Podcasts about Malaria

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Mosquito-borne infectious disease

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Best podcasts about Malaria

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Latest podcast episodes about Malaria

Take as Directed
Dr. Richard Lessells: Omicron Seen Up Close in South Africa

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 32:53


Dr. Richard Lessells is among the exceptional South African experts on the front lines of discovering and investigating Omicron in South Africa. Alarm bells went off within the scientific community, as it became clear after just a few days that “an extraordinary number of mutations” are clustered in the key regions in the genome for immune protection and transmissibility. It was a “gut feeling. ” Omicron is highly transmissible, spreading very efficiently in a population with high levels of immunity gained from previous infection and in some cases from vaccination. How long to know just how dangerous Omicron is? It's “too early to tell.” Lab work is underway to understand whether the virus affects T cells which are central to immune protection against severe disease. Why do we see such an unusual variant in South Africa? One theory, which Omicron may shed light on, is that the SARS-CoV-2 virus finds hosts who are very immune-compromised, persons living with HIV but not on anti-viral therapy. These individuals have difficulty clearing the virus, which permits it to replicate constantly over a very long period. Is this moment a pivot in the pandemic? That depends on whether Omicron significantly sets back vaccine protection, which would be a “step change.” Will this moment shock the world into more concerted global action, superseding the pattern of “vaccine apartheid”?  “I remain skeptical.” In the meantime, we have to fight against Omicron being fitted to a politicized narrative: by anti-vaccine groups, to tell the story that vaccines do not work. By others, to argue that there is nothing to worry about, that the virus is becoming less pathogenic, based on anecdotal evidence.  Dr. Richard Lessells is an infectious disease physician at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, in Durban, South Africa. He is a member of the Network for Genomic Surveillance in South Africa, and a researcher at CAPRISA, the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa.

Most memorable journeys
Erika Wichro - Medical Doctor and fearless leader

Most memorable journeys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:36


Dr. Erika Wichro is an Austrian Medical Doctor, humanitarian and expert in international crisis and outbreak-management, who was awarded "International Public HealthExpert 2020" and "Empowered Woman 2021" by the International Association of Top Professionals (IAOTP). Recently the IAOTP also selected her as one of the Top 50 fearless Leaders. Dr. Wichro's inter- and cross-disciplinary education and trainings led her to over 25 years of national and international clinical, medical, and public health work experience in challenging health crisis missions like Ebola, Polio, Influenza, Measles, Malaria, and more for WHO, European Commission, CDC, and others in countries such as Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkey for Syria, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Zambia, the Pacific region and Austria. She continues to contribute to conferences and online trainings related to crisis management - with the latest on COVID-19 & contact tracing hosted by the Geneva Center for Security Policy. For the last 18 months Dr. Wichro served and technically supported as independent advisor and senior expert countries worldwide including Austria in the COVID-19 management. This encompassed - in order to ensure evidence-based strategic decision-making - the establishment of a data competency center, which thoroughly collects, analyses and interprets data relevant to the COVID-19 development, operational oversight and strategic decision-making, the review and update of country COVID-19 guidelines, and more. Her additional capabilities span across several sectors including management, economics, research, bioethics, international law, training, and more. She served in various capacities worldwide and is part of the trained expert pool of the European Union Civil Protection mechanism. Dr. Wichro is a trainer in the "Course of Negotiation & Decision-Making" and "High-Level Coordination". Dr. Wichro is a board member and peer reviewer in several journals. She is passionate about linking academics, research, policy-making, management and field operations to strengthening communities` and women's capabilities and resilience. Support this podcast

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 76 - Eating Disorders

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 22:24


Episode 76: Eating Disorders. The malaria vaccine is announced by Dr Parker, eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia are briefly discussed by Sophia, Jeffrey and Dr Arreaza. Introduction: Introducing the malaria vaccine (RTS,S)Written by Hector Arreaza, MD; read by Tana Parker, MD.  Today is November 26, 2021.Malaria is a devastating disease that continues to kill thousands of people every year around the world. Since the year 2000, there have been 1.5 billion cases of malaria and 7.6 million deaths. In 2019, there were 229 million new cases, and 409,000 deaths, mostly children under 5 years of age.Effective vaccines for many protozoal diseases are available for animals (for example, the vaccine against toxoplasmosis in sheep, babesiosis in cows, and more.) However, vaccines for protozoal disease in humans had not been widely available … until now. The RTS,S is a vaccine against malaria approved by the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 for babies at risk, and it was rolled out in pilot projects in Malawi, Ghana and Kenya in 2019.  In October 2021, the World Health Organization announced the recommendation of this anti-malaria vaccine. The trade name of this vaccine is Mosquirix®. The vaccination is recommended for children in sub-Saharan Africa and other regions with moderate to high transmission of Plasmodium falciparum, which is considered the deadliest parasite in humans.  The approved vaccine has shown low to moderate efficacy, preventing about 30% of severe malaria after 4 doses in children younger than five years old. Implementation of vaccination is not free from challenges, and it should be executed not as the solution for the disease, but as part of the solution, along with other efforts such as mosquito control, effective health care, and more.RTS,S is an add-on to continue the fight against malaria worldwide. Hopefully we can lighten the heavy burden of malaria for more than 87 countries that suffer the severe consequences of poor control of this devastating disease. This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. ___________________________Eating Disorders. Written by Sophia Dhillon, MS3, Jeffrey Nguyen, MS3. Discussion with Hector Arreaza, MD.  This is not intended to be a comprehensive lecture on eating disorders. This episode is intended to give you basic information, hoping to motivate you keep learning about it. Let's start talking about eating disorders today, specifically anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. What is an eating disorder? An eating disorder is a disturbance of eating that interferes with health. As a reminder, health is “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.” So, an eating disorder, in a wide context, is any eating pattern that is out of what is considered “normal”, and that variation in feeding causes health problems. But in general, when we talk about eating disorders in medicine, we refer to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, but it includes also avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, binge eating disorder, night eating disorder, pica, and rumination disorder.  ANOREXIAIn general, anorexia is characterized by immoderate food restriction, inappropriate eating habits or rituals, obsession with having a thin figure or an irrational fear of weight gain as well as distorted body self-perception. There are 2 main subtypes of anorexia: restricting type vs binge-eating/purging type. Tell us the difference between anorexia restrictive type and binge eating-purging type.Anorexia, restrictive type is when weight loss is achieved by diet, fasting and/or excessive exercise, meanwhile the binge-eating/purging type entails eating binges followed by self-induced vomiting and/or using laxatives, enemas or diuretics. These patients will have intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat. They will have a distorted perception of body weight and shape or denial of the medical seriousness of one's low body weight.Anorexia nervosa is different than avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder. In anorexia, you have an altered perception of your body (“I'm fat”), but in avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, your perception of your body weight and shape is not abnormal. “I'm skinny, and I'm OK with that.” This is new information for me. I thought anorexia was present always when a patient refused to eat, whether you liked your body or not.Why do people develop eating disorders? There are so many reasons why people develop eating disorders. First, it can be psychological due to low self-esteem, feelings of inadequacy or failure, feeling of being out of control, response to change (i. e. puberty) or response to stress. Second, it can be due to interpersonal issues like having trouble with family and personal relationships, difficult expressing emotions or feelings, or even history of being teased based on size or weight. Lastly, it is the social and cultural norms that we grow up in. There are cultural pressures that glorify thinness and place value on obtaining the perfect body, narrow definitions of beauty that include women and men of specific body weights and shapes. Sometimes there is no reason. Some people just get obsessed with their weight and perceive themselves as “fat”. Effect of anorexia on different parts of the bodySince these patients are scared of gaining weight, how does it affect the entire body?Anorexia can affect multiple systems in our body. Just to name a few symptoms that it can manifest as: amenorrhea, infertility, constipation, dizziness, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, dry skin and even hair loss. Starvation induces protein and fat catabolism that leads to loss of cellular volume and atrophy of the heart, brain, liver, intestines, kidneys, and muscles. Cardiac: It can decrease cardiac mass, decrease cardiac chamber volumes, cause myocardial fibrosis and pericardial effusion. These manifestations are reversible if the patient gains weight. Functionally, it can cause bradycardia due to increased parasympathetic activity, hypotension, decreased heart rate variability and QT prolongation on ECG. Lungs: shortness of breath due to weakened and wasting of the respiratory muscles, pneumothorax and aspiration pneumonia. GI system: it leads to gastroparesis with bloating, constipation, severe pancreatitis and mild transaminitis. Hematologic: anemia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Skin manifestations include dry/scaly skin, hair loss, acne, hyperpigmentation and acrocyanosis. You can also find lanugo, which is a very thin, light colored hair on the face and body. It is thought that the lanugo is an adaptation from the body to keep it warm. Lanugo is common in patients with anorexia nervosa or other causes of malnourishment. That's why wearing coats in warm weather can be a silent sign of anorexia. Other subtle signs include social withdrawal, fidgeting (to burn calories), and always “eating” in private.  It is important to remember that all these manifestation that Jeffrey mentioned are not present with intermittent fasting because intermittent fasting is an intermittent restriction of food, the nutritional needs are met during the “feasting” periods after “fasting”. Some may argue that intermittent fasting may promote eating disorders, but I believe intermittent fasting is just an effective treatment for obesity.Treatment plan for anorexiaThere are several treatment options for these patients. We can refer them to nutritional rehabilitation where they can supervise meals. We can refer them to psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or motivational interviewing. There is also a drug called Olanzapine for this condition. Sometimes, patients may need admission to the hospital. I learned recently that UCLA has an Eating Disorder Program which includes inpatient services. Some centers are very specialized and include family therapy and group therapy. Listeners, you can continue to research about anorexia, it's is fascinating. The prevalence of anorexia in the US is estimated to be 0.6%[3]. BULIMIABy definition, bulimia nervosa is when a person binge eats and then uses certain behaviors to prevent weight gain. These behaviors may include self-induced vomiting, using laxatives or diuretics, exercising excessively, or fasting and having a restrictive diet. Signs and symptoms to look forA physical examination is key. On physical presentation, these people usually can have overweight or obesity. That's the main difference with anorexia. Anorexia: skinny people, bulimia: normal weight, overweight or obesity. Regardless of their weight, these patients are malnourished. They may lack some essential nutrients causing serious health consequences. That's why nutrition cannot be assessed by BMI only. Common signs they will present with will include tachycardia, hypotension (systolic blood pressure below 90), dry skin, and hair loss. If the person uses self-induced vomiting to prevent weight gain, they may have erosion of the dental enamel from all the acid that comes up when they vomit. There may also be scarring or calluses on the dorsum side of the hand from all the acid too. Their parotid glands, that are located on the side of the jaws will also be swollen, causing a sign known as chipmunk face of bulimia.From talking to this person and getting a detailed history, we will learn of the symptoms bulimia nervosa can cause. This will include lethargy and fatigue, irregular menstrual periods in a female, abdominal pain and bloating, and constipationThis disorder really does take a toll on the body. There's plenty of complications that come with it as well. Let's try to break it down by system. GI system has the most complications: esophageal tears from the vomiting called Mallory-Weiss syndrome, which will present with bloody vomits, a loss of gag reflex, esophageal dysmotility, abdominal pain and bloating, GERD, diarrhea and malabsorption of nutrients, fatty stools known as steatorrhea, colonic dysmotility leading to constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, rectal prolapse, and pancreatitis. Cardiac: serious complication is ipeac-induced myopathy, let's spend a little time on this. Ipecac is a syrup that someone with bulimia nervosa may use to make themselves vomit. If a person uses this syrup frequently or for a long amount of time, there is a component called emetine will accumulate in muscle, including cardiac muscle. If a person uses ipecac chronically, it can be detected in the urine for up to 60 days. This will damage the heart muscles or myocardium and lead to cardiomyopathy. It will present with symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, hypotension, tachycardia or bradycardia, T wave abnormalities on ECG, conduction delays, arrythmias, pericardial effusions, and even congestive heart failure. Cardiomyopathy may be irreversible. Renal system: dehydration, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, hyponatremia, and metabolic alkalosis. This could happen in patient who use diuretics as a purging mechanism. Endocrine system: Electrolytes and hormones imbalance. The endocrine system primarily impacts the reproductive and skeletal systems. Among 82 women treated for bulimia nervosa, menstrual irregularities were present in 45 percent at pretreatment and in 31 percent at 12-month follow-up. These irregularities may look like spotty or very light menstrual cycles. Cycles may be very erratic or completely absent. Skeletal system: osteopenia and osteoporosis are common with bulimia nervosa. Osteopenia means weaker and more brittle bones. Osteoporosis is more serious than osteopenia and can more easily result in fractures.The diagnosis of bulimia nervosa can usually be made clinically. And after the diagnosis with bulimia nervosa, the first step in helping them is always getting a full lab work up to see what systems to the body have been impacted. Treatment options include nutritional counseling, behavioral therapy, and even medications. If a person needs help connecting with someone that can help with this disorder, there are organizations that they can contact which will connect them with proper resources in their area. Organizations include the Academy for Eating Disorders and the National Eating Disorders Association. Bulimia nervosa is more prevalent in females than males in all age groups. In the US, adult prevalence is 1.0% and adolescent prevalence is 0.9%, with the median age of onset of 18 years. After comparing different age groups, we have seen the prevalence of bulimia nervosa has increased over time. Conclusion: Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are eating disorders that can have consequences on the health of our patients. We should know the difference between these two diseases and know the resources available in our community to assist these patients. The diagnosis may be done clinically, but you will need to order labs or imaging for a full assessment. Eating disorders are an example of the direct effect a mental illness can have in the body. In the specific case, anorexia and bulimia cause malnutrition. The treatment of these diseases requires a multidisciplinary team to treat the patient and the family as well.____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 76 “Eating Disorders.” We started this episode with exciting news about the new malaria vaccine, a step forward on our fight against malaria. Sophia, Jeffrey, and Dr Arreaza presented an interesting overview about anorexia and bulimia. They taught us that if a patient perceives him or herself as “fat”, but they are actually underweight, they may have anorexia. Patients with bulimia tend to have normal or above normal BMI but have periods of binging and purging. Be aware of these conditions while assessing your patients' nutritional status and treat appropriately or refer as needed. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RBresidency@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Tana Parker, Sophia Dhillon, and Jeffrey Nguyen. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week! _____________________References: Malaria's Impact Worldwide, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/malaria_worldwide/impact.html, accessed on November 15, 2021.  Constitution of the World Health Organization, Basic Documents, Forty-fifth edition, Supplement, October 2006, accessed on Aug 26, 2021. Accessed on November 15, 2021.  https://www.who.int/governance/eb/who_constitution_en.pdf. 12 Secret Signs of Anorexia, CBS News, August 12, 2010, https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/12-secret-signs-of-anorexia/3/.  Hudson JI, Hiripi E, Pope HG Jr, Kessler RC. The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Feb 1;61(3):348-58. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.03.040. Epub 2006 Jul 3. Erratum in: Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 15;72(2):164. PMID: 16815322; PMCID: PMC1892232. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16815322/.  Mitchell, James E, MD; and Christie Zunker, PhD, CPH, CHES, Bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder in adults: Medical complications and their management, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/bulimia-nervosa-and-binge-eating-disorder-in-adults-medical-complications-and-their-management?search=Bulimia%20nervosa%20and%20binge%20eating%20disorder%20in%20adults:%20Medical%20complications%20and%20their%20management&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1 Yager, Joel, MD, Eating disorders: Overview of epidemiology, clinical features, and diagnosis, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/eating-disorders-overview-of-epidemiology-clinical-features-and-diagnosis?search=Eating%20disorders:%20Overview%20of%20epidemiology,%20clinical%20features,%20and%20diagnosis&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1 Yager, Joel, MD, Eating disorders: Overview of prevention and treatment, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/eating-disorders-overview-of-prevention-and-treatment?search=Eating%20disorders:%20Overview%20of%20prevention%20and%20treatment&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1

BBC Inside Science
Malaria: what's in it for the mosquito?

BBC Inside Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 36:11


Malaria, a disease that infects hundreds of millions of people and kills hundreds of thousands each year. It is caused after a plasmodium parasite is passed from a blood-feeding mosquito into a human host. Subject to much research over hundreds of years, of both host and parasite, one of the evolutionary mysteries has been why the plasmodium so prospers in the mosquito populations in infected areas. Why haven't mosquitoes' immune systems learned to fight back for example? In short, what's in it for the mozzies? Ann Carr, working with Laurence Zwiebel at Vanderbuilt University, reports in the journal Nature Scientific Reports how they managed to discover a mutual symbiotic relationship between the plasmodium and the mosquito. Using advanced sequencing technology they discovered that the infected insects can live longer, and have enhanced sensing (olfaction) and egg positioning than their uninfected brethren. This, in turn, could help them finds meals better, bestowing higher numbers of infection opportunities for the parasite, and benefitting both. NASA this week successfully launched its DART mission, which will next year attempt to nudge an asteroid in its orbit by smashing a mass into it. Could this method allow future humans, endangered by an impending collision push an asteroid out of the way to save the planet? It is billed as human's first ever “earth-defence mission”, but as relieved-sounding mission leads Nancy Chabot and Andy Rivkin of Johns Hopkins University told the BBC, it is perhaps finally time to stop talking about these sorts of things and have a go. Less relieved perhaps are astronomers around the world, as the James Webb Space Telescope team announce a further small delay to its launch to sometime after December 22nd. The BBC's John Amos a few weeks ago stood in the presence of the telescope before it was coupled to the launch vehicle, and spoke with ESA's Peter Jensen about its cost and complexity. BBC Inside Science is planning a special episode devoted to the instrument to accompany the launch of this successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Watch, as they say, this space... And finally an insight perhaps into the origin of words and language. Apart from onomatopoeia, where a word can sound like the noise of a noise-making thing, can a word sound like other properties, such as for example its shape? In the late 1920s psychologists found that different people would match certain made-up words with the same abstract shapes. This “Bouba/ Kiki” effect has been studied since, where the word “Bouba” is associated with rounded blobby shapes, and “Kiki” with spikier, angular forms. But there wasn't so much evidence whether or not the effect worked across different languages or different written alphabets, until now. Aleksandra Ćwiek of Leibniz-Zentrum Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft in Berlin tells Gaia of her international study (published in Royal Society Phil. Trans. B) looking at the effect in 25 different languages and cultures. The effect is robust across the different writing systems and locations, so the link is not simply about the shape of a letter b or letter k when written in a latinate alphabet, but could allude to something much deeper. Presented by Gaia Vince Produced by Alex Mansfield Assistant Producer, Emily Bird Made in Association with The Open University.

Intelligent Design the Future
Two Recent Papers Buttress Behe's Darwin Devolves Thesis

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 23:54


On today's ID the Future Darwin Devolves author and biologist Michael Behe discusses two recent technical papers that the news media billed as dramatic evidence for evolution. As Behe explains in his conversation with host Eric Anderson, a careful look at the papers themselves shows that both cases involve devolution. That is, the biological forms in question did not evolve novel structures and information; instead they threw away things to achieve a niche advantage. In the first study, in the journal Nature Microbiology, the researchers found that in Africa, where “most rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for falciparum malaria recognize histidine-rich protein 2 antigen,” the malaria parasite has repeatedly evolved a way to sometimes elude detection, giving it a selective advantage, Read More › Source

Take as Directed
Dr. Taison Bell: “You Tend to Find Yourself Back Home.”

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 44:18


Dr. Taison Bell, MD, an acclaimed African-American doctor, educator, and emergency medicine director in Charlottesville, Virginia, shares his personal story of how medicine – back home in Virginia – became the center of his life. “Success was not assumed in my neighborhood.” As a child with asthma, he connected with his physician, as he did also with his Black dentist and several teachers. Such “affirmative experiences” made the dream “seem like it was achievable.” In retrospect, “so many things had to align at the right place and right time.” The pandemic now puts a premium on doctors becoming communicators. “Things will not be the same from this moment forward.” “People arrive in my ICU because they are unvaccinated… People are generally willing to trust their local provider in their community regardless of what side of the aisle they are on.” But “everyone has an opinion, some spread by misinformation.”A recent conspiracy alleges doctors put patients on ventilators to intentionally make them sicker. “That has become one of the toughest parts of care.” You have to have a “therapeutic alliance” and trust with the patient and family. When those do not exist, it almost always does not end well. Boosters a good thing? Yes, though “everyone has good points.” Talking openly about how he makes decisions with his family during the pandemic makes him “relatable.” It opens a window into how he is processing things.  Dr. Taison Bell, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine in the divisions of Infectious Diseases and International Health and Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Virginia. He is also the Director of the medical intensive care unit (ICU) and director of the UVA Summer Medical Leadership Program.

Gaia GPS Offroad
9. Dan Grec's Never-Ending Road Trip.

Gaia GPS Offroad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 59:29


Since 2009, Dan Grec has traveled the world in his Jeep Wrangler, searching for connection in local cultures and beauty in wild landscapes. After some 90,000 miles behind the windshield, the author of the popular adventure travel books, The Road Chose Me, finally returns home to Australia. But Grec's homecoming won't be filled with the rest and relaxation you'd expect after a decade-long road trip. Grec continues his odyssey to see and experience the world up-close and personal. This time, he returns to his birthplace to tackle Australia's classic routes and explore unknown trails. His trip to the bush will take at least 12 to 18 months.  Grec sits down with Wade in the days before starting his Australian expedition to explain why the international road chose him. Grec retraces his tracks from Alaska to the tip of South America and hiw 54,000-mile road trip around Africa. Learn Grec's secrets to worldwide travel, including how to masterfully make your dollars go the extra mile so you can prolong your trip. Plus, these trips aren't always sunshine and rainbows, Grec shows us how to avoid bribery at international border crossings and what to do when you get Malaria ... twice. Follow Dan Grec's journey on Instagram. Subscribe to his YouTube channel. Read about his adventures in his books The Road Chose Me, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2.  If you want maps for your own journeys, big and small, then don't miss this sweet discount on a Gaia GPS Premium Membership.

Take as Directed
Cary Funk, Pew Research Center: “It Can Be Confusing”

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 36:59


We asked Cary Funk, Pew Research Center, to make sense of how the pandemic has impacted our society and American opinion as we approach the pandemic's two years. “It can be confusing.” Polarization now increasingly aligns between the vaccinated versus the unvaccinated, versus simple partisan identity. At the fundamental level, Americans are split over whether Covid-19 is a common problem. Does the “Big Lie” bleed over into the field of public health? “It's all complicated.” “The political lens” increasingly encompasses so much of public health, accelerating the erosion of public trust and confidence in science, a trend that had already been underway for years. False statements can travel the globe in 48 hours, but knowing the impact is much more difficult. Are we at a turning point, a softening of polarization? “We need to wait and see.” Heightened US international engagement enjoys majority support and has not become politicized. What is the impact of the loss of 757,000 lives on opinion? We have to continue looking at that.  Cary Funk is director of science and society research at the Pew Research Center.

The Naked Scientists Podcast
Q&A: Mars, malaria and monstrous ducks

The Naked Scientists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 57:05


It's Q&A time! In this episode we'll be answering questions from you, our listeners, such as how close are we to developing a vaccine against the common cold, what's it like to live on Mars and what are the weirdest animals in Antarctica? That's right this week is dedicated to you. We're answering all your questions with the help of supernova scientist Sarafina Nance, marine mastermind Huw Griffiths, viral virtuoso John Tregoning and genetic genius Nessa Carey... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

5 live Science Podcast
Malaria, Mars, and Monstrous Ducks!

5 live Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 53:58


This week, it's Q&A time and we find out if there's an end in sight for malaria, how female vultures can have chicks without any males, what it's like to live on Mars for two weeks, and the flesh-eating ducks in Antarctica.

Diplomatic Immunity
Global Health and Global Cities with Rebecca Katz and Matt Boyce

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:31


Season 3, Episode 6: ISD Director of Programs and Research Kelly McFarland talks to Rebecca Katz, professor and director of the Center for Global Health Science and Security, who holds joint appointments in Georgetown University Medical Center and the School of Foreign Service, and Matt Boyce, PhD student in the Global Infectious Diseases program at Georgetown, about the COVID-19 pandemic and cities' responses. They discuss the public health and medical responses to COVID-19, vaccine development, the HIV and Malaria pandemics, and the ways in which city, state, and local governments have responded. Rebecca also draws on over 15 years experience working on infectious disease at the State Department.  The Rise of Metropolitanism: The International Order and Sub-National Actors, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (September 2019) The New Weapon of Choice: Technology and Information Operations Today, ISD New Global Commons Working Group Report (October 2020) Matt Boyce and Rebecca Katz (eds.), Inoculating Cities: Case Studies of Urban Pandemic Preparedness (Elsevier, 2021)  Rebecca Katz, "Case 342 - Global Governance of Disease," ISD Case Studies Library (2017) Episode recorded: October 28, 2021.  Episode image: Peace Through Food (Institute for the Study of Diplomacy)  Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  Funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Produced by Alistair Somerville and Kelly McFarland. For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.

Take as Directed
Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg on Her Memorial to America's Pandemic Loss: ‘In America: Remember'

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 35:11


From September 17-October 1, Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg created the largest participatory art installation on the Washington National Mall since the AIDS quilt of 1996, entitled ‘In America: Remember,' composed of 700,000 white flags, in the shadow of the Washington Monument. A stunning achievement. Listen to her reflections on listening to those among the 16,000 who personalized a flag to memorialize their loss. “So many of these deaths happened in isolation.” The project unfolded amid our bitter divisions: “ We are tearing ourselves apart as a society.” 35,000 died unnecessarily over the two-week course of the installation. Remarkably, though, she succeeded in creating a solemn, quiet, respectful space where it was “safe to bring one's grief” and escape our politics. Does this memorial create a lasting constituency that will press for a national commission? Any memorialization has to include an in-depth examination of what happened. Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg is an artist based in Bethesda Maryland.

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
115: Physicians and the Power of Mentorship

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 27:14


“As busy as I am, I try to give 15, 10 minutes every week to someone because I recognize the power of that. And I recognize that I wouldn't be where I am if someone who was even busier than me didn't give me that 10 or 30 minutes.” -Dr. Umaru Barrie In today's episode, Coach Gabriella Dennery MD has a refreshing conversation with Dr. Umaru Barrie about his journey in medicine and all about how to benefit from mentorships to boost your progress in your personal, community service and professional life, as well as how to pay it forward and become a mentor. Dr. Barrie gives us an inside look at how he utilizes and has utilized  mentors in his personal life, education, community service, and professional career.  On a scale of 1 to 10, he ranks having mentors with an importance of 1000! Do you have a mentor/mentors? Is having a mentor something that you haven't previously considered, or are you unsure how to find the right mentor? Do you wish you were further along in reaching your targeted trajectory or wish you had help knowing how to go about reaching your goals? This episode shines a light on these topics and more. Tune in to learn how to start reaching your full potential today.  Umaru Barrie, a Sierra Leone/Guinean-American by way of Harlem, NY, is a 6th year combined Doctor of Medicine (M.D.)/Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) candidate at UT Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW) with a research focus on Molecular Microbiology and medical interests in Neurosurgery, Global Health, Academic Medicine and Molecular Microbiology. Prior to joining UTSW, he was a National Institute of Health scholar working under the mentorship of Dr. Desruisseaux at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, where he studied Chagas Disease and Malaria. During medical school, he served as medical class Co-President, Board of Directors of Student National Medical Association, Albert Schweitzer Fellow, Co-Director of National Future Leadership Project while maintaining active involvement in research publishing manuscripts in Neurosurgery, Academic Medicine, Community and Global Health. He has been fortunate to give back by co-founding numerous nonprofit organizations that raised money for humanitarian relief, providing uninsured patients with health literacy programs, creating relief projects to support Hurricane victims, delivering healthcare and medicines to underprivileged communities in the Dominican Republic, establishing programs for underrepresented minorities, and organizing research projects geared towards HIV/AIDS and Child Mortality in Uganda. He aspires to become the director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO).   You can find him on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/umarubarrie/  Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog  How many coaches do you think your favorite actors and athletes have worked with over the years in order to achieve such extraordinary success?   What if you had a team of trusted thinking partners, experienced coaches who have helped hundreds of physicians overcome obstacles and who know what works?    What if you were part of a community of like-minded physicians from across the nation, across specialties and career stages? Your collective brain trust, sharing ideas and experiences, so you would no longer feel like an island, surrounded by people yet alone?   What if you had small group coaching sessions, could interact with your coaches and community as often as you wish, and had virtual courses at your fingertips 24-7 that could help you with things like time and stress management, resilience, and mapping out your future to achieve what matters most to you?   What if you could have all of this for less than the cost of a single 1:1 coaching session per month?   DocWorking THRIVE is the Physician Coaching and Community Subscription Package that Guides You as a Doctor to Embrace Life in the way that is most meaningful to you, integrate that with your work so you can truly thrive, and be a valued member of our growing private community of doctors from across the nation. Join the DocWorking mailing list by clicking here.   At DocWorking, our specialty is Coaching Physicians to achieve the best in life and medicine.    Doctors devote their lives to caring for others. But does that mean they must sacrifice their own health and wellbeing? Absolutely not!   At DocWorking, we have developed a unique way to embrace it all.   The caring for others that you do so selflessly AND the caring for YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY that you crave in order to bring it all into the perfect balance specific to YOU.   What if we told you that you CAN have it all? The career you dreamed of when you decided to become a doctor AND the life outside of medicine that you desire?   DocWorking empowers physicians to get back on the path to achieving their dreams.   Ace the Boards and Max Your CME Preparing for your board exam or looking for a quick and convenient way to earn CME? Study for your board exam and fulfill your CME requirements with BoardVitals. BoardVitals is the leading online board review platform, with question banks and CME activities available in more than 50 medical and healthcare specialties.   Save Money Now: Refinance Your Student Loan Debt   Take Back Your Time: Get a Virtual Assistant Working in the medical field is fulfilling but it can also be exhausting. Physicians often sacrifice their personal time to carry out their duties. They want to go on vacations, start passion projects, or start side businesses but finding the time seems impossible. Recently, more and more physicians are giving outsourcing a try. Outsourcing allows you to delegate tasks to virtual assistants so you can free up your time and finally do whatever it is you've been wanting to do.   Become a Medical Legal Consultant We at DocWorking are excited to collaborate with Dr. Armin Feldman to bring you this opportunity to develop a side income or even a full time income while using your clinical skills!   Achieve Financial Independence with a Financial Planner/Advisor Change your trajectory: build financial independence and strength by working with our trusted resources. Working with a trusted financial planner and/or financial advisor can help you to create a specific plan that works for you. The right advisor can help you stay on track to reach your financial independence goal and your next vision.   Protect Yourself and Your Family with the Right Insurance Doctors and their families need many types of insurance–and inadequate coverage can cost you dearly. Connecting with trusted insurance professionals in your area is recommended to be sure you're appropriately covered.   Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda, our producer, at Amanda@docworking.com to be considered. And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful! We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast! Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Amanda Taran

Take as Directed
Dr. Richard Brennan, WHO Emergency Operations: The “Delicate Dance” with the Taliban

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 45:31


Dr. Richard Brennan, WHO Emergency Operations, sat down this week with Steve and Professor Leonard Rubenstein, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Rick has been at the very center of urgent efforts, following the Taliban's coming to power in mid-August, to avoid the collapse of Afghanistan's health system, through fast-moving negotiations to bring emergency funding, opening air links, resuming Covid-19, polio, and measles immunization programs, and delivering emergency medical supplies. The political and security complexities to achieving these short-term, emergency stop-gap measures remain formidable, and the space for striking deals exceedingly narrow. How has the Taliban leadership seen things, and how did they agree to these initial measures which have to operate outside their control, a precondition of donors? What is the space in which he and others can find financing solutions that will sustain the health system long-term? Pressures upon WHO Emergency Operations in Afghanistan, combined with demands in Lebanon, Yemen, and Syria, have escalated to levels that greatly exceed capacities. What is to be done now?   Dr. Richard Brennan is Regional Emergency Director, Eastern Mediterranean Region, World Health Organization.

Short Wave
A new step toward ending 'the wrath of malaria'

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 10:56


Scientists have been trying to figure out how to eradicate malaria for decades. Globally, a child under the age of five dies from the disease every two minutes, and even for kids who do survive there can be long term complications. A big breakthrough finally came in October when the World Health Organization endorsed MoSQUIRIX, the first malaria vaccine. It has relatively low efficacy, just about 30%, but malaria researcher Winter Okoth explains how the new vaccine could still make a big difference.

Next in Foreign Policy
Global Health with Shannon Kellman

Next in Foreign Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 42:34


This week Grant and Zoe are joined by Shannon Kellman, Policy Director at Friends of the Global Fight against AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. Shannon talks about where we are in the fight against COVID, the recent breakthrough of a malaria vaccination, and how to talk to members of Congress about technical topics. In the final segment, Grant discusses Dune, Zoe talks about the New York Governor's race, and Shannon endorses the musical Six. If you are under 40 and interested in being featured on the podcast, be sure to fill out this form: https://airtable.com/shr5IpK32opINN5e9

Closer Mentality
Ep. 39: Malaria and Major League Soccer with Jesse Bradley

Closer Mentality

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:31


Jesse Bradley, whose professional soccer career includes stints in Minnesota, Scotland, and Zimbabwe, came on Episode 39 to talk about his experience with professional soccer, playing internationally, the psychology of the goalkeeper position, and the trials and tribulations of living in an area of the world ripe with malaria. Closer Mentality: UNCENSORED: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR-ZXjCExys Jesse's Website: https://jessebradley.org/

Houston Healthcare Initiative's podcast
Ivermectin Off Label Prescriptions for Covid-19

Houston Healthcare Initiative's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 11:15


Doctors' Right To Prescribe Off Label Treatments for their Patients. Even in the year 2021 the more things change, the more they stay the same. By that I am referring to the off-label prescription options doctors have always had that are still controversial when it comes to the ongoing global Covid 19 pandemic. Off-label prescribing is when a physician gives a drug that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved to treat a condition different than the one you've got. This practice is legal and even common. In fact, one in five prescriptions written today are for off-label use. Last year Dr. Goldstein discussed the controversy and government interference with how hydroxychloroquine, a common treatment for Malaria was prescribed off-label for patients suffering with Covid-19. Fast forward from September 2020 to October 2021 and the same thing is happening with a drug called Ivermectin, a drug that is approved for treatment of certain parasitic worm infestations, and its possible use as a treatment for Covid-19. Here on the podcast with some much-needed insight is respected neurologist and founder of the Houston Healthcare Initiative, Dr. Steven Goldstein. This on the latest edition of his popular Houston Healthcare Initiative Podcast which can be heard on : Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Podbean, Soundcloud, and the Houston Healthcare Initiative website. How do the government, media and lobbyists work to suppress affordable treatments for Covid-19 and interfere with a doctor's right to prescribe off label  

Take as Directed
Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo: An Inbox Full of Dangerous Threats

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 38:40


Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo has emerged as a forceful expert voice making sense of the complex and times confusing, shifting shoals of the pandemic. ”All of us have had to step into this sphere,” filling “a power vacuum.” It has however been chaotic. Public communication is essential “to move the needle” but the experience can be “tough.” Vocal experts are the subject of attacks, the worst during the Black Lives Matter protests. The field of public health needs to invest more in how to message on vaccines. People are "swimming in disinformation.” Though she is “cautiously optimistic” for the United States, “no one is going to run out the clock on this virus.” For poor countries, which increasingly are in desperation abandoning a response, the future is “bleak.” Are we numb to the more than 700,000 dead Americans? Perhaps. It's impossible to wrap our minds around this scale of death in America. There is a need for a “national reckoning” through a commission, “a true opening of the books that goes deep.” Have we entered a new era of high-level diplomacy? “No.” “We don't have a Covid control strategy” at home or abroad. The lack of strategy is causing people to disengage. Can we be optimistic? “It can feel like there's an unraveling” but that in fact is not happening.  A “civic spirit” among citizens is buoying America. Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo is a Senior Scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is also a Senior Fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Take as Directed
Prof. Larry Gostin: “It's No Secret. America is a Mess.”

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 55:13


On October 7, Andrew and Steve sat down with a close friend, Georgetown's Prof. Larry Gostin, for a lively live-cast conversation about his new book, ‘Global Health Security: A Blueprint for the Future.” The podcast captures that rich, vivid exchange. The big messages: We underestimate the power of the SAR-CoV-2 virus: it is wily and pernicious and will continue to surge. We cannot forget anti-microbial resistance. A fundamental shift is needed in the US international approach – away from charity and towards advancing technology transfer to manufacture vaccines in low and middle-income countries to create resilience. That requires far greater pressure upon Moderna and Pfizer to cooperate in meeting urgent global needs. The USG has the legal authorities to make that happen but has not yet followed through. USG health communications have been “pitiful” and left the public “utterly confused.” That too can be corrected.   Professor Lawrence O. Gostin is University Professor at Georgetown University where he directs the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law.

In Focus by The Hindu
Why the world's first malaria vaccine is important | In Focus

In Focus by The Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 22:47


The world's first malaria vaccine is here. The World Health Organisation, earlier this month, endorsed RTS,S/AS01 or Mosquirix, developed by British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline in partnership with the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative. The vaccine, which acts against P. falciparum, believed to be most deadly malaria parasite globally, took nearly 30 years to make. Malaria is an ancient disease -- it has been around for centuries, affecting populations around the world. Though many countries have been successful in eliminating the disease, which is caused by a parasite and transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito, it still continues to affect some countries in Africa and Asia. In 2019, there were an estimated 229 million cases of malaria, with 94% of the burden in the African region. About 67% of the deaths were of children under the age of 5. India, according to the WHO, recorded a significant decrease in its malaria burden, with cases declining from 20 million in the year 2000 to about 5.6 million in 2019. Deaths too, have decreased. But India still accounts for over 80 percent of all malaria cases in the SE Asia region. It also bears the largest burden of Plasmodium vivax in the world at 3.5 million cases a year -- a parasite for which a vaccine has not yet been found. How will the vaccine help combat malaria globally? How effective is it? Will other malaria control measures continue to be needed? Guest: Dr Daniel Chandramohan, professor of public health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Host: Zubeda Hamid

On Point
Inside the 40-year fight to rid the world of malaria

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:14


In Uganda, like many countries, malaria is endemic and deadly. But that might soon change. After 40 years in development, the WHO has approved the first ever malaria vaccine. Malaria has shaped human history. Could that story now be coming to a hopeful end? Dr. James Tibenderana and Dr. Ripley Ballou join Meghna Chakrabarti.

WorldAffairs
Sustainable Development in a Post-Covid World

WorldAffairs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 59:01


How are cities from Pittsburgh to Bogotá using sustainable development goals to guide pandemic recovery and increase health and equity? We talk with Mamta Murthi, VP of human development at the World Bank, about the World Health Organization's decision to endorse the first vaccine for malaria. The preventable disease kills around 500,000 people a year, mostly children in Africa. Then, we talk with global development veteran Tony Pipa and Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, about a bottom-up approach cities and communities are taking to drive local progress with the goal of making global change. Guests: Mamta Murthi, vice president for human development, The World Bank Bill Peduto, mayor of Pittsburgh Tony Pipa, senior fellow, Center for Sustainable Development, Brookings Institution Hosts: Philip Yun, CEO, World Affairs Ray Suarez, co-host, WorldAffairs If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to WorldAffairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

Tócamela de Primera
CHIVAS: Adiós malaria

Tócamela de Primera

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:10


Chivas ganó su encuentro contra Toluca en un partido que, a pesar del resultado, a pesar de que se ganó se jugó mal. Y sí, la noticia más relevante en esto es que por fin dejé atrás mi malaria, JAJA! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
Humanity Gets A Malaria Vaccine!

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:05


On October 6, the World Health Organization endorsed a malaria vaccine for the first time ever. After years of testing, the vaccine was shown to be safe and effective at preventing the deaths of thousands of children in Sub-Saharan Africa. The WHO's backing of this Malaria vaccine is both a breakthrough in scientific research and an important moment in human history. Margaret McDonnell, executive director of Nothing But Nets at the UN Foundation, explains why this new malaria vaccine is so promising    

Biohacking with Brittany
70. Q&A: Sugar Cravings, C-Section Births, Fasting for Hormonal Health, Candida, Sauna Usage for Female Health, Parasites, Acne and Much More!

Biohacking with Brittany

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 59:24


This week I answer your submitted questions on a variety of health and personal topics. I dive into maintaining gut health, balancing hormones, sauna usage, C-section births, anti-microbial tinctures and herbs, Candida, Parasites and much more.  I also talk about: Intuitive Eating versus cravings  Acne, skin health and texture problems Malaria and anti-bacterial herbs Let's Connect: Instagram Facebook Become A Client Join my Emfies pre-order waitlist Listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Play Sponsors:  Use discount code BIOHACKINGBRITTANY for 10% off supplements from BiOptimizers and a free bottle of P3OM and HCl while supplies last. Use discount code BIOHACKINGBRITTANY for 25% off all health tests from InsideTracker.

The Take
Could this new malaria vaccine save millions of lives?

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:57


With close to half a million deaths from Malaria in 2019 --most in Sub-Saharan Africa-- scientists have spent decades working toward a vaccine, and last week, the World Health Organization approved the first. But, with only 30 to 40 percent efficacy some are also asking, is it worth it? And, there are other questions about how quickly it can be deployed.  We talk to one Kenyan scientist who grew up in one of the world's most malaria ridden regions and hear about how he's helping to stop this dogged and deadly disease.

Take as Directed
Dr. Leana Wen: “The End of the Pandemic is in Sight”

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 26:38


Dr. Leana Wen joined us this week to explore her personal history and its revelations, laid out in remarkably candid detail in her newly released memoir, Lifelines: A Doctor's Journey in the Fight for Public Health.  And to speak to the most pressing current challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Her childhood struggles, as a young immigrant Chinese girl living amid insecurity, taught powerful lessons about poverty, race, and health. Her tenure as Health Commissioner in Baltimore, operating in close partnership with the late Congressman Elijah Cummings, opened the way to confront opioid addiction, stigma, maternal and infant mortality, and the acute vulnerabilities of youth. In her new life in the print and cable mediascape, she follows the advice of former Senator Barbara Mikulski: “do what you are best at – and needed for.” The Biden administration needs to up its game with the public: “It's not enough just to get the science right.” It is about values, communication, and public trust. America's hardened polarization -- surrounding vaccines, masking, and distancing -- is too advanced to fix: it is best to focus on engaging individual by individual. Listen to learn more.  Dr. Leana Wen is an emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University. She is a contributing columnist at the Washington Post and a CNN medical analyst. She's served as Baltimore's Health Commissioner.  

Science Weekly
The world finally has a malaria vaccine. Why has it taken so long?

Science Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:57


Last week the World Health Organization approved the world's first malaria vaccine. It's been hailed as a historic breakthrough that could save tens of thousands of lives each year. But researchers have been trying to create one for more than a century – so why has it taken so long? Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Latif Ndeketa and Prof Chris Drakeley about how the new RTS,S vaccine works and why it's been so difficult to produce. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

3 Things
An expert on why the malaria vaccine matters, and the reason it took so long

3 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 27:54


Last week, the World Health Organization (WHO) approved the world's first vaccine against malaria – ‘RTS,S', known by its brand name Mosquirix. The vaccine, which is to be administered to those under age of 5, is the result of more than 30 years of research and development. But what took so long to develop it? How effective is it? And what does it mean for India? In this episode, Dr V S Chauhan, who is known for his efforts to develop a recombinant malaria vaccine, joins us to answer these questions and talk about the significance of this development.And in the end, Indian Express' Gargi Verma talks about how malaria impacts remote villages in Chhattisgarh, and the efforts of health care workers that have made a difference. (Dr V S Chauhan is the former director of the Delhi-based International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biology, and has worked in the field of malaria for over three decades).

Newsy Jacuzzi
Kid News This Week: Battle against mosquitoes, beavers are back, clean cling-film, cow-poo zapper

Newsy Jacuzzi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:57


Kid News This Week: In humanity's battle against mosquitoes – should we swat or swap them? Also, Britain's beavers are back, cleaner cling-film is being developed and how to make cow poo less toxic for the environment? A poo zapper, naturally. All that and more on this week's news pool for curious kids and adults!

This Week in Parasitism
TWiP 199: Chagas kisses Cruzi and Brucei bites

This Week in Parasitism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 67:40


The TWiP team solves the case of the Traveler to Tanzania with a Purple Lesion, and discuss Mosquirix, the first vaccine approved for Plasmodium parasites. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Daniel Griffin, and Christina Naula Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Links for this episode PWB on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter Historic malaria vaccine (Nature) Efficacy and safety of RTS,S/AS01 (Lancet) Letters read on TWiP 199 Become a patron of TWiP Case Study for TWiP 199 Gentleman in 40s, repeated intestinal issues, diagnosed with Giardia and treated, a year later again, again not feeling well. Stool testing shows Blastocystis and Endolimax nana. Lives in NYC area, single, active socially with different partners, no other medical problems, does take PREP for AIDS. Exam and labs normal except for stools. HIV negative. Treated with metronidazole, no impact on symptoms. Coincides with successful encounters.   Send your case diagnosis, questions and comments to twip@microbe.tv Music by Ronald Jenkees

Give The People What They Want!
Give The People What They Want! October 8

Give The People What They Want!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 30:21


In this week's episode of Give The People What They Want! Vijay Prashad, Prasanth R. & Zoe discuss the creation of the CIA's China Mission Center, what the Pandora Papers leaks tell us about capitalism and what impact this is having in Latin America, the historic strike in South Africa's engineering sector, the cabinet reshuffle in Peru, violent attacks on farmers in India as protests continue, and the hope of the vaccine against Malaria.

Health Report - ABC RN
Malaria and vector-borne diseases, the Hippocratic Oath, the best way to treat snake bite

Health Report - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 38:45


Malaria and the implications of a vaccine for it; a new book about what happens to the Hippocratic Oath when it's in the real world; and, if you are bitten by a snake - what next?

AnglicanTV
Anglican Unscripted 690 - Ending Malaria

AnglicanTV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 50:48


A new vaccine for Malaria has been announced and the world should rejoice.

Que se vayan todos
Aburrido121

Que se vayan todos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 33:25


Aunque no lo crean esta semana se hizo historia… Llegó la vacuna más esperada de los últimos tiempos, no contra el extremismo sino la de la Malaria… La otra epidemia es más complicada e involucra nuestros datos… Y para no dejar lo de los antivacunas quietos, he aquí los que ya desbloquearon otro nivel… Y facebook se defiende con un ad hominem que da vergüenza… y para dejar quieto ya a Facebook que pasó con el pana que inventó Unfollow everything… El dilema económico mundial se parece a los 70s ojalá no implique el retorno de la Bola de Disco… Olvídate del Molino vamos con la fusión nuclear… El Milagro Noruego fue ponerse las pilas… Volvimos a los griegos, el crecimiento del tutor de niños frente a la Escuela deficiente… Un policía chino nos da un vistazo del tratamiento a Uigures… El premio Nobel, por si no creemos lo del clima pues… Una encuesta que pone los datos donde nadie quiere ponerlos… y en el EXTRA hablemos de la palabra mujer… mi opinión del especial de Chapelle. ESENCIALES https://www.elconfidencial.com/tecnologia/2021-10-06/privacidad-carissa-whatsapp-amazon-apple-google_3300603/ https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/is-the-world-economy-going-back-to-the-1970s/21805260 COMPLEMENTARIOS https://www.bbc.com/mundo/noticias-internacional-58851075 https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/06/health/malaria-vaccine-who.html https://www.bbc.com/mundo/noticias-america-latina-58809817 https://www.facebook.com/zuck/posts/10113961365418581 https://apnews.com/article/facebook-outage-global-reaction-281fded63f1478193d7e5e3e799833fc https://www.theverge.com/2021/9/28/22698917/facebook-child-research-messenger-instagram-kids https://www.genbeta.com/actualidad/zuckerberg-niega-nuevas-acusaciones-facebook-problema-confiar-estos-otros-casos-no-ha-dicho-verdad https://www.genbeta.com/actualidad/ingeniero-creo-extension-usemos-facebook-no-existe-amenazas-red-social https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/10/11/can-nuclear-fusion-put-the-brakes-on-climate-change https://www.enriquedans.com/2021/10/el-milagro-noruego.html https://www.economist.com/international/the-pandemic-will-spur-the-worldwide-growth-of-private-tutoring/21805216 https://edition.cnn.com/2021/10/04/china/xinjiang-detective-torture-intl-hnk-dst/index.html https://www.npr.org/2021/10/05/1043278925/nobel-prize-physics-climate-change-winner https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DFoVEsNnz0 https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/10/8/the-shining-path-controversies-that-spurred-peru-govt-shakeup EXTRA https://www.economist.com/leaders/2021/10/02/why-the-word-woman-is-tying-people-in-knots https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-81411-4 https://www.vulture.com/article/dave-chappelle-the-closer-comedy-review.html https://g.co/kgs/rJA6tc

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Los plegables de Samsung rompen récords / AMD promete un parche para Windows 11 / Reino Unido sin emisiones para 2035 / Google Maps más verde / Apple y Google investigados por Países Bajos y Japón / Jabra + SteelSeries Patrocinador: Allianz es el líder mundial en gestión activa https://www.allianz.es/allianz-inversion.html. Te ofrece fondos de inversión, sostenibles y tecnológicos, así como planes de jubilación adaptados a tu edad actual https://www.allianz.es/plan-de-pensiones.html. Además de un producto único con garantía alemana como es Allianz Perspektive https://www.allianz.es/seguro-de-ahorro.html. — Para más información, asesórate en Allianz.es https://www.allianz.es/ o en el 900 228 228 tel:+34900228228. Los plegables de Samsung rompen récords / AMD promete un parche para Windows 11 / Reino Unido sin emisiones para 2035 / Google Maps más verde / Apple y Google investigados por Países Bajos y Japón / Jabra + SteelSeries  Autoridades canadienses cierran una planta eléctrica pirata que minaba Bitcoin usando los restos de un pozo de gas natural abandonado. Habían montado cuatro generadores https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/link-global-auc-penalties-1.6194653 sin informar a las autoridades, ni a los dueños del pozo, y que producían 5 MW de potencia en total. Suficiente para dar electricidad a 6.000 casas.  Descubrieron el pastel unos vecinos que llevaban semanas escuchando un sonido "como de un avión calentando motores".  Las ventas de plegables despegan en Corea del Sur. Parece que los nuevos Galaxy Z de Samsung son un éxito en su segunda generación. Han vendido más de un millón de unidades https://www.elespanol.com/elandroidelibre/moviles-android/20211007/samsung-marca-vende-millon-galaxy-fold-flip/617688772_0.html en 39 días, su tercer lanzamiento más exitoso tras el Note 10 y el S8. Una cifra altísima para un país de 52 millones de habitantes.  Los test rápidos contra la Malaria han hecho evolucionar al virus. Este tipo de tests son muy eficaces y comunes en países de alta incidencia del virus pero los científicos están preocupados https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/09/rapid-tests-for-malaria-may-be-selecting-for-strains-it-cant-identify/. Han encontrado nuevas "cepas" del virus nacidas recientemente con el ADN alterado precisamente pare no aparecer en estas pruebas, aunque eso dificulta su propagación.  Es decir: los virus mutados han ido infectando personas porque los tests no los detectaban, y han podido ganar algo de popularidad entre el resto de sus hermanos. Un curioso caso de presión evolutiva https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presi%C3%B3n_evolutiva. — Justo ayer se aprobaba la primera vacuna https://www.abc.es/sociedad/abci-respalda-unica-vacuna-aprobada-contra-malaria-utilice-ninos-africanos-202110061805_noticia.html contra la Malaria de la historia.  AMD y Microsoft trabajan en parches para mitigar la caída de rendimiento de Windows 11. Han encontrado dos posibles culpables del peor rendimiento del nuevo sistema operativo en tareas intensivas.Prometen parches para finales de octubre https://www.geeknetic.es/Noticia/23263/Un-bug-en-Windows-11-reduce-el-rendimiento-de-las-CPU-AMD-en-hasta-un-15.html y aconsejan quedarse en Windows 10 de momento.  Jabra y Steel Series crearán un gigante de los accesorios electrónicos. GN, los dueños daneses de Jabra, han comprado la también danesa SteelSeries por unos 1.000 millones de euros https://gizmodo.com/jabra-owner-is-buying-steelseries-because-gaming-is-1847811930. Ambas empresas operarán de forma independiente, y calientan el mercado de los accesorios de alta gama, cada día más codiciados.  Reino Unido promete eliminar el gas para generación eléctrica en 2035. Tras eliminar el consumo de carbón, el siguiente paso según su gobierno es eliminar las plantas de gas y de ciclo combinado https://apnews.com/article/5d1e04b9969176085f59027541d6a48a. Actualmente el 38% de la electricidad de Reino Unido se genera con gas natural. Mantendrán las nucleares, eso sí, incluyendo las que están en construcción o planificación https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_the_United_Kingdom.  EE.UU. prometió lo mismo en abril https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/04/22/fact-sheet-president-biden-sets-2030-greenhouse-gas-pollution-reduction-target-aimed-at-creating-good-paying-union-jobs-and-securing-u-s-leadership-on-clean-energy-technologies/, aquí os dejo un gráfico de evolución https://twitter.com/mixx_io/status/1446102390675886080 que compara las hojas de ruta de la UE, EE.UU. y Reino Unido para llegar a las cero emisiones en sus sectores eléctricos.  Google Maps te dará rutas menos contaminantes para ir con el coche. La opción está en pruebas en EE.UU. pero llegará a más países en 2022. Aparecerán rutas con una "hoja verde" que informa de una ruta que tarda "X minutos más" pero con un ahorro estimado de combustible https://www.lanacion.com.ar/agencias/las-nuevas-herramientas-de-google-para-viajar-y-comprar-de-forma-mas-sostenible-nid06102021/ gracias a hacer menos paradas.  Firefox tendrá publicidad en la barra de direcciones. Cada vez que comiences a escribir una URL o un término de búsqueda, el navegador ofrecerá enlaces promocionados https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/navigate-web-faster-firefox-suggest en la lista de auto-completado. — Estará activado por defecto aunque se podrá cambiar en ajustes. De momento solo para usuarios en EE.UU.  Más investigaciones por abuso de competencia. La agencia regulatoria de la competencia de Países Bajos informó a Apple el mes pasado que sus restricciones de pagos en la App Store no cumplen las leyes locales. Apple ha recurrido la decisión, y todo se ha filtrado ahora https://www.reuters.com/technology/exclusive-dutch-watchdog-finds-apple-app-store-payment-rules-anti-competitive-2021-10-07/.  La UE prepara su resolución contra los límites artificiales https://www.xataka.com/moviles/union-europea-se-prepara-para-acusar-a-apple-su-tecnologia-nfc-debe-dejar-que-otros-usen-reuters del uso de NFC en los iPhone. No sabemos si llegará con multa o solo pidiendo cambios de implementación.  Japón mientras tanto ha abierto una nueva investigación para ver si Apple y Google han manipulado el mercado https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Technology/Apple-and-Google-under-antitrust-scrutiny-in-Japan-for-mobile-OS en detrimento de desarrolladores y consumidores.  Rusia impedirá a los periodistas y bloggers informar sobre su programa espacial. Ningún ciudadano ruso o extranjero residente en Rusia podrá publicar artículos https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/10/russia-tells-its-space-reporters-to-stop-reporting-on-the-space-program/ de noticias sobre las misiones espaciales rusas. El objetivo es mantener mayor secreto y control sobre el estado de misiones presentes y futuras.  La ONG Dagersystem ha creado un directorio de videojuegos accesibles. Se llama Accesible Games Database y recoge hasta ahora casi 150 videojuegos categorizados https://accessiblegamesdatabase.com/ por las funciones de accesibilidad que incorporan: personalización de controles, lupas digitales para ver mejor, opción de alto contraste, cambiar las pulsaciones repetidas, etc.

New Scientist Weekly
#88: Should climate activism go to extreme levels?; malaria vaccine; new drugs to treat covid; mission to the asteroid belt

New Scientist Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 27:21


The team opens with the welcome news that after 37 years of development, the world's first malaria vaccine has been approved. They then hear from Swedish author Andreas Malm, who argues that the climate movement needs to get more militant. He says the likes of Extinction Rebellion have 'peace-washed' historical accounts of protest movements, and, controversially, puts the case for escalating from mass civil disobedience to engage in property destruction. The fight against covid is picking up pace - the team unpacks a flurry of announcements about promising new treatments. They discuss the new UAE space mission launching in 2028 which plans to swing by Venus before heading to the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. They also share a roundup of the physics and chemistry Nobel prize winners, and find out how touch receptors in the skin are involved in social bonding and sexual desire. On the pod are Rowan Hooper, Penny Sarchet and Alice Klein. To read about these stories and much more, subscribe at newscientist.com/podcasts.

Today, Explained
A vaccine for malaria

Today, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:16


But also, should we kill all the mosquitoes? Today's show was produced by Will Reid with help from Miles Bryan, edited by Matt Collette, engineered by Efim Shapiro, fact-checked by Laura Bullard and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Victoria Chamberlin was the mosquito. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained Support Today, Explained by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Here & Now
Dave Grohl's new memoir; First vaccine to treat malaria

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:36


Dave Grohl only spent three and a half years drumming for Nirvana — but he says it felt like a lifetime. The Foo Fighters frontman talks about his new memoir, "The Storyteller." And, Mosquirix is the first vaccine to treat malaria and the first developed to treat any parasitic disease. World Health Organization malaria expert Dr. Mary Hamel and Dr. Kwame Amponsa-Achiano of Ghana's Health Service join us to discuss the breakthrough treatment.

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk
WHO-Empfehlung für Mosquirix - Forscher sieht Malaria-Impfstoff als "Meilenstein" für Afrika

Forschung Aktuell - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 7:07


Es sei ein "historischer Tag", sagte der Tropenmediziner Peter Kremsner zur WHO-Empfehlung für den Malaria-Impfstoff Mosquirix. Zwar sei die Wirksamkeit noch nicht so hoch, wie man es sich wünsche, doch die Entwicklung von Impfstoffen mit einer noch höheren Wirksamkeit sei bereits sehr weit fortgeschritten. Peter Kremsner im Gespräch mit Michael Böddeker www.deutschlandfunk.de, Forschung aktuell Hören bis: 19.01.2038 04:14 Direkter Link zur Audiodatei

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle
07.10.2021 – Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten

Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten | Deutsch lernen | Deutsche Welle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:20


Trainiere dein Hörverstehen mit den Nachrichten der Deutschen Welle von Donnerstag – als Text und als verständlich gesprochene Audio-Datei.Erstes Dreier-Gespräch zur Regierungsbildung Elf Tage nach der Bundestagswahl treffen sich an diesem Donnerstag SPD, Grüne und FDP erstmals zu einer Dreier-Sondierung in Berlin. Das Ziel ist, eine sogenannte Ampel-Koalition in Deutschland zu bilden. Nach Zweier-Gesprächen auch mit den Unionsparteien CDU und CSU hatten sich Grüne und FDP am Mittwoch für Gespräche mit den Sozialdemokraten entschieden. Parallele Verhandlungen mit der Union über eine sogenannte Jamaika-Koalition soll es nicht geben. Nach Angaben von FDP und Grünen bleibt ein Bündnis mit CDU/CSU aber weiterhin eine Option. IS-Anhängerinnen zurückgeholt Deutschland hat acht deutsche Frauen samt Kindern aus Syrien geholt, die sich in der Vergangenheit der Terrormiliz "Islamischer Staat" angeschlossen hatten. Sie seien mit einer Chartermaschine in der Nacht zum Donnerstag in Frankfurt gelandet, teilte Außenminister Heiko Maas mit. Die Frauen müssten sich nun vor der Strafjustiz verantworten, ein Großteil von ihnen sei nach ihrer Ankunft in Haft genommen worden. Deutschland hatte die Aktion laut Maas gemeinsam mit Dänemark organisiert, das 14 Kinder und drei Frauen zurückholte. Alle lebten in einem kurdischen Gefangenenlager. Die USA leisteten logistische Unterstützung. UN verschärfen Ton gegenüber Äthiopien UN-Generalsekretär António Guterres hat vor einer "immensen humanitären Krise" in Äthiopien gewarnt, die ein sofortiges Handeln erfordere. In einer Sondersitzung des Sicherheitsrats der Vereinten Nationen in New York rief er die Regierung in Addis Abeba dazu auf, humanitäre Helfer ihre Arbeit machen zu lassen. Bis zu sieben Millionen Menschen sind laut Guterres in den Regionen Tigray, Amhara und Afar dringend auf Hilfslieferungen angewiesen, um zu überleben. Scharf kritisierte der UN-Generalsekretär die Entscheidung der äthiopischen Regierung, vor einer Woche sieben UN-Vertreter des Landes zu verweisen. Texanisches Abtreibungsverbot gestoppt Ein US-Bundesrichter hat das neue Gesetz für ein weitgehendes Abtreibungsverbot im Bundesstaat Texas vorläufig ausgesetzt. Richter Robert Pitman gab damit einer Klage der Regierung von US-Präsident Joe Biden statt. Diese hält das texanische Gesetz für verfassungswidrig. Texas kann gegen die Gerichtsentscheidung allerdings Widerspruch einlegen. Das strengste Abtreibungsgesetz der USA war Anfang September in Kraft getreten und verbietet Schwangerschaftsabbrüche ab dem Zeitpunkt, zu dem der Herzschlag des Fötus festgestellt werden kann - also etwa ab der sechsten Schwangerschaftswoche. Parlament in Ankara bestätigt Klimaabkommen Als letztes Mitglied der G20-Gruppe hat die Türkei das Pariser Klimaschutzabkommen ratifiziert. Das Parlament in Ankara votierte einstimmig dafür. Präsident Recep Tayyip Erdogan hatte den Schritt im September vor der UN-Vollversammlung in New York angekündigt. Bislang deckt die Türkei ihren Energiebedarf zum größten Teil aus Kohle, Gas und Öl. Im Klimaabkommen von 2015 verständigte sich die Weltgemeinschaft darauf, die Erderwärmung wenn möglich auf weniger als 1,5 Grad Celsius zu begrenzen. Die nächste Weltklimakonferenz findet im November in Glasgow in Schottland statt. Durchbruch bei Malaria-Bekämpfung Die Weltgesundheitsorganisation WHO hat erstmals die breite Anwendung eines Impfstoffes gegen Malaria empfohlen. Das Vakzin RTS,S solle an Kinder in Afrika südlich der Sahara und in anderen Malaria-Regionen verabreicht werden, hieß es aus der UN-Behörde in Genf. Dies sei ein historischer Moment, sagte WHO-Chef Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. Zusammen mit bisherigen Präventionsmaßnahmen könnten nun jährlich Zehntausende junge Leben gerettet werden, sagte er. Die Empfehlung beruht auf Pilotversuchen mit rund 800.000 Kindern in Ghana, Kenia und Malawi. Tote und Verletzte bei Beben in Pakistan Ein starkes Erdbeben hat einen abgelegenen, bergigen Teil im Südwesten Pakistans erschüttert, in dem viele Kohleminen liegen. Die Behörden sprechen von mindestens 20 Todesopfern und mehr als 200 Verletzten. Das Unglück ereignete sich am frühen Morgen, als viele Bergleute bereits in den Minen arbeiteten. Nach Angaben des Innenministeriums der Provinz Belutschistan hatte das Beben eine Stärke von 5,7. Das Epizentrum lag etwa 14 Kilometer nordöstlich des besonders heftig getroffenen Bezirks Harnai. Zahlreiche Menschen befinden sich laut Katastrophenschutz noch unter den Trümmern eingestürzter Gebäude.

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램
세계보건기구, 최초의 말라리아 백신 사용 적극 권고

SBS Korean - SBS 한국어 프로그램

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 2:00


아프리카 전역에서는 2분마다 1명의 어린이가 말라리아로 사망하고 있는 가운데 세계 보건 기구가 처음 승인한 말라리아 백신이 전염 확산 방지에 큰 효력을 발휘할 것으로 기대된다.

The NewsWorthy
Congress to Compromise?, First Malaria Vaccine & Google Goes Green - Thursday, October 7th, 2021

The NewsWorthy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 12:59


The news to know for Thursday, October 7th, 2021! What to know about a possible compromise on Capitol Hill just days before the U.S. is set to default on its debt. That could trigger a financial crisis. Also, what a judge just ruled about the abortion ban in Texas. And a first-of-its-kind vaccine for Malaria. Plus, we'll explain a student loan overhaul happening soon, how GM is taking on Tesla, and new features on Google to help you go green. All that and more in around 10 minutes... Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com/shownotes for sources and to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by JoinCrowdHealth.com/99 (Listen for the discount code) and Ritual.com/newsworthy Support the show and get ad-free episodes here: www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider            

As It Happens from CBC Radio
October 7: Needle in a haystack

As It Happens from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 71:32


Malaria vaccine, Irish collapsing homes, Orangutan pregnant, Texas temporary abortion ruling, Best restos, Oldest black church and more

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast
lo-Fi Global News: Lebanon, Africa/Malaria, EU-Trivia, Tunisia, NATO/Russia, California

Lofi Poli Sci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 6:21


Today's Topics: Lebanon Immunity Law, Africa to get Malaria Vaccine, EU-Trivia, Tunisia Shuts down TV Station, NATO Throws Out Russian Spies?, California sees Machines Make Water from Air Always remember that Lofi Poli Sci is more than just me, it's the “we”, that we be. Episode 43 Season 4 (series 359) Email: lofipolisci@planetmail.com Instagram: lofi_poli_sci_podcast Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/lofi-poli-sci-podcast/id1513691477 Spotify: open.spotify.com/show/4Ii0JKbsKEzkO8SA2u3796 Google Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xNzg1MjhjYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaLg4TOVb7nh4laDatZZ3yQ LinkedIn: Michael Pickering #lofipolisci #lofi #politicalscience #news #worldnews #globalnews #lofiGlobalNews #alwaysHope #podcast #lofipoliscipodcast #Top10 #GoodNewsFriday #PickeringUnplugged #LettersOfTheLofiPoliSci #Lebanon #Africa #Malaria #WHO #MalariaVaccines #EU #EuropeanUnino #Trivia #Tunisia #NATO #Russia #California #WaterTech

Take as Directed
Carmen Paun, Year One of POLITICO Global Pulse a Success

Take as Directed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:32


Carmen Paun, a dynamic, fresh media voice on global health in Washington, shares her personal and career journey from Romania to Brussels, and on to her arrival in Washington D.C. one year ago, amid the pandemic, to launch POLITICO Global Pulse. This past summer, while visiting family in a small village in the Romanian countryside, she was “shocked” to discover only 10% vaccinated at that time, the pandemic seen as “all just a conspiracy.” The pandemic was the trigger in creating POLITICO Global Pulse. In its first year, it did find its audience and voice quickly. What to make of the U.S. Global Covid Summit? It re-established that “the U.S. was in charge,” now the challenge lies in execution. Faith in American leadership has diminished, while African officials remain frustrated by slow delivery and the West's export restrictions. Will the EU-US Task Force bring great transparency and accountability? “Hard to say… How fast is this going to happen?” The turn to boosters likely creates “a vicious cycle” that could leave low and lower-middle-income countries still struggling to access vaccines. Will Africa be left far behind? No. Vaccines are finally arriving. India is reopening exports. Don't expect the push by South Africa and India to suspend intellectual property to succeed. Her overall prognosis? “It is hard to be optimistic” Give a listen to learn more. Carmen Paun is a health writer at POLITICO and author of POLITICO Global Pulse.

The Science Hour
Drug resistant malaria found in East Africa

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 61:48


Since their discovery in the 1970s, artemisinin-based drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Researchers have identified artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites in Southeast Asia since the early 2000s, but now, there is evidence of resistance in Rwanda and Uganda. Dr Betty Balikagala of Juntendo University tells us how this resistance developed and what it means for managing malaria in Africa, which carries the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths worldwide. We hear from some of the scientists from COVID Moonshot, a non-profit, open-science consortium which has just received key funding to develop affordable antivirals to stop SARS-CoV-2 in its tracks. Also on the programme, Dr Rakesh Ghosh from the University of California, San Francisco tells us how air pollution is contributing to 6 million preterm births globally each year, and Dr Catherine Nakalembe of the University of Maryland and Africa Lead for NASA Harvest returns to the programme as NASA/USGS launches Landsat 9. Also In the past 18 months we have heard lots about the human immune system, as we all learn about how our bodies fight off Covid-19 and how the vaccine helps protect us. But this got listener John, in Alberta, Canada, thinking about how trees and plants respond to diseases and threats. Do they have immune systems and if so, how do they work? Do they have memories that mean they can remember diseases or stressful events 5 months, or 5 years down the line, to be better prepared if they encounter the same threats again? Presenter Marnie Chesterton sets out to investigate the inner workings of plants and trees, discovering that plants not only have a sophisticated immune system, but that they can use that immune system to warn their neighbours of an attack. Some researchers are also investigating how we can help plants, especially crops, have better immune systems – whether that's by vaccination or by editing their genes to make their immune systems more efficient. But some plants, like trees, live for a really long time. How long can they remember any attacks for? Can they pass any of those memories on to their offspring? Crowdscience visits one experimental forest where they are simulating the future CO2 levels of 2050 to understand how trees will react to climate change. Image: Mosquito net demonstration in a community outreach centre in Kenya Credit: Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images

Science in Action
Drug resistant malaria found in East Africa

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 29:01


Since their discovery in the 1970s, artemisinin-based drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Researchers have identified artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites in Southeast Asia since the early 2000s, but now, there is evidence of resistance in Rwanda and Uganda. Dr Betty Balikagala of Juntendo University tells us how this resistance developed and what it means for managing malaria in Africa, which carries the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths worldwide. We hear from some of the scientists from COVID Moonshot, a non-profit, open-science consortium which has just received key funding to develop affordable antivirals to stop SARS-CoV-2 in its tracks. Also on the programme, Dr Rakesh Ghosh from the University of California, San Francisco tells us how air pollution is contributing to 6 million preterm births globally each year, and Dr Catherine Nakalembe of the University of Maryland and Africa Lead for NASA Harvest returns to the programme as NASA/USGS launches Landsat 9. Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Samara Linton Image: Mosquito net demonstration in a community outreach centre in Kenya Credit: Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images

Twisted History
The Twisted History of Insects

Twisted History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 66:05


Scaphism, Colorado Beatles, Fleas, Unit 731, The Black Well, Asian Giant Honeybee, Camel Spiders, Malaria, Cockroach Milk, Hawk Moth Caterpillar, and more ...