and not really, or not an adversary, but an ally or potential ally against an adversary that you have, and they have. But part of the problem is we're talking about Ukraine here. Ukraine was not invited in Donato because it was so corrupt. You might remember. [00:24:39] They elected a new president over there that president started investigating, hired a prosecutor to go after the corruption in Ukraine. And then you heard president Joe Biden, vice president at the time bragging about how he got this guy shut down. Yeah, he got the prosecutor shut down the prosecutor that had his sights on, of course hunter Biden as well as other people. [00:25:03] So it's a real problem, but. Let's set that aside for now, we're talking about Ukraine and the weapon systems who we've been sending over there. There have been rumors out there. I haven't seen hard evidence, but I have seen things in various papers worldwide talking about telegram, saying. The Ukrainians have somehow gotten their hands on these weapons and are selling them on telegram. [00:25:32] Imagine that a effectively kind of a dark web thing, so we're saying the byte administration okay. There, that none of this is going to happen. Why? Because we went ahead and we put into the contracts that they could not sell or share or give any of this equipment away without the explicit permission of the United States, governor. [00:25:57] Okay. That kind of sounds like it's not a bad idea. I would certainly put it into any contract like this, no question, but what could, what happened here? If this equipment falls into the hands of our adversaries or our other Western countries, NATO countries, how do you keep track of them? It's very hard to do. [00:26:18] How do you know who's actually using. Very hard to do so in forcing these types of contracts is very difficult, which makes the contract pretty weak, frankly. And then let's look at Washington DC, the United States, according to the Washington post in mid April, gave Ukraine a fleet of M 17 helicopter. Now, these are my 17 helicopters are Russian, originally Soviet designs. [00:26:51] Okay. And they were bought by the United States. About 10 years ago, we bought them for Afghans government, which of course now has been deposed, but we still have our hands on some of these helicopters. And when we bought them from Russia, We signed a contract. The United States signed a contract promising not to transfer the helicopters to any third country quote without the approval of the Russian Federation. [00:27:23] Now that's according to a copy of the certificate that's posted on the website of Russia's federal service on military technical cooperation. Russia has come out and said that our transfer, those helicopters has grossly violated the foundations of international law. And you know what they think it has, right? [00:27:43] Arms experts are saying the Russia's aggression Ukraine more than justifies you. I support, but the violations of the weapons contracts, man, that really hurts our credibility and our we're not honoring these contracts. How can we expect you crane to honor those contracts? That's where the problem really comes in. [00:28:07] And it's ultimately a very big problem. So this emergency spending bill that it, the $30 billion. Makes you crane, the world's single largest recipient of us security assistance ever. They've received more in 2022 than United States ever provided to Afghanistan, Iraq, or Israel in a single. [00:28:33] So they're adding to the stockpiles of weapons that we've already committed. We've got 1400 stinger and the aircraft systems, 5,500 anti-tank missiles, 700 switch blade drones, nine 90. Excuse me, long range Howard. There's that's our Chellora 7,000 small arms. 50 million rounds of ammunition and other minds, explosives and laser guided rocket systems, according to the Washington post. [00:29:03] So it's fascinating to look. It's a real problem. And now that we've got the bad guys who are using the dark web, remember the dark web system that we set up, the onion network. Yeah. That one they can take these, they can sell them, they can move them around. It is a real problem. A very big problem. What are we going to do when all of those weapons systems come back aimed at us this time? [00:29:32] It's one thing to leave billions of dollars worth of helicopters, et cetera, back in Afghanistan is the Biden administration did with her crazy withdrawal tactic. But at least those will wear out the bullets, missile systems, Howard, a different deal. [00:29:51] It seems like the government calls a war on everything, the war against drugs or against poverty. Now we are looking at a war against end-to-end encryption by governments worldwide, including our own. [00:30:07] The European union is following in America's footsteps steps again, only a few years behind this time. [00:30:16] But it's not a good thing. In this case, you might remember a few have been following cybersecurity. Like I have back in the Clinton administration, there was a very heavy push for something called the clipper chip. And I think that your whole clipper chip. Actually started with the Bush administration and it was a bad thing because what they were trying to do is force all businesses to use this encryption chip set that was developed and promoted by the national security agency. [00:30:52] And it was supposed to be an encryption device that is used to secure voice and data messages. And it had a built-in. Back door that allowed federal state, local law enforcement, anybody that had the key, the ability to decode any intercepted voice or data transmissions. It was introduced in 93 and was thank goodness. [00:31:19] Defunct by 1996. So it used something called skipjack, man. I remember that a lot and use it to transfer Dilley or defi, excuse me, Hellman key exchange. I've worked with that maybe for crypto keys that used it. Use the Dez algorithm, the data encryption standard, which is still used today. And the Clinton administration argued that the clipper chip was. [00:31:46] Absolutely essential for law enforcement to keep up with a constantly progressing technology in the United States. And a lot of people believe that using this would act as frankly, an additional way for terrorists to receive information and to break into encrypted information. And the Clinton administration argued that it would increase national security because terrorists would have to use it to communicate with outsiders, bank, suppliers, contacts, and the government could listen in on those calls, are we supposed to in the United States have a right to be secure in our papers and other things, right? That the federal government has no right to come into any of that stuff unless they get a court order. So they were saying we would take this key. We'll make sure that it's in a lock box, just like Al gore social security money. [00:32:41] And no one would be able to get their hands on it, except anyone that wanted to, unless there was a court order and you know how this stuff goes. And it just continues to progress. A lot worse. There was a lot of backlash by it. The electronic privacy information center, electronic frontier foundation boast, both pushed back saying that it would be. [00:33:05] Only have the effect of have not, excuse me, have the effect of, this is a quote, not only subjecting citizens to increased impossibly illegal government surveillance, but that the strength of the clipper Chip's encryption could not be evaluated by the public as it's designed. It was classified secret and that therefore individuals and businesses might be hobbled with an insecure communication system, which is absolutely true. [00:33:33] And the NSA went on to do some things like pollute, random number generators and other things to make it so that it was almost impossible to have end-to-end encrypted data. So we were able to kill. Many years ago. Now what about 30 years ago? When they introduced this thing? It took a few years to get rid of it, but now the EU is out there saying they want to stop and end encryption. [00:34:00] The United States has already said that the new director of Homeland security has, and as well as Trump's again Homeland security people said we need to be able to break the. And we've talked about some of those stories, real world stories of things that have happened because of the encryption. [00:34:20] So the EU is now got our proposal forward. That would force tech companies to scan private messages for child sexual abuse material called CSM and evidence of grooming. Even when those messages are supposed to be protected by indenting. So we know how this goes, right? It starts at something that everybody can agree on, right? [00:34:48] This child, sexual abuse material abductions of children, there's still a lot of slavery going on in the world. All of that stuff needs to be stopped. And so we say, yeah. Okay. That makes a whole lot of sense, but where does it end? Online services that receive detection orders. This is from ARS Technica under the pending European union legislation would have obligations concerning the detection, the reporting, the removal, and blocking of known and. [00:35:20] Child sexual abuse material, as well as the solicitation of children. So what we're starting to see here in the us is some apps, some companies that make smartphones, for instance, looking at pictures that are sent and shared to see if it looks like it might be pornographic in. Because again, we're seeing the younger kids who are sending pictures of each other naked or body parts and they get to others. [00:35:46] If you can believe that. Absolutely incredible. But what happens when you send them using an end-to-end encrypted app? Now, my advice for people who want to keep information private, you're a business person you're working on a deal. You don't go to Twitter like Elon Musk and put it out there for the world. [00:36:08] Although, I'm sure he's got some ulterior motives in doing that. You use an app called signal. That's certainly the best one that's out there right now. It provides a whole lot of encryption and privacy, and even has some stuff built in to break the software. That's often used to break into the end to end encryption systems. [00:36:29] So they're trying to get this in place here. They're calling it an important security tool. But it's ordering companies to break that end to end encryption by whatever technological means necessary. It's going to be hard because it's, frankly, it's going to be impossible for them to enforce this because you can take encrypted data and make it look like. [00:36:53] Anything, and man has that happened for a long time? Think of the microdots way back when, certainly in rural world war two and on, they were very popular there's techniques to encrypt data and embedded in a photograph and make it almost impossible to detect. So again they're not going to get to do what they're hoping to do. [00:37:18] And I think that's an important thing for everybody. Please pay close attention to, so they do want to get rid of end-to-end there's WhatsApp out there, which I don't really trust because it's owned by Facebook, but that's supposedly end to end. There's end to end encryption on apple. I message. Although. [00:37:38] Apparently, there are some ways to get into that. I think apple is now maintaining a secondary key that they can use to decrypt, but the back doors that the us has called for and other people have called for. I have been pushed back by companies like apple CEO, Tim cook, oppose the government mandated back doors. [00:38:01] Of course, apple got a major backlash from security experts when in veiled, a plan to how I phones and other devices, scan user photos for child sexual abuse images. That's what I was referring to earlier. And apple put that plan on hold and promised to make changes. But this is apple all over again. And it's hard to say what's the least privacy intrusive way, because if the ISP can read them all, if the company that's providing new with the app that you're using to send the message. [00:38:34] I can read them all, how much privacy is there and if they can read it, who else can read it and what can be done with it? Blackmail has happened many times in the past because someone got their hands on something. So what happens when a Congressman or the military or someone in the military uses that's another problem. [00:38:54] Because if we don't know the way the encryption is being used or is made just like, was true with a clipper chip. And then we move on to the next step, which is okay. So what do we do now with this data that we're storing? Are they going to keep that data confidential? Can they keep it out of the hands of the criminals. [00:39:17] We've certainly found that they just haven't been able to. And if you're talking about grooming, which is what the European union wants. In other words, someone that's trying to get a child to the point where they're doing something that would be important. You've got two. Look at all of the messages, you have to have them analyze by some sort of an AI artificial intelligence, and then ultimately analyzed by people. [00:39:42] It's just going to get worse and worse. This is the most sophisticated mass surveillance machinery. That has ever been deployed outside of China in the USSR. It's absolutely incredible when you look at it from a crypto graphic standpoint. And again, we understand protecting the children. We all want to do that, but how far will this end up going? [00:40:06] I also want to point out that. Nu insider show notes that I've been sending out over the last few weeks have had some amazing responses from people. I've had people saying that this is what they look for in their mailbox. It's the first piece of email they read that it's the most relevant news. But you can only get it one way and that's by going to Craig peterson.com, you can sign up there. [00:40:33] It's easy enough to do. There's no obligation on your part, right? This is not my paid newsletter. This is absolutely free. And it's incredibly valuable. Plus I'll also be sending you once a week. Ish, a small training, just, it takes you a few minutes to read. I just last week went through the firewall in your windows machine, the firewall. [00:40:56] And gave you step-by-step instructions. Is it turned on? What is it doing? What should it do? How do you turn it on and how do you use it? So you can only get that one way and that's, if you are on my email list, so it's important to be there. And if you have any questions, you can hit reply. Any of those emails where there's a training, or if it's the insider show notes, just hit reply. [00:41:22] And I'll go ahead and answer your question. You might have to wait a few days cause I can get pretty busy sometimes, but always answer. So me M e@craigpeterson.com. Anybody can send me email and you can also text me at 6 1 7 503 2 2 1 6 1 7 5. 3, 2, 2, 1 with any questions? That's it for right now, there is so much more. [00:41:51] Make sure you sign up right now. And of course there's more coming right up. So stick around. . [00:42:04] Jam packed today. We're going to start with non fungible tokens. If you don't know what those are, this is a very big deal because so many people are investing in them right now. Are they really investments? I've got a bit of a blow back here. Most people think that Bitcoin is anonymous. We're going to talk about how it absolutely is not. [00:42:24] We're going to talk about anonymous. In fact, the Russians, Microsoft, what they're doing against the Russians and this little comedic thing about cars. [00:42:32] NFTs or very big deal. [00:42:34] I'm going to pull up here on my screen right now. This is a picture of Mr. Jack Dorsey. We'll go full screen, an article from a website called CoinDesk. CoinDesk is one of these sites that really tries to track what's happening out there in the Bitcoin community. Of course, nowadays it's much more than Bitcoin. [00:42:57] Isn't it? We're talking about all kinds of. Different currencies that have a blockchain backend. They're called cryptocurrencies basically. But the big one was of course, Bitcoin. And there is a whole concept. Now, when we're talking about things like cryptocurrencies and these non fungible tokens. People have been investing them in them. [00:43:23] Like crazy people are making millions of dollars every week. Now, remember, I am not an investment advisor and particularly I'm not your investment advisor. So take all the. To your investment advisor. I'm not telling you to buy them. I am telling you to be cautious here though, because these non fungible tokens are designed to give you the ability to be able to just, own something in the digital world. [00:43:52] What might you own in the digital world? We've had a lot of different stuff. We've seen some just crazy monkey things. Have you seen those, these little pictures of monkeys there? Graphic designed and it's all animated. If you will. It's like cartoons and people pay money for them. One of the things that people paid money for was the rights to the first tweet ever on Twitter. [00:44:20] So that's what you're getting. When we're talking about an NFT on a non fungible transaction, it is now yours. So this particular NFT we're talking about was of our friend here, Jack Dorsey. We'll pull it up again, this article, and he had a tweet that was sold last year for $48 million. That is a lot of money. [00:44:47] So people look at this as an investment, but it's not the same as hanging art on the wall. You've got a Picasso that has some intrinsic value. It's a painting. It has all the oil paint on that, it was designed by and painted by a crazy man years ago. And you can take that Picasso and you can. [00:45:11] Turn it around and sell it. It has some real value. If you own the rights to something, let's say it's one of these monkey pictures. It reminds me of a postage stamp and you paid real money for it. Some of these things are going, as I said, for over a million dollars and this Jack Dorsey first tweet went for $48 million. [00:45:31] So let's say that's what you did, right? You bought this thing for $48 million. Really? What do you have? Because anybody can go online and look at that tweet. Anybody can print it up and stick it on a wall. Anybody can go out and get that picture of the monkeys right there. The guy drew, and you can look at it. [00:45:54] In fact, I can pull it up right now, if you want to do. But people paid real money for that. So they've got what really? What do they have? You can't take it off the wall, like you're Picasso and salad, right? Or Banksy, if you're into the more modern art, it's just not. What is doable? How do you make this work? [00:46:15] Only the NFT only gives you bragging rights in reality. That's what it does. You have bragging rights because you could take that digital picture and make a hundred quadrillion copies. Yeah, you'd still own the NFT you would still have in the blockchain for whatever NFT company you're using the rights to it. [00:46:41] They would say this, you owned it. So let's talk about the blockchain behind it. There are a lot of companies that are trying to give you that. Okay. All right. I get it. Yeah, I get to to own it. But who's running the blockchain behind it. Who's validating that you own it with Bitcoin and many of these other blockchain currencies that are out there. [00:47:08] There are various. Companies and individuals who are registered, who have all of the paperwork, if you will saying who owns, how much of what, and who paid, who and everything. And that by the way, is why it takes so long for some of these Bitcoin and other transactions to occur. But how about the NFT? There are tons of companies out there that say they will certify the NFT. [00:47:38] So it gets to be real problem. And when we get into this Jack Dorsey tweet and this article about it, which are let me pull it up again here for you guys. This guy Sina bought the very first tweet ever from Twitter founder, Jack Dorsey for $2.9 million last year. And he decided that he wanted to sell it. [00:48:07] So he listed it for sale again at $48 million last week. Real. He put it up for open bid and this article and CoinDesk is talking about that. And you can see that if you're watching me on rumble or YouTube, I'm showing you my screen here right now. But this Iranian born crypto entrepreneur named of again. [00:48:32] As TAVI purchased it for $2.9 million in March, 2021. Last Thursday, he announced on Twitter where out, that he wanted to sell this and Ft. And he said, Hey, listen, I'm going to put 50% of the proceeds to charity while the auction closed. This was an open auction. People could go and bid on it and head auction closed. [00:49:00] With a, an offer of basically $288, $277 at current prices when this article was written $277 and the lowest bid was $6. And as I recall, this is not in this article, but there were only. I handful of bids. Like when I say handful, I mean a half a dozen beds. Crazy. This is a real problem because the deadline is over. [00:49:31] He paid how much for it, right? How much did he pay? Pull that up again. $2.9 million last year. And his highest bid was in the neighborhood of $280. Isn't that crazy. So did he get money on this? Did he win money on this? I don't know. I'm looking at those saying is it worth it to buy something like that? [00:49:59] That you might think, oh, the very first apple computer, an apple. While that's going to be worth some serious money. Yeah, it is. It's something, you can grab onto, you can hold onto it, it's something and you can sell it. You can trade it. You can take a picture of it. You can't make digital copies of it. [00:50:20] You, you, it's a physical thing. That's worth something. Same thing with that Picasso on the wall, it's really worth something that has some basic intrinsic. Jack's true tweet. The very first tweet. How much is that thing worth? It basically nothing. So the tweet is showing he'll pull it up on the screen again that he's selling ad Jack 2000 6 0 3 21 at eight 50 14:00 PM. [00:50:50] Just setting up my Twitter. So there you go. There's Jack is very first to. And it's absolutely amazing. Is it worth it? Let me pull up some other stuff here for you guys. I'm going to pull this up here is Coinbase launching an NFT marketplace in hopes of appealing to crypto on mainstream users. So here's some examples from a man and FTEs. [00:51:16] I'm going to zoom in on this for those of you guys watching on rumble or on Twitter. All right. Mean. Yeah actually you can see it on Twitter too, but YouTube, here you go. Here's some NFTs it's artwork and it's a creature. So you can buy creature number 7, 8 0 6 right now for six Eve. So let me see. [00:51:39] Value of six. Ethereum is what ether, M two us dollars. So for 3000. And $84. As of right now, you can get a crappy picture that even I could have draw okay. Of this guy and look at all of the work this artist has put in. There's how many of these up here? 1, 2, 3, 4, or five, 10 of them. And it's the same head. [00:52:08] Each time it looks like this almost the same eyes. He changes colors and he's got different background. It's absolutely not. So that's what they're trying to do right now, trying to sell these NFT. So who's going to buy that. Who's going to pay $3,000 for artwork that hunter Biden could have done with a straw. [00:52:30] Anchored around. Here's another one. This is from ledger insights. NBA's launching dynamic NFTs for fans, baseball cards for the NBA that are basically just worthless. They're NF. Non fungible tokens. It has taken the crypto world by storm and people are losing millions as you look, but it really is changing the e-commerce world. [00:52:58] Stick around. We'll be right back. [00:53:02] Bitcoin blockchain. All of the rage, a lot of people are talking about it, but I got to say most people who are talking. I don't know much about it. And when it comes to anonymity, Bitcoin is probably the worst thing you could possibly do. It's amazing. [00:53:20] There are a lot of misconceptions out there when it comes to technology, you have almost any kind of technology and blockchain and Bitcoin are examples of a very misunderstood technology. [00:53:35] Now I'm not talking about how does it work? How are these ledgers maintained? How does this whole mining thing work? Why has Chan. Bandit. Why are a lot of countries going away from it, one country. Now the dictator said, yeah, we're going to use Bitcoin as our we're official currency. In addition to the U S dollar what's going on. [00:53:57] It is complicated behind the scenes. It's complicated to use. Although there are some entrepreneurs that have made some great strides there. I saw a documentary on what has been happening in that one country. I mentioned. They are able to pay in us dollars using Bitcoin. So they'll go up to a vendor on the street. [00:54:22] Quite literally they'll have their smartphone with them. The vendor has their smartphone. They type in 15 cents for the taco and a hit send. It goes to the other person and they have 15 cents worth of Bitcoin. By the way, these types of micro-transactions with the way Bitcoin is structured behind the scenes, make things even less manageable in the Bitcoin world than they have been in the past. [00:54:50] And that's why in case you didn't know, Bitcoin is making some major changes here fairly soon. They've got to change the way all of this ledger stuff works because it takes too long. To record and authorized transactions. And these ledgers just get way too long when it comes to all of these kinds of microtransaction. [00:55:14] So there's stuff going on, Bitcoin, there, there are many of these types of currencies out there. Theories comes one. You've heard about doge coin because of course that's Elon Musk has been talking about and many others and they're all different somewhat, but the main concepts are the. One of the big concepts, I'm going to pull an article up here on the screen for those watching on YouTube or also on rumble. [00:55:39] But this is an article from our friends at wired magazine. And now you have subscribed to wired for many years. This particular one is about what wired is calling the crypto. Trap now that's a very big deal. It is a trap and it's a trap and a lot of different ways. And that's what we're going to talk about right now. [00:56:05] Crypto is not what its name implies. A lot of people look at it and say, oh, crypto that's cryptography. That's like the German enigma machine in world war two and all of this new, great crypto that we have nowadays. And there are some pretty amazing new cryptographic technologies that we've been using, but no, that's not. [00:56:26] What's really going on. You see the basic premise behind all of these technologies is the concept of having a. And this wallet has a unique identifier. It has a number assigned to it. So if I'm sending money to you, I'm going to have your wallet, ID, your wallet number, and I'm going to now send you some amount of fraction, most likely of a cryptocurrency. [00:56:55] It's certainly if it's Bitcoin, it's almost certainly a fraction. And so I'm going to send you $100 worth of, let's say. What ends up happening now is these ledgers, which are public, are all going to record the Craig's sent you a hundred dollars worth of Bitcoin. Of course, it's going to be in a fraction of a Bitcoin. [00:57:16] So sometimes there's rounding errors is not going to be really exactly a hundred dollars. Plus there's the amazing amount of. Tivoli volatility in the cyber currencies. So even though I meant just hitting a hundred dollars, mine ended up being 110 of it goes up. It might be 90. If it goes down you get that. [00:57:34] You don't understand how that works. So the problem now is I have sent you a hundred dollars. And public ledgers that anyone can gain access to now say wallet number 1, 2, 3, 4 cent, a hundred dollars, two wallet, number 5, 6, 7, 8. Obviously the wallet numbers bruises a lot longer than that. So then it's fine. [00:57:58] And there's a degree of anonymity there it's really called pseudo anonymity because in reality, it's not completely anonymous because people know the transaction occurred and they know the wallet numbers. Correct. It's like a bank account, and if I'm putting money into your bank account, that bank account number knows that the money came from a check that I wrote. [00:58:21] Can you imagine that someone writing a check and that check I had a number on it, a bank account number, right? So it can all be tracked while much. The same thing is true when it comes to cryptocurrencies, these cryptocurrencies are in public ledgers and those public ledgers can be used with a little bit of work to figure out. [00:58:42] Who you are. So this article here from our friends at wired gets really hairy. And it might be of interest to you to read, but this is talking about a take-down that happened, and this is a massive take down. This take down was of a whole group of people who were involved in some really nasty stuff. [00:59:09] In this particular case, what it was kitty. Just a terrible thing and the abuse surrounding it. So this logical goes into not a lot of detail. I'm not going to read it because here on the air, because I don't want to upset too many people. Cause it's some of the details of this evening to think about them are incredible. [00:59:29] But. This the police broke into this middle-class suburb home in the outskirts of Atlanta. And he there was Homeland security. It was a guy from the IRS and they came in, they took all of their electronic devices. They separated the family, putting the father who is an assistant principal at the local high school assistant printers. [00:59:57] And he was the target of this investigation. So they had him in one room, they had his wife and another room and they put the two kids into a third room and they started questioning him. Now, this is part of a takedown of a, as I said, a whole ring of these people, including this assistant. Principal at a school. [01:00:20] Can you believe that? So this IRS guy had flown in from Washington DC to have a look over what was going on, but this agent from the IRS and his partner whose name is let's see, his name was Jenn S Scouts. I probably got that wrong. And Tigran GAM bar Yan, Cambodian, and they had a small group of investigators and they were at a whole bunch of different federal agencies, not just the IRS. [01:00:48] What once seemed to be. Untraceable was no longer traceable. Now I've talked on this show before about a lecture I went to by the secret service about how they had tracked down and shut down the world's largest website that was being used to sell illegal materials online. And it's fascinating what they did. [01:01:12] But frankly, they're calling this particular boss to proof of concept and that's why they are IRS was in on this as well, but it was huge. Here's a quote from the IRS agent in this wired magazine article. He's saying he remembers how the gravity of this whole thing. Let me pull this up on the screen too. [01:01:32] So you can read along here, but this was a high school administrator, a husband, and a father of two, whether he was guilty or innocent. The accusations, this team of law enforcement agents were leveling against him. There are mere presence in the home would almost certainly ruin his life. And he, as well as these other people were counting on anonymity from Bitcoin. [01:01:59] Now, obviously I'm glad they got taken down, but listen, folks, if you think that it's safe, that it's anonymous, it ain't Bitcoin just ain't there. Craig peterson.com stick around. [01:02:15] I've been blamed for really complaining about people not updating their software. And that includes things like firewalls. The FBI has stepped in and they are going ahead and doing updates for you. [01:02:30] So once you get into this, because this is, I think something that should concern all of us, what should we be doing as a country? [01:02:40] People are. Updating their software. They're not updating their hardware. And particularly our hardware take a look at what's been happening with the firewalls and the firewall concerns. Everybody has some sort of firewall will almost everybody, but enough people that we can say, everybody has a firewall, you get your internet from you, name it. [01:03:05] And because of the fact they're using something called Nat network address translation, they've got some sort of firewall in front of you. So for instance, You've got your phone, right? You're using your phone and it's got internet on it. You're going through whoever your carrier is. And that carrier is giving you internet access, right? [01:03:28] They don't have enough IP addresses, particularly IPV four, in order for you to get your very own unique little address out on the. No they do. When it comes to V6 things a little bit different, but your device is not completely exposed on the internet. Windows comes to the fire. And by default, the windows firewall is turned on. [01:03:50] Now this gets more than a little concerning because that firewall that's turned on. Isn't really doing anything because I've got a firewall turned on and yet every service is accessible from outside, which is defeating the purpose of the firewall. Again, it's a complaint I've had about Microsoft now for. [01:04:10] Decades, which is they have features that are just check boxes. Yes. Yes. It's got a firewall. Yeah, it's turned on, but the features don't work. So having a firewall and having everything open defeats the purpose of a firewall max do not have a firewall turned on by default, but they do have their services disabled. [01:04:33] Which is just as effective if not more effective. So one of the things we advise people to do is go into your windows system, into the firewalls and your security settings, and turn off any services that you're not using. If you're not sharing file systems, then turn that off. In other words, You're mounting the G drive or whatever you might call it from another computer, then you don't need it. [01:04:59] If you're not as server for what's called SMB, then you don't need to share it. So turn off everything that you don't need. That's going to happen is one of your programs isn't going to work, right? And the, what you did last year, you're going to turn it back on and you can do a lot of research online to find out what they are. [01:05:18] We have over 200 settings that we change in windows. When we get a customer. Now on the Mac side, you can turn it on. I liked turning it on. I liked turning off the ability to see my machine. So in other words, the ability to be able to. So I turned it on and I enable specific services. And again, you can do some research on that. [01:05:44] I've got an improving windows security course that people have taken, and we should probably do that again, if not just have some free webinars on how to do this. So you guys can learn how to do it, but not that hard to do. Anyhow, bottom line is. People aren't updating their computers, even the Macs and windows. [01:06:06] We have a client that would just started a new client and we're tightening things up and we've been finding Mac computers that are major multiple major revisions behind. And that to me is shocking. Apple Macs are just so easy to update. It is extremely rare that an apple update will make your computer break unlike in the windows world, where it's pretty common. [01:06:32] So windows guys, I can understand, but your even more exposed, your bigger target, you need to keep up to date. So how about all of the other equipment that we. I've had warnings again and again, with you guys about what's happening with our smart devices that are out there, right? Our security cameras we have up in the corner, right? [01:06:56] We have these smart thermostats, people are using the list goes on and on of all of this equipment that we're using that is exposing us because when was the last time you have. How about the firmware in your router or your wifi, right? Some of the devices that I recommend to people, and if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:07:19] I can give you recommendations, even if you're a home user. Although my business obviously is working with businesses on what kind of wifi to buy, what you should get, what you should do. I don't charge for any of that stuff. Okay. You get it. But you have to ask. Me@craigpeterson.com. So you get this information and you go ahead and you buy whatever it is, but you don't keep it up to date, which is why I tend to only recommend stuff that automatically updates. [01:07:48] But that also means every few years you're going to have to replace it because unless you're using the good Cisco equipment where you can get a seven year life out of it you're not gonna find that in consumer grid. So what's happened here. I'm going to pull this up on my screen for people watching this on YouTube or on rumble. [01:08:07] But here is a thing that came straight out of our friends here from the FBI. This is from CSO. This is a a magazine that I do follow. But they're talking about what they call psych clock. Blink. So the article says for the second time in a year, the FBI has used search and seizure warrant to clean malware from devices owned by private businesses and users without their explicit approval. [01:08:40] The FBI used this approach to disrupt a botnet, believed to be the creation of right. Government hackers. So the calling this SYEP clock cycle clubs, blink malware discovered earlier this year. So here's the problem. What do you do if you're the federal government, how do you try and keep your country safe? [01:09:05] Now we know. We've got these military contractors. They make missiles that take out missiles, right? The provide defensive systems. You've heard of iron dome from years ago, all the way through all of the current stuff. That's what they do, but what do they do? What can they do when there's a botnet? A botnet is where there are multiple computers in this case, probably tens of thousands of computers located in the United States that are acting like sleeper. [01:09:36] They sit there and they wait for commands as to what they should do. Should they try and attack a machine? Should they try and spread more? Malware, what should they be doing? And the, these things are vicious. They are absolutely nasty. And in this case, we're looking at Russian malware. So Russia effectively like the Americans. [01:09:59] You might remember that TV show. It was great show, but that. Computers that are owned by you and me and our businesses and government agencies that are under the control of the Russians. Now you don't even know it. You're using your computer or you're playing games. You're going to Facebook, whatever it is you do on your computer. [01:10:20] Your computer is under command and control of the Russians. So the FBI goes to a court and says, Hey, we've got to go ahead and shut this down. We need a warrant. They get the warrant and the search and seizure warrant lets them now. Get on to these machines that are part of the bot net or the controlling machines for the bot net, and either remove the malware or go ahead and take control of the botnet themselves. [01:10:49] So it can't be used. And by the way, our friends at Microsoft they've gotten involved in this too, which is really frankly, cool in shutting down some of these botnets, Hey, I want to encourage everyone. Take a couple of minutes, go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. That's Craig Peterson. CREI G P T R S O N. [01:11:12] And subscribe, and I'll be sending you a special report on passwords. Plus two more. I send out the most popular special reports that anybody has ever asked for. [01:11:25] Hey, I've got a little bit more to discuss on what's happening with Russia and Microsoft and more, but I'm also going to talk about QR codes. There is a great explanation. That's in your newsletter from Monday about why you shouldn't trust him. [01:11:41] Let's finish up this Russian thing. And then we're going to get into why you cannot trust QR codes and a brand new way. [01:11:51] The bad guys are using QR codes to really mess with us. Now, if you're watching over on either YouTube or on rumble, you'll see this. Let me pull up my screen for you. But here we go. Okay. This is very interesting. Then the last segment, we talked a little bit about what our friends over at the FBI had been doing, which is they have been removing malware from people's computers because people haven't been keeping their computers up-to-date right. [01:12:26] Part of the botnets. So we explained. At the FBI, isn't the only one out there trying to stop these Russians and the hackers anonymous has been very big at it. In fact, let me pull up this other article. This is from security affairs. And here we go. And it's talking about this whole army of these anonymous hackers. [01:12:50] Now none of us have been a nightmare for many businesses that they didn't like. I had an anonymous we'll go ahead and they'll do usually pretty basic stuff. They'll do denial of service attacks and some other things, so they don't like you because of. The don't say gay bill in Florida, and, without bothering to do any research, they'll just start attacking organizations that support it, or organizations that don't support it depending on how they want to do it. So this is an interesting article here, because it's talking about these various. Websites that they've hacked. Now, some of them are government site and some of them are private industries. Now, one of the cool things, bad things about hacking private industry and releasing the emails is now the competitors to these businesses know what they're doing. [01:13:46] And in some cases there's proprietary technology that's being released. Now, when it comes to Russian proprietary technology. The Western world doesn't care a whole lot about some of it, but here's some examples of what these hacktivists of GoDaddy. This is a company called forest 37,000 emails stolen from the company, Russian logging and wood manufacturing firm. [01:14:09] Again, it would give a little bit of an idea into the whole Russian, what are they doing? In the forest industry. This one, I think is a little more concerning for the Russians Aero gap. This is an engineering company that focuses in the oil and gas industry. Their clients include a whole bunch of Russian companies. [01:14:30] They've leaked approximately 100,000 emails from Aero gas. That is a huge deal because so much of the country's revenue, the number one industry in Russia is oil and gas. Petro Fort one of the largest office space and business centers in St. Petersburg, the hackers have leaked approximately 300,000 emails from Petro fork. [01:14:56] Again, you can use that to find out what's happening in your economy. What. Doing how are businesses doing? Are they going to go under so you can see some tweets here. I've got them up on my screen on YouTube and rumble anonymous. What they're saying that they've done and you can follow anonymous directly on Twitter. [01:15:14] Particularly fond of them. They've done a lot of things that I disagree with. This is really telling us about a whole new approach to warfare, right back in the day, you and I couldn't get involved, we could potentially take up arms and go and fight right there and think about the Spanish American war. [01:15:33] Think about what's happening now in Ukraine, where Americans have just gone over there. Taken up firearms in order to help them defend Ukraine. People who are maybe of Ukrainian descent, maybe not right. We have never seen this type of involvement by average citizens because anonymous is not like some big fancy company or government agency anonymous is a bunch of people who are trying to be anonymous and do something. [01:16:05] So they stole 145 gigabytes. Look at this. It's just crazy. So here. The anonymous Twitter thread itself, right? Talking about what. It's absolutely incredible. Incredible. So that's what anonymous is up to. They are hacking Russia and they're hacking Russia in a big way. Now, next stop. We have our friends at Microsoft. [01:16:30] Microsoft has been seizing Russian domains that they are accusing of having been linked to these Russian hackers that have been going after think tanks and government agencies in the U S and the. He kn

CATS Roundtable
Sen. Ron Johnson - Inflation is a function of energy shortages

CATS Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 9:30


Sen. Ron Johnson - Inflation is a function of energy shortages by John Catsimatidis

Heavenly Foods - Local Conferences
Msg 04 - The Shaping Function of the Law of the Spirit of Life

Heavenly Foods - Local Conferences

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 72:26


Speaker: Ron Kangas; Scripture Reading: Rom. 8:2, 26-29; Subject: KNOWING, EXPERIENCING, AND PROPAGATING CHRIST IN HIS RESURRECTION AS THE FIRSTBORN SON OF GOD. Source: Japan

The CEO Podcast
Communication Junction, What's Your Function? (Part 3): Email Etiquette, Proper Procedures, Burdens & Benefits

The CEO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 37:23


So much business communication occurs through email—some might even say TOO MUCH communication is done this way. As a result, far too often relationships are strained, and deals are damaged due to typing the wrong message. You may not have intended to send that message, but the only message that is ever delivered is the one that is perceived by the recipient. Tune in this week for episode 2.17 as Scott and Vince dive into email etiquette. They offer some tips on how best to use email in business and offer some basic processes that can help let email continue to be a tool for business and not a burden on business. When to respond, when not to respond, and ultimately, how to WRITE the RIGHT email and ensure your message is delivered as you intended. About our Hosts: To learn more about Scott De Long, Ph.D., and Vince Moiso, MBA, please visit theceopodcast.net. If you have questions, comments, or to make topic suggestions for future episodes, please contact them at scottandvince@gmail.com. Resources: The Communication Hierarchy Business & Professional Communications Course Effective Communications Webinar (Free)

Good Works on SermonAudio
The Positive Place and Function of Good Works

Good Works on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 48:00


A new MP3 sermon from Randolph Protestant Reformed Church is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: The Positive Place and Function of Good Works Speaker: Rev. Erik Guichelaar Broadcaster: Randolph Protestant Reformed Church Event: Sunday - AM Date: 5/15/2022 Bible: Titus 3 Length: 48 min.

Protestant Reformed on SermonAudio.com
The Positive Place and Function of Good Works

Protestant Reformed on SermonAudio.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 48:00


Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan
S2 Ep7: A Decade of Terror: Village of the Damned Part 2

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 37:14


We left off in the ill-fated Dryden, NY with two high school cheerleaders missing and a town in mourning for years of tragedy under its belt. In the second half of this series on the “Village of the Damned,” we'll go over the hunt for a murderer and the unfortunate string of deaths that followed. How did this decade of terror come to a conclusion? The end would be more bitter than sweet. This week's sponsors: Luminess - Right now, if you go to BreezeToday.com/STRANGE and enter promo code STRANGE, you'll receive 50% OFF their airbrush makeup system PLUS free shipping! And because you're a listener there is a special free eyeliner, valued at over $20, included just for you. Daily Harvest - Go to dailyharvest.com/daisy to get up to $40 off your first box! Calm - For listeners of the show, Calm is offering an exclusive offer of 40% off a Calm Premium subscription at CALM.COM/strange. Function of Beauty - Go to FunctionofBeauty.com/STRANGE to let them know you heard about it from our show and to get 25% off your first order. 

On the Mark Golf Podcast
Bob Toski on Golf and Building a Golf Swing for a Lifetime

On the Mark Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 40:27


Bob Toski is a legend of golf instruction, a member of The PGA Hall of Fame, a former PGA TOUR winner, and still teaching golf at age 95. Arguably the "Father of Modern Instruction" Toski joins Mark Immelman to talk about golf, the golf swing and how you can understand the nature of the swing to build a swing that can stand the test of time. Mr Toski elaborates on: Feeling Your Golf Swing, Controlling the Clubface, Developing Good Contact and Ball-striking, The Function of and Correct Use of the Arms and Hands in the Swing, How the Body Supports the Swing, and  Aiming and Alignment. Learn a little "Old-school" yet timeless wisdom guaranteed to improve your golf-swing.

The Military Sherpa Leadership Podcast
69. How Do You Function?

The Military Sherpa Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 15:15


Having a diagnosable mental health condition doesn't define you.  Instead, it shapes you and impacts the way you interact with those around you.   The question we have to answer is: "How do we minimize the degree to which our mental health conditions negatively impact our lives and the lives of those around us?"

The Product Experience
Setting up a product function from scratch - Maggie Crowley on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 35:28


What it's like to join a new company and set up a new product from the start. On this weeks' podcast, we spoke to Maggie Crowley all about her experiences during this process. We also had some time to discuss hypotheses and testing in product. Featured Links: Follow Maggie on LinkedIn and Twitter | Work with Maggie at Charlie Health | 'Build With Maggie Crowley' podcast

Everyday Musicality: Unlocking the Inner Musician Through MLT

Mentioned in this episode… E01.43 “Tonal Verbal Association Skills (https://everydaymusicality.com/2022/04/12/e01-43-tonal-verbal-association-skills/) Learning Sequences in Music (https://www.giamusic.com/store/resource/learning-sequences-in-music-2012-edition-book-g2345) E01.07 “Menu of Meters” (https://everydaymusicality.com/2020/04/14/e01-07-menu-of-meters/) E01.42 “Choosing a Tonal Solfege or Rhythm Syllables System” (https://everydaymusicality.com/2022/03/08/e01-42choosing-a-tonal-solfege-or-rhythm-syllable-system/) Info on rhythm (https://giml.org/mlt/lsa-rhythmcontent/) GIML 2022 Professional Development Levels Courses (https://giml.org/summer2022/) GIML 2022 Online Intro Courses (https://giml.org/online-workshops/summer-workshops/)

Welcome to the OC, Bitches!
The Showdown with Marguerite Moreau

Welcome to the OC, Bitches!

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 65:13


This week, Rachel Bilson and Melinda Clarke are joined by Marguerite Moreau who played Summer's rival, Reed Carlson, to discuss season 2, episode 22, “The Showdown.” Marguerite discusses how she got into acting and talks about being in one of Rachel's favorite films, “Wet Hot American Summer.” Hear about all the O.C. behind-the-scenes fun they had when they shot the graphic novel launch party with Adam and Michael.  And Marguerite tells the ladies what it was like to work with *spoiler alert for next episode* George Lucas!  And just how vastly different is the OC from Marguerite's hometown, Newport Beach...she and Melinda discuss!  The Showdown Synopsis:  Marissa is reeling from being nearly raped by Trey and is refusing to tell Ryan, who is starting to get suspicious about what happened while he was in Miami. Seth and Zach have declared war over Summer's affections.  Meanwhile, Sandy confronts Kirsten about her very apparent drinking problem, and Caleb hands over divorce papers to Julie.   **Trigger Warning:  This episode contains sensitive material containing sexual assault, if want to skip ahead please avoid listening/viewing from 37:00 through 47:02 of the podcast. Help is always available for anyone struggling with the trauma of sexual assault, RAINN is the nation's largest anti-sexual violence organization and offers help to survivors, if you need to speak to someone, you can call their hotline at 1.800.656.HOPE. **  Please support our sponsors: Earn cashback while you shop! Rakuten is an online shopping platform that rewards you for shopping.  Go to https://www.rakuten.com. Article has launched their new line of Outdoor products for Summer ‘22. Go to https://www.article.com/oc to get $50 dollars off of their first purchase of $100 dollars or more.  Cocofloss is like a loofah for your teeth - it's a woven floss made up of more than 500 textured interwoven filaments. It actually snatches plaque and debris from between your teeth and gums. Go to https://www.cocofloss.me/oc to get 20% off sitewide and free shipping.   Function of Beauty is the world's first fully customizable hair care that creates individually-filled shampoos, conditioners, styling, and treatment formulas based on your hair now, and where you want it to go. Go to https://www.functionofbeauty.com/OC to get 25% off your first order.  Meritis clean, well-edited makeup product essentials that will make you look like you – but better.  Go to https://www.meritbeauty.com/theoc to get their free signature reusable makeup bag with your purchase.  Follow @rachelbilson, @themelindaclarke, and @margueritemoreau on Instagram  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Wake Up Call
Body Function Expert 3-8-22

The Wake Up Call

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 5:06


9-5 OTP
9-5 OTP EP.143 "FUNCTION FORWARD, CONTROL WHAT WE CAN..."

9-5 OTP

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 163:40


ON THIS EPISODE THE GODS CHOP IT UP ABOUT THE UNTIMELY DEMISE OF THE GOD KEVIN SAMUELS AND THE DISRESPECT THAT HAS BEEN PUT ON HIS NAME FOR SPEAKING TRUTH TO WOMEN AND MEN ABOUT THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS FROM THEIR POTENTIAL PARTNER. THE GODS ALSO GET INTO CURRENT EVENTS FROM THE PAST WEEKS SHENANIGANS ENJOY.

Every Outfit
On Kim Cattrall's Variety Interview, Better Things, Severance

Every Outfit

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 81:23


The ladies are back to discuss the insane TikToK estate sale Lauren went to, the Hacks screening with more COVID protocols than the Met Gala, Kim Cattrall's revealing Variety interview, her “just say no” speech, SJP's Tony snub, Patti Lupone mask tirade, an extended discussion on what we're watching including: the Better Things series finale, the gay romance subplot in Severance, Lauren explains Selling Sunset to Chelsea, the unnecessary length of Girl From Planville, Chloë Sevigny- the queen of Suburban moms in prestige miniseries on Hulu, trying Devin Booker's Sweetgreen salad, decoding Psalm's Hulk themed birthday, dissecting the latest Kardashian episodes, AND SO MUCH MORE!This week's episode is brought to you by Dipsea. Our listeners get an extended 30 day free trial when you go to DipseaStories.com/Outfit!As well as,  Function of Beauty. Save 25% on your first order when you go to FunctionofBeauty.com/OutfitShow NotesKim Cattrall's Variety interviewKim Cattrall's Variety speechWatch Better ThingsWatch SeveranceWatch Selling SunsetWatch The Girl from PlainvilleWatch The OfferDevin Booker's Sweetgreen SaladPsalm West's Terrifying CakeMore scary fist dildosWatch The KardashiansWant to hear our thoughts on The First Wives Club? Magnolia? Girls on its 10th anniversary? Become a Patron! Go to Patreon.com/EveryOutfit.WE HAVE A HOTLINE! Disagree with us? Make your case and we may play it on the show. Questions, secrets, or gossip from the And Just Like That set also welcome. Call 323-486-6773

Everything Fastpitch - The Podcast
Quality of play is a function of knowledge, practice and talent.

Everything Fastpitch - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 12:37


Patrick Winston, a former professor and computer scientist at MIT, used a formula in one of his talks about things that go into the quality of a performance. Obviously he wasn't talking about softball, but it really applies developing players. The formula was Quality is a function of Knowledge, Practice and Talent with the importance in that order. The coaches break this down and apply it to softball.Support the show

Sam Miller Science
S 348: The Inflammation-Depression Connection: Metabolic Health as a Cornerstone of Mental Health, Acute vs Chronic Inflammation, Serotonin Function, and More!

Sam Miller Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 25:13


Is there a connection between inflammation and depression? We know there are many factors both psychologically and physiologically that contribute to mood disorders but I wanted to cover this area specifically today. We'll cover serotonin function and holistic function, acute vs chronic inflammation, the different types of cytokines that contribute in this area, and much more! Topics include:   - Connection between Inflammation and Depression - Quick Context on Depression - Serotonin Function and Holistic Function - Acute vs Chronic Inflammation - Different Types of Cytokines - SSRI's and CO**D19 - Causes of Inflammation - Please Share, Rate, and Review ----------  My Live Program for Coaches: The Functional Nutrition and Metabolism Specialization  Learn More www.sammillerscience.com/FNMS2022  ----------  No-Cost Coaching Resources for Our Listeners The Check-In Checklist: www.Sammillerscience.com/checklist  The Metabolism School Mini Series: www.sammillerscience.com/metabolism ----------  Stay Connected  Instagram: @sammillerscience Facebook: The Nutrition Coaching Collaborative Community  https://www.facebook.com/groups/nutritioncoachingcollaborative TikTok: @sammillerscience - https://vm.tiktok.com/ZTdPVQtMH/ ---------- “This Podcast is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute the practice of medicine, nursing or other professional health care services, including the giving of medical advice, and no doctor/patient relationship is formed. The use of information on this podcast and the show notes or the reliance on the information provided is to be done at the user's own risk. The content of this podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment and is for educational purposes only. Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program and users should not disregard, or delay in obtaining, medical advice for any medical condition they may have and should seek the assistance of their health care professionals for any such conditions. By accessing this Podcast, the listener acknowledges that the entire contents and design of this Podcast, are the property of Oracle Athletic Science LLC, or used by Oracle Athletic Science LLC with permission, and are protected under U.S. and international copyright and trademark laws. Except as otherwise provided herein, users of this Podcast may save and use information contained in the Podcast only for personal or other non-commercial, educational purposes. No other use, including, without limitation, reproduction, retransmission or editing, of this Podcast may be made without the prior written permission of Oracle Athletic Science LLC, which may be requested by contacting the Oracle Athletic Science LLC by email at team@sammillerscience.com. By accessing this Podcast, the listener acknowledges that Oracle Athletic Science LLC makes no warranty, guarantee, or representation as to the accuracy or sufficiency of the information featured in this Podcast.”

Chiropractic OnLine Todays HealthBeat
COTs HealthBeat for Friday, May 13, 2022

Chiropractic OnLine Todays HealthBeat

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 6:51


In this edition of HealthBeat, we discuss Minimal-Dose Resistance Training for Improving Muscle Mass, Strength, and Function. Want More Health and Technology Info - Follow Dr Eglow at - http://www.twitter.com/teglow Please Support HealthBeat Advertisers - http://www.audiblepodcast.com/healthbeat For information about adding Personalized Healthbeat Podcasts to your offices Web Site, to help you attract new patients, please Email us at healthbeat@chiropracticradio.com COTs HealthBeat is now available on Stitcher Radio - Surf to - http://app.stitcher.com/browse/feed/31530/details And remember to surf to our Show Notes, located at http://www.ChiropracticRadio.com My Podcast Alley feed! {pca-35ddbc0845765814071fb2d2e8501841}

Dr. Dark Web
How Ransomware Gangs Function With Ilana Touboul, a Cyber ​​Threat Intelligence Analyst at Cybersixgill

Dr. Dark Web

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 32:35


The number and scope of ransomware gangs' activities grow daily. But not many organizations are aware of the risks these activities carry. Also, the ongoing war in Europe shows that battlefields exist in the digital world and can cause damage that can devastate entire economies and social orders.Therefore, organizations must ensure constant education of their personnel regarding the importance of cybersecurity. In this episode of Dr. Dark Web, Ilana Touboul joins our host Chris Roberts. Ilana is a Cyber ​​Threat Intelligence Analyst at Cybersixgill and has experience in technical documentation and user guide building for military and civilian end users.Ilana and Chris discuss ransomware gangs, how they choose their victims, their motives for attacking, and how companies and governments can protect against them.

Movement Podcast
Fighting Fire with Function

Movement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 72:18


Today, we welcome our guest, Mike Contreras. Mike is the Division Chief at Orange County Fire Authority, based in Mission Viejo, CA. With over 30 years of experience working with and training firefighting personnel, he also is the founder of FMS Health and Safety, which addresses individual risk of injury and helps optimize overall health and performance.   On this episode, we discuss working with industrial athletes. We cover what tactics he employs during training, how he implements his practices across a large and varied population, how the world of industrial athletes has evolved, and what are some takeaways we can learn from his journey. So let's sound the alarm in today's episode of the Movement Podcast -- powered by FMS.Get $50 off FMS L1 or L2 Virtual courses. Follow this link and use promo VIRT22 at checkout.

Covenant Of Peace Int'l Ministries podcast
Understanding The Church And It's Function

Covenant Of Peace Int'l Ministries podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 41:36


Part 4 - By Pastor Kenneth Harbaum

Afternoon Sport
12th May Deep Dive: Paul Gallen defeated, Graham Thorpe in hospital and a private function for State of Origin

Afternoon Sport

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 16:00


Tim and Shane discuss Paul Gallen's loss to Kris Terzievski, Former England cricketer Graham Thorpe in hospital, NRL State of Origin, Essendon's form, Greg Norman's 1-wood and more See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Neurology Minute
Neuromodulation Restores Function in Spinal Cord Injury

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:21


Dr. Andreas Rowald discusses the efficacy of activity-dependent spinal cord neuromodulation, which was shown to rapidly restore trunk and leg motor functions in patients with spinal cord injury after complete paralysis.

Dr. Hotze's Wellness Revolution
Male Hormones & Mental Function

Dr. Hotze's Wellness Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 23:56


Men – did you know that your mental function is directly affected by your hormones? It's true! In addition to hormone levels declining with age, toxins in the environment (petrochemical products) can decrease production of male hormones too! Join Dr. Hotze today as he discusses the importance of maintaining optimum hormone levels as we age and learn his secret to increased energy, vitality, drive, and better moods! Watch now and subscribe to our podcasts at www.HotzePodcast.com If you have any of the signs and symptoms mentioned on this podcast, take our free symptom checker test at https://www.hotzehwc.com/symptom-checker/

PVRoundup Podcast
Dapagliflozin safe in patients with COVID-19, regardless of kidney function

PVRoundup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 3:27


How does dapagliflozin affect kidney outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19? Find out about this and more in today's PV Roundup podcast.

The MindBodyBrain Project
The impact of Omega-3 fatty acids on brain structure and function and overall metabolic health

The MindBodyBrain Project

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 10:15


This episode looks at a recent randomised controlled trial in humans on the impact of Omega-3 fatty acids on brain structure and function and overall metabolic health. It was a beautifully designed study which, for me, absolutely puts an end to the debate on whether we should be supplementing with Omega 3 fatty acids. Make sure you subscribe to the newsletter on our website to get access to the research paper.

NOW of Work
Rebranding & Repositioning the People Function with Jill Katz, Founder & Chief People Officer of Assemble

NOW of Work

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 34:20


“The resources in our organization are the PEOPLE, that is what our human resources are.” The last few years of pandemic life set the stage for both talent and an organization's People function. The people function is more important than ever before; it's how we BUILD UP our people. But how we have created opportunities for improvement? How we define the true meaning of HR? IT IS THE PEOPLE. …AND that sparks the question, how are we taking care of our people? How are organizations shifting their HR mindset? How are we helping organizations reframe what HR really is? No organization should revert backward, pre-pandemic. You must solve for the outlier because then you have really done the work of the true people function. This is an extremely important and powerful conversation, one that will make you think about your own people function. TAKE A LISTEN!

The Talent Blueprint
Developing the TA Function with Cherry Ainsworth, Global Head of Talent Acquisition at The Financial Times

The Talent Blueprint

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 35:11


This episode features an interview with Cherry Ainsworth, Global Head of Talent Acquisition at The Financial Times. For the past twelve years, Cherry has helped to establish and grow the FT's talent acquisition function while meeting the businesses strategic hiring goals and increasing diversity across the organization.On today's episode, Cherry discusses FT's Next Generation Board, her own experience returning to work after maternity leave, and the importance of retention.--About CherryCherry has spent the last 12 years working in recruitment and is currently Global Head of Talent Acquisition at The Financial Times. In her role at The FT she has established and grown their TA function and is responsible for meeting the businesses strategic hiring goals and increasing diversity across the organisation. She is adept at building and embedding recruitment functions, having previously carried out similar roles at two technology startups and is a passionate about scaling successful teams and developing people. About Financial TimesThe Financial Times is one of the world's leading business news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. The FT has a record paying readership of one million, three-quarters of which are digital subscriptions. It is part of Nikkei Inc., which provides a broad range of information, news and services for the global business community. --“At the end of the day, we want to automate as much as possible and we want to be as efficient as possible. But we're hiring humans into businesses. So those humans will want to interact with other humans.” -Cherry Ainsworth--The Blueprint(1:33) Cherry's role building out the TA team(3:19) The most rewarding part of the role: a ripple effect of growing teams and processesThe Journey(4:13) Measuring success through diversity initiatives and positive feedback(8:57) Advocating for sponsorship(10:33) The candidate journey and reaching a different audience(12:35) Realigning the FT's external reputation(15:35) Cherry's experience returning to work after maternity leaveThe Future of Talent(17:59) Recipe for success: knowing your marketplace and being agile(21:03) A new initiative with FT's Next Generation Board(23:35) Creating career journeys and succession planning across the FT(26:47) Delving into data and talent mapping(29:52) Cherry's advice to her past self(31:54) Keeping the personal touch in recruitment--SponsorThe Talent Blueprint is brought to you by Beamery. Beamery's Talent Lifecycle Management Platform makes it possible for companies to deliver more human talent experiences and unlock the skills and potential of their global workforce using industry leading AI. Learn more at beamery.com.--LinksConnect with Cherry on LinkedInConnect with Sultan on LinkedIn--BonusFor fans of The Talent Blueprint, check out the latest episode of Often Imitated with Beamery Co-Founder, Abakar Saidov. Brought to you by Caspian Studios, the same team behind The Talent Blueprint.

Neurology® Podcast
Neuromodulation Restores Function in Spinal Cord Injury

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 19:28


Dr. Jeff Ratliff talks with Dr. Andreas Rowald about the efficacy of activity-dependent spinal cord neuromodulation, which was shown to rapidly restore trunk and leg motor functions in patients with spinal cord injury after complete paralysis.

NOLA Church
Discovering Love

NOLA Church

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 45:53


This is our sermon from Mother's Day 2022. A mother's love is the embodiment of everything we learn about the Character of GOD in 1 Corinthians 13.In this sermon Pastor Monte unpacks Paul's Love Chapter, teaching us the Legacy of Love, the Identity of Love, and the Function of Love.Support the show

You Can Heal Your Life®
Ari Whitten | Supercharge Your Health—Naturally!

You Can Heal Your Life®

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 36:25


Nutrition and lifestyle expert Ari Whitten shares techniques, supplements, and compounds to help your body achieve optimal performance, energy, mood, brain function, and overall health. To learn more about lifestyle choices you can make to optimize your energy and help improve your health, listen to Ari's brand new audiobook, Eat for Energy: How to Beat Fatigue, Supercharge Your Mitochondria, and Unlock All-Day Energy. It's FREE for 14 days in the Hay House Unlimited Audio App now! Apple users visit hayhouse.com/apple and Android users visithayhouse.com/google to download.

Zorba Paster On Your Health
Allergies and asthma linked to heart disease, Old skin cells may be reprogrammed to regain youthful function, Mango shrimp tacos

Zorba Paster On Your Health

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022


This week the hosts look at how allergies and asthma may be linked to heart disease, and they discuss how old skin cells may be re-programmed to to regain youthful function. Plus, they share a delicious recipe for Mango shrimp tacos.

The Dental Hacks Podcast
Group Function: Practice Ownership for New Dentists with Shared Practices

The Dental Hacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 46:49


Is practice ownership for new dentists a thing anymore? Today's guests say "YES!" Alan is joined by Dr. Richard Low, co-founder of Shared Practices, Dr. Megan Timm (client of Shared Practices and owner of 3 practices!) and Caitlin Shoemaker (coach at Shared Practices)! Shared Practices started as a podcast and has evolved into a complete solution for helping dentists into practice ownership! Richard, Megan and Caitlin share their experience helping dentists get into practice ownership using metrics and systems to help them grow and succeed!  Some links from the show: The Shared Practices Podcast Shared Practices website If you'd like to support the Very Dental Podcast Network then you should support our sponsors!  Zirc Dental Products' Color Method will rescue your team from clinical clutter and disorganization and if you use the coupon code “VERYDENTAL” to get 50% off their most popular level of organizational consultation. You'll have a box of all the different trays, tubs, cassettes and other goodies sent ot your office and then have an in depth conversation with one of Zirc's clinical efficiency specialists to help you choose what's best for your office!  So head over to verydentalpodcast.com/zirc and use coupon code “VERYDENTAL” to get 50% off Color Method consultation! Come join me in Chicago on May 19-20th for "Catch the Composite Wave and Surf its Potential" at Cosmedent! You'll get lots of face time with two amazing instructors: Dr. Buddy Mopper and Dr. Dennis Hartlieb! There are a few seats left, so come take a class with me! You won't believe all the changes and advances they're having over at CAD-Ray!  Now you can get the i700 in WIRELESS! Yes, you heard me correctly, all the goodness of the Medit i700 now is now available with no cables! The i700 wireless is available NOW from CAD-Ray and it ships immediately! If you've been waiting for a wireless intraoral scanning solution, your wait is over! Go check out CAD-Ray at verydentalpodcast.com/cadray or cad-ray.com Our friends at Enova Illumination have your magnification and lighting needs all figured out. Whether you're looking at new loupes, a surgical headlight like no other or the amazing line of Zumax microscopes, Enova Illumination has you covered! Go check them out at verydentalpodcast.com/Enova and take advantage of the discounts they have for Very Dental Podcast Network listeners! Do you need help with a logo, website design or anything marketing? Our friends at Wonderist can definitely help! Keep your eyes open for the updated Very Dental Podcast website coming soon! It's amazing and it was designed by the pros at the Wonderist Agency! Want more information? Go check them out at verydentalpodcast.com/wonderist! Do you want an easy way to support the Very Dental Podcast network? Go check out the monthly deals from our friends at Crazy Dental! Each month Crazy Dental will be offering high value coupons on the product you're using most! Head over to verydentalpodcast.com/crazy to see the monthly deals they have in store for you!

Thriving Thyroid with Shannon Hansen - Functional Nutrition for better women's hormones using food as medicine.

Hope is a holistic nutritionist, FDN-P and the founder of inBalance, a pilates based fitness studio franchise.   In the episode Hope covers:  How a plant-focused diet can help build a healthy thyroid and how a plant-focused diet can rebuild the gut and how that helps support a healthy thyroid.  What are some benefits of eating a plant focused diet? How can a plant focused diet build a healthy gut? And how is that related to a healthy thyroid? How does gut health relate to thyroid health? Connect with hope: facebook.com/groups/livewholesomeandhealthy facebook.com/hope.cowgill instagram.com/thehopepedraza hope@inbalancestudios.com . . . SHOW NOTES AT    Get on the Hansen Method waitlist. Click here. We open up the Hansen Method 2-3x a year so that we can fully support our clients to the highest degree possible.   Thinking about using nutrition and holistic health for restoring thyroid function? Learn EVERYTHING you need to know by joining our Free Facebook Group. Thriving Thyroid Balance Community.   Are you interested in learning more about your thyroid and finding answers?    We got you!    We have several different opportunities to work with us at several different price points and opportunities.    Our signature 6-month program is called The Hansen Method, we offer this in a VIP setting with personalized plans and protocols, individual one on one coaching and incredible bonuses that change regularly. You can schedule a complimentary thyroid breakthrough call with one of our thyroid advisors. Click here.  If you have questions about the Hansen Method and want to discuss your specific situation and make sure this is the right program for you you can schedule a complimentary thyroid breakthrough call with one of our team members. schedule here. Hurry, my schedule fills up quickly and we only work with limited amount of women at any given time.    Join hundreds of women who have improved their symptoms by 80% and lose on average 30lbs in the 4 months.     Not ready to schedule a call, no problem. Learn more about the Hansen Method to see if it's a good fit for you. Click here to learn more.    We also offer The Hansen Method as a Self Guided option.    Option number 1 for self guide is where you are totally on your own to go through the program content, make the changes and execute them on your own. Click here to purchase.    Option number 2 includes group coaching and access to our members facebook group that will allow you access to our Thyroid Success Coaches and testing with personalized protocols. Click here to purchase.      But one of our favorite ways to work with us is our Thriving Thyroid Coaching Membership Opportunity.  This is where many of clients first begin working with us. It allows you to get to know us, our system and start making changes before making a larger financial investment. Click here to learn more.    CONTACT LINKS Website Facebook Community YouTube Instagram   DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES Freedom From Fatigue Guide  Download our Thyroid Panel Guide. Best Foods for Thyroid Thriving Hair Guide Dining Out Guide Thyroid Blocker List   PAID RESOURCES Thyroid Recipe Book 10-day detox   AFFILIATE LINKS Branch Basics Doterra Essential Oils Beauty Counter Wellevate Supplements   Xo, Shannon Hansen   P.S. Make sure to schedule our Thyroid Breakthrough call with one of our thyroid advisors.    FULL AUDIO TRANSCRIPT (00:00): Welcome back to episode 83 and I am so excited. This is with hope and we are talking about how a plant focused diet can help restore gut health hope is a holistic nutritionist, a functional diagnostic nutrition practitioner, and the founder of imbalance, a Pilates based fitness. All right, you guys help me welcome hope to the show. Welcome back to the thriving thyroid podcast, where we choose to become empowered patients and take our health into our own hands. Hi, I'm Shannon Hansen, a Christian entrepreneur, a mom of three. And after dealing with my own health mysteries, I made it my mission to learn everything I could about the thyroid. I soon became certified as a holistic wellness practitioner, a functional nutrition practitioner and a functional diagnostic practitioner. And so much more. After that, I founded the revolutionary thyroid program, the handsome method as a health professional and a mom. (01:06): I fully understand the importance of having a fun, simple, and sustainable plan for achieving a responsive thyroid. So I share actionable and practical strategies for developing a responsive thyroid so that the ambition moms and women can gain freedom from fatigue and lose the thyroid weight once. And for all each week, I will be here for you along with my guest experts, we will be sharing simple and tangible tips that work for not only your thyroid, your hormones, your family, and your mindset, so that you can get back to living the life that you and vision for yourself. Welcome to the thriving Throid podcast. Welcome back you guys to the thriving Throid podcast. We have hope Praza on with us today, and I'm super excited to be talking to you guys about health, fitness, Pilates and how that it played is a role in thyroid as well. So welcome hope. (02:06): Yeah. Thank you. Thanks so much for having me. (02:08): Yeah. So for the listeners, give us a little bit of a background as to who you are, what you do, what you specialize in, all of that. (02:18): Yeah. So I am the owner of a brick and mortar plotty space, fitness studio. And so our studios are built on Pate's principles. We have six signature classes all based on Pate's principles. So they're all focused on mobility, flexibility balance in the core. It's like, you know, at the core of it is the core and that's kind of what our classes are based on. And in addition to that, I'm also a holistic nutritionist and a function diagnostic nutrition practitioner. And so I've kind of blended the two together while also having kinda two separate businesses with my nutrition business running online, and then my brick and mortar UMWA studio. (02:56): Yeah. Super fun. And how did you, so you started with Pilates and then moved into Nu nutrition. (03:03): I did. Yeah. Yeah. So my background is in dance and that's really what got me into Pilates. I danced for 20 however many years of my life. And so that kind of led me into Pilates, which led me down the path for the brick and mortar. (03:15): Super fun. So did you start doing Pilates like in college or? (03:20): Yeah. So it's funny. I was just thinking about this the other day too. I, I actually started doing floods when I was, I guess I was probably in high school. I would go to the gym with my mom and she would go to like, you know, they had the old school step aerobics classes, you know, and so we would do step aerobics and then like once a week they'd have floods and so I'd go with her, but then our really got into it when I was in college. And I just, I was teaching group fitness and then I just decided like Pilates, it just, it just kind of naturally learned that way, that what somebody recommended it like, oh, you should get certified. And so I just kinda started my path in Pilates as well. It just matched so well with my dance background and I just, I loved doing it. It I'm like, oh, I don't wanna teach it. So yeah. (04:02): Yeah. I love that. So I danced too. Awesome. Yeah, I did. So at my school we were very highly competitive in the dance field. Yeah. And so I made varsity team my freshman year Uhhuh, and that was like the first year, any varsity or any freshman had made yeah. (04:21): Made varsity, (04:22): Made varsity in like that's so cool. 10 years or something ridiculous. And so I love that and I, I, you know, I, a fan of Pilates and a fan of yoga and all of those things, they just kind of mm-hmm go together. (04:36): They do? They do. (04:38): And I, okay. So I took yoga my first like yoga classes were my freshman year in high school and my teacher was so weird and I was like, I, this (04:49): Is not, yeah. (04:51): I hate yoga if this is what yoga is. I hate it. (04:55): Not for me. (04:57): Yes. (04:57): Could totally have that experience though. And I mean, I honestly it's the same with Pilates too, and I think it's important too, for, you know, anyone listening, who isn't familiar with Pilates, like there are multiple schools of teaching with Pilates, you know, there's more classical based, more contemporary. Our studios are more contemporary based, so it's more functional movement. It's more like natural progressions and like a better, more functional flow to like the class and stuff, which is what I loved about it. Contemporary style. Cause it, it lit more just to like dance, how it all flows together and it all move, you know, mm-hmm so there is, and you'll always find, you know, there's teachers that you like in teachers that, you know, don't, aren't a good fit for you and it's the same with Pilates too. So you definitely have to find what fits best for you and what feels best for you and what you job with, you know? (05:41): Yeah. I, and I love that point because I feel like a lot of times with exercise and movement, people will try out, like you said, a certain class and they're like, oh, this isn't for me. Mm-Hmm . But I have a really good friend of mine who had her entire colon removed. Oh, wow. And she's been doing Pilates to help with her core muscles because obviously that's really important . Mm. And that's Pilates has been extremely beneficial and I love that. It's so gentle on the body. (06:14): Totally. Yeah. And that's really at think that's kind of the premise of my studio. Cause we do have some like higher intensity classes and stuff, but the whole, our premise really is like, this is for longevity. Like you can still do high intensity classes and it still be gentle on your body. Like, it doesn't mean you have to be, you know, pounding your joints or throwing, you know, 500 pounds over your head and stuff. Like you can still be gentle to your body and do a higher intensity class and high intensity. Really. It means so many things to different people. Like what's high intensity for me is not the same thing as someone who might be, you know, 70 years old or somebody who's, you know, a marathon runner who needs a little bit more to get their heart rate at, you know? So it's, it means different things to different people. And I think that's the great thing about pate and how we structured our classes. They're all multi-level classes. We don't level out level one, level two, you know, whatever. And so it provides a space for everyone to be included. It's, you know, it's inclusive and it, it gives a chance for someone who's maybe more, every beginner to have something to kinda strive for. And then there's always a way to make it more challenging, but it's, it's, it's safe for everybody. And yeah. (07:23): Yeah. So what would you say are the big benefits of doing Pilates? (07:29): Yeah, so obviously, like I mentioned before, the biggest benefit is gonna be the core and that's really the focus of Pilates. And it's important to understand that the core is not just your abs, right? Your course, everything from your shoulders to your hips. So it's that whole like trunk part of your body. And that's what the focus is. And we're not only focusing on like working, working, and strengthening the core, but also you know, using that to stabilize the rest of the body. So it's all about like moving one part of the body while stabilizing another parts are working those little tiny, stable laser muscles. You're working the core, you're working the spine, you're building all of those little tiny muscles comprehensively throughout the class. (08:10): I love that. And I, I, and you can correct me if I'm wrong, but a lot of the core muscles lend into like a gut health. Right. And the mobility that we see in your, just your GI track with the stomach and the intestines and things like that. So do you find that once people get started with you, that those things are shifting as well? (08:34): Yeah. I mean, that's a huge thing. It's funny. We just had a, do we also do teacher trainings at my studio, but we had one weeks ago when we were talking about that. Just how I, I think people underestimate the power of proper posture and how, when you don't have proper posture, I mean, it affects everything. It literally affects how your organs are configured in your body. Like it really does affect things. So yeah, totally. I mean, it can really it sounds so like, you know, melodramatic and we're talking about, you know, you hear cause it it's, I think it gets, we hear all the time, oh, this transforms your body. This says that really. And truly, there's so many transformative aspects of potties because it really can help with things like, you know, digestion and proper functioning of your organs and proper breathing. And you just, people don't think about that. We're thinking about posture that it's so much more than just where your bone, which are also, which is also important, but it's more than just where your bones are situated. There's so much more to it than that. So, yeah, for sure. (09:32): Yeah. And what are the, like, since I know you do a lot of teaching and stuff, what are some of those like misconceptions about Pilates? Because I'm sure they're out there, but (09:44): oh yeah, no for sure. And we get 'em all the time. And I think one of the things that I kind of mentioned before, and it's important to mention is that there are different schools of teaching was I've had people walk into my studio and, you know, be talking to them about is, and they're like, oh, well I don't, I don't like Buddie I tried it one time. I didn't like it. And you can't judge it by the one time, because you might have had a teacher. You didn't like, you might have been in a more classical class and maybe you're, you're better at doing hi contemporary. Maybe you you're better at doing class. You know, you have to kind of find what style suits you. So think, first of all, it's not all pate is equal and that all the classes are the same. (10:16): And two, I think the other biggest one we see is that Pilates and yoga are the same thing and it's not at all. so, you know, whereas yoga is more of, you know, holding positions for longer. And it's more about the flexibility and yes, there are plenty of yoga classes that build on strength and the focus is not the same. The breathing is not same where in Pilates, we're focused more on di formatic breathing and breathing from the diaphragm and, and like holding on the muscle contraction while you're breathing. Yoga's more about the belly breath, right? So it's, it's a totally different focus and it's definitely not the same goal, both great forms of movement and exercise, but not the same thing. (10:57): Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Well, and I, I love that because I just recorded an episode for the podcast with a guy talking about breath work. And I mean, obviously I think most of us are at least somewhat familiar with that. Mm-Hmm but he was talking about the difference of belly breathing, big breath, you know, breathing down into your stomach. And I was like, some of this stuff I have never heard of (11:26): yeah, yeah. (11:27): Before (11:28): It's true. Yeah. And we practice that when we're doing our teacher chatting, especially. And honestly, it, it sounds silly to say, but really people Mo a lot of people I'd say the, of people, at least that, you know, come through our doors really don't know how to breathe properly. And it sounds silly to say it, but it's true. And not only that, but people also aren't familiar with how to use their abs while they're breathing. Like that's like a novel concept to so many people come in. Like, I don't know how to use my AB and breathe at the same time. Like, don't you have to let go of your AB you know, it's so it totally is a whole different way of like thinking and which is why it's, you know, it's called a mind body exercise, cuz you really do have to connect the mind and the body for all the parts to work the way they're supposed to. And (12:13): Yeah, which I find really interesting, especially now that I'm pregnant and I'm like, oh my gosh, I can't breathe. you know, I'm like, oh, she's like super high up, you know? So I know my breathing has changed mm-hmm and anyway, he was talking about how women need to breathe different anyways. It's really just a fascinating Concepts. Yeah. I was like, I never knew that like yeah. And he was saying the same thing. We have to learn how to breathe. And I'm like, oh no, add one more thing checklist. (12:51): Yes it's. (12:54): So tell me hope. What do you let's kind of shift into nutrition. What are some of the benefits of eating more? Plant-Based kind of like a plant focused diet. What are your thoughts on that? (13:07): Yeah. So my approach with my clients is I call it plant focus. So you know, I'm, I, I am plant based. It works for me. I know it doesn't work for everybody, but I, I do, I am a firm believer that every, everybody should be eating more plants, whether it's all plants or not, everybody should be eating more plants. And so that's kinda the approach I take with my clients because the fact is that the majority of us don't get enough fiber. We don't get enough vitamins and minerals and we don't get of, you know, the, the benefits of eating a predominantly plant based diet. And for most of the clients I work with, there's some sort of like gut issues going on and which can lead to other things. And actually just did a masterclass talking about thyroid about the thyroid and connecting the gut and the thyroid and sub and really the benefits of eating plants while there's like a bazillion of them I could talk about. (13:57): But for just for, to narrow down a few big ones, first is the fiber, like I mentioned, and for so many things, obviously I think most of us know that fiber helps keep us regular, but really it's so much more than that. Fiber helps you full fiber helps stabilize your blood sugar. Fiber helps the breakdown when it's broken down in your body is broken down into short fatty acids. And this is really what helps create a healthy gut environment. It helps promote healthy bacteria. It provides food for the bacteria that's in your gut. It helps promote healthy stomach and intestinal lining. So there's so many benefits of the that's in the that's in. And then in addition to that, it can also help it can help you keep a healthy weight because it can help excrete excess, fatty acids help excrete, excess cholesterol out of your body. And then, and then the vitamins and minerals, of course implant, you know, you get the antioxidants and all those good things that help you know, lower inflammation and stuff comes from plant food, plant-based food as well. (14:58): Yeah. So when you say plant focused, (15:01): Mm-Hmm (15:02): What does that, what does that mean for you or what, yeah, yeah, (15:06): Yeah. It's really just putting a focus shifting the focus on the plate. So for the majority of my clients, none of them are really coming to me to be vegan. And I get those conversations in the DMS all the time. Like I'm not looking to be vegan. I'm like, well, good, cuz I'm not gonna tell you to be vegan so it's really just shifting the focus to more plants. So it's just maybe making the meat portion on your plate a little bit smaller and filling the rest with plants. So it's just putting more focus on plants. Maybe, maybe it's eating, you know, one solid plant based meal a day making just one meal a day plant based. So it's really just shifting the focus where it's not so much focus on the meat that's on the plate or the, you know, whatever animal protein or whatever that you're eating, but it's really filling your plate with mostly vegetables, which can still be full of protein and fiber, like, you know, lentils and Lago a other legumes in quinoa. So there are plenty of ways to get what you're looking for in the animal based food. Like which of those people, it's all about protein, right? There's plenty ways to get it, but it's just kinda shifting the focus. So it's more plants on your plate than it is animal products. (16:05): Yeah. And, and I find, I love this because that's kind of how I grew up and then life happened and I got married and I was introduced to like other ways of eating mm-hmm right. But my, my parents were both very health conscious. My parent, I remember for a period of time they were vegan. they were watching their cholesterol. They were watching sodium. My parents were just very mindful and that we would sit down and like three fourths of our plate would be plant based mm-hmm and then we would have, you know, some kind of like maybe meat or a caserole cuz we kind of have a big family, you know, like some of those things. Yeah. But a I I'm finding the more that I work with women, not everybody is brought up that way. Mm-Hmm yeah. So for you, how, like how were you brought up? What were your beliefs around food prior to plant-based or plant focused? (17:10): Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. So my mom was very high health conscious too. We didn't, I didn't grow up plant based or anything. We did eat meat growing up and stuff, but my mom was, my parents both were pretty health conscious. Like they were the more health conscious in the, in the sense that they were like tried all the fad diets, you know, like I remember they had the sugar bus for book and they had the you know, Mediterranean whatever, but, you know, so they kind of tried the things like, so they were health conscious mm-hmm you know, my mom wasn't, you know, never bought a sugary cereals, that kinda thing that I grew. And I grew up with a ton of digestive issues and, and it wasn't for meeting a lot of junk food cause we didn't, we didn't have that at my house. (17:49): Sure. And so, you know, I had multiple doctor's appointments, a lot of tests. I, I had probably four colonies before I was like 17 years old, just trying to figure out what was going on. So and then really that's kinda what led me down this path to be interested in nutrition really, because I just wanted to figure out what was wrong with myself cuz is really at the end of the day, the doctor was just like, oh, it's IBS. Which is like, basically they're like, I don't know. You're yeah. so, and, and they didn't, you know, they don't give you anything to do or try or it's like, okay, that's it. So I'm like, okay, well that's great. So as I kinda got older out of high school, I kinda started reading books. And then right out I read a couple books on eating plant based. And I was like, okay, I'm (18:37): Gonna try it out. What do I have to (18:39): Lose? Exactly. So I literally did it overnight. I just was like, okay, tomorrow I'm gonna be vegan. And, and I did. And, and, and my felt, I mean, it was probably a few weeks into it. I was like, I could tell, I felt a difference. And so it worked for me. And so that's, that was my kind of journey to get there was that it worked for me. I felt better. My skin was clearing up. My allergies got better. Like all these things started kind of a fixing themselves and I'm like, okay, well it works for me. So there's (19:06): Something here. Mm-Hmm yeah. Oh, I love that. And now I feel like my journey is a little similar. I didn't have a lot of digestive issues that I knew about. I felt like I was pretty regular and things like that, but my parents did. , mm-hmm this is so embarrassing, but well, not for me, I guess, but like my dad, he would fart, he would pass gas and it smelled so bad. It would clear the room. Right. (19:41): (19:42): Like, get outta there. And it, like you said, we were eating pretty healthy. My, my dad hunted, we ate, you know like game, you know, deer bear, you know, things like that. So it wasn't like we were on this terrible diet right. You know, we still eat ice cream and had cake and you know, things like that. But I didn't like you, I didn't grow up with a lot of sugary cereal. Like you probably the most sugary cereal I had was Cheerios. Yeah. (20:16): That too was cheer (20:18): Cheerios or rice crisp treats like Uhhuh, you know, we didn't grow up on cinnamon toast crunch. And if we did ever get lucky charms or something, it was like gone in a day. Yes because was so rare. So (20:34): Yes. Yes. (20:36): And, and I, I, I really appreciate finding people who grew up kind of similar to me where parents were health conscious, they were working out, they were, you know, watching what they ate mm-hmm they were taking care of their body and yet we're still experiencing health issues. (20:55): Yep, totally, totally. (20:56): And that, I think that this is such a great topic in the sense of you can be doing air quotes here, all the right things. Mm-Hmm , you can exercising, you can be sleeping, you can be eating, you know, watching your sugar and things like that. And still have something a little bit off. But when you shift your diet, like what you were talking about, there can be healing mm-hmm right. Mm-Hmm that can take place and the importance of fiber and just all of, all of these things I think gets beautiful. (21:27): yep. Absolutely. (21:29): To realize. So how is this related to the health of our thyroid? (21:37): Yeah. Good question. So you know, as you know, and as I'm sure most of your listers know, there's a lot of things that can contribute to thyroid issues, right? Like it could be a million different things. And actually the master class, I did a couple months ago last month, last month we kind of dove into a little bit of like all these possible things could be it. So basically it's like, it can be anything , you know, so for me connecting it to healthy gut, cuz that's really kind of, my focus is a healthy gut. It's balancing out, it's keeping a health first, it's keeping a healthy balance of gut bacteria, right? So it's, mm-hmm, it's preventing any dysbiosis, which can cause things to go wrong with all parts of the body, including your thought, right. Making sure the good and the bad bacteria are in balance, making sure that you do have a healthy gut with, with that balance of good, bad bacteria to keep out any potential like parasites or pathogens that can come in, which can also cause things like thyroid issues and it, and, and it's also about keeping, you know, a healthy endocrine system and keeping the adrenals working properly. (22:38): So all of those other organ systems that all work together with a thyroid, it's it all for me and in my world, it really all starts with a healthy gut. And so and so that's what I have, you know, my clients are working on just building this healthy gut biome microbiome that helps keep all of these other organ systems working in check. And then also it's also about, you know, limiting as much inflammation as possible inflammation is what causes a lot OFID issues as well. And so, you know, eating fruit foods that are high vitamins and minerals and antioxidants to, to find that those good anti-inflammatory foods to help limit any inflammation. And at the same time, it's not just about what you eat. It's about, you know, managing stress and sleep and getting proper exercise. It's all of those things that work together really to help promote this healthy environment in our body to prevent or to, to keep all our organ systems working in the right way. (23:37): Yeah. So you talked about the importance of a healthy gut microbiome. And I, this is one of the questions that I get asked a lot is, well, I take a probiotic, so shouldn't everything be okay. Right. What do you, what are your thoughts on that? And maybe where can, where can people get started if they're yeah. Struggling with the get (24:02): Yeah, no, it's a good question. I get that question all the time. I'm too. My mom actually just told me to say that, well, I'll take my probiotic. I'm like, OK, well , I mean, and it's kinda one of those things where, you know, you've probably heard the phrase like you can't you can't work off a bad diet, you know, like working out all the time, isn't gonna fix anything. If you're eating like crap all the time, it's kinda the same thing with your probiotic. Like yes, a probiotic is definitely beneficial, but you are dealing with like chronic dysbiosis where you have so much bag bacteria, that's outweighing the good, it's really not gonna do much good. And if you're not seeding the good bacteria that's in your gut, then it's really not gonna do any good. So really what, what you're looking at is you wanna have a good probiotic and a good prebiotic, whether that, whether that's in supplementation or whether it's from food, but we're looking at like Mo plant-based foods. (24:48): And there's a lot of, you know, specific ones you can look at, but really most plant-based foods are gonna be good food for your healthy bacteria. And that's, what's feeding the probiotics that you're taking. So if we're not helping those healthy get bacteria to flourish by feeding them, then the it's not doing any good. And then at the same time, if there's any sort of you know, pathogen or parasite, that's gonna throw off things too. And it's really gonna like basically cancel out, you know, a lot of the good bacteria that's supposed to be doing its job. And then another thing that can happen is, you know, if there's any sort of intestinal permeability, like leaky gut going on, then that's also gonna cause cuz that's just causing inflammation to go hay wire in your body and that's gonna mess up all the, the bacteria in your gut too. So the probiotic's not really gonna do much good. If you've got like this mucosal lining in your intestines, in your stomach, that's just like leaking out stuff all over the place. (25:44): Yeah. This is, I like this topic and I obviously at the time of recording, I'm still pregnant and one of the things. So I'm ending like my, my gestation period. I'm 10 days for my due date. Oh my gosh. I know. Just try to like squeeze it all in. Yes but one of the things I'm thinking about, and this might be TMI, I think a majority of our listeners are female and they've had kids. They get it. Yeah. They get this, they get it. mm-hmm but that first bowel movement, after having a baby can be scary, traumatizing, totally. You know, all of the things. And so as I've been preparing for pregnancy, I'm like, I am going to increase my fiber intake because whatever is happening in my digestive system, I want it to be easy (26:40): Yes, yes. (26:41): To, to pass (26:42): Absolutely. (26:43): After having the baby mm-hmm right. Being more natural minded, obviously I, if you need a stool softener. Okay. Fine. But like I would prefer to go more natural route. So fiber increasing that fiber and then also for me, making sure I have magnesium in my system to just keep things calm, (27:03): Keep moving. That's right. That's (27:04): Right. Yes. And so I, I just, I appreciate this conversation because gut health and what you're getting at is keeping things moving so that we don't have this buildup of pathogens and gut dysbiosis and leaky gut and things like that. And I find, especially with, we see a lot of constipation. Yep. (27:25): For sure. (27:26): So then things are just sitting there mm-hmm and we feel heavy and bloated and gassy and UN uncomfortable mm-hmm and focusing on the fiber and the nutrients that you're eating can make a big difference. Yeah. for someone who let's say is like brand new to eating fruits and veggies, you know, maybe we have some clients who I'm gonna say, are they CA they categorize themselves as picky. Right. I don't like a lot of fruit. I don't like a lot of veggies you know yeah. I for drive through or whatever it is. So for someone just getting started on maybe their journey and trying to increase that fiber content, where would be a good place for them to start. (28:15): Yeah. That's a good question. So when I'm working with clients who are similar to what you're saying, or they're, you're not, not so much used to eating plant-based meals, the easiest way I think to get started eating just more plant-based meals is starting with breakfast, breakfast, I think is the easiest meal of the day to make plant-based right. You you know, change up your regular yogurt for plant-based yogurt. There's some really good cashew and almond based yogurts out there. You you know, eat oatmeal with some hip seeds and, you know, make it a good protein packed fiber meal instead of eating, you know, eggs or sausage or, you know, whatever protein you eat for breakfast. So I think getting started with breakfast is the easiest way. And then, and then from there, it's just figuring out ways that are figuring out some good, like smart substitution. (29:05): So if you you're wanting to replace you know, maybe you have a few favorite dishes and I, I start with my clients do this too, like pick a few favorite dishes that you like to make very easy. And then let's talk about ways that we can make those plant based. So if it's, I'll take something easy, simple, for example, like if you're making like a POS like spaghetti with like a meat sauce okay. To my, when you make that let's use some seasoned lentils instead of the ground beef that you usually use. Right. So just learning ways, just to tweak things here and there. So again, you don't have to eat plant based 100% of the time, but just making those tweaks here and there to incorporate more plants into your meal is gonna change things. Just, you know, it's just a simple way to change those things up. (29:48): Yeah. And I, I have kids mm-hmm so I feel like as a mom, I have to be super creative yes. In how to get veggies into my kids' diet. And so I kinda, I personally play a game with myself. where, like, if I'm you, you brought up spaghetti or whatever, you know, like a pasta sauce. Mm-Hmm I will finally grade like zucchini. Yeah. Posh (30:15): Carrots, (30:16): Carrots. Yep. All of those types of things. And when I'm simmering sauce, I put those in there. So it kind of cooks 'em down a little bit. And then I remember one time I was sitting at the table and we were eating, I think it was like bake Edie or something like that. And I asked my, my kids and my husband to see how many veggies they could find in . That's (30:39): Awesome. And we (30:40): Had that said that that's great. (30:43): Oh my gosh. That's so cool. (30:45): Yeah. And it was, it was just fun. So yeah, I think that's the other thing that we can do with food is try to make it fun for yourself, make it fun for your kids, for sure. And be sneaky. And I find that, like you said, breakfast is a great place to start whether it be smoothies or, you know, a yogurt, like a coconut yogurt or a cashew yogurt, or mm-hmm, something like that. Because also, and maybe you can speak more into this. It's helping to stabilize those blood sugar levels right. For the day. So do you wanna share a little bit about that? (31:23): Yeah. Yeah, for sure. I mean, and that's, I, you know, I was mentioning fiber before and that's really like the beauty of fiber is that it does help stabilize blood sugar. It keeps your insulin levels stable. And and I agree, I think you know, I, I have a lot of clients come to me too that a lot of them either they're not used eating breakfast cuz they're like in a rush in the morning or they go, well, I'm not really hungry in the morning kind of thing, which, which I can appreciate, I could totally get it. But at the same time, I also think it's important too. Like you're saying, like to start the day off with something that's really gonna stabilize your blood sugar the rest of the day and to keep you from like binging at no, because you haven't eaten since six o'clock the night before. So yeah. I think it's a great way to keep your blood sugar stable and to kinda get your day started off where your blood sugar is at like a good level because you've had the fiber and you've had all those things that are helping stabilize it. (32:13): Yeah. Yeah. I find that for my clients who do that throughout the day, there's sugar cravings. Mm-Hmm are less (32:22): For (32:22): Sure. Right. Instead of waking up and I'm sure you experienced this as well, your clients, they wake up, they go straight to the coffee pot yep. Add in all the creamers and the sugars and everything to make it taste good. Yep. And then by, depending on the person by 10 o'clock by noon, they're crashing, (32:42): Crashing. Yep. (32:44): Instead of eating something and I, I don't know again, what your philosophy on coffee is. I tell my clients, if you wanna drink coffee fine, but we need to get a breakfast in you first (32:55): Mm-Hmm (32:55): because most people are, like I said, dumping in extra stuff to make the coffee taste good. (33:04): Yes. Right. (33:05): And then it's, it's causing that midday crash totally. A little bit later. (33:11): Yes. Yep. Agreed. (33:14): All right. Well, hope I have loved this convers. Is there anything you would like to share just in closing about the thyroid or the gut health or Pilates or anything to help people get started? (33:29): Yeah. I think, I mean, I think just like anything else, I think it's just starting small. So I think it's you know, if you're wanting to incorporate more plant-based meals into your day, then take my, and start with breakfast. And maybe you start with a plant-based breakfast a few days a week and you kinda increase from there, but it's really just small, just little small tweaks that really are gonna make a difference in incorporating more plants. And then like you're saying too, to your point, just be more creative with it. And so throwing in veggies and you know, your smoothies and your sauces and your bins, that's, that's what we do at our house too, for my kids, you know, spinach and, you know, put those in the muffins. They have no idea, but just getting creative and making little small tweaks to dishes you already like to making those plant based and not trying to tackle it in which is why I like to use the word plant focus rather than plant based because people don't do well with the restriction right. With really restrictive diets. And so I think plant focus kind of broadens it up a little bit. And so I'm not telling you, you need to go be a hundred percent plant base. It's just opening yourself up to eat to, you know, being more creative and implementing more plants into your food that you're already eating and just you know, doing it just little by little, just little tweaks in there. (34:42): Yeah, absolutely. I agree. 100%. I am one of those that doesn't do well. with restriction (34:51): Of none of us do none of us do. (34:54): If you tell me like, you can never eat this again, I will be like, I'm going to eat that watch (35:00): Watch. Exactly. (35:03): And I think for me, part of it was, I was 100% gluten free and dairy free for over five years. Mm-Hmm . And I finally got to the point where I was like, I just want some bread that actually tastes good. Right. You know? Right. (35:18): Yes. (35:18): And, you know, being able to incorporate that and, and now we do sour, no bread from time to time. But I, I just got to the point where I was like, no, like I'm done with this. This (35:32): Sucks. It sucks. Mm-Hmm (35:34): yes. So thank you. Hope. Where can people find you connect with you on social media and learn more about all the fun things that you do? (35:44): Yeah. So on Instagram, I'm at the hope Praza you can also find my Facebook group. That's really the best way to kind of get started in my world to get lots of cool free stuff. It's live wholesome and on Facebook and yeah, both of those are great channels to get started. (36:03): Amazing. We will make sure to link all of this up for you guys in the show notes. And we will, we'll see you guys on the next. (36:24): Wait, before you go, please subscribe. If you found value in today's episode, leave us a review and share on Instagram and please tag us. (36:35): We love yours, (36:38): Please.    

The Star Guided Entrepreneur
Secrets to Our Community's Success and How You Can Do It Too

The Star Guided Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 27:17


Our CareerClimb community has had phenomenal success, as expressed in:40%+ raises in compensationAccelerated promotionsSenior roles negotiatedVP roles landedIndustry and Function switches,and more.   How did these mid-career women in tech achieve all this in less than 18 months? I reveal the keys to their success in this episode.  A quick preview: It starts with the vision crafted during the Product VP Challenge.  The next Challenge is coming up in mid-May 2022 - register for free at www.productvpchallenge.com.

Make It Simple
What Matters More: Function or Fat Loss

Make It Simple

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 27:48


In today's culture we tend to put a great deal on the importance of fat loss. Andrea is challenging this thought process and offers ideas to shift our priorities and our mindset behind our goals in fitness. She explains the difference between fat loss and function with three real lifestyle examples with her personal trainers and clients. MOTHER'S DAY SALE on Diastasis Recti, Postpartum, and Pregnancy Guide Use code MOTHER for 20% off. Don't miss our on this once a year sale which ends Sunday.Click HERE for links to the guides. Follow Andrea on Instagram@deliciouslyfitnhealthy@dfh.training.picsTraining & Coachinghttps://www.deliciouslyfitnhealthy.com/linksVisit Andrea's Websitewww.deliciouslyfitnhealthy.comProduced by Light On Creative Productions 

Dharmapunx NYC
Healthy Ego Function and Sense of Self in a Narcissistic Landscape

Dharmapunx NYC

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 66:23


Switchbacks: The Never Told Stories of Entrepreneurs
Ryan Bricker, Art and Design as Form and Function, Season 2 - Episode 3

Switchbacks: The Never Told Stories of Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 37:52


Key segments with time2:00 The inventor of the Whiskey Wedge5:45 Arlington National Cemetery6:45 AC Slater/Mario Lopez reality show8:00 Shark Tank for inventors "Everyday Edison"10:00 How do you find what works?12:00 How do you turn art and design into something into business14:30 Describing the Good God Gallery16:50 How do you bounce back from a failed project?19:00 I don't like taking on risk20:50 The value of hitting foul balls22:00 I want to take care of my family, not put  a dent in the universe27:30 How to have a right sized approach in you life31:00 Favorite inventors35:00 Design is all about relationships Show NotesIG: @ryanebrickerwww.goodgodgallery.comwww.rebrickerstudio.com Books: The Four Hour WorkweekDyson biographyPlaces: Bonton Farms

The Professional Athlete Podcast with Ken Gunter
73. Jamie Gabel - Using Peptides to Increase Growth Hormone, Improve Performance & Enhance Cellular Function with the Co-Founder of Advitam

The Professional Athlete Podcast with Ken Gunter

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 49:13


Jamie is the Co-Founder of Advitam, an NYC based practice specializing in anti-aging and metabolic aesthetic treatments. Today an expert practitioner of Peptide Optimization and Hormone Replacement Therapies, Jamie in his previous life was an accomplished Athletic trainer and worked with a number of professional sports organizations including the New York Jets, the U.S. Tennis Association, and contracted directly with top professionals on the ATP Tour.    In today's episode Jamie explains how he transitioned from living his dream job as an athletic trainer to co-founding a practice in the exciting field of anti-aging and regenerative medicine. He gives us a rundown of hormone therapy and why you shouldn't take the “acceptable” ranges at face value. Jamie introduces Peptide Optimization Therapy by explaining what peptides are and how they work. Discusses the spectrum of conditions it treats and informs listeners how they can get started. Lastly, explains why peptides are one of the most exciting areas of medicinal research today across all fields of study.    Learn More about Jamie Gabel & Advitam: Advitam Website - https://www.myadvitam.com/   For Our Listeners: Hyperice 10% discount for our listeners - https://bit.ly/3IalDa1 Libsyn use promo code “KEN” for 2 months FREE - https://bit.ly/3tNkpxC    Follow The Professional Athlete Podcast with Ken Gunter: Instagram: @kengunter_tpa Website: https://www.kengunter.com/ YouTube: Ken Gunter https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRhgjkoSiJXAbS_MIasvvzQ/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kengunterpodcast Audio recorded with SquadCast: https://squadcast.fm/?ref=kengunter Audio Produced By: Justin Gunter Show Produced By: Ken Gunter, Justin Gunter Content Designer: Austin Suit Music: “Up and Down” by Patrick Sweany

The Bike Shed
336: Million Dollar Password

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 35:07


Chris came up with a mnemonic device: Fn-Delete – for when he really wants to delete something and is also thinking about password complexity requirements, which leads to an exciting discussion around security theater. Steph talks about the upcoming RailsConf and the not-in-person option for virtual attendees. She also gives a shoutout to the Ruby Weekly newsletter for being awesome. NIST Password Standards (https://specopssoft.com/blog/nist-password-standards/) 3 ActiveRecord Mistakes That Slow Down Rails Apps: Count, Where and Present (https://www.speedshop.co/2019/01/10/three-activerecord-mistakes.html) Difference between count, length and size in an association with ActiveRecord (https://bhserna.com/count-size-length-active-record.html) Ruby Weekly (https://rubyweekly.com/) Railsconf 2022 (https://railsconf.org/) Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of The Bike Shed! Transcript: STEPH: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Steph Viccari. CHRIS: And I'm Chris Toomey. STEPH: And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. So hey, Chris, happy Friday. You know, each time I do that, I can't resist the urge to say happy Friday, but then I realize people aren't listening on a Friday. So happy day to anyone that's listening. What's new in your world, friend? CHRIS: I'm going to be honest; you threw me for a loop there. [laughs] I think it was the most recent episode where we talked about my very specific...[laughs] it's a lovely Friday, that's true. There's sun and clouds. Those are true things. But yeah, what's new in my world? [laughs] I can do this. I can focus. I got this. Actually, I have one thing. So this is going to be, I'm going to say vaguely selfish, but I have this thing that I've been trying to commit into my brain for a long time, and I just can't get it to stick. So today, I came up with like a mnemonic device for it. And I'm going to share it on The Bike Shed because maybe it'll be useful for other people. And then hopefully, in quote, unquote, "teaching it," I will deeply learn it. So the thing that happens in my world is occasionally, I want to delete a URL from Chrome's autocomplete. To be more specific, because it's easier for people to run away with that idea, it's The Weather Channel. I do not like weather.com. I try to type weather often, and I just want Google to show me the little, very quick pop-up thing there. I don't want any ads. I don't want to deal with that. But somehow, often, weather.com ends up in my results. I somehow accidentally click on it. It just gets auto-populated, and then that's the first thing that happens whenever I type weather into the Omnibox in Chrome. And I get unhappy, and I deal with it for a while, then eventually I'm like, you know what? I'm deleting it. I'm getting it out of there. And then I try and remember whatever magical key combination it is that allows you to delete an entry from the drop-down list there. And I know it's a weird combination of like, Command-Shift-Alt-Delete, Backspace, something. And every single time, it's the same. I'm like, I know it's weird, but let me try this one. How about that one? How about that one? I feel like I try every possible combination. It's like when you try and plug in a USB drive, and you're like, well, it's this way. No, it's the other way. Well, there are only two options, and I've already tried two things. How can I not have gotten it yet? But I got it now. Okay, so on a Mac specifically, the key sequence is Shift-Function-Delete. So the way I'm going to remember this is Function is abbreviated on the keyboard as Fn. So that can be like I'm swearing, like, I'm very angry about this. And then Shift is the way to uppercase something like you're shouting. So I just really need to Fn-Delete this. So that's how I'm going to remember it. Now I've shared it with everyone else, and hopefully, some other folks can get utility out of that. But really, I hope that I remember it now that I've tried to boil it down to a memorable thing. STEPH: [laughs] It's definitely memorable. I'm now going to remember just that I need to Fn-Delete this. And I'm not going to remember what it all is tied to. [laughs] CHRIS: That is the power of a mnemonic device. Yeah. STEPH: Like, I know this is useful in some way, but I can't remember what it is. But yeah, that's wonderful. I love it. That's something that I haven't had to do in a long time, and I hadn't thought about. I need to do that more. Because you're right, especially changing projects or things like that, there are just some URLs that I don't need cached anymore; I don't want auto-completed. So yeah, okay. I just need to Fn-Delete it. I'll remember it. Here we go. I'm speaking this into the universe, so it'll be true. CHRIS: Just Fn-Delete it. STEPH: Your bit about the USB and always getting it wrong, you get it 50-50 [laughs] by getting it wrong, resonates so deeply with me and my capability with directions where I am just terrible whether I have to go right or left. My inner compass is going to get it wrong. And I've even tried to trick myself where I'm like, okay, I know I'm always wrong. So what if I do the opposite of what Stephanie would do? And it's still somehow wrong. [laughs] CHRIS: Somehow, your brain compensates and is like, oh, I know that we're going to do that. So let's...yeah, it's amazing the way these things happen. STEPH: Yep. I don't understand it. I've tried to trick the software, but I haven't figured out the right way. I should probably just learn and get better at directions. But here we are. Here we are. CHRIS: You just loosely referred to the software, but I think you're referring to the Steph software when you say that. STEPH: Yes. Oh yeah, Steph software totally. You got it. [laughs] CHRIS: Gotcha. Cool. Glad that I checked in on that because that's great. But shifting gears to something a little bit deeper in the technical space, this past week, we've been thinking about passwords within our organization at Sagewell. And we're trying to decide what we want to do. We had an initial card that came through and actually got most of the way to implemented to dial up our password strictness requirements. And as I saw that come through, I was like, oh, wait, actually, I would love to talk about this. And so we had the work that was coming through the PR that had been opened was a pretty traditional set of let's introduce some requirements on our passwords for complexity, so let's make it longer. We're going from; I think six was the default that Devise shipped with, so we're increasing that to, I think it was eight. And then let's say that it needs a number, and a special character, and an uppercase letter or something like that. I've recently read the NIST rules, so the National Institute of Standards and Technology, I think, is what they are. But they're the ones who define a set of rules around this or guidelines. But I think they are...I don't know if they are laws or what at this point. But they tell you, "This is what you should and shouldn't do." And I know that the password complexity stuff is on the don't do that list these days. So I was like, this is interesting, and then I wanted to follow through. Interestingly, right now, I've got the Trello boards up for The Bike Shed right now. But as a result, I can't look at the linked Trello card that is on the workboards because they're in different accounts. And Trello really has made my life more difficult than I wanted. But I'm going to pull this up elsewhere. So let's see. So NIST stuff, just to talk through that, we can include a link in the show notes to a nice summary. But what are the NIST password requirements? Eight character minimum, that's great. Change passwords only if there is evidence of a compromise. Screen new passwords against a list of known compromised passwords. That's a really interesting one. Skip password hints, limit the number of failed authentication attempts. These all sound great to me. The maximum password length should be at least 64 characters, so don't constrain how much someone can put in. If they want to have a very long password, let them go for it. Don't have any sort of required rotation. Allow copy and pasting or functionality that allows for password managers. And allow the use of all printable ASCII characters as well as all Unicode characters, including emojis. And that one really caught my attention. I was like, that sounds fun. I wish I could look at all the passwords in our database. I obviously can't because they're salted and encrypted, and hashed, and all those sorts of things where I'm like, I wonder if anybody's using emojis. I'm pretty sure we would just support it. But I'm kind of intrigued. STEPH: You said something in that list that caught my attention, and I just want to see if I heard it correctly. So you said only offer change password if compromised? Does that mean I can't just change my password if I want to? CHRIS: Sorry. Yeah, I think the phrasing here might be a little bit odd. So it's essentially a different way to phrase this requirement is don't require rotation of passwords every six or whatever months. Forgotten password that's still a reasonable thing to have in your application, probably a necessity in most applications. But don't auto-rotate passwords, so don't say, "Your password has expired after six months." STEPH: Got it. Okay, cool. That makes sense. Then the emojis, oh no, it's like, I mean, I use a password manager now, and thanks to several years ago where he shamed me into using one. Thank you. That was great. [laughs] CHRIS: I hope it was friendly shame, but yeah. STEPH: Yes, it was friendly; kind shame if that sounds like a weird sentence to say. But yes, it was a very positive change. And I can't go back now that I have a password manager in my life. Because yeah, now I'm thinking like, if I had emojis, I'd be like, oh great, now I have to think about how I was feeling at the time that then I introduced a new password. Was I happy? Was I angry? Is it a poop emoji? Is unicorn? What is it? [laughs] So that feels complicated and novel. You also mentioned on that list that going for more complexity in terms of you have to have uppercase; you have to have a particular symbol, things like that are not on the recommended list. And I didn't know that. I'm so accustomed to that being requirements for passwords and the idea of how we create something that is secure and less easy to guess or to essentially hack. So I'm curious about that one if you know any more details about it as to why that's not the standard anymore. CHRIS: Yeah, I think I have some ideas around it. My understanding is mostly that introducing the password complexity requirements while intended to prevent people from using very common things like names or their user name or things like that, it's like, no, no, no, you can't because we've now constrained the system in that way. It tends in practice to lead to people having a variety of passwords that they forget all the time, and then they're using the forgotten password flow more often. And it basically, for human and behavior reasons, increases the threat surface area because it means that they're not able to use...say someone has a password scheme in mind where it's like, well, my passwords are, you know, it's this common base, and then some number of things specific to the site. It's like, oh no, no, we require three special characters, so it's like they can't do their thing. And now they have to write it down on a Post-it Note because they're not going to remember it otherwise. Or there are a variety of ways in which those complexity requirements lead to behavior that's actually less useful. STEPH: Okay, so it's the Post-it Note threat vector that we have to be worried about. [laughs] CHRIS: Which is a very real threat factor. STEPH: I believe it. [laughs] Yes, I know people that keep lists of passwords on paper near their desk. [laughs] This is a thing. CHRIS: Yep, yep, yep. The other thing that's interesting is, as you think about it, password complexity requirements technically reduce the overall combinatoric space that the passwords can exist in. Because imagine that you're a password hacker, and you're like, I have no idea what this password is. All I have is an encrypted hashed salted value, and I'm trying to crack it. And so you know the algorithm, you know how many passes, you know potentially the salt because often that is available. I think it has to be available now that I think about that out loud. But so you've got all these pieces, and you're like, I don't know, now it's time to guess. So what's a good guess of a password? And so if you know the minimum number of characters is eight and, the maximum is 12 because that actually happens on a lot of systems, that's actually not a huge combinatoric space. And then if you say, oh, and it has to have a number, and it has to have an uppercase letter, and it has to have a special character, you're just reducing the number of possible options in that space. And so, although this is more like a mathematical thing, but in my mind, I'm like, yeah, wait, that actually makes things less secure because now there are fewer passwords to check because they don't meet the complexity requirements. So you don't even have to try them if you're trying to brute-force crack a password. STEPH: Yeah, you make a really good point that I hadn't really thought about because I've definitely seen those sites that, yeah, constrain you in terms of like, has to have a minimum, has to have a maximum, and I hadn't really considered the fact that they are constraining it and then reducing the values that it could be. I am curious, though, because then it doesn't feel right to have no limit in terms of, like, you don't want people then just spamming your sign up and then putting something awful in there that has a ridiculous length. So do you have any thoughts on that and providing some sort of length requirement or length maximum? CHRIS: Yeah, I think the idea is don't prevent someone who wants to put in a long passphrase, like, let them do that. But there is, the NIST guidelines specifically say 64 characters. Devise out of the box is 128, I believe. I don't think we tweaked that, and that's what we're at right now. So you can write an old-style tweet and that can be your password if that's what you want to do. But there is an upper limit to that. So there is a reasonable upper limit, but it should be very permissive to anyone who's like, I want to crank it up. STEPH: Cool. Cool. Yeah, I just wanted to validate that; yeah, having an upper bound is still important. CHRIS: Yeah, definitely. Important...it's more for implementation and our database having a reasonable size and those sorts of things. Although at the end of the day, the thing that we saw is the encrypted password. So I don't know if bcrypt would run slower on a giant body of text versus a couple of characters; that might be the impact. So it would be speed as opposed to storage space because you always end up with a fixed-length hash of the same length, as far as I understand it. But yeah, it's interesting little trade-offs like that where the complexity requirements do a good job of forcing people to not use very obvious things like password. Password does not fit nearly any complexity requirements. But we're going to try and deal with that in a different way. We don't want to try and prevent you from using password by saying you must use an uppercase letter and a special character and things that make real passwords harder as well. But it is an interesting trade-off because, technically, you're making the crackability easier. So it gets into the human and the technical and the interplay between them. Thinking about it somewhat differently as well, there's all this stuff about you should salt your passwords, then you should hash them. You should run them through a good password hashing algorithm. So we're using bcrypt right now because I believe that's the default that Devise ships with. I've heard good things about Argon2; I think is the name of the new cool kid on the block in terms of password hashing. That whole world is very interesting to me, but at the end of the day, we can just go with Devise's defaults, and I'll feel pretty good about that and have a reasonable cost factor. Those all seem like smart things. But then, as we start to think about the complexity requirements and especially as we start to interact with an audience like Sagewell's demographics where we're working with seniors who are perhaps less tech native, less familiar, we want to reduce the complexity there in terms of them thinking of and remembering their passwords. And so, rather than having those complexity requirements, which I think can do a good job but still make stuff harder, and how do you communicate the failure modes, et cetera, et cetera, we're switching it. And the things that we're introducing are we have increased the minimum length, so we're up to eight characters now, which is NIST's low-end recommended, so it's between 8 and 128 characters. We are capturing anytime a I forgot password reset attempt happens and the outcome of it. So we're storing those now in the database, and we're showing them to the admins. So our admin team can see if password reset attempts have happened and if they were successful. That feels like good information to keep around. Technically, we could get it from the logs, but that's deeply hidden away and only really accessible to the developers. So we're now surfacing that information because it feels like a particularly pertinent thing for us. We've introduced Rack::Attack. So we're throttling those attempts, and if someone tries to just brute force through that credential stuffing, as the terminology goes, we will lock them out so either based on IP address or the account that they're trying to log into. We also have Devise's lockable module enabled. So if someone tries to log in a bunch of times and fails, their account will go into a locked state, and then an admin can unlock it. But it gives us a little more control there. So a bunch of those are already in place. The new one, this is the one that I'm most excited about, is we're going to introduce Have I Been Pwned? And so, they have an API. We can hit it. It's a really interesting model as to how do we ask if a password has been compromised without giving them the password? And it turns out there's this fun sort of cryptographic handshake thing that happens. K-anonymity is apparently the mechanism or the underpinning technology or idea. Anyway, it's super cool; I'm excited to build it. It's going to be fun. But the idea there is rather than saying, "Don't use a password that might not be secure," it's, "Hey, we actually definitively know that your password has been cracked and is available in plaintext on the internet, so we're not going to let you use that one." STEPH: And that's part of the signup flow as to where you would catch that? CHRIS: So we're going to introduce on both signup and sign-in because a password can be compromised after a user signs up for our system. So we want to have it at any point. Obviously, we do not keep their plaintext password, so we can't do this retroactively. We can only do it at the point in time that they are either signing up or signing in because that's when we do have access to the password. We otherwise throw it away and keep only the hashed value. But we'll probably introduce it at both points. And the interesting thing is communicating this failure mode is really tricky. Like, "Hey, your password is cracked, not like here, not on our site, no, we're fine. Well, you should probably change your password. So here's what it means, there's actually this database that's called Have I Been Pwned? Don't worry; it's good, though. It's P-W-N-E-D. But that's fine." That's too many words to put on a page. I can't even say it here in a podcast. And so what we're likely to do initially is instrument it such that our admin team will get a notification and can see that a user's password has been compromised. At that point, we will reach out to them and then, using the magic of human conversation, try and actually communicate that and help them understand the ramifications, what they should do, et cetera. Longer-term, we may find a way to build up an FAQ page that describes it and then say, "Feel free to reach out if you have questions." But we want to start with the higher touch approach, so that's where we're at. STEPH: I love it. I love that you dove into how to explain this to people as well because I was just thinking, like, this is complicated, and you're going to freak people out in panic. But you want them to take action but not panic. Well, I don't know, maybe they should panic a little bit. [laughs] CHRIS: They should panic just the right amount. STEPH: Right.[laughs] So I like the starting with the more manual process of reaching out to people because then you can find out more, like, how did people react to this? What kind of questions did they ask? And then collect that data and then turn that into an FAQ page. Just, well done. CHRIS: We haven't quite done it yet. But I am very happy with the collection of ideas that we've come to here. We have a security firm that we're working with as well. And so I had my weekly meeting with them, and I was like, "Oh yeah, we also thought about passwords a bunch, and here's what we came up with." And I was very happy that they were like, "Yeah, that sounds like a good set." I was like, "Cool. All right, I feel good." I'm very happy that we're getting to do this. And there's an interesting sort of interplay between security theater and real security. And security theater, just to explain the phrase if anyone's unfamiliar with it, is things that look like security, so, you know, big green lock up in the top-left corner of the URL bar. That actually doesn't mean anything historically or now. But it really looks like it's very secure, right? Or password complexity requirements make you think, oh, this must be a very secure site. But for reasons, that actually doesn't necessarily prove that at all. And so we tried to find the balance of what are the things that obviously demonstrate our considerations around security to the user? At the end of the day, what are the things that actually will help protect our users? That's what I really care about. But occasionally, you got to play the security theater game. Every other financial institution on the internet kind of looks and feels a certain way in how they deal with passwords. And so will a user look at our seemingly laxer requirements or laxer approach to passwords and judge us for that and consider us less secure despite the fact that behind the scenes look at all the fun stuff we're doing for you? But it's an interesting question and interesting trade-off that we're going to have to spend time with. We may end up with the complexity requirements despite the fact that I would really rather we didn't. But it may be the sort of thing that there is not a good way to communicate the thought and decision-making process that led us to where we're at and the other things that we're doing. And so we're like, fine, we just got to put them in and try and do a great job and make that as usable of an experience as possible because usability is, I think, one of the things that suffers there. You didn't do one of the things on the list, or like, it's green for each of the ones that you did, but it's red for the one that you didn't. And your password and your password confirmation don't match, and you can't paste...it's very easy to make this wildly complex for users. STEPH: Security theater is a phrase that I don't think I've used, but the way you're describing it, I really like. And I have a solution for you: underneath the password where you have "We don't partake in security theater, and we don't have all the other fancy requirements that you may have seen floating around the internet and here's why," and then just drop a link to the episode. And, you know, people can come here and listen. It'll totally be great. It won't annoy anyone at all. [laughs] CHRIS: And it'll start, and they'll hear me yelling about Fn-Delete that weather.com URL. [laughter] STEPH: Okay, maybe fast forward then to the part about -- CHRIS: Drop them to the timestamp. That makes sense. Yep. Yep. STEPH: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. [laughs] CHRIS: I like it. I think that's what we should do, yeah. Most features on the app should have a link to a Bike Shed episode. That feels true. STEPH: Excellent Easter egg. I'm into it. But yeah, I like all the thoughtfulness that y'all have put into this because I haven't had to think about passwords in this level of detail. And then also, yeah, switching over to when things start to change and start to move away, you're right; there's still that we need to help people then become comfortable with this new way and let them know that this is just as secure if not more secure. But then there's already been that standard that has been set for your expectations, and then how do you help people along that path? So yeah, seems like y'all have a lot of really great thoughtfulness going into it. CHRIS: Well, thank you. Yeah, it's frankly been a lot of fun. I really like thinking in this space. It's a fun sort of almost hobby that happens to align very well with my profession sort of thing. Actually, oh, I have one other idea that we're not going to do, but this is something that I've had in the back of my mind for a long time. So when we use bcrypt or Devise uses bcrypt under the hood, one of the things that it configures is the cost factor, which I believe is just the number of times that the password plus the salts and whatnot is run through the bcrypt algorithm. The idea there is you want it to be computationally difficult, and so by doing it multiple times, you increase that difficulty. But what I'd love is instead of thinking of it in terms of an arbitrary cost factor which I think is 12, like, I don't know what 12 means. I want to know it, in terms of dollars, how much would it cost to, like dollars and cents, to crack a password. Because, in theory, you can distribute this across any number of EC2 instances that you spin up. The idea of cracking a password that's a very map-reducible type problem. So let's assume that you can infinitely scale up compute on-demand; how much would it cost in dollars to break this password? And I feel like there's an answer. Like, I want that number to be like a million dollars. But as EC2 costs go down over time, I want to hold that line. I want to be like, a million dollars is the line that we want to have. And so, as EC2 prices go down, we need to increase our bcrypt cost factor over time to adjust for that and maintain the million dollar per password cracking sort of high bar. That's the dream. Swapping out the cost factor is actually really difficult. I've looked into it, and you have to like double encrypt and do weird stuff. So for a bunch of reasons, I haven't done this, but I just like that idea. Let's pin this to $1 value. And then, from there, decisions naturally flow out of it. But it's so much more of a real thing. A million dollars, I know what that means; 12, I don't know what 12 means. STEPH: A million-dollar password, I like it. I feel like -- CHRIS: We named the episode. STEPH: I was going to say that's a perfect title, A Million-Dollar Password. [laughs] CHRIS: A Million-Dollar Password. But with that wonderful episode naming cap there, I think I'm done rambling about passwords. What's up in your world, Steph? STEPH: One of the things that I've been chatting with folks lately is RailsConf is coming up; it's May 17 through the 19th. And it's been sort of like that casual conversation of like, "Hey, are you going? Are you going? Who's going? It's going to be great." And as people have asked like, "Are you going?" And I'm always like, "No, I'm not going." But then I popped on to the RailsConf website today because I was just curious. I wanted to see the schedule and the talks that are being given. And I keep forgetting that there's the in-person version, but there's also the home edition. And I was like, oh, I could go, I could do this. [laughs] And I just forget that that is something that is just more common now for conferences where you can attend them virtually, and that is just really neat. So I started looking a little more closely at the talks. And I'm really excited because we have a number of thoughtboters that are giving a talk at RailsConf this year. So there's a talk being given by Fernando Perales that's called Open the Gate a Little: Strategies to Protect and Share Data. There's also a talk being given by Joël Quenneville: Your Test Suite is Making Too Many Database Calls. I'm very excited; just that one is near and dear to my heart, given the current client experiences that I'm having. And then there's another one from someone who just joined thoughtbot, Christopher "Aji" Slater, Your TDD Treasure Map. So we'll be sure to include a link to those for anyone that's curious. But it's a stellar lineup. I mean, I'm always impressed with RailsConf talks. But this one, in particular, has me very excited. Do you have any plans for RailsConf? Do you typically wait for them to come out later and then watch them, or what's your MO? CHRIS: Historically, I've tended to watch the conference recordings after the fact. I went one year. I actually met Christopher "Aji" Slater at that very RailsConf that I went to, and I believe Joël Quenneville was speaking at that one. So lots of everything old is new again. But yeah, I think I'll probably catch it after the fact in this case. I'd love to go back in person at some point because I really do like the in-person thing. I'm thrilled that there is the remote option as well. But for me personally, the hallway track and hanging out and meeting folks is a very exciting part. So that's probably the mode that I would go with in the future. But I think, for now, I'm probably just going to watch some talks as they come out. STEPH: Yeah, that's typically what I've done in the past, too, is I kind of wait for things to come out, and then I go through and make a list of the ones that I want to watch, and then, you know, I can make popcorn at home. It's delightful. I can just get cozy and have an evening of RailsConf talks. That's what normal people do on Friday nights, right? That's totally normal. [laughs] CHRIS: I mean, yeah, maybe not the popcorn part. STEPH: No popcorn? CHRIS: But not that I'm opposed to popcorn just —- STEPH: Brussels sprouts? What do you need? [laughs] CHRIS: Yeah, Brussels sprouts, that's what it is. Just sitting there eating handfuls of Brussels sprouts watching Ruby conference talks. STEPH: [laughs] CHRIS: I do love Brussels sprouts, just to throw it out there. I don't want it to be out in the ether that I don't like them. I got an air fryer, and so I can air fry Brussels sprouts. And they're delicious. I mean, I like them regardless. But that is a really fantastic way to cook them at home. So I'm a big fan. STEPH: All right, I'm moving you into the category of fancy friends, fancy friends with an air fryer. CHRIS: I wasn't already in your category of fancy friends? STEPH: [laughs] I didn't think you'd take it that way. I'm sorry to break it to you. [laughter] CHRIS: I'm actually a little hurt that I'm now in the category of fancy friends. It makes a lot of sense that I wasn't there before. So I'll just deal with...yeah, it's fine. I'm fine. STEPH: It's a weird rubric that I'm running over here. Pivoting away quickly, so I don't have to explain the categorization for fancy friends, I saw something in the Ruby Weekly Newsletter that had just come out. And it's one of those that I see surface every so often, and I feel like it's a nice reminder because I know it's something that even I tend to forget. And so I thought it'd be fun just to resurface it here. And then, we can also provide a link to the wonderful blog post that's written by Benito Serna. And it's the difference between count, length, and size and an association with ActiveRecord. So for folks that would love a refresher, so count, that's a method that's always going to perform a SQL count query. So even if the collection has already been loaded, then calling count is always going to execute a database query. So this is the one that's just like, watch out, avoid it. You're always going to hit your database when you use this one. And then next is length. And so, length loads the whole collection into memory and then returns that length to the number of items in that collection. If the collection has been loaded, then it's not going to issue a database call. And then it's just still going to use...it's going to delegate to that Ruby length method and let you know how many records are in that collection. So that one is a little bit better because then that way, if it's already loaded, at least you're not going to have a database call. And then next is the size method, which is just the one that's more highly recommended that you use because this one does have a nice safety net that is built-in because first, it's going to check if we need to perform a database call, if the records have been loaded or not. So if the collection has not been loaded, so we haven't executed a database query and stored the result, then size is going to perform a database query. Specifically, it's using that SQL count under the hood. And if the collection has been loaded, then a database call is not issued, and then going to use the Ruby length method to then return the number of records. So it just helps you prevent unnecessary database calls. And it's the reason that that one is recommended over using count, which is going to always issue a call. And then also to avoid length where you can because it's going to load the whole collection into memory, and we want to avoid that. So it was a nice refresher. I'll be sure to include a link in the show notes. But yeah, I find that I myself often forget about the difference in count and size. And so if I'm just in the console and I just want to know something, that I still reach for count. It is still a default for mine. But then, if I'm writing production code, then I will be more considered as to which one I'm using. CHRIS: I feel like this is one of those that I've struggled to lock into my head, but as you're describing it right now, I think I've got, again, another mnemonic device that we can lock on to. So I know that SQL uses the keyword count, so count that's SQL definitely. Length I know that because I use that on other stuff. And so it's size that is different and therefore special. That all seems good. Cool, locking that in my brain along with Fn-Delete. I have two things that are now firmly locked in. So you were just mentioning being in the console and working with this. And one of the things that I've noticed a lot with folks that are newer to ActiveRecord and the idea of relations and the fact that they're lazy, is that that concept is very hard to grasp when working in a console because at the console, they don't seem lazy. The minute you type out user.where some clause, and the minute you type that and hit enter in the console, Ruby is going to do its normal thing, which is like, okay, cool, I want to...I forget what it is that IRB or any of the REPLs are going to do, but it's either inspect or to_s or something like that. But it's looking for a representation that it can display in the console. And ActiveRecord relations will typically say like, "Oh, cool, you need the records now because you want to show it like an array because that's what inspect is doing under the hood." So at the console, it looks like ActiveRecord is eager and will evaluate the query the minute you type it, but that's not true. And this is a critical thing that if you can think about it in that way and the fact that ActiveRecord relations are lazy and then take advantage of it, you can chain queries, you can build them up, you can break that apart. You can compose them together. There's really magical stuff that falls out of that. But it's interesting because sort of like a Heisenberg where the minute you go to look at it in the REPL, it's like, oh, it is not lazy; it is eager. It evaluates it the minute I type the query. But that's not true; that's actually the REPL tricking you. I will often just throw a semicolon at the end of it because I'm like, I don't want to see all that noise. Just give me the relation. I want the relation, not the results of executing that query. So if you tack a semicolon at the end of the line, that tells Ruby not to print the thing, and then you're good to go from there. STEPH: That's a great pro-tip. Yeah, I've forgotten about the semicolon. And I haven't been using that in my workflow as much. So I'm so glad you mentioned that. Yeah, I'm sure that's part of the thing that's added to my confusion around this, too, or something that has just taken me a while to lock it in as to which approach I want to use for when I'm querying data or for when I need to get a particular count, or length, or size. And by using all three, I'm just confusing myself more. So I should really just stick to using size. There's also a fabulous article by Nate Berkopec that's titled Three ActiveRecord Mistakes That Slow Down Rails Apps. And he does a fabulous job of also talking about the differences of when to use size and then some of the benefits of when you might use count. The short version is that you can use count if you truly don't care about using any of those records. Like, you're not going to do anything with them. You don't need to load them, like; you truly just want to get a count. Then sure, because then you're issuing a database query, but then you're not going to then, in a view, very soon issue another database query to collect those records again. So he has some really great examples, and I'll be sure to include a link to his article as well. Speaking of Ruby tidbits and kind of how this particular article about count, length, and size came across my view earlier today, Ruby Weekly is a wonderful newsletter. And I feel like I don't know if I've given them a shout-out. They do a wonderful job. So if you haven't yet checked out Ruby Weekly, I highly recommend it. There are just always really great, interesting articles either about stuff that's a little bit more like cutting edge or things that are being released with newer versions, or they might be just really helpful tips around something that someone learned, like the difference between count, length, and size, and I really enjoy it. So I'll also be sure to include a link in the show notes for anyone that wants to check that out. They also do something that I really appreciate where when you go to their website, you have the option to subscribe, but I am terrible about subscribing to stuff. So you can still click and check out the latest issue, which I really appreciate because then, that way, I don't feel obligated to subscribe, but I can still see the content. CHRIS: Oh yeah. Ruby Weekly is fantastic. In fact, I think Peter Cooper is the person behind it, or Cooperpress as the company goes. And there is a whole slew of newsletters that they produce. So there's JavaScript Weekly, there's Ruby Weekly, there's Node Weekly, Golang Weekly, React Status, Postgres Weekly. There's a whole bunch of them. They're all equally fantastic, the same level of curation and intentional content and all those wonderful things. So I'm a big fan. I'm subscribed to a handful of them. And just because I can't go an episode without mentioning inbox zero, if you are the sort of person that likes to defend the pristine nature of your email inbox, I highly recommend Feedbin and their ability to set up a special email address that you can use to then turn it into an RSS feed because that's magical. Actually, these ones might already have an RSS feed under the hood. But yeah, RSS is still alive. It's still out there. I love it. It's great. And that ends my thoughts on that matter. STEPH: I have what I feel is a developer confession. I don't think I really appreciate RSS feeds. I know they're out there in the ether, and people love them. And I just have no emotion, no opinion attached to them. So one day, I think I need to enjoy the enrichment that is RSS feeds, or maybe I'll hate it. Who knows? I'm reserving judgment. Either way, I don't think I will. [laughs] But I don't want to box future Stephanie in. CHRIS: Gotta maintain that freedom. STEPH: On that note, shall we wrap up? CHRIS: Let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. STEPH: This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHRIS: If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review on iTunes, as it really helps other folks find the show. STEPH: If you have any feedback for this or any of our other episodes, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me on Twitter @SViccari. CHRIS: And I'm @christoomey. STEPH: Or you can reach us at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. CHRIS: Thanks so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. ALL: Byeeeeee!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.