Podcasts about des moines

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Capital of Iowa

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  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about des moines

95 KGGO
Teaming up with Moose for Movie Reviews

95 KGGO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 19:23


Usually on Fridays, B-sox is joined by Mike Reyes from Cinemablend to review movies. While Mike is out of town this week, B-sox teamed up with his old morning show partner Moose talk about this week's movies and TV!  http://www.kggo.com https://marriedwithchannels.podbean.com/ https://twitter.com/Moosenstein  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KUOW Newsroom
Ferry service ... from Des Moines? Walk-on sailings to Seattle launch this week

KUOW Newsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 4:33


Kim Malcolm talks with Des Moines city manager Michael Matthias about the city's new walk-on ferry service to Seattle.

CHOONS
Carrie McDowell Says "Uh Uh, No No Casual Sex"

CHOONS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 40:55


In June of 1987, 24 year-old Carrie McDowell—the second white female artist signed to Motown Records—walked the stage of the legendary music show "Soul Train," and rocked the house with a performance of her first and only single, the controversial "Uh Uh No No Casual Sex." For McDowell, it was no daunting task, as she was already a seasoned entertainer by then.Born and raised in Des Moines, Iowa, Carrie was a musical child prodigy destined to sing. At age 3, she could carry a note and embody the feelings of classic melodies from Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell. By the time she was 10, Carrie went from showcasing her talent at local venues to dazzling the Vegas crowds alongside Liberace, George Burns, and comedy duo Rowan & Martin, and drawing standing ovations at the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.After her parents' divorce and poor management curtailed her early career, Carrie got her second wind by experimenting with musical styles, and embracing new opportunities with legendary Motown producer Willie Hutch, who introduced her to a song that, despite its lyrics, was part of a serious conversation society was having in the late 80s.Show TracklistingStella by Starlight - From the movie "The Uninvited" (Liberace)Over The Rainbow (Carrie McDowell)Top of The World - Carpenters Cover Live at the Tonight Show (Carrie McDowell)I'll Be There (Jackson 5)Uh Uh, No No Casual Sex (Carrie McDowell)Let's Wait Awhile (Janet Jackson)Can't Love You Tonight (Gwen Guthrie)Carrie McDowell on Social Media:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carriemcdowellmusic/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CarrieMcDowellMusicTwitter: https://twitter.com/carriemcmusicHost and Producer: Diego MartinezExecutive Producer: Nicholas "NickFresh" PuzoAudio Engineer: Adam Fogel Follow us on social media: @choonspodSubscribe to our PATREON: patreon.com/choonspod

Mission: Employable
Episode 125 – Building the Future Workforce One Student at a Time

Mission: Employable

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 25:58


School districts are being more creative than ever to get their students ready for their future careers. We're joined by Dr. Erick Pruitt, Superintendent of the Ankeny School District, to talk about the new ways they are helping students plan ahead. Find out why Pruitt says one of the best things a school can do for students is to get them OUT of the classroom. 

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - Lemonade salesman scammed

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 37:16


What's Trending: Man dies after assault in downtown Seattle, grocery delivery services taking a hit, Nancy Pelosi slammed, and a 'Grease' star died. Big Local: 11-year-old Everett boy was scammed while running lemonade stand, and a new walk-on ferry will cruise from Des Moines to Seattle.  Some teen is flying around the world, big whoop. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Moose Tracks
Pryce Sandfort PICKS THE HAWKEYES

Moose Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 3:45


- Weekend Highlights! - Mary from Des Moines gets the Disturbed PIT UPGRADE! - The peacock has been found! - A HUGE commitment for the Iowa basketball team!

Eric Scheske's Weekly Eudemon
Jack Kerouac: The Tao on Steroids

Eric Scheske's Weekly Eudemon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 12:29


He sat on his mother's couch, smoking marijuana and watching the McCarthy hearings, cheering Tail Gunner Joe. He was 32 and it was 1954. In his 20s and the 1940s, he said he'd like to join his Russian comrades and fight against Fascism. He coined the term “Beat Generation” which became the proto-countercultural movement of the 1960s. He detested the 1960s counterculture, noting that the Beatnik's was a movement of enthusiasm and glee, not one of disgruntled whining. He took Benzedrine, morphine, marijuana, hashish, LSD, and opium. He saw a statue of Mary turn its head. He died at age 47 from hemorrhaging of the esophagus, the drunkard's classic death. His corpse held a rosary and his funeral Mass was held at St. Jean Baptiste Catholic Church. Such was the short life of Jack Kerouac. He was hip before it was hip, crisscrossing America in the late 1940s, from New York to Denver to San Francisco, with stops in Des Moines, Chicago, New Orleans, and points in-between, with a jaunt into Mexico City. He wrote about it during a Benzedrine-fueled three-week writing session in 1951, typing onto rolls of paper that were taped together into a long scroll so he didn't have to stop to change the paper. When Truman Capote heard that Kerouac had written the book in three weeks, he sneered, “That's not writing, that's typing.” But youngsters disagreed. They lapped up the book when it was published in 1957 and took to the road, seeking to become Beats. Show notes here

Moose Tracks
The Peacock Has Been Found

Moose Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 7:33


- Weekend Highlights! - Mary from Des Moines gets the Disturbed PIT UPGRADE! - The peacock has been found! - A HUGE commitment for the Iowa basketball team!

Rule The Galaxy Podcast
Chapter 156 - ESPN HQ is the Death Star with Ryan McGee

Rule The Galaxy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 81:44


In this episode of Rule the Galaxy Joe, Alfie and DDoc welcome Ryan McGee of ESPN. Ryan is a huge Star Wars fan and this is his second time on the podcast! We discuss: our love for Captain America An email from listener Jason Allen of Des Moines, IA The Andor Trailer The Kenobi series How Alfie keeps getting Star Wars gifts DDoc and his Kitchen renovation Icons Unearthed on Vice Light and Magic on Disney Plus there was going to be a 1986 Kenner Star Wars toy line You can now be buried in a Star Wars casket  How the ESPN HQ in Bristol, CT looks like the Death Star and they were filming a Star Wars related commercial there the other day. And so much more!

Moose Tracks
Mary Gets The Disturbed PIT PASS UPGRADE

Moose Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 1:42


- Weekend Highlights! - Mary from Des Moines gets the Disturbed PIT UPGRADE! - The peacock has been found! - A HUGE commitment for the Iowa basketball team!

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY
PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY - Episode 240

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 31:58


Andy talks about bad lyrics in good songs, Sandman on Netflix, restaurant buffet carving station training, Iggy and the Stooges, and some guy who badly needed to talk to Paul Simon in 1981. On Rachel's Chart Chat, Rachel from Des Moines finds gems in charts from 1970 and 1983. You can find a playlist for Rachel's Chart Chat here. Follow Rachel on Last.fm here.

Moose Tracks
Weekend Highlights!

Moose Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 18:08


- Weekend Highlights! - Mary from Des Moines gets the Disturbed PIT UPGRADE! - The peacock has been found! - A HUGE commitment for the Iowa basketball team!

Liberty & Justice with Matt Whitaker
Ken Paxton and Sean Reyes, Attorneys General for Texas and Utah join L&J Ep. 26

Liberty & Justice with Matt Whitaker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 27:23


Ken Paxton, Texas Attorney General (kenpaxton.com), and Sean Reyes, Utah Attorney General (www.seanreyes.com) join Liberty & Justice.   Watch every episode of Liberty & Justice at Whitaker.tv.Matthew G. Whitaker was acting Attorney General of the United States (2018-2019).  Prior to becoming acting Attorney General, Mr. Whitaker served as Chief of Staff to the Attorney General. He was appointed as the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa by President George W. Bush, serving from 2004-2009. Whitaker was the managing partner of Des Moines based law firm, Whitaker Hagenow & Gustoff LLP from 2009 until rejoining DOJ in 2017. He was also the Executive Director for FACT, The Foundation for Accountability & Civic Trust, an ethics and accountability watchdog, between 2014 and 2017.   Mr. Whitaker is Author of the book--Above the Law, The Inside Story of How the Justice Department Tried to Subvert President Trump.  Buy Matt's book here: https://amzn.to/3IXUOb8Mr. Whitaker graduated with a Master of Business Administration, Juris Doctor, and Bachelor of Arts from the University of Iowa.  While at Iowa, Mr. Whitaker was a three-year letterman on the football team where he received the prestigious Big Ten Medal of Honor.Mr. Whitaker is now a Co-Chair of the Center for Law and Justice at America First Policy Institute and a Senior Fellow at the American Conservative Union Foundation. Matt is on the Board of Directors for America First Legal Foundation and is a Senior Advisor to IronGate Capital Advisors. He is also Of Counsel with the Graves Garrett law firm.  Whitaker appears regularly to discuss legal and political issues on Fox News, Newsmax and other news outlets.  He splits his time between Iowa, Florida and Washington, D.C.  Believe In Arkansas - Free People Are Capable of Extraordinary ThingsEquipping you with information you need to advocate for issues you believe in. Listen on: Spotify

Talk of Iowa
Des Moines artist recreates COVID-19 events through miniature worlds

Talk of Iowa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022


Des Moines-based artist Mollie Wallace journaled her COVID-19 pandemic experience, but not with a pen and paper. Using antique jewelry boxes, she created miniature worlds to represent key events from the last two years. The result is "Pandema's Box."

Andy's Hall Pass
Andy Hall interviews The L.I.F.E. Project

Andy's Hall Pass

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 27:30


(08/05/22) - Audio from last night's event at xBk Live, a Q&A with Josh Rand and Casandra Carson before the band's Des Moines debut - talking past, present and future with the guitarist and singer

Iowa Basement Tapes
Iowa Basement Tapes #213 08-04-2022 GUEST: Brendan Wells of Nerv, Solid Attitude, These Needles, and Patrick Swayze's Ghost

Iowa Basement Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 59:49


Night Listeners -OK this is the last interview for awhile BUT IT RULES. My guest tonight is Brendan Wells who was part of Nerv, Solid Attitude, These Needles, Patrick Swayze's Ghost, and currently in Uranium Club in Minneapolis. Lots of stories from the Des Moines and Iowa City scene circa 2006 - 2012.Iowa Basement Tapes has its own archive of Iowa music. Be sure to check out iowabasementtapes.bandcamp.com and download any of the releases for free. If you would like to contribute any music please send an email to kristianday@gmail.com. Hear us every Thursday at 9PM on 98.9FM KFMG – Des Moines and every Friday at 11PM on 90.3FM KWIT – Sioux City & 90.7FM KOJI – Okoboji. If you miss the show please subscribe to the broadcast archives: https://apple.co/2MzdH5e Find me on twitter @kristianmday #trustkristiandayNerv - "Big Idea" / 3 (Iowa City)Half the Facts - "Someday" (?)7inchWave - "Dynamite" / Demo (Ames)Dead in Bed - "A Reason to Swallow" / Tib's Picks: Iowa City Weirdo Scene Comp (Iowa City)Samuel Lock Ward - "Nothing for Me" / SLW / Toby Goodshank split 7" (Iowa City)Soldiers in a Field - "Lullaby" / Demo (Des Moines)

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Why is There a Peacock in a Des Moines Tree?

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 4:58


Big thank you to Emily from Van Meter for joining us to audition for the show!

The Unfinished Print
April Vollmer - Printmaker: The Balance of Paste, Water, and Colour

The Unfinished Print

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 61:33


April Vollmer is one of the most important mokuhanga printmakers and authors working today. Her book, Japanese Woodblock Print Workshop, is a must have for any person interested in mokuhanga. its process, history, and the artists making it.  On this epsiode of The Unfinished Print, I speak with April Vollmer about her travels throughout the mokuhanga landscape. Her time at Nagasawa Art Park, and then onto MI Lab. How she got into becoming an author, writing Japanese Woodblock Print Workshop, her influences and her process.  Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own mokuhanga work on Instagram @andrezadoroznyprints Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com  Artists works follow after the note about them. Notes: may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase. April Vollmer -website, Instagram, Facebook. April was recently a part of the mokuhanga exhibition at the Kentler International Drawing Space, in Red Hook, Brooklyn, New York. This show was curated by the Mokuhanga Sisters collective and is called Between Worlds from, June 17 - July 31st, 2022. Rochester, New York - is a city located in Upstate New York. It was originally inhabited by the Seneca peoples. Shaped by the Genesee River, Rochester was once a flour making city as well as a city famous for its horticulture. More information can be found, here. Hunter College - Is a public college located in Manhattan, New York, and was founded in 1870 as a college for women. More info, here.  abstract art - is an art type which moved away from a 19th Century artistic idea of perspective.  Abstract art was a rebellion of colour, shape, and experience, for both the viewer and the maker. It corresponds to the modernism of the industrial world, with science, technology, and architecture. More info can be found, here.  colour field - is a term in painting associated with the abstract painters of the 1950's and 1960's using large swaths of flat colour. Mark Rothko (1903-1970) is one such painter associated with colour field. More info, here.  Vincent Longo (1923-2017) -  was a painter, printmaker and teacher based in New York City. He was a part of the New York School of artist's of the 1950's and 1960's. His work was based in geometry. You can find more information about Vinnie, here. 4 Blocks (1985) Bill Paden (1930-2004) - was a woodblock printmaker and artist who studied under the American expat Clifton Karhu (1927-2007) in Kyoto. More info, here. Beppu Beach Water Bay Mountain (ca. 1970's) hanmoto system - is the Edo Period (1603-1868) collaboration system of making woodblock prints in Japan. The system was about using, carvers, printers, and craftsmen, by various print publishers in order to produce woodblock prints. The system consisted of the following professions; publisher, artist, carver, and printer. Tetsuya Noda (b 1940) - is a contemporary print artist, photographer and professor emeritus at Tokyo University of the Arts (Tōkyō Geidai).  His process uses photographs through a mimeograph machine, then woodblock and silk screen. Considered one of Japan's most famous living artists, Noda's work is a wonderful representation of what can be done with the print medium. More info, with video, can be found, here.  The LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies - is a not for profit centre at the Columbia University School of the Arts, which provides an atmosphere of print education for students and invited guests.  Tōkyō v Kyōto (Ōsaka) school of mokuhanga - Tōkyō and Kyōto have, historically, been culturally different throughout Japanese history. Even today, especially with foreign expats, which side of the border you pledge allegiance to can make or break a pleasant conversation. Regarding woodblock printing, it was the moving of the capital to Edo from Kyōto by Tokugawa Ieyasu (1542-1616), officially in 1603, which centred the world for an entire nation. Edo became the business, and cultural district in which most people found themselves. The sankin kōtai system, where daimyō from the entire country, were obligated to spend alternating years in the capital, allowed the merchant classes to grow prosperous, spending their time and money on entertainments such as ukiyo-e, kabuki, and sumo.  This didn't mean that Kyōto and Ōsaka didn't have ukiyo-e, it simply meant that it was overshadowed by Edo. This is because many publishers and artists lived and worked in Edo's environs. Kabuki from Edo and kabuki from Kyōto thrived, therefore there were many prints published for the plays performed in both cities. Stylistically the prints are different, with Ōsaka ukiyo-e being called Kamigata-e, the region where Ōsaka, and Kyōto are situated. For instance, the work of Ōsaka artist, and painter Shunkōsai Hokushū (active 1802-1832) is famous in Ōsaka for his kabuki prints, but is relatively unknown today, as compared to Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) who lived and worked around the same time in Edo. Comparing the two is perhaps comparing Brad Pitt (b. 1963), with Steve Buscemi (b. 1957), but I feel that it shows what both artists, successful in their fields, can accomplish for the genre. More information on Ōsaka ukiyo-e, can be found, here.  Keiko Kadota (1942-2017) - was the director of Nagasawa Art Park at Awaji City from 1997-2011, and then of MI Lab at Lake Kawaguchi from 2011 until her passing. Minimalism - is an art movement based on simplicity and geometry. Generally connected to 1960's New York City. More info, here. Yoonmi Nam (b. 1974) - is a contemporary mokuhanga printmaker, lithographer, sculptor, and teacher, based in Lawrence, Kansas. Her work can be found, here. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. Yakult  (2018) Katie Baldwin -  is a contemporary mokuhanga printmaker, illustrator, book maker, and artist based in Huntsville, Alabama.  Her work can be found, here. The Dance (2015) Mariko Jesse - is an illustrator, and mokuhanga printmaker based in Tōkyō, London, and California.  Her work can be found, here. Mariko, Katie, and Yoonmi are also a part of the collective, wood+paper+box, which can be found, here.  Summer Flowers (2021) Daniel Heyman (b. 1963) - is a painter and printmaker based in Rhode Island at the Rhode Island School of Design, where he is Assistant Professor. His work can be found, here. Janus (2019/2020) IMPACT Conference - started by The Center for Print Research, IMPACT stands for "International Multi-discipinary Printmaking, Artists, Concepts and Techniques'. Based in Europe, it is an academic conference discussing printmaking and how it fits into this world. More info about the most recent conference can be found, here.  Kari Laitinen (b. 1952) - is a Finnish artist and printmaker based in Finland. His works explore colour and dimension. More information can be found, here. He helped write, with Tuula Moilanen, the book Woodblock Printmaking with Oil-based Inks and the Japanese Watercolour Woodcut. It was published in 1999. Secret Space II (2014) Tuula Moilanen - is a Finnish mokuhanga printmaker and painter based in Finland. She lived and studied in Kyōto from 1989-2012,  where she learned her printmaking at Kyōto Seika University and from printmaker Akira Kurosaki (1937-2019). Her work can be found, here. Clear Day Fuji (2014) Arches - is a brand of Western watercolour paper that is acid-free. BFK - also knowns as Rives BFK, is a Western printmaking paper, made in France. Like Arches, it is 100% cotton. Lower East Side Print Shop - founded in 1968, and is a not-for- profit printmaking studio located in New York City. More information can be found, here.  Jennifer Mack-Watkins -  is a contemporary mokuhanga printmaker, and serigrapher based in New York City and New Jersey. Her work explores American culture through a personal lens. Her work has been featured  in Vogue and the New York Times. More information can be found, here.  What To Do (2013) Andrew Stone - is based in Florence, Italy. Andrew is a wine maker and former full-time doctor who has been making mokuhanga and baren, for years. His blog can be found, here. his interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Mons Veneris (2016) Frogman's Print Workshop - is a print space, opened in 1979,  in South Dakota. In 2016 the space moved to the University of Nebraska. More info can be found, here.  The Adachi Institute of Woodblock Prints - is a print studio located in Tōkyō. Established in 1994 in order to promote and preserve the colour woodblock print of Japan. More information, in English and in Japanese.  bokashi -  is a Japanese term associated with the gradation of water into ink. There are several types of bokashi. For more information regarding these types of bokashi please check out Professor Claire Cuccio's lecture called “A Story in Layers,” for the Library of Congress, and the book Japanese Printmaking by Tōshi Yoshida, and Rei Yuki. Below are the following types of bokashi. This is from the Yoshida book: ichimonji bokashi - straight line gradation ichimonji mura bokashi - straight line gradation with an uneven edg. Ō-bokashi - a gradual shading over a wide area atenashi bokashi - gradation without definition futairo bokashi - two tone gradation Ansei Uchima (1921-2000) - was a mokuhanga printmaker in the sōsaku hanga style of Japanese printmaking. He was the translator for Japanologist Oliver Statler (1915-2002). In Memoriam (1958) Keiji Shinohara (b. 1955) - is a Japanese mokuhanga printmaker who apprenticed under Uesugi Keiichiro in Ōsaka. He is the artist-in-residence at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. More info about Keiji can be found here, and here. Twilight (2012) Ursula Schneider - is a painter, woodblock printmaker and teacher at Sarah Lawrence College in Yonkers, New York. More info about her work can be found, here. Leaf and Wood (2018) Jackie Battenfield - is a painter, printmaker, collagist, author, and motivational speaker. April alludes to Jackie's  book, “The Artist's Guide: How to Make a Living Doing What You Love,” (2009). More information about Jackie's work can be found, here. Soundings (1999) International Mokuhanga Conference - is a bi-yearly conference dedicated to mokuhanga which started in 2011 by the International Mokuhanga Association. Each conference is themed. The latest conference was in 2021, delayed a year because of the pandemic. More information can be found, here.  Tōhoku Earthquake and Tsunami 2011 - (東北地方太平洋沖地震) was a massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami which struck the coast of North East Japan on March, 11, 2011. The earthquake was 9.0 - 9.1 on the Richter scale. Watson-Guptill - is an American publishing house, starting business in 1937. It is now a part of Ten Speed Press.  Mina Takahashi - is the editor of Hand Papermaking magazine dedicated to the production and preservation of handmade paper. Was the editor of Dieu Donné in New York City from 1990-2004. She is also a curator. Printmaking Today - is a magazine published by Cello Press in England, and is published quarterly. The magazine focuses on printmaking themes and artists. More info, here. Mid-America Print Council - promotes the art of printmaking of all types. It was started in 1990 in Des Moines, Iowa. It publishes an annual journal with essays and articles about printmaking. More information can be found, here. Edvard Munch (1863-1944) - was a Norwegian artist, who at the time of his death in 1944 had amassed thousands of his own works, including 15,391 prints of all types. Munch loved printmaking, using various mediums. The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. has an excellent exploration of his prints, here.  Mokuhanga books in English -  Here is a list of books for those interested in studying and understanding mokuhanga, that I am aware of. This list is by no means exhaustive, so if you believe I've missed one please message me. If the book is in print (or even out of print and there are PDF's) you will see the authors name hyper-linked so you can get the books : April Vollmer - Japanese Woodblock Printshop: A Modern Guide to the Ancient Art of Mokuhanga. (2015) Watson-Guptill Publications Tuula Moilanen, Kari Laitinen, and Antti Tanttu - The Art and Craft of Woodblock Printmaking. (2013) Aalto Books Laura Boswell - Making Japanese Woodblock Prints. (2020) The Crowood Press. Hiroshi Yoshida - Japanese Woodblock Printing. (1939) Sanseido Company, Ltd. Walter J. Phillips -  The Technique of the Colour Woodcut. (1926) Brown-Robertson, New York. Rebecca Salter - Japanese Woodblock Printing. (2001) A&C Black. Tōshi Yoshida & Rei Yuki - Japanese Print Making: A Handbook of Traditional and Modern Techniques. (1966) Tuttle Publishing. Marilyn Chesterton and Rod Nelson - Making Woodblock Prints. (2015) Crowood Press  Terry McKenna - Terry has written two excellent woodblock primers for the beginner and the intermediate practitioner. The first is Mokuhanga Fundamentals: Core Skills... & the second book is, Creative Print. Both can be purchased directly from here, and other fine establishments in e-book or physical form. Self Published.  Fabiola Gil Alares - her book, Mokuhanga: Manual Ilustrado de Xilografía Japonesa, is one of the finest books on the subject of mokuhanga. This book is in Spanish. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Keiko Hara (b.1942) - is a painter, printmaker in mokuhanga, lithograph, and stencil. She is also a sculptor, and collagist. More info can be found, here. Verse R - Black and White (2017) floating kentō - is a removable registration system attached to the block when printing. As the kentō isn't affixed to the block; blotting, and very clean borders are one of the positives of using this method of registration. It is an "L" shape.  baren - is a Japanese word to describe the flat, round shaped disc which is predominantly used in the creation of Japanese woodblock prints. It is traditionally made of cord of various types, and a bamboo sheath, although baren come in many variations.  Guerra & Paint Pigment Corp. - is a brick and mortar store located in Brooklyn, New York that sells artists pigments. More info, here.  Endi Poskovich - is a printmaker and artist who focuses on symbols, and language for his work. More info about his work can be found, here.  Two (Hälftberg) (2004-2017) Holbein - is a pigment company with offices in Japan, Canada, and the United States. More info, here Benjamin Selby - is an artist who works in mokuhanga, as well as touching on serigraphy and installations. More information about Benjamin's work can be found, here.  Turbulent Waters (2020) Auto Mach Reciprocating Wood Carver -  is an automatic chisel that is made in Japan. It is plugged into an outlet. It comes with a variety of bits for carving. It makes carving large areas of hard wood a breeze. More information can be found, here.  acetate - is a plant based, non-petroleum product. It is made from wood pulp and cotton. It is bendable, and stiff enough to use for getting into your kentō registration if you decide to use it for key block transfer. Yoshida Family of Artists - The Yoshida's are one of the most famous family of artists from Japan. Started with painter Yoshida Kasaburō (1861-1894), and made famous by Yoshida Hiroshi (1876-1950) and his work with the shin-hanga movement and woodblock printing. The Yoshida family has helped shape many artists around the world. More info from the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, here. Generation by April Vollmer (2002) © Popular Wheat Productions opening and closing credit - Anyone Can Have a Good Time by OWLS (2001). From their self-titled album, and released on Jade Tree.  logo designed and produced by Douglas Batchelor and André Zadorozny  Disclaimer: Please do not reproduce or use anything from this podcast without shooting me an email and getting my express written or verbal consent. I'm friendly :) Слава Україну If you find any issue with something in the show notes please let me know. ***The opinions expressed by guests in The Unfinished Print podcast are not necessarily those of André Zadorozny and of Popular Wheat Productions.***        

How to Decorate
Ep. 264 Art 101 with Liz Lidgett

How to Decorate

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 58:44 Very Popular


We are so excited to be joined today by Des Moines based art advisor and gallery owner Liz Lidgett. Liz works with clients in more than 45 states and 7 countries. She has been featured in Better Homes & Gardens, Business Insider, and Forbes. Part of what makes Liz's business so successful is her accessible approach to art. For Liz, art is for everyone. We talk about all the ins and outs of how to feel good about your art investment, how to release the fear and intimidation around art galleries, and much more! What You'll Hear on This Episode: How being based in the Midwest impacts Liz's view on art as well as her business. Liz's philosophy that “art is for everyone” is intricate to her design. Art and art galleries are for everyone; no one should ever feel like they don't belong. How do you buy art if you don't know anything about it? Why it's important to know more about the artists behind their work. What to do when your taste varies greatly from your partner's. How does Liz suggest buying art online or sight unseen? Liz tells us more about price levels and how they are determined. Why Liz loves commissioned pieces. All about framing; when to frame, when it's included, what to choose, etc. Tips on how and where to hang art. When should you light artwork? What are Liz's tips for artists to get their work in a gallery? Mentioned in This Episode: Liz Lidgett Gallery + Design Liz Lidgett Gallery on Instagram Liz Lidgett on Instagram

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Meet Rebecca from Des Moines!

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 2:02


Rebecca from Des Moines is in studio auditioning for the show!

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY
PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY - Episode 239

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:29


Andy talks about his mom's health, plays autotuned John Lennon, discusses glizzies, his diet, his forthcoming novel, and Ottessa Moshfegh's Lapvona. On Rachel's Chart Chat, Rachel from Des Moines finds gems in charts from 1972 and 1988. You can find a playlist for Rachel's Chart Chat here. Follow Rachel on Last.fm here.

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Rebecca's Daughter Did the Unthinkable

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 3:21


Rebecca from Des Moines is in studio auditioning for the show!

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Lobster...Everything Bagels...Bacon?

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 6:08


Rebecca from Des Moines is in studio auditioning for the show!

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Rebecca the Axe Thrower

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 2:42


Rebecca from Des Moines is in studio auditioning for the show!

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Fancy Feast...for Humans?

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 2:47


Rebecca from Des Moines is in studio auditioning for the show!

Q&A in the Kitchen
Is It Safe to Get a Tattoo or Piecing - Q&A in the Kitchen S04 EP06

Q&A in the Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 31:03


In Q&A in the Kitchen Season 4, Episode 6, Jack Lowe, Jimmy St John, DaVo, and Brent Starr discuss if it is safe to get a tattoo or a piercing. What should you look for and consider before getting some new body art?This is the Audio Only Version, you can watch the Video Version at https://youtu.be/0vWybeGs1U4Q&A in the Kitchen is a series where Professional Tattooist and Body Piercers discuss common subjects relating to the Body Arts. If you have a question that you would like us to cover in the future, please comment below or send an email to davo@axiompiercing.com.In this episode, our panel is DaVo from Axiom Body PIercing - https://axiompiercing.com/, Jimmy St John,  Jack Lowe, and Brent Starr from Skin Kitchen Tattoo - https://skinkitchen.com.Check Out Our New Merch Store - https://teespring.com/stores/bpt-channelBody Piercing & Tattooing Channel LinksWebsite - https://bptchannel.com/Youtube Channel Page - https://www.youtube.com/c/BodyPiercingTattooingOur Merch Store = https://teespring.com/stores/bpt-channelInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/bptchannel/Twitter @channel_body - https://twitter.com/channel_bodyFacebook - https://www.facebook.com/Body-Piercing-Tattooing-Channel-112580290467919For more information on the Skin Kitchen go to http://skinkitchen.com.To book a Tattoo Appointment email us at shop@skinkitchen.com or call 515-255-4430For more information on DaVo and the Axiom Body Piercing Studio go to https://axiompiercing.comContact DaVo at davo@axiompiercing.com or by phone at 515-966-4814If you would like to set up a Piercing Appointment go to https://axiompiercing.com/bookingSkin Kitchen Tattoo and The Axiom Body Piercing Studio are located at 3800 Douglas Ave./Des Moines, Iowa 50311Tattoo hours are Thursday - Monday 1-8 pmPiercing hours are Thursday - Monday 2-8 pmAll footage was filmed using a Canon EOS 80D - https://amzn.to/3mohWDb with Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens - https://amzn.to/3bb5PV4, Canon EOS R - https://amzn.to/386Y1BZ with Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Lens - https://amzn.to/3jkvptO and Canon EOS M50 - https://amzn.to/37yuovU with Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 is STM Lens - https://amzn.to/37Etg9S8. All Recorded Live with Blackmagic ATEM Mini Pro - https://amzn.to/3r77mm9Audio - Recorded with Zoom PodTrak P8 - https://amzn.to/3cu3Uye with Shure MV7 USB Podcast Microphones - https://amzn.to/39fKKbS

Liberty & Justice with Matt Whitaker
Eric Schmitt, Missouri Attorney General and US Senate Candidate, joins Liberty & Justice

Liberty & Justice with Matt Whitaker

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 29:21


Eric Schmitt, Missouri Attorney General and candidate for US Senate in Missouri (schmittforsenate.com) is this week's guest on Liberty & Justice with Matt Whitaker.  This is Eric's second time on the show and it was recorded live at The America First Agenda Conference in Washington, D.C. hosted by AFPI.  Eric and Matt discuss Eric's primary election on Tuesday August 2, 2022, St. Louis Cardinals baseball and several other interesting topics.  Every episode can be watched at Whitaker.tv.SAVE MISSOURI VALUES PAC is this week's sponsor.Eric Schmitt is Missouri's 43rd Attorney General and chief legal and law enforcement official. A lifelong, sixth-generation Missourian, Eric is driven by his constitutional conservative beliefs, which he applies every day as the lawyer for all six million Missourians.  Eric has proven over and over that he will boldly defend the rule of law. He has remained the leader Missourians can count on.Eric and his wife Jaime have three children: Stephen, Sophia and Olivia. Their son, Stephen was born with a rare genetic condition causing tumors on his organs. He also has epilepsy, is on the autism spectrum, and is non-verbal.  Eric's son was his inspiration to run for office to be a voice for individuals like him and their families. One of Eric's early legislative victories was taking on insurance companies by leading a bipartisan effort to ensure Missouri families are covered when they need it the most – including therapies for autism.As Missouri Attorney General, Eric launched multiple major initiatives to better the lives of Missourians across the state. In his first month in office, Eric launched his Safer Streets Initiative, featuring unprecedented cooperation between the U.S Attorney's Office and the Attorney General's Office, taking on violent crime across the state. Recently, Eric has launched his Office's first Cold Case Unit to deliver justice to victims who have waited far too long.SAVE MISSOURI VALUES PAC is this week's sponsor.Matthew G. Whitaker was acting Attorney General of the United States (2018-2019).  Prior to becoming acting Attorney General, Mr. Whitaker served as Chief of Staff to the Attorney General. He was appointed as the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa by President George W. Bush, serving from 2004-2009. Whitaker was the managing partner of Des Moines based law firm, Whitaker Hagenow & Gustoff LLP from 2009 until rejoining DOJ in 2017. He was also the Executive Director for FACT, The Foundation for Accountability & Civic Trust, an ethics and accountability watchdog, between 2014 and 2017.   Mr. Whitaker is Author of the book--Above the Law, The Inside Story of How the Justice Department Tried to Subvert President Trump.  Buy Matt's book here: https://amzn.to/3IXUOb8Mr. Whitaker graduated with a Master of Business Administration, Juris Doctor, and Bachelor of Arts from the University of Iowa.  While at Iowa, Mr. Whitaker was a three-year letterman on the football team where he received the prestigious Big Ten Medal of Honor.Mr. Whitaker is now a Co-Chair of the Center for Law and Justice at America First Policy Institute and a Senior Fellow at the American Conservative Union Foundation. Matt is on the Board of Directors for America First Legal Foundation and is a Senior Advisor to IronGate Capital Advisors. He is also Of Counsel with the Graves Garrett law firm.  Whitaker appears regularly to discuss legal and politicaThe Greg Krino ShowVeteran, pilot, and attorney - Greg Krino - takes you on a deep-dive with experts to...Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast
How Partnerships Work [RR 766]

Remarkable Results Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 38:32


What does it take to build and maintain a long-term and successful business partnership? Why do so many fail? I'm with Travis Troy and Josh Mullins from Honest Wrenches, and they are debunking the misconception that partnerships in business don't work. Spoiler alert, just like a marriage, it takes hard work and clear communication with aligned values.   Travis Troy, Josh Mullins, https://honestwrenches.com/ (Honest Wrenches), Akeny and Des Moines, IA. Listen to Travis' other episodes https://remarkableresults.biz/?s=%22travis+troy%22 (HERE) Key Talking Points Thinking of opening a second location? If you're going to do it, just do it; you'll figure it out along the way Biggest learning curve- you're already spread thin because you're afraid of letting things go, but you must. Letting go will challenge you and bring you success. Empower your team. Trust the process that is built Working together- 2 way street, stay in your lanes with the flexibility to help each other when needed and asked. Constant ‘check-ins' and communication together. You have to be aligned together. Know the capabilities and roles of your partner and understand the boundaries without overstepping each other  Making mistakes- it happens; move on without making each other feel guilty about the wrong decision. Empower each other to use blameless problem-solving. Travis and Josh are in CEO and COO group along with other networking groups “People buy from people” 10 year age gap- it's not about the age gap, you can't compare workloads, you need defined roles. Don't create animosity and if it starts building you stop and talk it through. Grow with the right people- don't force yourself to grow and risk diminishing the culture. Know your purpose, your wants, and your desires Connect with the Podcast: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/ (Aftermarket Radio Network) http://youtube.com/carmcapriotto (Subscribe on YouTube) https://remarkableresults.biz/episodes (Visit us on the Web) https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsPodcast (Follow on Facebook) https://remarkableresults.biz/insider/ (Become an Insider) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm (Buy me a coffee) https://remarkableresults.biz/books/ (Important Books) Check out today's partners:         Set your sights on Las Vegas in 2022. Mark your calendar now … November 1-3, 2022, https://www.aapexshow.com/ (AAPEX) - Now more than ever. And don't miss the next free AAPEX webinar. Register now at http://AAPEXSHOW.COM/WEBINAR (AAPEXSHOW.COM/WEBINAR). More Time. More Profit. Transform your shop at https://getshopware.com/carm (getshopware.com/carm) https://aftermarketradionetwork.com () https://remarkableresultsradio.captivate.fm/listen ()

What's The Hazard
MakUSafe - Data Driven Safety

What's The Hazard

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 68:22


Doug welcomes, all the way from Des Moines, Gabriel Glynn with MakuSafe. A company built with the worker in mind, using data to prevent incidents on the jobsite. Once Doug retires, he want to go to work with them!Doug Fletcher can be reached at doug@fletchersafety.com__________________________________Much gratitude to our Sponsors and Supporters!CCS Group - Cheyenne Wohlfordhttps://ccsgrouponline.comFalewitch Construction Services - John Falewitchhttps://www.falewitch.comNDOL – Onsite Consultation - Jim CoverJim.Cover@nebraska.govBuilding Omahabuildingomaha.org or 402-397-5105Work Safe ConsultingDanni Arroyo at 402-802-6316________________________________A Hurrdat Media Production. Hurrdat Media is a digital media and commercial video production company based in Omaha, NE. Find more podcasts on the Hurrdat Media Network and learn more about our other services today on HurrdatMedia.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

WTIP Boundary Waters Podcast
Episode 71 WTIP Boundary Waters Podcast

WTIP Boundary Waters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 27:07


Emily Haavik is a Twin Cities based journalist and musician who has a deep love for the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Emily and her husband, Phil, chose the BWCA as the setting for their honeymoon in September 2020, for example. The couple also got engaged in the canoe-country wilderness in 2019 on Rose Lake. Emily grew up in Duluth and has been coming to the Boundary Waters for most of her life. Phil grew up in Des Moines, making his first trip to the BWCA in 2001 with a group of scouts. Those early trips were the foundation for a spirited passion for wilderness for both Emily and Phil, particularly the portages, rivers, lakes and forest of the BWCA. Emily and Phil share more on their story in this episode of the podcast. Also featured in this episode is a familiar voice on the podcast, Aubrey Helmuth-Miller. Aubrey and her family open the episode prior to their recent trip to the Gunflint Trail and the BWCA. Music featured in this episode includes the song “Good Times” by Emily Haavik. Other music from the Blue Dot Sessions and Ian Tamblyn.

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Podcast, July 29

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 3:47


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Friday, July 29. The great weather continues! According to the National Weather Service it will be sunny with a high near 82 degrees in the Cedar Rapids area on Friday. On Friday night it will be mostly clear, with a low of around 59 degrees Thanks but no thanks. This appears to be the answer from the Cedar Rapids School Board after the City of Cedar Rapids offered to pay for two officers that the board voted to remove from the district's  middle schools in a recent approval of the contract. Cedar Rapids school board president David Tominsky said Thursday the board is not considering changing its decision on a contract for school resource officers in schools after the mayor offered for the city to pay for two of the officers to work in middle schools. “The board has examined the School Resource Officer program comprehensively, made a data-driven decision, and voted earlier this month on a path forward,” Tominsky said in an email to The Gazette. “After review of the mayor's letter, no board member will be changing their vote.” Board members said the decision was not based on funding, but rather on a racial disparity in student arrests. This said, there will still be officers in other schools in the district. The city of Cedar Rapids hopes to receive a $50 million boost for flood protection under a bill that passed the U.S. Senate Thursday. Senators voted 93-1 to pass the 2022 Water Resources Development Act. The biannual packages authorizes the Army Corps of Engineers to carry out water resources projects and includes key measures secured by Iowa Republican U.S. Sens. Joni Ernst and Chuck Grassley to update Cedar Rapids' flood system and a levee in the Des Moines area. The bill could unlock federal dollars for flood protection on the east side of the Cedar River — which would allow the city to accelerate work on other segments of the system. A year after Mercy Iowa City announced plans to exit its four-year affiliation with the statewide MercyOne health network and integrate into a larger health care system, the only community hospital in Iowa City is ending its unsuccessful search and sticking with MercyOne after all. In an email to Mercy Iowa City employees Thursday, Acting President and Chief Executive Officer Mike Trachta acknowledged “significant changes that could not have been anticipated” during the search for a partner that would help put the hospital on a better financial path. In the email, Trachta also announced Dawna Miller, Mercy Iowa City's executive vice president and chief financial officer, and Judy Andronowitz, vice president and chief operating officer, are leaving. While Mercy Iowa City is focusing internally on improving performance and staffing, the hospital has engaged consultant Insight Health Partners to assess its financial and strategic operations, Trachta said Thursday. An assessment of the 194-bed hospital will take about 60 days and engage leaders, colleagues and providers in meetings and evaluation activities to give feedback for the campus' future. Mercy Iowa City has been struggling to find financial footing for years, even before the COVID-19 pandemic, which ravaged the healthcare industry. Numbers show that Mercy Iowa City did not bounce back as well as other local hospitals as pandemic conditions improved.

KXnO Sports Fanatics
The Des Moines Menace Coaching Staff Hop In Studio To Talk About the Big Game with Emery - Thursday Hour 3

KXnO Sports Fanatics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 41:26


The Des Moines Menace Coaching Staff Hop In Studio To Talk About the Big Game with Emery - Thursday Hour 3

Miller and Condon on KXnO
Miller and Condon 7/28/22 Hr 1

Miller and Condon on KXnO

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 49:01


Ken Miller on a Thursday with TC on vacation! AAC/Big 12 connections! Bama Bob joins to talk further realignment rumors including Big 12 and Texas! Ben Gislason from the Iowa Wild stops in to talk 10 years of Iowa Wild hockey in Des Moines!

Kona Kamps (Triathlon and Endurance)
Caitlin Alexander, Ironman Des Moines 2022

Kona Kamps (Triathlon and Endurance)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 41:58


Caitlin Alexander is this year's age group champion (30-34) at Ironman Des Moines 2022. Caitlin's Race Data: https://bit.ly/3oDHW0A SUBSCRIBE: iTunes: apple.co/2MLBzb2 Podcast Index: bit.ly/3gSMbRB

Miller & Condon 1460 KXnO
Miller and Condon 7/28/22 Hr 1

Miller & Condon 1460 KXnO

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 49:52


Ken Miller on a Thursday with TC on vacation! AAC/Big 12 connections! Bama Bob joins to talk further realignment rumors including Big 12 and Texas! Ben Gislason from the Iowa Wild stops in to talk 10 years of Iowa Wild hockey in Des Moines!

Youth Culture Today with Walt Mueller
Negative Sideline Behavior

Youth Culture Today with Walt Mueller

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 1:00


Earlier this summer, a television station in Des Moines, Iowa ran a report about how unruly parents were causing issues for umpires at youth baseball games. It seems that over the course of one weekend in June, umpires had to eject seventeen parents from baseball games for heckling and other bad behavior. In order to combat this, Central Iowa Sports, the organization that runs the league, instituted a strict no-tolerance policy. The following weekend, Central Iowa Sports reported that the new policy worked, as only two parents had to be ejected from the games. This story is not unusual, nor is the deplorable behavior of parents limited to Central Iowa. Increasingly we hear these reports from just about everywhere. Parents, sports are meant to be played. Play is meant to be fun. Negative sideline behavior ruins it for everyone, including our kids, who not only feel greater pressure, but learn these bad behaviors. We are to glorify God in all things, including our spectating.

Trackside Podcast
Kevin and Curt discuss Hy-Vee Iowa doubleheader, Josef Newgarden

Trackside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 53:47


Tonight on Trackside, Kevin Lee and Curt Cavin recap the Hy-Vee Doubleheader at Iowa Speedway, with wins by Josef Newgarden and Pato O'Ward. They give the latest on Newgarden, who crashed while leading Sunday, and later collapsed and was transferred to a Des Moines hospital. They discuss his standby replacement for this weekend's race on the IMS road course, Santino Ferrucci, and what the Connecticut native could bring to Team Penske. Kevin and Curt also speculate about other drivers that could have been options to fill in.  Later, they talk about O'Ward's victory in the second race, what this weekend meant for the championship chase, and Jimmie Johnson's strong weekend. Our News of the Day, brought to you by the Indianapolis Speedrome and Circle City Raceway is the controversial finish from Indy Lights on Saturday, in which Linus Lundqvist was penalized three positions, giving the win to Hunter McElrea. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Remote Work and Finding Your Voice with Jeff Smith

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 40:42


About JeffJeff Smith has been in the technology industry for over 20 years, oscillating between management and individual contributor. Jeff currently serves as the Director of Production Operations for Basis Technologies (formerly Centro), an advertising software company headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. Before that he served as the Manager of Site Reliability Engineering at Grubhub.Jeff is passionate about DevOps transformations in organizations large and small, with a particular interest in the psychological aspects of problems in companies. He lives in Chicago with his wife Stephanie and their two kids Ella and Xander.Jeff is also the author of Operations Anti-Patterns, DevOps Solutions with Manning publishing. (https://www.manning.com/books/operations-anti-patterns-devops-solutions) Links Referenced: Basis Technologies: https://basis.net/ Operations Anti-Patterns: https://attainabledevops.com/book Personal Site: https://attainabledevops.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffery-smith-devops/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/DarkAndNerdy Medium: https://medium.com/@jefferysmith duckbillgroup.com: https://duckbillgroup.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the fun things about doing this show for long enough is that you eventually get to catch up with people and follow up on previous conversations that you've had. Many years ago—which sounds like I'm being sarcastic, but is increasingly actually true—Jeff Smith was on the show talking about a book that was about to release. Well, time has passed and things have changed. And Jeff Smith is back once again. He's the Director of Product Operations at Basis Technologies, and the author of DevOps Anti-Patterns? Or what was the actual title of the book it was—Jeff: Operations Anti-Patterns.Corey: I got hung up in the anti-patterns part because it's amazing. I love the title.Jeff: Yeah, Operations Anti-Patterns, DevOps Solutions.Corey: Got you. Usually in my experience, alway been operations anti-patterns, and here I am to make them worse, probably by doing something like using DNS as a database or some godforsaken thing. But you were talking about the book aspirationally a few years ago, and now it's published and it has been sent out to the world. And it went well enough that they translated it to Japanese, I believe, and it has seen significant uptick. What was your experience of it? How did it go?Jeff: You know, it was a great experience. This is definitely the first book that I've written. And the Manning process was extremely smooth. You know, they sort of hold your hand through the entire process. But even after launch, just getting feedback from readers and hearing how it resonated with folks was extremely powerful.I was surprised to find out that they turned it into an audiobook as well. So, everyone reaches out and says, “Did you read the audiobook? I was going to buy it, but I wasn't sure.” I was like, “No, unfortunately, I don't read it.” But you know, still cool to have it out there.Corey: My theory has been for a while now that no one wants to actually write a book; they want to have written a book. Now that you're on the other side, how accurate is that? Are you in a position of, “Wow, sure glad that's done?” Or are you, “That was fun. Let's do it again because I like being sad all the time.” I mean, you do work Kubernetes for God's sake. I mean, there's a bit of masochism inherent to all of us in this space.Jeff: Yeah. Kubernetes makes me cry a little bit more than the writing process. But it's one of the things when you look back on it, you're like, “Wow, that was fun,” but not in the heat of the moment, right? So, I totally agree with the sentiment that people want to have written a book but not actually gone through the process. And that's evident by the fact that how many people try to start a book on their own without a publisher behind them, and they end up writing it for 15 years. The process is pretty grueling. The feedback is intense at first, but you start to get into a groove and you—I could see, you know, in a little while wanting to write another book. So, I can see the appeal.Corey: And the last time you were on the show, I didn't really bother to go in a particular topical direction because, what's the point? It didn't really seem like it was a top-of-mind issue to really bring up because what's it matter; it's a small percentage of the workforce. Now I feel like talking about remote work is suddenly taking on a bit of a different sheen than it was before the dark times arrived. Where do you land on the broad spectrum of opinions around the idea of remote work, given that you have specialized in anti-patterns, and well, as sarcastic as I am, I tend to look at almost every place I've ever worked is expressing different anti-patterns from time to time. So, where do you land on the topic?Jeff: So, it's funny, I started as a staunch office supporter, right? I like being in the office. I like collaborating in person; I thought we were way more productive. Since the pandemic, all of us are forced into remote work, I've hired almost half of my team now as remote. And I am somewhat of a convert, but I'm not on the bandwagon of remote work is just as good or is better as in person work.I've firmly landed in the camp of remote work is good. It's got its shortcomings, but it's worth the trade off. And I think acknowledging what those trade-offs are important to keeping the team afloat. We just recently had a conversation with the team where we were discussing, like, you know, there's definitely been a drop in productivity over the past six months to a year. And in that conversation, a lot of the things that came up were things that are different remote that were better in person, right, Slack etiquette—which is something, you know, I could talk a little bit about as well—but, you know, Slack etiquette in terms of getting feedback quickly, just the sort of camaraderie and the lack of building that camaraderie with new team members as they come on board and not having those rituals to replace the in-person rituals. But through all that, oddly enough, no one suggested going back into the office. [laugh].Corey: For some strange reason, yeah. I need to be careful what I say here, I want to disclaim the position that I'm in. There is a power imbalance and nothing I say is going to be able to necessarily address that because I own the company and if my team members are listening to this, they're going to read a lot into what I say that I might not necessarily intend. But The Duckbill Group, since its founding, has been a fully distributed company. My business partner lives in a different state than I do so there's never been the crappy version of remote, which is, well, we're all going to be in the same city, except for Theodore. Theodore is going to be timezones away and then wonder why he doesn't get to participate in some of the conversations where the real decisions get made.Like that's crappy. I don't like that striated approach to things. We don't have many people who are co-located in any real sense, nor have we for the majority of the company's life. But there are times when I am able to work on a project in a room with one of my colleagues, and things go a lot more smoothly. As much as we want to pretend that video is the same, it quite simply isn't.It is a somewhat poor substitute for the very high bandwidth of a face-to-face interaction. And yes, I understand this is also a somewhat neurotypical perspective, let's be clear with that as well, and it's not for everyone. But I think that for the base case, a lot of the remote work advocates are not being fully, I guess, honest with themselves about some of the shortcomings remote has. That is where I've mostly landed on this. Does that generally land with where you are?Jeff: Yeah, that's exactly where I'm at. I completely agree. And when we take work out of the equation, I think the shortcomings lay themselves bare, right? Like I was having a conversation with a friend and we were like, well, if you had a major breakup, right, I would never be like, “Oh, man. Grab a beer and hop on Zoom,” right? [laugh]. “Let's talk it out.”No, you're like, hey, let's get in person and let's talk, right? We can do all of that conversation over Zoom, but the magic of being in person and having that personal connection, you know, can't be replaced. So, you know, if it's not going to work, commiserating over beers, right? I can't imagine it's going to work, diagramming some complex workflows and trying to come to an answer or a solution on that. So again, not to say that, you know, remote work is not valuable, it's just different.And I think organizations are really going to have to figure out, like, okay, if I want to entice people back into the office, what are the things that I need to do to make this realistic? We've opened the floodgates on remote hiring, right, so now it's like, okay, everyone's janky office setup needs to get fixed, right? So, I can't have a scenario where it's like, “Oh, just point your laptop at the whiteboard, right?” [laugh]. Like that can't exist, we have to have office spaces that are first-class citizens for our remote counterparts as well.Corey: Right because otherwise, the alternative is, “Great, I expect you to take the home that you pay for and turn it into an area fit for office use. Of course, we're not going to compensate you for that, despite the fact that, let's be realistic, rent is often larger than the AWS bill.” Which I know, gasp, I'm as shocked as anyone affected by that, but it's true. “But oh, you want to work from home? Great. That just means you can work more hours.”I am not of the school of thought where I consider time in the office to be an indicator of anything meaningful. I care if the work gets done and at small-scale, this works. Let me also be clear, we're an 11-person company. A lot of what I'm talking about simply will not scale to companies that are orders of magnitude larger than this. And from where I sit, that's okay. It doesn't need to.Jeff: Right. And I think a lot of the things that you talk about will scale, right? Because in most scenarios, you're not scaling it organizationally so much as you are with a handful of teams, right? Because when I think about all the different teams I interact with, I never really interact with the organization as a whole, I interact with my little neighborhood in the organization. So, it is definitely something that scales.But again, when it comes to companies, like, enticing people back into the office, now that I'm talking about working from home five days a week, I've invested in my home setup. I've got the monitor I want, I've got the chair that I want, I've got the mouse and keyboard that I want. So, you're going to bring me back to the office so I can have some standard Dell keyboard and mouse with some janky, you know—maybe—21-inch monitor or something like that, right? Like, you really have to decide, like, okay, we're going to make the office a destination, we're going to make it where people want to go there where it's not just even about the collaboration aspect, but people can still work and be effective.And on top of that, I think how we look at what the office delivers is going to change, right? Because now when I go to the office now, I do very little work. It's connections, right? It's like, you know, “Oh, I haven't seen you in forever. Let's catch up.” And a lot of that stuff is valuable. You know, there's these hallway conversations that exist that just weren't happening previously because how do I accidentally bump into you on Slack? [laugh]. Right, it has to be much more it of a—Corey: Right. It takes some contrivance to wind up making that happen. I remember back in the days of working in offices, I remember here in San Francisco where we had unlimited sick time and unlimited PTO, I would often fake a sick day, but just stay home and get work done. Because I knew if I was in the office, I'd be constantly subjected to drive-bys the entire time of just drive-by requests, people stopping by to ask, “Oh, can you just help me with this one thing,” that completely derails my train of thought. Then at the end of the day, they'd tell me, “You seem distractible and you didn't get a lot of work done.”It's, “Well, no kidding. Of course not. Are you surprised?” And one of the nice things about starting your own company—because there are a lot of downsides, let me be very clear—one of the nice things is you get to decide how you want to work. And that was a study in, first, amazement, and then frustration.It was, “All right, I just landed a big customer. I'm off to the races and going to take this seriously for a good six to twelve months. Great sky's the limit, I'm going to do up my home office.” And then you see how little money it takes to have a nice chair, a good standing desk, a monitor that makes sense and you remember fighting tooth-and-nail for nothing that even approached this quality at companies and they acted like it was going to cost them 20-grand. And here, it's two grand at most, when I decorated this place the first time.And it was… “What the hell?” Like, it feels like the scales fall away from your eyes, and you start seeing things that you didn't realize were a thing. Now I worry that five years in, there's no way in the world I'm ever fit to be an employee again, so this is probably the last job I'll ever have. Just because I've basically made myself completely unemployable across six different axes.Jeff: [laugh]. And I think one of the things when it comes to, like, furniture, keyboard, stuff like that, I feel like part of it was just, like, this sort of enforced conformity, right, that the office provided us the ability to do. We can make sure everyone's got the same monitor, the same keyboard that way, when it breaks, we can replace it easily. In a lot of organizations that I've been in, you know, that sort of like, you know, even if it was the same amount or ordering a custom keyboard was a big exception process, right? Like, “Oh, we've got to do a whole thing.” And it's just like, “Well, it doesn't have to be that complicated.”And like you said, it doesn't cost much to allow someone to get the tools that they want and prefer and they're going to be more productive with. But to your point really quickly about work in the office, until the pandemic, I personally didn't recognize how difficult it actually was to get work done in the office. I don't think I appreciated it. And now that I'm remote, I'm like, wow, it is so much easier for me to close this door, put my headphones on, mute Slack and go heads down. You know, the only drive-by I've got is my wife wondering if I want to go for a walk, and that's usually a text message that I can ignore and come back to later.Corey: The thing that just continues to be strange for me and breaks in some of the weirdest ways has just been the growing awareness of how much of office life is unnecessary and ridiculous. When you're in the office every day, you have to find a way to make it work and be productive and you have this passive-aggressive story of this open office, it's for collaboration purposes. Yeah, I can definitively say that is not true. I had a boss who once told me that there was such benefits to working in an open plan office that if magically it were less expensive to give people individual offices, he would spare the extra expense for open plan. That was the day I learned he would lie to me while looking me in the eye. Because of course you wouldn't.And it's for collaboration. Yeah, it means two loud people—often me—are collaborating and everyone else wears noise-canceling headphones trying desperately to get work done, coming in early, hours before everyone else to get things done before people show up and distracted me. What the hell kind of day-to-day work environment is that?Jeff: What's interesting about that, though, is those same distractions are the things that get cited as being missed from the perspective of the person doing the distracting. So, everyone universally hates that sort of drive-by distractions, but everyone sort of universally misses the ability to say like, “Hey, can I just pull on your ear for a second and get your feedback on this?” Or, “Can we just walk through this really quickly?” That's the thing that people miss, and I don't think that they ever connect it to the idea that if you're not the interruptee, you're the interruptor, [laugh] and what that might do to someone else's productivity. So, you would think something like Slack would help with that, but in reality, what ends up happening is if you don't have proper Slack etiquette, there's a lot of signals that go out that get misconstrued, misinterpreted, internalized, and then it ends up impacting morale.Corey: And that's the most painful part of a lot of that too. Is that yeah, I want to go ahead and spend some time doing some nonsense—as one does; imagine that—and I know that if I'm going to go into an office or meet up with my colleagues, okay, that afternoon or that day, yeah, I'm planning that I'm probably not going to get a whole lot of deep coding done. Okay, great. But when that becomes 40 hours a week, well, that's a challenge. I feel like being full remote doesn't work out, but also being in the office 40 hours a week also feels a little sadistic, more than almost anything else.I don't know what the future looks like and I am privileged enough that I don't have to because we have been full remote the entire time. But what we don't spend on office space we spend on plane tickets back and forth so people can have meetings. In the before times, we were very good about that. Now it's, we're hesitant to do it just because it's we don't want people traveling before the feel that it's safe to do so. We've also learned, for example, when dealing with our clients, that we can get an awful lot done without being on site with them and be extraordinarily effective.It was always weird have traveled to some faraway city to meet with the client, and then you're on a Zoom call from their office with the rest of the team. It's… I could have done this from my living room.Jeff: Yeah. I find those sorts of hybrid meetings are often worse than if we were all just remote, right? It's just so much easier because now it's like, all right, three of us are going to crowd around one person's laptop, and then all of the things that we want to do to take advantage of being in person are excluding the people that are remote, so you got to do this careful dance. The way we've been sort of tackling it so far—and we're still experimenting—is we're not requiring anyone to come back into the office, but some people find it useful to go to the office as a change of scenery, to sort of, like break things up from their typical routine, and they like the break and the change. But it's something that they do sort of ad hoc.So, we've got a small group that meets, like, every Thursday, just as a day to sort of go into the office and switch things up. I think the idea of saying everyone has to come into the office two or three days a week is probably broken when there's no purpose behind it. So, my wife technically should go into the office twice a week, but her entire team is in Europe. [laugh]. So, what point does that make other than I am a body in a chair? So, I think companies are going to have to get flexible with this sort of hybrid environment.But then it makes you wonder, like, is it worth the office space and how many people are actually taking advantage of it when it's not mandated? We find that our office time centers around some event, right? And that event might be someone in town that's typically remote. That might be a particular project that we're working on where we want to get ideas and collaborate and have a workshop. But the idea of just, like, you know, we're going to systematically require people to be in the office x many days, I don't see that in our future.Corey: No, and I hope you're right. But it also feels like a lot of folks are also doing some weird things around the idea of remote such as, “Oh, we're full remote but we're going to pay you based upon where you happen to be sitting geographically.” And we find that the way that we've done this—and again, I'm not saying there's a right answer for everyone—but we wind up paying what the value of the work is for us. In many cases, that means that we would be hard-pressed to hire someone in the Bay Area, for example. On the other hand, it means that when we hire people who are in places with relatively low cost of living, they feel like they've just hit the lottery, on some level.And yeah, some of them, I guess it does sort of cause a weird imbalance if you're a large Amazon-scale company where you want to start not disrupting local economies. We're not hiring that many people, I promise. So, there's this idea of figuring out how that works out. And then where does the headquarters live? And well, what state laws do we wind up following on what we're doing? Just seems odd.Jeff: Yeah. So, you know, one thing I wanted to comment on that you'd mentioned earlier, too, was the weird things that people are doing, and organizations are doing with this, sort of, remote work thing, especially the geographic base pay. And you know, a lot of it is, how can we manipulate the situation to better us in a way that sounds good on paper, right? So, it sounds perfectly reasonable. Like, oh, you live in New York, I'm going to pay you in New York rates, right?But, like, you live in Des Moines, so I'm going to pay you Des Moines rates. And on the surface, when you just go you're like, oh, yeah, that makes sense, but then you think about it, you're like, “Wait, why does that matter?” Right? And then, like, how do I, as a manager, you know, level that across my employees, right? It's like, “Oh, so and so is getting paid 30 grand less. Oh, but they live in a cheaper area, right?” I don't know what your personal situation is, and how much that actually resonates or matters.Corey: Does the value that they provide to your company materially change based upon where they happen to be sitting that week?Jeff: Right, exactly. But it's a good story that you can tell, it sounds fair at first examination. But then when you start to scratch the surface, you're like, “Wait a second, this is BS.” So, that's one thing.Corey: It's like tipping on some level. If you can't afford the tip, you can't afford to eat out. Same story here. If you can't afford to compensate people the value that they're worth, you can't afford to employ people. And figure that out before you wind up disappointing people and possibly becoming today's Twitter main character.Jeff: Right. And then the state law thing is interesting. You know, when you see states like California adopting laws similar to, like, GDPR. And it's like, do you have to start planning for the most stringent possibility across every hire just to be safe and to avoid having to have this sort of patchwork of rules and policies based on where someone lives? You might say like, “Okay, Delaware has the most stringent employer law, so we're going to apply Delaware's laws across the board.” So, it'll be interesting to see how that sort of plays out in the long run. Luckily, that's not a problem I have to solve, but it'll be interesting to see how it shakes out.Corey: It is something we had to solve. We have an HR consultancy that helps out with a lot of these things, but the short answer is that we make sure that we obey with local laws, but the way that we operate is as if everyone were a San Francisco employee because that is—so far—the locale that, one, I live here, but also of every jurisdiction we've looked at in the United States, it tends to have the most advantageous to the employee restrictions and requirements. Like one thing we do is kind of ridiculous—and we have to do for me and one other person, but almost no one else, but we do it for everyone—is we have to provide stipends every month for electricity, for cellphone usage, for internet. They have to be broken out for each one of those categories, so we do 20 bucks a month for each of those. It adds up to 100 bucks, as I recall, and we call it good. And employees say, “Okay. Do we just send you receipts? Please don't.”I don't want to look at your cell phone bill. It's not my business. I don't want to know. We're doing this to comply with the law. I mean, if it were up to me, it would be this is ridiculous. Can we just give everyone $100 a month raise and call it good? Nope. The forms must be obeyed. So, all right.We do the same thing with PTO accrual. If you've acquired time off and you leave the company, we pay it out. Not every state requires that. But paying for cell phone access and internet access as well, is something Amazon is currently facing a class action about because they didn't do that for a number of their California employees. And even talking to Amazonians, like, “Well, they did, but you had to jump through a bunch of hoops.”We have the apparatus administratively to handle that in a way that employees don't. Why on earth would we make them do it unless we didn't want to pay them? Oh, I think I figured out this sneaky, sneaky plan. I'm not here to build a business by exploiting people. If that's the only way to succeed, and the business doesn't deserve to exist. That's my hot take of the day on that topic.Jeff: No, I totally agree. And what's interesting is these insidious costs that sneak up that employees tend to discount, like, one thing I always talk about with my team is all that time you're thinking about a problem at work, right, like when you're in the shower, when you're at dinner, when you're talking it over with your spouse, right? That's work. That's work. And it's work that you're doing on your time.But we don't account for it that way because we're not typing; we're not writing code. But, like, think about how much more effective as people, as employees, we would be if we had time dedicated to just sit and think, right? If I could just sit and think about a problem without needing to type but just critically think about it. But then it's like, well, what does that look like in the office, right? If I'm just sitting there in my chair like this, it doesn't look like I'm doing anything.But that's so important to be able to, like, break down and digest some of the complex problems that we're dealing with. And we just sort of write it off, right? So, I'm like, you know, you got to think about how that bleeds into your personal time and take that into account. So yeah, maybe you leave three hours early today, but I guarantee you, you're going to spend three hours throughout the week thinking about work. It's the same thing with these cellphone costs that you're talking about, right? “Oh, I've got a cell phone anyways; I've got internet anyways.” But still, that's something that you're contributing to the business that they're not on the hook for, so it seems fair that you get compensated for that.Corey: I just think about that stuff all the time from that perspective, and now that I you know, own the place, it's one of those which pocket of mine does it come out of? But I hold myself to a far higher standard about that stuff than I do the staff, where it's, for example, I could theoretically justify paying my internet bill here because we have business-class internet and an insane WiFi system because of all of the ridiculous video production I do. Now. It's like, like, if anyone else on the team was doing this, yes, I will insist we pay it, but for me, it just it feels a little close to the edge. So, it's one of those areas where I'm very conservative around things like that.The thing that also continues to just vex me, on some level, is this idea that time in a seat is somehow considered work. I'll never forget one of the last jobs I had before I started this place. My boss walked past me and saw that I was on Reddit. And, “Is that really the best use of your time right now?” May I use the bathroom when I'm done with this, sir?Yeah, of course it is. It sounds ridiculous, but one of the most valuable things I can do for The Duckbill Group now is go on the internet and start shit posting on Twitter, which sounds ridiculous, but it's also true. There's a brand awareness story there, on some level. And that's just wild to me. It's weird, we start treating people like adults, they start behaving that way. And if you start micromanaging them, they live up or down to the expectations you tend to hold. I'm a big believer in if I have to micromanage someone, I should just do the job myself.Jeff: Yeah. The Reddit story makes me think of, like, how few organizations have systematic ways of getting vital information. So, the first thing I think about is, like, security and security vulnerabilities, right? So, how does Basis Technologies, as an organization, know about these things? Right now, it's like, well, my team knows because we're plugged into Reddit and Twitter, right, but if we were gone Basis, right, may not necessarily get that information.So, that's something we're trying to correct, but it just sort of highlights the importance of freedom for these employees, right? Because yeah, I'm on Reddit, but I'm on /r/sysadmin. I'm on /r/AWS, right, I'm on /r/Atlassian. Now I'm finding out about this zero-day vulnerability and it's like, “Oh, guys, we got to act. I just heard about this thing.” And people are like, “Oh, where did this come from?” And it's like it came from my network, right? And my network—Corey: Mm-hm.Jeff: Is on Twitter, LinkedIn, Reddit. So, the idea that someone browsing the internet on any site, really, is somehow not a productive use of their time, you better be ready to itemize exactly what that means and what that looks like. “Oh, you can do this on Reddit but you can't do that on Reddit.”Corey: I have no boss now, I have no oversight, but somehow I still show up with a work ethic and get things done.Jeff: Right. [laugh].Corey: Wow, I guess I didn't need someone over my shoulder the whole time. Who knew?Jeff: Right. That's all that matters, right? And if you do it in 30 hours or 40 hours, that doesn't really matter to me, you know? You want to do it at night because you're more productive there, right, like, let's figure out a way to make that happen. And remote work is actually empowering us ways to really retain people that wasn't possible before I had an employee that was like, you know, I really want to travel. I'm like, “Dude, go to Europe. Work from Europe. Just do it. Work from Europe,” right? We've got senior leaders on the C-suite that are doing it. One of the chief—Corey: I'm told they have the internet, even there. Imagine that?Jeff: Yeah. [laugh]. So, our chief program officer, she was in Greece for four weeks. And it worked. It worked great. They had a process. You know, she would spent one week on and then one week off on vacation. But you know, she was able to have this incredible, long experience, and still deliver. And it's like, you know, we can use that as a model to say, like—Corey: And somehow the work got done. Wow, she must be amazing. No, that's the baseline expectation that people can be self-managing in that respect.Jeff: Right.Corey: They aren't toddlers.Jeff: So, if she can do that, I'm sure you can figure out how to code in China or wherever you want to visit. So, it's a great way to stay ahead of some of these companies that have a bit more lethargic policies around that stuff, where it's like, you know, all right, I'm not getting that insane salary, but guess what, I'm going to spend three weeks in New Zealand hanging out and not using any time off or anything like that, and you know, being able to enjoy life. I wish this pandemic had happened pre-kids because—Corey: Yeah. [laugh].Jeff: —you know, we would really take advantage of this.Corey: You and me both. It would have very different experience.Jeff: Yeah. [laugh]. Absolutely, right? But with kids in school, and all that stuff, we've been tethered down. But man, I you know, I want to encourage the young people or the single people on my team to just, like, hey, really, really embrace this time and take advantage of it.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: One last topic I want to get into before we call it an episode is, I admit, I read an awful lot of books, it's a guilty pleasure. And it's easy to fall into the trap, especially when you know the author, of assuming that snapshot of their state of mind at a very fixed point in time is somehow who they are, like a fly frozen in amber, and it's never true. So, my question for you is, quite simply, what have you learned since your book came out?Jeff: Oh, man, great question. So, when I was writing the book, I was really nervous about if my audience was as big as I thought it was, the people that I was targeting with the book.Corey: Okay, that keeps me up at night, too. I have no argument there.Jeff: Yeah. You know what I mean?Corey: Please, continue.Jeff: I'm surrounded, you know, by—Corey: Is anyone actually listening to this? Yeah.Jeff: Right. [laugh]. So, after the book got finished and it got published, I would get tons of feedback from people that so thoroughly enjoyed the book, they would say things like, you know, “It feels like you were in our office like a fly on the wall.” And that was exciting, one, because I felt like these were experiences that sort of resonated, but, two, it sort of proved this thesis that sometimes you don't have to do something revolutionary to be a positive contribution to other people, right? So, like, when I lay out the tips and things that I do in the book, it's nothing earth-shattering that I expect Google to adopt. Like, oh, my God, this is the most unique view ever.But being able to talk to an audience in a way that resonates with them, that connects with them, that shows that I understand their problem and have been there, it was really humbling and enlightening to just see that there are people out there that they're not on the bleeding edge, but they just need someone to talk to them in a language that they understand and resonate with. So, I think the biggest thing that I learned was this idea that your voice is important, your voice matters, and how you tell your story may be the difference between someone understanding a concept and someone not understanding a concept. So, there's always an audience for you out there as you're writing, whether it be your blog post, the videos that you produce, the podcasts that you make, somewhere there's someone that needs to hear what you have to say, and the unique way that you can say it. So, that was extremely powerful.Corey: Part of the challenge that I found is when I start talking to other people, back in the before times, trying to push them into conference talks and these days, write blog posts, the biggest objection I get sometimes is, “Well, I don't have anything worth saying.” That is provably not true. One of my favorite parts about writing Last Week in AWS is as I troll the internet looking for topics about AWS that I find interesting, I keep coming across people who are very involved in one area or another of this ecosystem and have stories they want to tell. And I love, “Hey, would you like to write a guest post for Last Week in AWS?” It's always invite only and every single one of them has been paid because people die of exposure and I'm not about that exploitation lifestyle.A couple have said, “Oh, I can't accept payment for a variety of reasons.” Great. Pick a charity that you would like it to go to instead because we do not accept volunteer work, we are a for-profit entity. That is the way it works here. And that has been just one of the absolute favorite parts about what I do just because you get to sort of discover new voices.And what I find really neat is that for a lot of these folks, this is their start to writing and telling the story, but they don't stop there, they start telling their story in other areas, too. It leads to interesting career opportunities for them, it leads to interesting exposure that they wouldn't have necessarily had—again, not that they're getting paid in exposure, but the fact that they are able to be exposed to different methodologies, different ways of thinking—I love that. It's one of my favorite parts about doing what I do. And it seems to scale a hell of a lot better than me sitting down with someone for two hours to help them build a CFP that they wind up not getting accepted or whatnot.Jeff: Right. It's a great opportunity that you provide folks, too, because of, like, an instant audience, I think that's one of the things that has made Medium so successful as, like, a blogging platform is, you know, everyone wants to go out and build their own WordPress site and launch it, but then it like, you write your blog post and it's crickets. So, the ability for you to, you know, use your platform to also expose those voices is great and extremely powerful. But you're right, once they do it, it lights a fire in a way that is admirable to watch. I have a person that I'm mentoring and that was my biggest piece of advice I can give. It was like, you know, write. Just write.It's the one thing that you can do without anyone else. And you can reinforce your own knowledge of a thing. If you just say, you know, I'm going to teach this thing that I just learned, just the writing process helps you solidify, like, okay, I know this stuff. I'm demonstrating that I know it and then four years from now, when you're applying for a job, someone's like, “Oh, I found your blog post and I see that you actually do know how to set up a Kubernetes cluster,” or whatever. It's just extremely great and it—Corey: It's always fun. You're googling for how to do something and you find something you wrote five years ago.Jeff: Right, yeah. [laugh]. And it's like code where you're like, “Oh, man, I would do that so much differently now.”Corey: Since we last spoke, one of the things I've been doing is I have been on the hook to write between a one to two-thousand-word blog post every week, and I've done that like clockwork, for about a year-and-a-half now. And I was no slouch at storytelling before I started doing that. I've given a few hundred conference talks in the before times. And I do obviously long Twitter threads in the past and I write reports a lot. But forcing me to go through that process every week and then sit with an editor and go ahead and get it improved, has made me a far better writer, it's made me a better storyteller, I am far better at articulating my point of view.It is absolutely just unlocking a host of benefits that I would have thought I was, oh, I passed all this. I'm already good at these things. And I was, but I'm better now. I think that writing is one of those things that people need to do a lot more of.Jeff: Absolutely. And it's funny that you mentioned that because I just recently, back in April, started to do the same thing I said, I'm going to write a blog post every week, right? I'm going to get three or four in the can, so that if life comes up and I miss a beat, right, I'm not actually missing the production schedule, so I have a steady—and you're right. Even after writing a book, I'm still learning stuff through the writing process, articulating my point of view.It's just something that carries over, and it carries over into the workforce, too. Like, if you've ever read a bad piece of documentation, right, that comes from—Corey: No.Jeff: Right? [laugh]. That comes from an inability to write. Like, you know, you end up asking these questions like who's the audience for this? What is ‘it' in this sentence? [laugh].Corey: Part of it too, is that people writing these things are so close to the problem themselves that the fact that, “Well, I'm not an expert in this.” That's why you should write about it. Talk about your experience. You're afraid everyone's going to say, “Oh, you're a fool. You didn't understand how this works.”Yeah, my lived experiences instead—and admittedly, I have the winds of privilege of my back on this—but it's also yeah, I didn't understand that either. It turns out that you're never the only person who has trouble with a concept. And by calling it out, you're normalizing it and doing a tremendous service for others in your shoes.Jeff: Especially when you're not an expert because I wrote some documentation about the SSL process and it didn't occur to me that these people don't use the AWS command line, right? Like, you know, in our organization, we sort of mask that from them through a bunch of in-house automation. Now we're starting to expose it to them and simple things like oh, you need to preface the AWS command with a profile name. So, then when we're going through the setup, we're like, “Oh. What if they already have an existing profile, right?” Like, we don't want to clobber that.SSo, it just changed the way you write the documentation. But like, that's not something that initially came to mind for me. It wasn't until someone went through the docs, and they're like, “Uh, this is blowing up in a weird way.” And I was like, “Oh, right. You know, like, I need to also teach you about profile management.”Corey: Also, everyone has a slightly different workflow for the way they interact with AWS accounts, and their shell prompts, and the way they set up local dev environments.Jeff: Yeah, absolutely. So, not being an expert on a thing is key because you're coming to it with virgin eyes, right, and you're able to look at it from a fresh perspective.Corey: So, much documentation out there is always coming from the perspective of someone who is intimately familiar with the problem space. Some of the more interesting episodes that I have, from a challenge perspective, are people who are deep technologists in a particular area and they love they fallen in love with the thing that they are building. Great. Can you explain it to the rest of us mere mortals so that we can actually we can share your excitement on this? And it's very hard to get them to come down to a level where it's coherent to folks who haven't spent years thinking deeply about that particular problem space.Jeff: Man, the number one culprit for that is, like, the AWS blogs where they have, like, a how-to article. You follow that thing and you're like, “None of this is working.” [laugh]. Right? And then you realize, oh, they made an assumption that I knew this, but I didn't right?So, it's like, you know, I didn't realize this was supposed to be, like, a handwritten JSON document just jammed into the value field. Because I didn't know that, I'm not pulling those values out as JSON. I'm expecting that just to be, like, a straight string value. And that has happened more and more times on the AWS blog than I can count. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, very often. And then there's other problems, too. “Oh, yeah. Set up your IAM permissions properly.” That's left as an exercise for the reader. And then you wonder why everything's full of stars. Okay.Jeff: Right. Yep, exactly, exactly.Corey: Ugh. It's so great to catch up with you and see what you've been working on. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to find you?Jeff: So, the best place is probably my website, attainabledevops.com. That's a place where you can find me on all the other places. I don't really update that site much, but you can find me on LinkedIn, Twitter, from that jumping off point, links to the book are there if anyone's interested in that. Perfect stocking stuffers. Mom would love it, grandma would love it, so definitely, definitely buy multiple copies of that.Corey: Yeah, it's going to be one of my two-year-old's learning to read books, it'd be great.Jeff: Yeah, it's perfect. You know, you just throw it in the crib and walk away, right? They're asleep at no time. Like I said, I've also been taking to, you know, blogging on Medium, so you can catch me there, the links will be there on Attainable DevOps as well.Corey: Excellent. And that link will of course, be in the show notes. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I really do appreciate it. And it's great to talk to you again.Jeff: It was great to catch up.Corey: Really was. Jeff Smith, Director of Product Operations at Basis Technologies. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice or smash the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes, whereas if you've hated this podcast, do the exact same thing—five-star review, smash the buttons—but also leave an angry, incoherent comment that you're then going to have edited and every week you're going to come back and write another incoherent comment that you get edited. And in the fullness of time, you'll get much better at writing angry, incoherent comments.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Daily Crime
"Somebody in that man's life knew about his anger"

The Daily Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 16:52


On June 2, two Iowa State University students were shot and killed outside a church in Ames, Iowa. The shooter was later identified as an ex-boyfriend of one of the victims. Reporter Mary Sugden covered the case for WeAreIowa in Des Moines and has been taking a broader look at cases of domestic violence in Iowa. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

HawkFanatic Podcast
Hawkfanatic Podcast 7/25/22

HawkFanatic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 94:11


Former Iowa All-America center Luka Garza was the guest on Monday's Hawk Fanatic radio show and podcast. He addressed multiple topics, including the upcoming skills camps that he will host in August in Davenport, Cedar Rapids and Des Moines. Check it out here!

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY
PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY - Episode 238

PEOPLE ARE THE ENEMY

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 30:52


Andy plays audio of a boy shocking his nana with Charli XCX lyrics, analyzes a twelve-year-old's English homework, and feels bad for Kid Cudi at Rolling Loud. On Rachel's Chart Chat, Rachel from Des Moines finds gems in charts from 1976 and 1985. You can find a playlist for Rachel's Chart Chat here. Follow Rachel on Last.fm here.

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Kathy Was a Cooling Services Dream

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 5:37


Kathy of Des Moines is in-studio with us and auditioning for the show!

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
How Late is Too Late to Eat Out of the Garbage?

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 3:39


Kathy of Des Moines is in-studio with us and auditioning for the show!

Pretty Fort Weekly
139. Druids

Pretty Fort Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 30:47


Looking for our 80/35 2022 recap? Just search your podcast app for "Pretty Fort" to find our main feed with event coverage, single premieres, artist interviews, and more!This week, PR & Chase summon an orc army and charge into battle. That's right – it's time to talk "Shadow Work," the latest LP from Des Moines metal trio Druids. Rad!

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
Welcome to Kathy's Idiot Show!

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 3:26


Kathy of Des Moines is in-studio with us and auditioning for the show!

River to River
Most Iowa Republicans want Trump to run in 2024, Iowa poll finds

River to River

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022


The Des Moines Register and Mediacom Iowa Poll found most Republicans hope former President Donald Trump runs in 2024. Des Moines is launching a pilot program that will put up to $500 a month in some residents' pockets. And we explore other recent headlines.

KXnO Sports Fanatics
Sports Fanatics Hour 3- Emery and Nathan talk Des Moines Menace and how good is the AFC?

KXnO Sports Fanatics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 42:47


Sports Fanatics Hour 3- Emery and Nathan talk Des Moines Menace and how good is the AFC?

Steve Deace Show
EVIL: Deborah Birx BRAGS About Undermining Trump on COVID | 7/18/22

Steve Deace Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 96:11 Very Popular


Steve discusses the new revelations from former White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx found in her new book. Then, Steve recaps last week's Family Leadership Summit in Des Moines. In Hour Two, it's another edition of "Ask Deace Anything," featuring questions from his audience at Truth Social. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Steve Deace Show
Here's the REAL Reason Biden Has Been a Disaster | Guest: Bob Vander Plaats | 7/11/22

Steve Deace Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 95:57 Very Popular


Steve explains why the large cache of blackmail material found on Hunter Biden's electronic devices is a far, far greater matter than mere clickbait. Then, Bob Vander Plaats from the Family Leader joins the show to preview this week's Family Leadership Summit in Des Moines. In Hour Two, Steve attempts both a generational and a theological intervention. Aaron and Jill Savage (filling in for Todd) react. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices