Podcasts about coloradans

State in the western United States

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Best podcasts about coloradans

Latest podcast episodes about coloradans

The Daily Sun-Up
State fish no longer extinct & How Coloradans are coping with inflation; Antonio Valverde y Cosio

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 14:26


Today - Colorado Sun reporters Michael Booth and Tamara Chuang discuss their recent coverage of how Coloradans are coping with inflation, what's happened with housing prices and … fish.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Colorado Inside Out
September 23rd, 2022

Colorado Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 27:50


COLORADO INSIDE OUT presents a thought-provoking and in-depth analysis of Colorado current affairs. Each week, topical experts discuss the latest in Colorado Politics. Produced by Colorado Public Television PBS12, this must-see show has been informing Coloradans since its debut in 1992.

Tech Talk Y'all
I actually have my 3D printed teeth

Tech Talk Y'all

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 35:52


In this episode: Ethereum completes the “Merge,” which ends mining and cuts energy use by 99.95% Coloradans can now pay state tax bills with cryptocurrency TikTok just launched a BeReal clone called TikTok Now Hilton to design astronaut suites, facilities for Voyager’s private space station Starlab Watch out, Zoom - Slack is here to eat your lunch Framework’s new Chromebook is upgradable and customizable Elon Musk Says the Optimus, Tesla's Human-Like Robot, Will Premiere on September 30 Amid Investor Hesitancy Twitter is facing an exodus of hundreds of workers since Elon Musk pitched them on his vision for the company three months ago AD BREAK Uber apparently hacked by teen, employees thought it was a joke Uber Investigating Breach of Its Computer Systems Google accidentally transferred a quarter of a million dollars to a blogger and took almost a month to ask for it back Getty Images bans AI-generated content over fears of legal challenges Weird and Wacky: 3D printed Blizzflosser is the most customized and quickest way to gently floss all your teeth at once The last man selling floppy disks says he still receives orders from airlines Watch this team of drones 3D-print a tower Tech Rec: Sanjay - USB-C to USB-A adapter & Buy Mullvad cards on Amazon! (ep 175) Adam - Carrot Weather --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/techtalkyall/message

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
American before Republican: Hugh Hewitt and Joe O'Dea

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 4:16


In this episode, Hugh Hewitt talks with Joe O'Dea, Republican candidate for Colorado's Senate Highlights:  • Is Kamala Harris delusional? The VP claims our borders are secure • Affordability, crime, inflation, and the border are key issues for Republicans heading into the midterms • Are working Americans in Colorado working an entire month for free? • Fentanyl has killed 1,800 Coloradans in the last year • Colorado, cocaine, and car thefts. What is going on?

The Craig Silverman Show
Episode 113 - Hard Hitting Colorado

The Craig Silverman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 141:39


Rundown -    Steve Busick - 06:37   Jordan Hedberg - 49:48   Troubadour Dave Gunders - 02:06:45   "Too Many Drivers" by Dave Gunders - 02:14:00   It is our Denver Broncos' season. For pro football stars like Russell Wilson, Denver has become the place to play. Former Broncos' linebacker Steve Busick, who won Rose Bowls and national championships at USC, joins our show to talk football.   As an LA kid growing up with a tough Marine dad and even tougher mother, Steve Busick describes life at USC including encounters with OJ Simpson, Marcus Allen, Ronnie Lott, and others. And wait till you hear of Steve's encounter with Muhammad Ali at LA's Wilshire Hotel.   Drafted in Dan Reeves' first draft class, Steve Busick wore #58 playing alongside Bronco greats Bob Swenson, Tom Jackson, Randy Gradishar and Jim Ryan. The Broncos won big as John Elway hit his stride in the mid-1980's. Steve Busick explains why he and other Broncos stay in Denver to raise their families.   Jordan Hedberg is a rural Coloradan. He's a Westcliffe, Colorado dude which means he lives in remote Custer County. As a kid, Jordan Hedberg tells us he lived in Boulder and attended the same elementary school as Burke and JonBenet Ramsey. Not only that, they were friends.   Listen to Jordan Hedberg, publisher of the Wet Mountain Tribune, and you may want to visit Custer County. Or perhaps not. It is scenic but mega-MAGA. Jordan Hedberg tells us Linda Stanley won the 11th Judicial District DA job just by toting an AR-15. We discuss Stanley's Barry Morphew murder case mistakes.   Jordan Hedberg's newspaper has a rich history – delivering a piece of the Wet Mountain Valley since 1883 - and was recently featured on 9News. There's a beef with the county commissioners and now, allegations of retaliation. https://www.9news.com/article/news/local/next/next-with-kyle-clark/custer-county-paper-first-amendment-lawsuit-commissioners/73-84f100cd-e508-4061-a80c-25274426fff6   Dave Gunders gifts us with his blues song, Too Many Drivers and explains how it is about infidelity. This deep song gives many meanings to the word Drive, but since it is football season and we're talking Broncos, remember in The Drive in Cleveland.  This hard hitting episode is fit for football season.

Colorado Inside Out
September 9th, 2022

Colorado Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 27:38


COLORADO INSIDE OUT presents a thought-provoking and in-depth analysis of Colorado current affairs. Each week, topical experts discuss the latest in Colorado Politics. Produced by Colorado Public Television PBS12, this must-see show has been informing Coloradans since its debut in 1992.

Colorado Inside Out
September 1st, 2022

Colorado Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 27:30


COLORADO INSIDE OUT presents a thought-provoking and in-depth analysis of Colorado current affairs. Each week, topical experts discuss the latest in Colorado Politics. Produced by Colorado Public Television PBS12, this must-see show has been informing Coloradans since its debut in 1992.

KUNC's Colorado Edition
Veteran outreach; bear encounters; student loan forgiveness; Ethiopian coffee ceremonies

KUNC's Colorado Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 22:34


On this week's Colorado Edition, we learn about a new mobile outreach unit to connect veterans experiencing homelessness with resources. As bear encounters get more common, we hear how one community is looking to reduce bear-human interactions. We get a breakdown of how the student loan forgiveness plan will affect Coloradans. Finally, we learn about Ethiopian coffee ceremonies happening in Aurora.Featured SegmentsThis week, the Veterans Community Project of Longmont launched a brand new mobile outreach unit. The van will connect veterans experiencing homelessness in rural parts of northern Colorado with resources like transportation and temporary housing. KUNC's Beau Beaker spoke to the project's executive director, Jennifer Seybold, about the mobile unit and efforts to aid unhoused veterans in our region. Around here, it's not unusual for a bear to wander into a neighborhood, especially as we head into fall. That can be dangerous – for the residents and bears. The Mountain West News Bureau's Will Walkey reports on a community looking to reduce these encounters. Last week President Joe Biden announced a sweeping student loan forgiveness plan that would erase up to $20,000 of debt for many borrowers. To learn more about how this debt forgiveness plan will impact Coloradans, we spoke with Jason Gonzales from Chalkbeat Colorado. He reports on higher education and has been covering the student debt crisis. The Colorado Dream podcast from KUNC shares the stories of Coloradans who are overcoming obstacles to create a better life for themselves and their families in an effort to achieve the American Dream. Hosted by Stephanie Daniel, the latest season, called “Newcomers Welcome”, explores the Black immigrant experience in Colorado as told through the eyes of one African immigrant and Aurora, as the city - and its residents - strive to become an inclusive home for all.In this bonus episode, Stephanie profiles an Ethiopian immigrant who loves to share a piece of her culture with others.CreditsColorado Edition is hosted by Yoselin Meza Miranda and produced by the KUNC newsroom, led by news director Sean Corcoran. Web was edited by digital operations manager Ashley Jefcoat. The mission of Colorado Edition is to deepen understanding of life in Northern Colorado through authentic conversation and storytelling.Colorado Edition is made possible with support from our KUNC members. Thank you!Our theme music was composed by Colorado musicians Briana Harris and Johnny Burroughs. Other music in the show by Blue Dot Sessions.

Colorado In Depth
How three Coloradans found solutions for chronic pain

Colorado In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 35:16


One in five Americans has dealt with chronic pain. It can be physically, mentally and financially draining. It can lead to addiction, death and even thoughts of suicide. But some Coloradans have found new solutions to manage their pain, like brain therapy and medications other than opioids. We talk with people who experience pain, and physicians, to uncover these solutions and provide hope for pain sufferers and their loved ones who want to help. This is an installment of Colorado In Depth, a podcast featuring documentary news, investigations and special reporting from the CPR newsroom. Follow the show for stories from the plains to the mountains, the Western Slope to the Four Corners. Hosted by Rachel Estabrook Reporters: Ryan Warner and Andrea Dukakis Editor and producer: Rachel Estabrook Production, sound design and mixing: Pedro Lumbrano Artwork: Mia Rincón Executive producers: Kevin Dale, Brad Turner, Gillian Coldsnow

What's On Tap Radio
How NOT to Drink a Beer at a Baseball Game!!!

What's On Tap Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 86:40


On tap this week: America loses it after fan caught turning hot dog into beer drinking straw, Want to brink less alcohol?….Drink out of a shot glass., Shiner Beer and Academy Sports + Outdoors launch new collab, Auntie Anne's launches new Oktoberfest Lager made with pretzels, A Wyoming brewery offers free beer for a year, Brewery offering Coloradans free solar cookers to help prevent wildfires, Manchester United fans acting wild. Featuring special guest Ryan Hiscox Sales Manager and Breweriana Historian at Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery talks about his impressive PBR memorabilia collection. All this and so much more presented by Cask Branding. Enjoy the show!

Colorado Matters
Aug. 29, 2022: Midterms heat up; Shoe entrepreneur hits her stride

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 51:20


Ballots for the November election go out in just under two months. We talk about the key Colorado races. Then, Coloradans share their inflation hacks at the supermarket and the pump. Plus, a health condition meant she could no longer wear heels, so Boulder entrepreneur Leontyne Ashmore started her own shoe brand. Also, Colorado musicians you should know.

Colorado Inside Out
August 28th, 2022

Colorado Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 29:16


COLORADO INSIDE OUT presents a thought-provoking and in-depth analysis of Colorado current affairs. Each week, topical experts discuss the latest in Colorado Politics. Produced by Colorado Public Television PBS12, this must-see show has been informing Coloradans since its debut in 1992.

Colorado Inside Out
August 19th, 2022

Colorado Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 26:49


COLORADO INSIDE OUT presents a thought-provoking and in-depth analysis of Colorado current affairs. Each week, topical experts discuss the latest in Colorado Politics. Produced by Colorado Public Television PBS12, this must-see show has been informing Coloradans since its debut in 1992.

Common Sense Digest
The Impact of New Energy Codes on Colorado's Fraught Housing Market Part 1

Common Sense Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 25:29


The issue of housing is one we tackle repeatedly on Common Sense Digest because it touches every single Coloradan in some way and impacts the overall economic health and well-being of the state. Building off our recent report The Uncertain Future Cost of Colorado's Energy Infrastructure and Housing Affordability, this first in a two-part series on Common Sense Digest discuss the cost of implementing recently passed legislation that requires the adoption of a new energy code for buildings as well as what electrification of the built environment could cost Coloradans.   Joining Host and Chairman Earl Wright are CEO of the Colorado Association of Homebuilders and CEO of the HBA of Metro Denver, Ted Leighty, Founder of Confluence Companies Tim Walsh, and CSI 2022 Mike A. Leprino Fellow and report author Evelyn Lim. In Part 1, the four discuss the state of the Colorado housing market, the goals of recently passed energy code legislation, the increased costs those new codes will result in for builders (and ultimately homebuyers and employers), and what challenges exist in implementing them.  Thank you for listening to Common Sense Digest. Please rate, review, and subscribe on your favorite podcatcher. All of our podcasts can be found here.  In addition to being the CSI 2022 Mike A. Leprino Fellow, Evelyn Lim is the Former Region 8 Director at the US Housing and Urban Development and is now the Director of Policy and Research at the American Cornerstone Institute. Since 2017 Ted Leighty has been the CEO of the Colorado Association of Home Builders and CEO of the HBA of Metro Denver since 2020. Ted has extensive experience in Colorado real estate, having served as Vice President of Government Affairs for the Colorado Association of Realtors.  He has also chaired the Colorado Real Estate Alliance and the Colorado Competitive Council. Tim Walsh is the founder of Confluence Companies which plans, designs, develops, and provides construction management services here in Colorado. Since its founding, Confluence has managed the development and construction of over $750 million in projects including 2,000 multi-family residential units.

Common Sense Digest
The Impact of New Energy Codes on Colorado's Fraught Housing Market Part 2

Common Sense Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 23:56


Following Part 1 of this series, we re-join Host and Chairman Earl Wright, CEO of the Colorado Association of Homebuilders and CEO of the HBA of Metro Denver, Ted Leighty, Founder of Confluence Companies Tim Walsh, and CSI 2022 Mike A. Leprino Fellow and report author Evelyn Lim. They continue their conversation about the state of the Colorado housing market, the goals of recently passed energy code legislation, the increased costs those new codes will result in for builders (and ultimately homebuyers and employers), and what challenges exist in implementing them. Our recent report The Uncertain Future Cost of Colorado's Energy Infrastructure and Housing Affordability, foregrounds this discussion as our experts dig into the cost of implementing recently passed legislation that requires the adoption of a new energy code for buildings as well as what electrification of the built environment could cost Coloradans.   Thank you for listening to Common Sense Digest. Please rate, review, and subscribe on your favorite podcatcher. All of our podcasts can be found here.  In addition to being the CSI 2022 Mike A. Leprino Fellow, Evelyn Lim is the Former Region 8 Director at the US Housing and Urban Development and is now the Director of Policy and Research at the American Cornerstone Institute. Since 2017 Ted Leighty has been the CEO of the Colorado Association of Home Builders and CEO of the HBA of Metro Denver since 2020. Ted has extensive experience in Colorado real estate, having served as Vice President of Government Affairs for the Colorado Association of Realtors.  He has also chaired the Colorado Real Estate Alliance and the Colorado Competitive Council. Tim Walsh is the founder of Confluence Companies which plans, designs, develops, and provides construction management services here in Colorado. Since its founding, Confluence has managed the development and construction of over $750 million in projects including 2,000 multi-family residential units.

Colorado Matters
Aug. 18, 2022: Colorado River crisis; Helping Black Coloradans buy homes

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 50:05


The federal government says livelihoods are at stake as the Colorado River drops to new lows. Jennifer Pitt with the National Audubon Society explains what it could mean in Colorado and surrounding states. Then, how a Loveland farmer is adapting to climate change. And, a new fund that's helping Black homebuyers in metro-Denver achieve the dream of home ownership.

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast
Steffan Tubbs Show 8-16-22 Hr2

The Steffan Tubbs Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 44:22


Our guest for the hour is Colorado's 4th Judicial DA Michael Allen. We discuss the fentanyl crisis, increased crime, and self=described "progressive" DA's here and around the country. We talk about the source of fentanyl, human trafficking in CO and other top issues impacting Coloradans. The U.S. Navy veteran wraps the hour discussing the state's first Veterans Court in the 4th JD.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Sun-Up
Jared Orsi is Colorado's new state historian; Columbine High School remembers all they overcame

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 19:23


Today - Colorado has a new state historian, Jared Orsi of Colorado State University. In his new role, he aims to amplify under-told stories, share his expertise of how Coloradans have shaped public lands - and how they also have been shaped by them.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Athena Baca-Chieza: Understanding Trans-Racial Identity

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 54:43


In this episode, we speak to Athena Baca-Chieza, Associate Professor, Clinical Director, and Training Coordinator at the University of Colorado Denver, about tran-racial identity, including: Speaking to her experiences as an adoptee and the struggles she faced being different from her family members. How understanding her trans-racial identity helped her more deeply understand herself and how her identity has shaped her experiences. How the Latinx culture can be anti-Black and how her Afro-Latina Identity impacted her relationships. About our guest: Dr. Athena Y. Baca-Chieza is a clinical health psychologist in Denver, Colorado. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology in 2006. Dr. Baca-Chieza is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado, Denver, where she is the Coordinator of Clinical Training and Director of a community mental health clinic in the CU Denver Clinical Health Psychology PhD program. In addition to her current position at CU, Dr. Baca-Chieza also works as a consulting psychologist in the Hem/Onc and Bone Marrow Transplant program at University of Colorado Hospital, where she supports patients who are navigating the complex biopsychosocial intersections of living with blood cancers, and she also conducts pretransplant evaluations. Previously, Dr. Baca-Chieza worked for 10 years at the Colorado Blood Cancer Institute as a BMT psychologist and Training Director, as well as an integrated primary care provider at the South Texas Veterans Health Care System in San Antonio, Texas.Dr. Baca-Chieza is actively involved in leadership and advocacy for her profession and has served on the board of the Colorado Psychological Association (CPA) since 2015, when she was elected as the state's Diversity Representative. In 2018 she was elected to serve as President of CPA, a 3-year position, which afforded her opportunities to write laws that impact mental health outcomes for Coloradans, and especially marginalized populations such as LGBTQIA communities who were vulnerable to archaic and harmful practices. Dr. Baca-Chieza is interested in consultation psychology, including leadership selection and development in the healthcare arena and enjoys any opportunity to present on topics related to leadership, advocacy, and professional development. Dr. Baca-Chieza proudly hails from the beautiful Bordertown of El Paso, TX, is fluently bi-lingual in Spanish and English and identifies as Afrolatina (Mexican and Black). She lives in the Park Hill neighborhood of Denver with her spouse, Chido, who works as a nurse, and their two daughters, Raphaelle and Juno, who attend Stedman Elementary school, where Athena is an active PTA member and advocate for black and brown families in the Denver Public School system. They also have a 5-pound Chihuahua named Fiona.Links:Marisol's website: https://www.marisolerlacher.com/LinkedIn: Marisol - www.linkedin.com/in/marisol-solarte-erlacher & Athena - https://www.linkedin.com/in/athena-y-baca-chieza-6564823/Instagram: @Resilience_and_ResistanceWe have partnered with US Bank to support our communities like this one through responsive and humbled actions focused on addressing racial and economic inequities and creating lasting change through our Community Possible Grant Program,https://www.usbank.com/about-us-bank/community/community-possible-grant-program.htmlIf you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn more.Check out exclusive offers from our sponsors and partners - https://www.theplug-agency.com/sponsorsProduction CreditsArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comMusic: Inte-Gritty by Bianca MikahnPodcast Editing and Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comDistribution by: The Plug Podcast Network - https://art19.com/networks/the-plugSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Colorado Inside Out
August 12th, 2022

Colorado Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 26:41


COLORADO INSIDE OUT presents a thought-provoking and in-depth analysis of Colorado current affairs. Each week, topical experts discuss the latest in Colorado Politics. Produced by Colorado Public Television PBS12, this must-see show has been informing Coloradans since its debut in 1992.

City Cast Denver
The Real Story Behind the $750 Check in Your Mailbox

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 16:16


More than 3 million Coloradans are receiving $750 checks in the mail this week, but who's to thank? Is it Governor Jared Polis and the Democrats, who re-branded and re-worked our tax policy to create this ‘Colorado Cashback'? Or is it the conservatives who convinced Colorado voters to approve the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights (aka TABOR) in 1992 and have defended it ever since? Host Bree Davies and producer Paul Karolyi dive into the politics of TABOR to figure out the real story behind these $750 checks.  For an even deeper dive, Bree recommends The Taxman, CPR's podcast series about the origins and lasting impact of TABOR.  Want to get more plugged in to all the cool stuff happening in Denver? Subscribe to our daily newsletter: https://denver.citycast.fm/newsletter/ What are you doing with your $750? Tell us on Twitter: @citycastdenver Leave us a voicemail with your name and neighborhood, and you might hear it on the show: (720) 500-5418‬ Looking to advertise on City Cast Denver? Check out our options for podcast and newsletter ads at citycast.fm/advertise Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Colorado Matters
Aug. 11, 2022: How climate change bill could impact home energy use; The new Broncos owners

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 51:45


From new windows to electric cars, we ask what the federal climate bill could mean for Coloradans and their pocketbooks. Plus, meet the new owners of the Denver Broncos. Then, ancient Cambodian artifacts sold to the Denver Art Museum using false documents were returned this week. We'll explore the illegal art trade. And we enter the "skyspace."

The Forgotten Art Project
30 - Katie Kramer on the Boettcher Foundation

The Forgotten Art Project

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 38:33


In this episode your host, David Weaver, talks with entrepreneur Katie Kramer, President & CEO of the Boettcher Foundation.    As president and CEO, Katie has come full-circle with the Boettcher Foundation. She was selected as a Boettcher Scholar in 1993 and has been at the foundation in various roles since 1997, including as the director of the scholarship program, vice president—a title she assumed at the age of 26.    Boettcher's mission is to support the potential of Coloradans by providing Scholarships & Grants. Every day they set out for excellence across Colorado by investing in their most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come.   During this episode Katie & David discuss her journey through life & into the Boettcher Foundation, how she moved her way up with the Company & her take on leadership after 25+ years in leadership.     To learn more about the Boettcher foundation, click HERE:  https://boettcherfoundation.org/   If you'd like to be a guest on Sacrifice to Success, click HERE:  https://lnkd.in/dUj-4bEV   To learn more about how I serve business owners, visit: davidweavercoach.com

Colorado Matters
Aug. 8, 2022: What’s up with Colorado’s economy; The joy of matchbooks; South Park' is 25

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 51:33


What does this weird economy mean for Coloradans? Then, Steamboat Springs voters consider a measure to build affordable housing. Also, why a plaque is coming down at the site of an anti-Chinese riot in Denver. Plus, cigarettes are out of favor, but a Colorado match business thrives. And, “South Park” celebrates 25 years on TV.

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast
Morning Magazine Podcast – Monday, August 8, 2022

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 29:21


On today’s Morning Magazine, food inflation is putting pressure on food banks and what they can make available to their growing client base. Then, CityCast Denver talks about abortion without euphemisms and what longer wait times mean for Coloradans. (Download […]

Colorado Inside Out
August 5th, 2022

Colorado Inside Out

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 29:06


COLORADO INSIDE OUT presents a thought-provoking and in-depth analysis of Colorado current affairs. Each week, topical experts discuss the latest in Colorado Politics. Produced by Colorado Public Television PBS12, this must-see show has been informing Coloradans since its debut in 1992.

Colorado Water Conservation Board
Water Talk Episode 16: Colorado's Water Plan 2023

Colorado Water Conservation Board

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:24


On Episode 16 of Colorado Water Talk, CWCB's Russ Sands talks about the new and improved Colorado Water Plan, including how Coloradans can get involved, and what to expect leading up to the Plan's final release in 2023. Links from the show: https://cwcb.colorado.gov/colorado-water-plan https://engagecwcb.org/ https://cwcb.colorado.gov/funding/colorado-water-plan-grants Twitter: @CWCB_DNR

City Cast Denver
Abortion. Abortion. Abortion!

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 32:13


It's only been six weeks since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ripple effects are still being felt across the country — including here in Colorado, where surprising new fronts have opened in the battle to keep reproductive healthcare safe, legal, and accessible. Today, host Bree Davies sits down with two Colorado experts on abortion issues: Denver Post reporter Elizabeth Hernandez shares insight from her reporting on healthcare providers and Coloradans looking for reproductive healthcare, and Justine Sandoval, a political insider who's been working on abortion rights legislation for close to a decade.   Find all of Elizabeth's fantastic reporting on the local ripple effects of the Roe decision via The Denver Post. Justine mentioned supporting abortion access advocates already doing the work, like: Cobalt, COLOR Latina, and National Abortion Funds.  Looking for fun stuff to do this weekend? Check out the City Cast Denver newsletter for editor Peyton Garcia's handpicked list: https://denver.citycast.fm/newsletter/ Find us on Twitter: @citycastdenver Learn more about the sponsors of this episode: Trade Coffee How to Buy a Home podcast Looking to advertise on City Cast Denver? Check out our options for podcast and newsletter ads at citycast.fm/advertise Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Distance Daddies
Ep 8| Interview with Lauren Gregory

Distance Daddies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 59:50


We interview Lauren Gregory (@lgeeeeezy), an All-American runner at the University of Arkansas, winner of the USATF Vertical Mountain Championships, and finalist in the 1500 meters at USA Outdoor Championships. We discuss how the native Coloradan got started in running from an early age and never stopped. She talks with us about her high school running career, her transition to mountain races and running at the University of Arkansas, and how she battled injuries while there to ultimately find balance and help propel her to even more success --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/distancedaddies/support

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast
Morning Magazine Podcast – Wednesday, August 3, 2022

KGNU Morning Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 25:10


On today’s Morning Magazine, we’ll hear from the state Attorney General about restitution payments and student loan forgiveness to thousands of Coloradans as part of a nationwide settlement with a student loan company. Then, we'll share a speech by a […]

The Daily Sun-Up
Extreme heat is posing a threat to Coloradans' health; Governor Davis Waite

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 15:57


Few people die in Colorado each year from heat-related causes, but heat remains a top concern for medical and public health experts. One major reason: Heat can be particularly dangerous for people who have underlying health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, and can push them into a medical crisis. And as climate change warms the environment, heat is only posing more of a threat to people's health. Health care reporter John Ingold talks to Erica Breunlin about how heat could put Coloradans' wellbeing at greater risk as summers continue to turnSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On Land
Bonus: Representing land stewards on Colorado wolf advisory group

On Land

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 6:57


We thought you might enjoy this short interview that aired on Raymond Toney's Colorado Howl radio show, produced by KDUR Durango. It features WLA's programs director, Hallie Mahowald, who is on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife stakeholder advisory group (SAG) for the reintroduction and management of wolves in Colorado.  In 2020, Coloradans voted to reintroduce wolves to the western half of the state. As you'll hear in this short segment, Hallie is working to ensure that landowners, producers, and land managers have a seat at the table in this critical process, and making sure that they have the tools and resources available to share the landscape with wolves, which are already dispersing into North Park from Wyoming. Show Notes: https://onland.link/pod

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado has paid back 87% of what it borrowed to help pay unemployment; Denver & Rio Grande Railroad

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 14:16


Colorado has paid back 87% of the $1 billion it borrowed from the federal government to help give unemployment benefits to out-of-work Coloradans during the pandemic. As of this week, the outstanding balance was just over $133 million. The unemployment loan is on track to be paid off by mid November. Colorado Sun reporter Tamara Chuang has the full story.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fact Check This Podcast
Ep. 180 - Colorado Senate Candidate Brian Peotter

Fact Check This Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:30


For this episode I'm joined by Brian Peotter, who is running for Senate in Colorado against a terrible Democratic incumbent and a Republican challenger who isn't honestly any better. Brian talks about hi previous run for City Council, some of his campaign points, and what he hopes to see happen in his state to move things toward more liberty for Coloradans. Go check Brian out and send him some support! Brian Peotter for U.S. Senate --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/factcheckthis/support

Glocal Citizens
Episode 135: Soul Food and Black Smoke Storytelling with Adrian Miller

Glocal Citizens

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 49:22


Greetings Glocal Citizens! This week's conversation is a great complement to a favorite summer past-time and what many consider delicacy--Barbecue. My guest is fellow Coloradan and Stanford Alum, Adrian Miller - The Soul Food Scholar. He is an award winning food writer, attorney, and certified barbecue judge. Two of his books, his first in 2014, Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time and most recent in 2022, Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue are the James Beard Foundation (https://www.jamesbeard.org/blog/the-2022-james-beard-award-winners) Award for Reference, History, and Scholarship winners. His second book, The President's Kitchen Cabinet: The Story of the African Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families, From the Washingtons to the Obamas was a finalist for a 2018 NAACP Image Award (https://naacpimageawards.net/naacp-hollywood-bureau/) for “Outstanding Literary Work – Non-Fiction.” He is also featured in the Netflix hit docu-series, "High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America (https://www.netflix.com/title/81034518)." He is currently the executive director of the Colorado Council of Churches (https://cochurches.org) and, as such, is the first African American, and the first layperson, to hold that position. As well, he is the co-project director and lead curator for the forthcoming “Proclaiming Colorado's Black History” exhibit at the Museum of Boulder.  In addition to fascinating anecdotes about foods common on three sides of the Atlantic Ocean, you'll get a sense of how this lawyer by training found himself on a career path in service not only to his dreams, but to the uncovering, elevation and preservation of narratives about culture defining foods and food practices. Where to find Adrian? www.adrianemiller.com (https://adrianemiller.com) On LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/adrian-miller-792b885/) On Twitter (https://twitter.com/soulfoodscholar) On Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/soulfoodscholar/) On Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/adrian.miller.564/) What's Adrian watching? Star Trek (https://www.startrek.com) Law and Order (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_%26_Order) Other topics of interest: One America Initiative (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_America_Initiative) John Egerton's Soul Food Cookbook (https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B00KEPHTH8&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_JM83Q0SEYBP0ESC5E655&tag=glocalcitizens20) Southern Foodways Alliance (https://www.southernfoodways.org) Red Drinks in Black Culture (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/a-brief-history-of-red-drink-180980046/) Edna Lewis (https://www.kinfolk.com/edna-lewis/) Ultimate Braai Master (https://ultimatebraaimaster.co.za) Kebab (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kebab), Suya (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suya), Shawarma (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shawarma), Yakatori (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakitori), Asada (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carne_asada) Special Guest: Adrian Miller.

The Daily Sun-Up
Why it's taking so long for Coloradans to get unemployment claims processed; Fort Garland

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 14:11


It's now taking nearly three months for Coloradans who are out of work to get a new unemployment claim processed. So why is it taking so long? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Love Talk Live with Jaime Bronstein

In this episode of "Love Talk Live," I interview matchmaker Abby Rosenblum. Abby is the founder and head matchmaker of The Social: Modern Matchmaking, the premiere matchmaking service for Colorado singles. She works with people who are relationship-minded, growth-oriented, and just too busy to spend hours swiping and looking for their person. Her passion is for connection, and her mission is to spread more love into the world. She's a 5th generation Coloradan, an avid skier, loves to cook, and just got married last year! Some topics discussed are: What it's like to work with a matchmaker How to find a matchmaker that's a good fit for you When do you know if you're ready to hire a matchmaker Why it's so important to use all avenues in dating -- online, meetups, matchmakers, your circle etc. How to approach dating more intentionally/mindfully You don't want to miss this episode!

City Cast Denver
Our Summer Reads: Finding Connection and Community in ‘Mixed Company'

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 14:11


Jenny Shank grew up in southeast Denver, but when it was time for school, she was bused all over the city — from an elementary school with a Chicano-rooted curriculum on the West Side to a predominantly Black middle school near Five Points. And it was those experiences that informed her new collection of short stories, “Mixed Company.” It explores all the awkward, comical, and challenging ways that very different kinds of Coloradans can find connection. The book has been awarded the George Garrett Fiction Prize and a Colorado Book Award since it was released last November — which is when host Bree Davies sat down with Shank to talk about their shared history with Denver Public Schools and busing, and how they understand their similar education experiences differently today. NOTE: This interview originally aired in November 2021, and is back as part of our special summer book series. Tune in all week for more reading recommendations! To learn more about her work including “Mixed Company,” check out her website, JennyShank.com And for more on Denver's history of busing, check out our episode from September 8 with playwright Alicia Smith Young!  What books are keeping you company this summer? Tweet us your recs! @citycastdenver Sign up for our morning newsletter! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Colorado Outdoors - the Podcast for Colorado Parks and Wildlife
S1E31: 1.31 - Keep Colorado Wild Pass - July 11, 2022

Colorado Outdoors - the Podcast for Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 9:59


Starting on Jan. 1, 2023, Colorado residents can get a $29 Keep Colorado Wild Pass during their annual vehicle registration through the Division of Motor Vehicles.As Coloradans, we treasure our outdoor lifestyle and state's beauty. This new state park pass gives all Coloradans an easy way to invest in Colorado's outdoors, wildlife and local communities in a meaningful way. Your contribution shows you care about Colorado and want to keep our landscapes healthy for current and future generations. Money raised will be used to protect wildlife habitats, search and rescue programs, avalanche safety, local outdoor community projects and more.

The FOX News Rundown
Colorado Senate Nominee Hopes To Join Red Wave This Fall

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 20:36 Very Popular


In Colorado's hotly contested Senate primary, Joe O'Dea came out victorious. O'Dea beat opponent Rep. Ron Hanks, who despite being 'far-right,' was the Democrats' preferred candidate to face Senator Michael Bennett in the fall. Joe O'Dea is making his political debut with his Senate campaign. O'Dea is a businessman and CEO who believes his background in the construction industry gives him an edge with blue-collar voters. He discusses how his business has been impacted by inflation and rising gas prices, and how that helps him relate to Coloradans facing these issues every day. Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the interview in our original segment. On the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire interview with Joe O'Dea about the state of his campaign and how he hopes to help Republicans claim the Senate this fall. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Colorado Senate Nominee Hopes To Join Red Wave This Fall

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 20:36


In Colorado's hotly contested Senate primary, Joe O'Dea came out victorious. O'Dea beat opponent Rep. Ron Hanks, who despite being 'far-right,' was the Democrats' preferred candidate to face Senator Michael Bennett in the fall. Joe O'Dea is making his political debut with his Senate campaign. O'Dea is a businessman and CEO who believes his background in the construction industry gives him an edge with blue-collar voters. He discusses how his business has been impacted by inflation and rising gas prices, and how that helps him relate to Coloradans facing these issues every day. Due to time limitations, we could not include all of the interview in our original segment. On the FOX News Rundown Extra, you will hear our entire interview with Joe O'Dea about the state of his campaign and how he hopes to help Republicans claim the Senate this fall. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado's abortion providers see surge in patients; Northeastern Coloradans attempt to secede

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 10:53


Colorado's abortion providers are seeing a surge of patients seeking medical care after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe-v-Wade and a swell of states ban abortions. And the are preparing for even more, with increased hiring, training, mobile clinics and telehealth services for  people who can use medication to terminate pregnancies. Colorado Sun reporter Tatiana Flowers spoke with several abortion service providers in Colorado about the expansion of services following the high court's controversial ruling. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KUNC's Colorado Edition
Colorado Edition: Roe v. Wade in Colorado; salvaging memories from the Marshall Fire; the Greeley Stampede's 100th year

KUNC's Colorado Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 17:42


Coloradans are still processing the Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights. Some residents are joining together to protest, while others are making plans to protect — or challenge — access to abortion here. KUNC's Scott Franz has more on the early reactions to the ruling, and what it might mean going forward.KUNC's Beau Baker spoke to Dr. Warren Hern, director of the Boulder Abortion Clinic. He's been providing access to care since 1975, and says that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade could impact abortion services in Colorado.In the months after the Marshall Fire devastated parts of Boulder County, many families returned to sift through the debris. KUNC's Leigh Paterson brings us a story about the memories contained in salvaged objects.The Greeley Stampede returned this year for the first time since COVID.. The summer rodeo festival celebrated its 100th year with rides, children activities, and food vendors at the Island Grove Regional Park. KUNC's Yoselin Meza Miranda was there, along with lots of families enjoying live music, kid's sheep races, and, of course, a multitude of different food trucks.Colorado Edition is hosted by Yoselin Meza Miranda and produced by the KUNC newsroom, led by news director Sean Corcoran. Web was edited by digital operations manager Ashley Jefcoat. Additional production support was provided by Stephanie Daniel. The mission of Colorado Edition is to deepen understanding of life in Northern Colorado through authentic conversation and storytelling.Colorado Edition is made possible with support from our KUNC members. Thank you!Our theme music was composed by Colorado musicians Briana Harris and Johnny Burroughs. Other music in the show by Blue Dot Sessions.

THE WONDER: Science-Based Paganism

Remember, we welcome comments, questions and suggested topics at thewonderpodcastQs@gmail.com   S3E23 TRANSCRIPT: ----more----   Yucca: Welcome back to the wonder science-based paganism. I'm one of your hosts, Yucca, and this episode, we're doing something new and kind of exciting that we've never done before. This is our mail bag episode. So we've gotten a lot of responses and questions from all of you on the email. And we wanted to talk about some of these. Mark: Yeah. We love it when we hear from our listeners. It's really helpful for us to know what you're enjoying what you'd like to hear more about all that kind of stuff. And we've, we've recently received some messages with some topics that probably aren't big enough for a whole episode by themselves, but they're important questions and we want to address them. So, yeah, this is, this is the mail bag and I imagine, going forward, we'll probably do more of them as we get more, more messages from listeners. Yucca: Yeah from you. That's right. So let's start, we've got a few from Paul and I've just cut out the, the bits from the emails, right? I'm not gonna read the whole thing, but this first one is if you guys felt like commenting on any pointers, other podcast books, webpages, etcetera, that could help a nube in the beginning of this journey. That'd be great. So I think mark, this is one that might be great for you to take. Cause I think you have a little bit more exposure to some of the, the blog world and all of that. Mark: I mean, I can certainly, there's a, a group of there's a resources and links page on the atheopagan blog@atheopagan.org. And I would recommend checking out a bunch of those links. Natural pagans.com is a is a an aggregation site that pulls writing on naturalistic paganism from a bunch of different sources and puts them together in one place where you can find them. So that's one thing to look at the naturalistic paganism website is another great source for information. Yucca: right, Mark: if you just want kind of overviews on what Ethiopia paganism is and the principles, and just sort of, broad descriptions about, what it is that we're practicing and what our values are. The website of the Ethiopia society is a good one to go to. And that is V AP society.org. Yucca: mm-hmm Mark: Uh, so that once Yucca: AP as in atheopagan mm-hmm Mark: Yes. So it's V AP society.org. That's another place where you can find quite a bit of information and you can legally Orain Yucca: right, of course. Your Mark: Just like at the universal life church, it's perfectly legal. You can perform weddings, all that kind of stuff. Because we are a registered religious nonprofit in the United States. So that's something that's cool and exciting. In terms of, Yucca: own book, right? Mark has an excellent book Mark: Oh yes. My book Ethiopia, paganism and earth honoring path rooted in science. You can order it from any bookstore. I recommend your local independent bookstore because they are great and we support them. And I'm working on another one, which there will be hopefully news about sometime soon. But it'll be a while before it's done. So. In other books, I really recommend rating Sweetgrass by Robin wall Kimmer, which is it's more of a worldview book. It's not really a, here's how to do rituals book, but it's, she is both a botanist an academic botanist and a registered member of the citizen. Patua Tommy Native indigenous tribe. And so she comes at her perspective about the human relationship with nature from both of those perspectives and weaves them together in this very beautiful and illuminating kind of way. So that's once against braiding sweet grass by Robin wall Kimmer Yucca: mm-hmm Mark: I know that she's written other steps that's out there on the web. You can search for her name and you'll find good stuff that she's published. Yucca: Right. Mark: It's not nontheistic, but I do recommend the earth path by Starhawk, which I think is. Yucca: It was very influential for me as a teenager. Like it's an excellent book. Mark: It's a really good book. And, I suspect she's always very circumspect about this, but I suspect that Starhawk is not a very woo woo person. My conjecture and this is just apropo of reading and observation and stuff is that, she may not subscribe to supernaturalism. But she's very careful not to come out explicitly and say that because a lot of people around her do, and she doesn't want to be off putting to them. And she's such luminary in the community that that would really make waves, Yucca: right. Well, it's, what, what is one's goal, right? What is, yeah. And that's, that's my take with my interactions with her as well, but of course, neither of us are her and can speak for her, Mark: course, and, and I'm not trying Yucca: Yeah.  Mark: The reason that I say that is that the book is not a heavily theistic book Yucca: yeah, yeah. Mark: or, or magical, and in terms of supernaturalism kind of book it's really about living life with a relationship with the natural world and in seeking to be a healing presence on the planet towards the natural world. Yucca: And there is a component in that that you can do or skip, but I really advise doing it there's activities that she gives. I don't remember if it's the beginning or the end of each chapter, but she talks about the concept. She gives examples from real life and then gives you things to do. And if you do those actual activities and those practices, they're really well designed and they, they tie into a lot of the stuff that we talk about here with the being present and observing and noticing. So, a good, a good one to get into. Yeah. Mark: Yeah. I, I really agree with that. And similarly her book circle round Yucca: Mm-hmm Mark: with Anne hill which is a book for families and with activities for children, Yucca: That's a great one. That's a little bit more on the theistic side. There's like stories with like deities and stuff, but we've read some of those in, in my family, but we're just really clear with the kids. These are stories. These are not, the, these, these figures exist in the way that Santa Claus exist. That it's a figure in our minds and it means something to us, but they're not like people walking around. They're not, there's not a person. And boy, we'd be in for a shock if there, if we were wrong about that Mark: It would definitely reframe the art cosmology a whole lot. But so both of those books, I, I really recommend in terms of practice building for a family or with young children. And then just generally, between braiding sweet grass and the earth path, I think you get a pretty good window into the sort of approach that you and I Yucca take to our paganism. And, and with my book, thrown in there as well that it is, it's a mindset and a worldview and a way of carrying ourselves in the world. Yucca: Right. Mark: More than it is about, worshiping deities or doing, even doing rituals. I mean, even though that is a part of it celebrating the holidays, but at a really deep level, what our paganism is about is how we Yucca: There's there's another side to this that we can add in which is the wow and wonder part. And that's all the science books, the science books, the science podcast I've been binging planetary radio, that's the planetary societies podcast. And they have, they have a lovely host whose whose voice is just a pleasure to listen to. Right? And then they bring on just these amazing guests who talk about the incredible things that we're exploring about our world. And there are podcasts that you can listen to that are about, the microscopic world and the, this and the, that, and the books that just all the pop science books, or if you're in a specific field, you can dig really deep in and, and that's, that can be part of your paganism too. Mark: Sure sure. Because part of the, the wow factor that the sense of wonder in awe about being here at all and. Everything else that's here as well is being informed about it. And so, the, the more you, the more you unravel the universe, the more you, kind of pull on that thread to unravel the sweater, the more you, that stuff you discover, that's just amazing and, and thrilling in a, in a deep spiritual kind of way. It's just so exciting. When I first learned about complexity theory and emergence, I mean, I read two pages and then I would sort of skip around the room and then I, read two more pages and would do that again. Because these are amazing, amazing things and they answer deep questions about why complexity emerges from simpler systems. Right. So, definitely, all that science stuff is right up there with, with our paganism. And I think, I think I would, I'm gonna kind of stop there. There's, I mean, I'm sure that there are tons of books that I'm missing and but my, my encouragement would be less to go in the sort of mainstream paganism direction with your reading at least to start with, because a lot of that stuff is really focused on magical correspondences and relationship with theos and, do this kind of spell to get that kind of result. Yucca: Mm-hmm Mark: And. We just come at this from a different angle. Yucca: Right. Wonderful. Mark: question. Yucca: So our next question, this is the second part from Paul and there's a lot of questions wrapped up in this. So I'm gonna, I'm just gonna read the whole piece here. I know you are both involved in environmental conservation and activism, as I suspect many athe pagans would be. I wonder if you would have enough material to discuss what kinds of things in your personal life and practice aimed at planetary protection, what organizations might you be involved in? What experiences have you had with them? Do you organize events like cleanups or fundraising stuff along that line? So there's Mark: very multipart question. Yucca: Right. So yes, both of us have been professionally involved in these areas for, for many years. Mark, do you wanna start with your half on that? Mark: I was gonna invite you to start first. Yucca: all right, well, I'll Mark: why don't Yucca: start on my side. So my background is I am an ecologist. I'm a restoration oncologist, actually. So I would say that I have not been involved in conservation rather in restoration. And currently a lot of my work has been moving in the direction of the education and science communication, but I still do work. There's several several projects that I'm working on in which I work with local land owners in working on respirating their ecosystem. So we're monitoring, looking at management strategies and I'm arranged land specialist. So we're looking at grasslands, Juniper shrub lands. And I mean, this is really amazing rewarding stuff because we can. We can make very small little changes in the way that the land is being managed, because let me, let me step back for this for just a moment we manage land, whether we do it purposefully or not, there's, you're not there isn't land. There isn't anywhere where humans are not involved and not influencing. And there's this, this myth of the wild wilderness where, humans, if you just let it go, it'll do its thing. Every single thing we do is a choice that impacts our land. And I'm from a part of the world, which is a very brittle environment, which is a very fragile environment. And is in fact, this was, is the case for the whole half of the continent is very wounded. Right. And it's been, the ecosystems have been really, really struggling for hundreds, actually thousands of years, but especially within the last few hundred years when the last of the, of the megafauna were purposefully wiped out. And so a lot of what I do is we as waterway restoration, but also bringing animals back in very purposefully, bringing back the grazers in a way that matches what would be happening. If humans hadn't gotten rid of the grazers and hadn't divided everything up with Barb wire and doing all of this. So I work in this, this. Kind of intersection between the ranching world, which is the world I come from. And some of the, the science world in the, bringing that science in, into the restoration for the people who are the stewards of this land and, and really understand it and are part of the land. So that's a incredibly rewarding and kind of beautiful thing to, to get, to, to be honored, to be in involved with that.  Mark: Yeah, that's really important work. I'm I'm really glad you do that. Thank you. Yeah. I have, well, let me see. My part of the reason that I invited you to go first is so that I could sort of put this together in my mind, how to, how to do this. I used to be much more involved in the policy advocacy side of of environmental protection and restoration than I am now. I was the founding executive director of an organization in my local county, which I built over the 10 years that I was their ed into the largest environmental group of any kind on the north coast of California, even larger than Sierra club. And We used grassroots organizing to mobilize thousands of letters and postcards to elected officials on targeted issues, working specifically on local stuff. So municipal stuff, county scale stuff where that kind of outpouring of voter input is unheard of. And it scares the living hell out of elected officials. So we were able to accomplish some really amazing things. We prevented the subregional wastewater system in our area from going to our local river as the discharge point for their tertiary treated wastewater. So instead that water goes up to a natural geothermal field for geothermal energy generation, Yucca: Mm-hmm Mark: um, we we got. Planning ordinances in place approved by voters that drew growth boundaries around each of the cities in our county, so that they would stop sprawling into agricultural and habitat lands. So that now the growth that they do is in density and up rather which facilitates public transportation. It facilitates walkable neighborhoods, all of those good urban planning principles. We really put on the map here where I am in Sonoma county. And I'm, I'm proud to say that we, we are really on the cutting edge of what's happening in environmental planning in many ways here in Sonoma county. The organization is called Sonoma county conservation action. And though I left it more than 20 years ago. It's still going and still doing good stuff. And and I'm, I'm very, very proud of that work. Subsequent to that, I worked for seven years a, after being an executive director of a couple of organizations, I focused my attention on fundraising specifically because the public interest missions that I really care about get advanced by nonprofit organizations whose capacities are entirely limited by how much funding they have. Yucca: Right, right. Mark: So it's just, it's about fuel for the engine. And if you, if you don't have it, then however, great your mission is it's very harder to make anything substantive take place. So, I really focused on developing skills in grant writing, major donor fundraising, direct mail event production planned giving. Organizing all that kind of stuff. And that's what I've mostly done since I left conservation action. I did spend seven years at a wetlands Conservancy, which did the kind of restoration work that you're talking about except in a California Oak Chaparral wetlands kind of context. So we restored linear miles of riparian habitat within the Laguna to Santa Rosa, which is the largest tributary of the Russian river. And had a science program as well and an education program for grade school kids. And that I was the second staff person hired there after an executive director. They'd been around as a volunteer group for years, but he and I built the organization's programs to be a really, sustainable and impactful organization. And I'm very proud of that work as well. And they're still around as well, doing the things that they're doing. In recent years, I've worked more on social services and kind of, social impact organizations than environmental organizations. To some degree, I feel like the 60 hour weeks that I worked during my 10 years at conservation action were kind of like my tour of duty. And after 10 years I was thoroughly burned out and I feel like, I got my medals, I got my, congressional resolution of appreciation and state legislature things. And I was named environmentalist of the year for the county and all that stuff. And I kind of took my medals and went home. Yucca: Mm-hmm Mark: So now the stuff that I do is much less around the public impact of stuff. And it's more just kind of how I personally conduct my life. I drive an electric car. I I'm really focused on energy consumption and carbon a lot in just how I live my personal life. I'm not much of a consumer. Buying new stuff is just not really a big thrill for me. And and I try to live. A simple but comfortable life within the context that I'm in, which is a kind of suburban city. And of course, to vote the right way and to stay plugged into understanding what that right way is. And and that's, that's kind of it for where I am right now, but I've, I've spent many, many years in the trenches really working to make things better for the environment around here. Yucca: Right. Sounds like you've got a lot of diverse experience. Mark: Well, I'm old or I'm getting old. And so that's, that's what that'll give you. It's yeah, it's been a pretty, pretty amazing ride. I'm I'm very happy with my career, although currently I'm unemployed. Hoping that that's gonna end soon and I can dive into some new mission that that I'm passionate about and that I can do some good with in terms of organizations that we can support. My focus has generally been twofold. I have focused on policy organizations and on land conservancies. So the nature Conservancy conservation international the conservation fund, these, those are organizations that are doing stuff like acquiring large swaves of theier Delta, which is one of the biggest bird bird hatchery, Rory estuary places in the world so that they are not developed in ways that are destructive to those creatures. I, and, and going along with what you said, Yucca they are actively managing those lands. They're not just throwing them behind a fence they're they have actual, land stewards whose job it is to restore and manage those lands. Yucca: Cause certainly if you do that in a brittle environment, you will starve the land. Right? If you just put a fence around it, say nothing, touch it, it, it gets worse and worse and worse. Yeah. Because it's kind of like, here's that, here's an analogy. You find a dog on the side of the road who's been hit and, and her leg is broken. If you just leave the leg alone, right. I mean, it was humans who hit the dog. Right. But if you leave the, the leg alone, it, the, the bones, if they survived, the bones gonna heal wrong, right. They're gonna have a, they're gonna have a, a messed up leg their whole life. But if you take them into the vet and you set the bone and, give them the, the care that they need, then they have a chance to recover, even though it was human's fault in the first place that the dog got hit. Right. So, or a land's kind of like that Mark: yeah. Human intervention is, is required in the vast majority of kind of habitat management. And habitat bio biological systems biological services, as some people call it because they wanna kind of monetarily quantify the value that's provided to humans.  Yucca: I mean, that might be coming a little bit from the terminology of ecosystem services, right? That's an old, an old term that is talking about the, the, the service of, of the water, what the things that it provides. So that would be, that might be one of the directions that is came in from Mark: Right. But some of the, some of the values that we have around conservation are. They're values that don't necessarily directly benefit humans, or if they do, you have to follow a chain in order to find out how they do like biodiversity. For example, I mean, to me, biodiversity is just a core value. I think it's a good thing, period. Whether it benefits humans or not, Yucca: Yeah, well, so I think that biodiversity is one of the most important things. It takes a little bit of explaining to help people understand why, but biodiversity is absolutely key to the survival. Everything that we need, the air that we breathe, the food that we eat, the everything is dependent upon that biodiversity. And when we have areas with low biodiversity, those systems fail, they fall apart, right? Biodiversity is perhaps one of the most important, important things there is for this, this planet, right. Biodiversity is a healthy biosphere. Mark: mm-hmm yeah. Yeah. I agree. The, the level of diversity prior to humans developing the kinds of capacities that we have now to really impact the environment in a really dramatic way.  Yucca: Monoculture being the, the really big yeah. For all your P protein. Mark: right. The level of complexity that existed on the earth at that time prior to the ad, the advent of those technologies is something that we can't even imagine today. And some of it, some of it was relatively recent. I mean, in the 19th century flock of passenger pigeons that took three days to pass over, would go over in migration in migration season. And the passenger pigeon is now extinct. And that's because they, their tail feathers were desired for hats. Yucca: yeah, Mark: And that's what we did. Yucca: and if you've ever visited someplace like yellow, The entire continent was like double that, Mark: Mm-hmm Yucca: Just in terms of the life that was everywhere. Now it's gonna be different life depending on the particular bio region. Right. Although some of those things were across the entire continent, right. Wolves or things like that. Speaking of Yellowstone just a mention to everybody. My, my brother lives there and he was sending us photographs of his neighbor's houses, like literally floating away. It's a, Mark: I was gonna ask you when we were done recording. If he was okay. Yucca: Yeah. He's just high enough up. But a lot of the they're tough Montanans are, are tough. They're a tough bunch, but but there's a lot of tourists who are stuck there too, that are in kind of a panic Mark: that's in Wyoming, right? Yucca: No Montana. Mark: Yellowstone. Yucca: Yeah. Well it's a big area, but he's in Gardner Montana. Mark: Huh Yucca: Yeah. Mark: I've I've been to Yellowstone and I could have sworn that it was in Wyoming relatively close to the border, Yucca: but maybe it goes into, but no it's Montana.  Mark: Oh, wait a Yucca: of it that are, that are in Mark: are in Wyoming and also Idaho. Yucca: Yeah. It's a big, it's a big area. Yeah, he's in gardener. So that's the, and there are multiple different entrances to the park. But it's, it's, I mean, there's flooding happening in that whole area. Yeah. Mark: boy, we could sure. Use some of that water here. Yucca: well, basically all the rain that the Southwest hasn't been getting and the surrounding areas has just been dumping right there. They got like a whole bunch of inches on top of their snow pack and then that's what came down. But anyways, so, yeah, that's just our hearts go out to, to everybody with that. And there are, you could just go fund me if you're interested. There are just type in type in, Montana floods Yellowstone floods, and there's, there's definitely some support that people can, can get. It's gonna be a quite a while before some of those roads and, and things are rebuilt. But it is a good lesson to not build your roads at the bottom of valleys.  Mark: Yeah. Run building your road right along the waterway is a, it's a bad, I it's bad for the waterway for one thing. But it's a really bad idea. If you are in a flashy valley that gets really big storm events periodically because it's gonna take the road out. Yucca: Yeah. Now this is the highest it's been ever in recorded history. This is the, but it's still, it's something that I think we're gonna have to be really mindful. We should have been over the last, century, but we're gonna have to be really mindful about that moving forward. And I think we'll see a lot more of this in communities having to redesign and those roadways that's where a lot of with the work I do, a lot of the erosion that we deal with was just. Roads that made sense why they were built that way, because it was the least expensive EC. I mean, if you've ever , if you've ever graded a road, you understand why you're trying to do it the easiest possible, because it's hard to do. But a lot of the erosion is caused by just poorly placed roads where we weren't paying attention. And we didn't realize on my own land, we have an Arroyo that cuts through that is 30 feet deep. So it's a cut gash 30 feet. And looking at it, I know that that, that erosion feature is can't be more than 80 or 90 years old to get 30 feet. Right. And that's the case across the whole, whole west Mark: the whole American west. Absolutely. Yucca: So, but coming back to our question, other, you were talking about organizations Mark: And then the, the other question was about organizing cleanups or other sort of volunteer activities. Yucca: Right. Mark: in my professional capacity, I have organized those kinds of things, for the organizations I've worked for. It is my hope that some of the affinity groups, the atheopagan local, geographically focused affinity groups may at some point do something like that, or at least, go to a cleanup event of some kind wearing atheopagan t-shirts or something like that to kind of represent the. The, the, the movement of non Theus paganism and show that we are putting our, our labor where our mouths are. But that's a new program that just started this year and it's early days yet. In fact, I'm going to an in-person summer solstice celebration to S celebration tomorrow with other folks from Northern California that are, on the atheopagan Facebook group and we have a discord and we're gonna do a summer solstice ritual and have a Noche and it'll be good. Yucca: when this goes live, I should be meeting up with another atheopagan family. So I'm very excited about that and our kids are gonna get to get to play. So, Mark: so cool. I, I just, I, I love the idea of Well, it's not even the idea. I love the fact that our community is starting to knit a little bit, even though we're we're geographically far flung. And there aren't that many of us we're starting to make connections in, and I think the sun tree retreat that we went to was a big factor for that. I know that a lot of people really wanted to stay in touch with the people that went to the retreat with them. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: So Yucca: So before we jump to our next one, I wanted to mention organizations that we're involved with. So I'm involved with and give money every month. We don't have a lot, but every little bit helps. The savory Institute is one that we have really, really value and have seen. And I'm speaking, we, as in my, my family and I seen incredible results with and also my husband is a student of Elaine Ingram. So we are, starting up our own soil, food web, and those are kind of the, the big organizations that we're involved with. That'd, invite people to check out in terms of like cleanups. We live pretty rural. So if we were in an urban environment, that would be kind of more of a thing. But we do go to the county meetings and and call, know the, the commissioners and call 'em up. And they, they, they know us. Right. And since it is a rural community, there is people like their privacy, but we also help each other out. So we don't really have barns around here, but the equivalent of barn raising type of things. And that's where a lot of our, our energy goes into is the, the small communities cuz we're, very rural and kind of everybody's their own little ranch homestead out in this area. Mark: Sure. Yeah. That really contrasts with where I am. I mean, California is obviously very heavily populated, but you know, I'm here on the coast and one of the most attractive things to a human is an area where there's water moving around. People love to go to the beach and so beach cleanups and river cleanups and that kind of thing are, are phenomenon where I am just because there's enough people to make a mess. Yucca: Well, and even if you didn't have people going to the beach, you'd probably have stuff washing up all the time anyways. So there's just always gonna be stuff to, to go and, and help out with. And you have some amazing, Mark: Yes  Yucca: Marine ecosystems right off your coast. Mark: we do. We do. Yeah. They are endangered the, the kelp forests are being replaced by a sort of gelatinous slime on the bottom of the ocean. And many of the many of the creatures are being replaced by sea urchins. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: But, Yucca: Kiddos are huge Octa, not fans, if there's any other parents out there, you know what I'm talking about? And their favorite character is Shellington the sea Otter. Who's allergic to sea urchins, but all his other friends eat up the the urchins. They have a whole episode about how important the sea otters are to keeping those urchins in balance. Mark: yes. And that's another species which was haunted nearly to extinction and is now rebounded quite well along the California coast. Yucca: I'm glad to hear that. Yeah. Mark: Yeah. It's, they're so adorable. It's great Yucca: They're oh my goodness. So. Mark: so. Yucca: yeah, our our next question, and this actually ties back to what we're talking about, about the, the community. This is coming from Savannah who did a, a much longer email, really love the email, but I'm just gonna pull this last bit out. Talking about community with the larger pagan community, which may not necessarily be non theist or athe pagans. So they write, I've been pondering, whether I should start attending local pagan events, which in this area seem to be skewed, more viewed, more theistic, and based in the supernatural, is it worth it? Are there ways to get along? Would I simply have to turn my brain off at a, at certain points, bite my tongue and swallow my allergy to woo. Or is there a way to be part of mainstream pagan community in a way that's authentic to me. So some good stuff in here. Mark: Yeah. Great question. And it's one that I think is really pertinent for everyone that's practicing in the non theist pagan realm. There, there is, as, as rare as pagans are, and the best estimate that I've seen for north America is that there's probably about a million of us in in the United States. And then more in Canada and Mexico. So that that's not very much in a country of 330 odd million people. Yucca: yeah. Mark: But there is a community and there are events, there are festivals and there are conferences and there are opportunities to get in their local groups that are opportunities to get together. And unfortunately there is no way to broadly characterize those. It really depends on the personalities and the culture of what's going on in your local area. So not knowing who those people are. I can't really say whether it's possible for you to be out as atheist pagan with other pagans and have them welcome you. Some places do some places don't, Yucca: And it's so personal too. Right? We can give advice, but what's gonna, even if, if you, there were two atheopagan in the same place who didn't know each other, we're having the same question. It's gonna be different for each of those people based on their personalities and their comfort zone. All of that stuff. so we can certainly give the advice, but, but know that it's gonna be different for absolutely everyone. And there's not a right answer. Mark: Right. My rule of thumb for this sort of thing is that when I'm a guest, I obey the hosts rules. Yucca: Mm-hmm Mark: So if I'm invited to a ritual and they're doing all this theistic stuff, I just translate it in my mind, understanding that they may not know that they're talking to air and that that's, that that they're just talking to themselves or not. But that doesn't really matter. I know that. And I understand what they're trying to get at in terms of the characteristics, the qualities, the nature of the figure that they're invoking, right? Like if they're invoking Zeus, there are particular qualities and characteristics that that figure of myth has, and that's what they're, that's what they're invoking into the ritual that you're working to do. So I don't necessarily, I mean, I'm not going to pipe up in the middle of somebody's ritual and say, I don't believe that Yucca: Yeah, Mark: but so it, it is rude, right. If we get into a theological discussion, I'm going to, I'm gonna be public about my atheopagan, but you don't have to be, if you're not comfortable, Yucca: right. Mark: You can say, my, my personal cosmology is really private to me. Or you can say I look at things somewhat differently, but that doesn't really matter. I'm glad to be here. And, enjoying being with you folks, Yucca: Or you can steer the conversation away and not actually ask, answer the question that they asked. Right. When they ask a direct question, you just talk about whatever you wanna talk about and just run with the conversation in a different direction,  Mark: I mean, Yucca: that's. Yeah. Mark: I mean, talk about your passion for nature, talk about your, your sense of awe and wonder at, what's happening with the James web telescope. There, there are a lot of different things that you can do that will resonate with the vast majority of practicing pagans that don't have to do with God's and magic. If somebody, is sort of grilling you about, well, what kind of spells do you really like to do? Yada yada? Well, I'm not much of a spellcaster I've been known. I've been known to use that line a lot. And the vast majority of pagans, at least in the United States are solitary. They are not people who work in groups or coves or circles. So. That understanding. That means that by definition, it's a very idiosyncratic community of people. Everybody's got their own way of approaching things. So there is a lot of tolerance in the pagan community for difference of many kinds. The problem is that when you, when you explain that you don't believe in deities or supernatural beings of any kind, people can take that as a criticism of their belief. And you want to kind of avoid that implication if at all possible. Everybody has to draw their own cosmological conclusions. We've done that based on evidence and science, others do it based on experiences that they've had. Right. Believing what their, what their sensorium developed as an experience for them believing that that is an actual physical thing that happened in the world. So if they heard the voice of a God talking to them, they don't think that it was their brain. They think that it was the voice of a God talking to them. And, we, we need to respect that they as humans, they have the right to do that. They have the right to their own spiritual path and the right to their own Conclusions about the nature of the world. But we don't have to say, oh yes, I see. I, I know how that is. We can, we can divert the conversation or just be, really Franken, but in a vague way. Right. I, I have kind of a different way of understanding that stuff, but that sounds really powerful to me, Yucca: Yeah. Cause that's, that's another strategy is to just let them talk about themselves and their. Turn it back to them getting to talk about themselves because not everybody, but most pagans are really excited to get to talk about their thing with somebody. Right. You're gonna listen to me. Go on. Right. So like asking a D and D player about their characters, you Mark: Right. Right. Exactly. Yeah. Well, let me just tell you, Yucca: yeah. Now the other thing that we of course need to put a plug in for is and this is kind of a place that, that atheopagan is right now. One of the stages is that we are growing and starting to build a lot of community. So it might be an opportunity for you to. To start building a community, right. If there isn't already an atheopagan affinity group in your area, maybe you could start one, right. Or maybe there might be, for me, there's just not enough of us in New Mexico. So I'm chilling with the Coloradans, right? Like, okay, that's close enough. I'll go hang out with you. You're, you're only a few hours away, so maybe there's something like that. So Mark: Yeah. Yeah. And community is a really good thing. And it's an important function of, of religion of spirituality. It's. Well, okay. I, I don't want to get into the difference between religion and spirituality and there are no universally agreed definitions for those terms anyway, but. To me, religion is a communal activity. It's something that, that, a community builds itself up around, and it's good for us. It's good for us not to be siloed all the time and to be connected with other people of like mind. So what Yucca says is really a, an important point that you know, I, there was this reporter in the bay area many years ago, scoop NICAR who used to say, if you don't like the news, go out and make some of your own. And similarly with pagan community, if you don't like what they're doing, make some of your own, announce a announce, a Sabba holiday celebration and invite people that you think. Might fit might, might celebrate that, you can have a nice, a nice feast dinner and meet some new people. Meetup.com is actually a really useful thing for that because people who are looking for things to do, looking for ways to connect with others are they're there. That's where they are. So it's a, it's a useful tool. Yucca: Yeah. Okay. So let's take this last one for now. And again, if you wanna, if you wanna send in your questions or topics please do, but this last one is from Cheryl. And this is kind of a, kind of a fun one, a little bit of a tricky one. So two parts to it. Okay. What positive stereotypes do you hope athe pagans become known for? And on the flip side, what are some possible negative stereotypes you worry about? And you would like to steer the community away. Yeah. Mark: Okay. Okay. Yucca: I mean, I could, some of the positive ones immediately, I could say. I hope that we've become known for being compassionate. Interesting. Open-minded very critical, but in like a Socratic kind of loving of education way, those are some, I mean, basically I'm just taking out my personal values that I like and saying, I want the whole community to be like that. Right. But yeah. Mark: Yeah. I think I would like, for us to know, for, to be known for being kind. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: And also critical thinkers and for our genuine love for nature, our, our, our deep passion for this world and our capacity to inspire that in others. I would also like for us to be known as really effective ritualists, people that can really change you psychologically really, transform the hurts within us so that we heal and really put on a great celebration. That's filled with joy and happiness and connection. So those, those pieces I think are really important to me as well. On the other side on the negative side, what I would like to do is divert our reputation away from the new atheists. Yucca: mm-hmm Mark: I don't want to be, I don't want to be perceived in the same bucket as Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris and all those guys, Lauren Krause. Yucca: I mean, for me, for many years, I shied away from using the term atheist because of that association. Right. I think actually there was a, a video like years back at this point that I had made that I had mentioned that. And you had commented in the, the comments section about that. Right. And it was a really nice kind of eye opener, but because you hear a lot of people, you hear the word atheist and the, what comes to mind is the person like shooting down and tearing apart and, and just being very like, Mark: Being being antithetic Yucca: and yeah, and just shutting everybody down. Right. Mark: right, right. In, in, in with, with the, with the key goal, being this sort of egotistical, Yucca: Superiority. Mark: the, and Desi desire to be right. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: And I mean, everybody, everybody thinks their cosmology is right. It's true that people who base their cosmologies on evidence are more likely to be. Right. But being right is cold comfort. It's not. It doesn't, you can't build community around being right. Which is why atheism doesn't really have communities. There's. I mean, there are a couple of organizations where people belong to them and get together to talk about how right they are. And I've been to a few of those, Yucca: Yeah. Well at its core, though, atheism is just not. Theist. Right. And then there's so many different then. I mean, that's only just a tiny part of culture. Right. And then there's so much. And so that's, I mean, what, what we've done is we've taken and brought together the, okay. We don't deal with that God thing, but we are pagans. We, we appreciate science. We use that as a framework for understanding the world, but we also have all of these other values that we are adding to this. You can be atheist and have values, Mark: Yes. Yes. And paganism by its very nature is culture building rather than being handed culture from a book or from an existing tradition, that's already got all of its own rules. We are in the process of creating culture for ourselves that meets our values and works to help us to be really happy and effective in the world. And those are things that don't really fit very well in the, in the new atheist schema of things, because they involve a lot of. Kind of soft, cushy stuff that isn't the bright, hard steel of science, right? They involve rituals and psychology and myth and symbols and all the, the artistic impulse, the creative impulse all of those things that are so, so intrinsic to who we are as humans, but not about the thinky part of being humans. They're about the other parts to being humans and valuing those other parts and feeding them and building community around them. Yucca: Right. And what I really hope for us is that we continue to grow and cultivate an appreciation for both of those sides. Right? Because the, the pagan community at large is really good at those feeling squishy stuff. But one of the things that we're doing is atheopagan is also bringing in the, yeah, let's bring in this logic, let's bring in this critical thinking and we're and we're bettered for it. We feel it improves our life. Mark: Yeah. Yeah. And, and there's a, I guess I would say there is a, a satiety to the worldview of non-US paganism. There's, there's a way that it fills us up because the world is enough, right. Nature, all the way out to the gala. Super clusters and, macro structures in the universe all the way down, down below the quirks to, the, the, the tiny boons and microparticles. It, it's so amazing and so enormous to try to get your mind around even a little bit, that we, we are able to be satisfied with it. Somehow we don't need to populate it with human-like figures that are probably pretty unlikely to exist based on the available evidence. And so one of the things that I've said about Ethiopia paganism quite a bit is that we're the spirituality of verifiable reality. Yucca: like that. Will you say that one again? Mark: we're the spirituality of verifiable reality. You, you don't need for there to be a supernatural dimension to the universe in order to be filled with a spiritual sense of awe and joy and purpose and finding meaning in this life. And and so that's what we're about and what I would hope people would take away from encountering us is this feeling of, wow, that's a really cool person. I really liked them. They were warm and they were thoughtful and they were interesting and they were creative. And I wanna spend more time with those kinds of people. Yucca: Yeah. And welcoming. Mark: Yes. And, and welcoming. Yucca: Yeah. Mark: Not proselytizing to be clear, not you should be one of us, but just welcoming, if you're, if you're curious about the stuff that I'm into, here's where you can find it. Yeah. As the, as the, the founder of the particular path of athe paganism within the broader category of non-US paganism, my goal has always been from the very beginning to try to do it. All right. And I'm human. So that means that there's gonna be, places where it doesn't get done. Right. But with a community, I think you can correct for any one person's errors in order to become more and more kind, more and more consistent with your expressed values, more and more mutually accountable and transparent, more and more affirming of the value of every person who's in the community and every person in the world. And so that really is my hope that we are on this evolutionary journey where as a movement, among the many movements of humans here we're gaining some traction for those kinds of values and way of being in the world with one another. Yucca: Yeah, I've been very encouraged and impressed by the community. And there's been so many people stepping forward and taking leadership roles and people are certainly not afraid to correct you or anyone else. And you have been you've received that very well in the situations that I've seen and just, just a very mature group of, of really passionate and kind people that are just excited to grow this and create, create this community that, that we're cultivating together. Mark: Yeah. Yeah. I've, I've really found that too. I mean, when I first entered the pagan community back in the eighties what struck me was how incredibly cool the people were. The, they were heartfelt. They were. Open. They were interesting. They were creative. Now a lot of them believed some stuff that I was kind of like, well, I, I'm not sure how that all, I I'm, I'm not sure how that all squares with the evidence, but okay. In this community, I'm finding all of those same qualities along with a real sort of intellectual sharpness a, a very thoughtful, analytical capacity. And it's just a joy to be a part of I've. I, I so enjoy, the online interactions, the, the, the in person interactions. It's just really been an amazing thing. Yucca: Yeah, and I am really grateful to share this time with you and all of you listening that, you take a, take a part of your week aside to hang out with us and, and be part of this, this amazing community and this amazing movement and whatever it is that we are. So thank you. Thank all of you. Mark: Yes. Thank you very much. Thank you for wanting to be the kind of person we're all working to be. Cuz the world needs it. The world, the world needs kind thoughtful, critically thinking inclusive people who care about things like justice and, and nature, right? Yeah. Yucca: Yeah. And thank you for the, the questions. And we will do another one of these episodes when we get some more questions. This was a lot of fun. I liked having the kind of a lot of the, the smaller topics. I mean, any of these, actually we could have really fleshed out into a full episode actually, but it was nice to get, to get to go through and, and kind of jump from topic to topic and, and go to some very different places in the same hour. Mark: Yeah, yeah. I really enjoyed it too. Remember you could contact us at the wonder podcast queues, gmail.com. That's the wonder podcast, QS, gmail.com. And we always welcome your, your feedback, your questions, all that kind of stuff. So thank you so much, Yucca. See you next week.

Driven By Insight
Jared Polis, Governor of Colorado

Driven By Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 35:15 Very Popular


In today's episode, Willy welcomes Governor Jared Polis. Before serving as the 43rd governor of Colorado since 2009, his political experience spans from being a Colorado State Board of Education member to a United States representative from Colorado's 2nd congressional district. He is an entrepreneur at heart, founding ProFlowers in 1998 and TechStars in 2006. As an openly gay man, he advocates for LGBTQ+ and racial equality in Colorado. He has committed to ensuring all Coloradans have the opportunity to pursue their dreams by opening schools for at-risk students and new students and starting nonprofits for war veterans. The podcast begins with Governor Polis emphasizing “Colorado for All” and how people of all races and genders are the foundation of making the state“an amazing place.” His mother, Susan Polis Schutz, wrote Depression and Back, an integral influence on Governor Polis' mental health policies. “We inherited an overly complicated and inefficient behavioral system…First days in the office, [I said] let's fix this.” Reshaping the bureaucracy was a challenge, yet he believes that “getting things done at state-level is possible,” as he pushed for accountability and transparency. He proudly describes Colorado's implementation of the red flag law, which allows families to temporarily confiscate guns from loved ones experiencing a mental health crisis. He supports universal background checks but points out a loophole: “You can drive an hour and a half to an open-air gun show in Wyoming and purchase a weapon without a background check.” As an entrepreneur, he enjoys how the private sector is always innovating but also finds the public sector fulfilling as it gives him a chance to improve people's quality of life. With the previous governor, John Hickenlooper's entrepreneurial background, Colorado has become a startup-friendly state, eliminating the costs of opening a business. Colorado's ranching and farming communities are fundamental to its economic growth, so Governor Polis prioritizes rural-urban unity. He continues to empower the agricultural technology sector with new practices and equipment as the state also depends on outdoor recreation. Governor Polis opposes buy-and-dry efforts and pushes for water conservation. In terms of natural disasters, Colorado has improved its rapid response and additional mitigation after experiencing three large wildfires in 2020. Governor Polis wants to create a better outdoor lifestyle experience, initiating the revitalization of main streets post-pandemic. Colorado aims to be 100% renewable energy by 2040. As COVID-19 infection numbers are dwindling, Governor Polis has stayed in the middle ground regarding wearing masks and lockdowns, giving people the freedom of choice. He focuses on reducing health care and pharma costs with a reinsurance program and talks with the FDA. With the positive effects of the cannabis industry, the Safe Banking Act aims to allow financial services even with businesses outside of state laws. Forbes ranked Colorado Springs and Boulder in the top five of the 100 Best Cities in America, increasing the volume of people moving into the state and driving housing affordability concerns. Governor Polis' solution is to build more infrastructure to avoid disrupting the quality of life. His superb intellect fuels his desire to surround himself and delegate creative people to his side. He expresses no interest in running for national office due to his fiery passion for protecting Colorado's urban and rural landscape for the newer generations to come.

Colorado Matters
June 15, 2022: Marking ten years of DACA

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 30:45


Ten years ago today, President Obama created the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. It allows young people brought to the US unlawfully as children to attend college or work legally. About 18,000 Coloradans have taken Obama up on that offer. We'll hear some of their stories today. We'll also talk with Marissa Molina, herself a DACA recipient, who advocates for immigration reform.

Colorado Matters
June 13, 2022: Black climbers make history on Everest; Using genetics to improve health care

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 29:37


The first all-Black team of climbers reached the summit of Mt. Everest this spring. We speak with two of the Coloradans who were part of the expedition. Then, using genetic testing to improve medical treatments. And, rethinking housing in Greeley.

The Flatbed Podcast
#1 - Nick Pullara

The Flatbed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 66:53


Multiple-time World Champion Horse Trainer Nick Pullara a native Coloradan, whose horse  "Marshall" won the 2020 BFI under Kal Fuller, stopped by and talked about his journey from outside the team roping world to becoming a futurity trainer and Arizona resident. 

City Cast Denver
If You Can't Beat the I-70 Traffic, Learn to Love It

City Cast Denver

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 15:15


If I-70 had a mayor, it would be Alejandro Brown. He started the I-70 Things Instagram account a few years ago when he was stuck in ski traffic. It was a fun way to share silly moments and crazy stuff people (and animals) were doing on the side of the highway. But then, something changed — Alejandro realized that the account could also serve as a public service, too. Today on the show, Host Bree Davies talks with Alejandro about why I-70 Things seems to resonate with so many Coloradans (200,000 and counting!), how he's managed to encapsulate our complex relationship with the well-traveled highway, and why he chose to use his powers for good. Wanna know the latest local restaurant hot goss? Peyton Garcia's got all you need to know in today's City Cast Denver newsletter. Read and subscribe: https://denver.citycast.fm/newsletter/ We're on Twitter: @citycastdenver Learn more about the sponsors of this episode: Wonderful Waste Denver Film presents Film on the Rocks Looking to advertise on City Cast Denver? Check out our options for podcast and newsletter ads at citycast.fm/advertise Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Wednesday, May 25th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 15:31


Daily News Brief for Wednesday May 25th, 2022 Wednesday Ads DNB: Dropwave Do you have a podcast, or thinking about starting one? Does your church have a podcast feed for sermons? The Dropwave.io is for you. Cancel culture is like walking on a thin glass bridge over the Grand Canyon. Every step you take could get you killed, I mean canceled. Since the beginning CrossPolitic has been working on being antifragile, so no matter what happens, our content can still be delivered to your tv and to your podcast. This past year, the Waterboy and his friend Jeremi, have been working on building a podcast hosting solution for rowdy platforms like CrossPolitic, so that you can be confident your podcast will never fall through that glass bridge. Dropwave offers seamless onboarding for shows that have been around for years to easy to use solutions for starting your own podcast. Dropwave will track all your show’s downloads by city, state, and country, and it offers network and enterprise packages for solutions like the Fight Laugh Feast Network. Free to speak, Free to podcast, free to start your journey now at www.Dropwave.io. Mass shooting at Texas elementary school, 14 children and one teacher dead, multiple injuries https://thepostmillennial.com/breaking-mass-shooting-at-texas-elementary-school-two-children-dead-multiple-injuries?utm_campaign=64487 18 students are dead and two teacher following the shooting, and the shooter's grandma was also killed prior to the school shooting. This according to Governor Greg Abbott, who said the shooter "shot and killed horrifically, 14 students, and killed a teacher." According to Ali Bradley, the suspect was wanted for murder and was being pursued by police when he exited his vehicle and ran into the grade school, where he began shooting. "The shooter was Salvador Ramos, an 18-year-old male who resided in Uvalde, it is believed that he abandoned his vehicle and entered the Robb Elementary school with a handgun and he may have also had a rifle, but that is not yet confirmed... He shot and killed, horrifically, incomprehensibly, 14 students and killed a teacher. Mr. Romas... he himself is deceased and it is believed that responding officers killed him," said Gov. Abbott on Tuesday. Mike Rowe Says Feds Revoked His Filming Permit, Received Call Claiming It Was Pulled For His ‘Personal Politics’ https://www.dailywire.com/news/mike-rowe-says-feds-revoked-his-filming-permit-received-call-claiming-it-was-pulled-for-his-personal-politics “Television host Mike Rowe said that the General Services Administration (GSA) recently revoked his permit to shoot a new episode of “Dirty Jobs” and wondered whether it was done for “political reasons” or as an attempt to “yank my chain,” which he said the move failed to do. In a lengthy message posted Monday on Facebook, Rowe explained why he didn’t appear at the job site this week as scheduled to shoot an episode highlighting a woman-owned company in the boilermaker trade. Rowe said that to his both surprise and disappointment the shoot was canceled “at the last minute” when the GSA “suddenly revoked our permit.” “I just wanted to assure you guys that this decision had nothing to do with me, Discovery, or my production team,” Rowe wrote. “This decision was made solely by the GSA, who oversees the location where you are currently working, and required us to apply for a permit months ago. Obviously, we did. The necessary permits were quickly issued, and we were assured several times over the last few months that everything was still good to go.” “Then, just two days before I was scheduled to arrive, we received a phone call from a woman at the GSA who informed us that our permits were being revoked,” he added. “When we asked for an explanation, she said, ‘security concerns.’ When we asked her what kind of security concerns, she said she didn’t know. She only told us that the decision had come down from ‘the very highest levels within the GSA.'” The TV host did not specify the location of the scheduled shoot but posted pictures of what appeared to be M&M Welding and Fabricators, the company his show had planned to feature in the episode. Rowe went on to reference other places where the show “has filmed in many sensitive environments under government control,” citing previous permits obtained from the Army, Navy, Air Force, and NASA, adding, “We even got a permit to film inside the National Security Agency!” “What’s really going on here?” Rowe asked in his post. Rowe said his crew later received a call from someone he said “sounded credible” who claimed the permit was revoked because of Rowe’s viewpoints. “According to this caller, someone at the highest levels of the GSA, ‘doesn’t like Mike Rowe’s personal politics,’ and used their power to deliberately string us along until the last possible second, for the express purpose of ‘yanking my chain,'” Rowe wrote. Rowe admitted he can’t say for sure if what the caller told him was accurate.” Supreme Court to weigh Christian web designer’s free speech argument against anti-discrimination law https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2022/may/18/supreme-court-weigh-christian-web-designers-free-s/ “Lorie Smith, a Colorado web designer who will have her case heard during the court’s 2022 term, argues that the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act forces her to create websites that celebrate same-sex marriages, which violates her faith. Her case comes four years after a Christian baker from Colorado also took his First Amendment fight to the high court after refusing to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex wedding. Ms. Smith said she observed Mr. Phillips’ more-than-a-decade-long legal battle, but knew she couldn’t live in fear of the government punishing her for her faith. Like Mr. Phillips, she’s also faced threats for challenging the law. “I knew I couldn’t live in fear,” she told reporters in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. “I am simply asking for the freedom for all of us to speak consistently with our beliefs.” The same state regulation is at issue in Ms. Smith’s challenge. Her 303 Creative is based in Denver and is subject to Colorado’s public accommodations law that is designed to protect certain groups from discrimination in business settings. One such group is LGBTQ people. At least 29 states have added protection for LGBTQ individuals into their public accommodation laws — but some have protected speech from government interference, according to Ms. Smith’s legal team. Under the Colorado law, Ms. Smith claims she is unable to make a statement on her website about her view that marriage is only between a man and a woman. A federal appeals court ruled against Ms. Smith, saying the state of Colorado can regulate a business’s speech because it has an interest in ensuring equal access. Ms. Smith said she loves using her talents to shape messages for her clients — so long as the messages do not violate her values. “I do believe God has chosen me to represent him,” she said. “Everything I do is consistent with my faith and running my business is a part of that.” Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser, though, insists companies cannot discriminate. “The U.S. Supreme Court has consistently held that anti-discrimination laws, like Colorado’s, apply to all businesses selling goods and services. Companies cannot turn away LGBTQ customers just because of who they are. We will vigorously defend Colorado’s laws, which protect all Coloradans by preventing discrimination and upholding free speech,” he said earlier this year when the high court took the case. A date for oral arguments in the legal battle has not yet been scheduled, but Kristen Waggoner, an attorney with Alliance Defending Freedom representing Ms. Smith, said they expect the justices to hear the case in October.” Lies, Propaganda, Story Telling, and the Serrated Edge: This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. The theme of this year’s conference is Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets sale now!. File this under conservatives are cowards, and not at the same time: BOOM! Indiana's Legislature Just Overrode Their "Conservative" Governor's Veto Of Bill That Kept Men Out Of Women's Sports https://notthebee.com/article/boom-indianas-legislature-just-overrode-their-conservative-governors-veto-of-bill-that-kept-men-out-of-womens-sports Indiana is one of the many red states that have governors who are unwilling to actually stand up for conservative principles and unflinchingly state the reality that boys are boys and girls are girls. With the opportunity to do just that a few weeks ago, Indiana's governor, Eric Holcomb, vetoed a bill that kept men out of women's sports. Holcomb tried to compromise Indiana girls, but the legislature was not about to have it. According to ABC News: “The Indiana Legislature voted Tuesday to override the governor's veto of the anti-trans bill that bans transgender girls from participating in girls' sports in K-12 schools. Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb vetoed the bill in March. He said the bill fell short in clarifying or creating policy to ensure "fairness" in school sports. In his veto letter, he said he echoed the Indiana High School Athletic Association's concerns that the bill does not address inconsistencies about enforcement across different counties and school districts and will cause confusion and litigation against schools. He also pointed to pending litigation seen in other states that have passed similar laws, where courts have enjoined or prohibited the laws from taking effect. "Any bill brought forward should address the issues raised in these lawsuits," Holcomb's March letter read. He also said there was no evidence of an issue of fairness in girls' sports and trans participation.” Just grateful for checks and balances. The National Pulse Announces World Economic Forum Investigative Priority and Dedicated Site. https://thenationalpulse.com/2022/05/23/new-the-national-pulse-announces-world-economic-forum-investigative-priority-and-dedicated-site/ According to the National Pulse: “The National Pulse is announcing a new investigative priority surrounding the work of the World Economic Forum, as well as launching a new public information website: TakeDownTheWEF.com. Founded in 1971 by German economist Klaus Schwab, the World Economic Forum (WEF) is an unaccountable, non-governmental organization which convenes meetings of world leaders in Davos, Switzerland, with a view to impacting policy decisions on behalf of its members: predominantly multi-national corporations and politicians. The group has been criticized for its stated aims of transforming or “resetting” global society for the benefit of private corporations rather than the public. Schwab himself has argued governments are no longer “the overwhelmingly dominant actors on the world stage” and “the time has come for a new stakeholder paradigm of international governance.” As a result, The National Pulse is announcing a new commitment to exposing the work of the World Economic Forum, and is calling on ordinary members of the public to help support this effort through our crowdfunding site: FundRealNews.com Speaking on the subject, The National Pulse Editor-in-Chief Raheem Kassam said: “We’re not just setting up a resource for members of the public to learn more about the World Economic Forum, we’re also crowdsourcing information on the group. The World Economic Forum is the throbbing, blackened heart of globalism, and we intend to drive a stake in it. For those interested in taking the fight to this group journalistically, as well as politically, think about urgently supporting this initiative.”” This is Gabriel Rench with Crosspolitic News. Support Rowdy Christian media by joining our club at fightlaughfeast.com, downloading our App, and head to our annual Fight Laugh Feast Events. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are trying to build a cancel-proof media platform, and we need your help. Join today and get a discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN and have a great day. Have a great day. Lord bless