Podcasts about Colorado River

Major river in the western United States and Mexico

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  • Nov 24, 2022LATEST
Colorado River

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Latest podcast episodes about Colorado River

The Daily Sun-Up
A conversation with Report for America member Olivia Sun; The Colorado River Compact

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 12:38


Today - an encore Daily Sun-Up that first aired back in early October. We speak with Colorado Sun photographer Olivia Sun. Olivia is assigned to The Sun as a Report for America corps member - like the Peace Corps, only for journalists.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KZMU News
Monday November 21, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 10:39


If you drove down Kane Creek Boulevard over the weekend you might have seen signs for a “Cave Sale.” It's what it sounds like — a very Moab take on a weekend yard sale. The caves on the bank of this stretch of the Colorado River have drawn drivers' gaze for decades. They're a quirky part of Moab's history. We visited the sale to learn more. Plus, a mass shooting at a gay night club in Colorado Springs over the weekend took the lives of five people and left at least 25 others wounded. Authorities suspect the horrific incident was a hate crime. And early-season storms have left snow totals above average throughout much of the Western U.S. — including Utah. // Show Notes: // Photo: Until recently the Walden family owned this stretch of land on the Colorado River where a number of caves are located. (KZMU) // Music: South of the Border by Jason Shaw // Moab Sun News: Kane Creek development leads to evictions: Developers promise community benefit, but first, tenants must leave https://moabsunnews.com/2021/10/29/kane-creek-development-leads-to-evictions-developers-promise-community-benefit-but-first-tenants-must-leave/ // KDNK: Five dead after horrific assault on gay nightclub in Colorado Springs https://www.kdnk.org/local-news/2022-11-21/five-dead-after-horrific-assault-on-gay-club-in-colorado-springs // Utah Snow Survey Program https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/wcc/home/quicklinks/states/utah/

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe
This Aerospace Engineer Brought Tech and Vision to Earthbound Challenges

#plugintodevin - Your Mark on the World with Devin Thorpe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 25:09


Devin: What is your superpower?Evan: Something that I've always tried to do—it sort of happened naturally and unconsciously in the beginning of my career, and now I'm a lot more conscious and sort of deliberate about it—but it's finding the synergies between organizations, between teams, among technologies, among problems. There are not a lot of people that are working on water access in Africa and California. My other day job is I'm a professor of engineering at the University of Colorado in Boulder, and I'm the CEO of this company. I've gotten a lot of side-eye about that over the years. My joke is I'm the best academic in a group, in a room of entrepreneurs, and I'm the best entrepreneur in a room of academics. And there's some truth to that because the corollary is I'm not the best at any one of those things. But by being able to see the benefit of what a university can do and what research can do and what students and faculty can do, but also seeing the benefits of what capital can do, and engineers and technology development and working with nonprofits and working with government—I've benefited from being able to see how those things can be aligned with each other and can help solve problems that any one of those kinds of organizations aren't able to do by themselves.“My Ph.D. is in aerospace engineering,” Evan Thomas, CEO of Virridy and professor in the Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering Department at the University of Colorado. “The beginning of my career was at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. I worked on water recycling and air quality systems for spacecraft.”That is not the beginning of most stories about public health. It is a fascinating start to our story today. Evan was the project manager for a system on the International Space Station today measuring recycled water quality.“The astronauts have to recycle the drinking water every day, and the astronauts in the space station need the same thing we all need,” Evan says. “They need clean water. They need clean air. They need safe sanitation. They need safe food. They need a warm environment. On the space station, we do that through water recycling and scrubbing the air and making sure that the environment is safe.”“We have those challenges here on Earth, too,” he says. “It's 2022, and you still have almost half the world's population, over three and one half billion people who use firewood every day to cook and to stay warm. The use of firewood contributes to deforestation and soil erosion and black soot emissions.”“But, all of those things are secondary to the immediate emissions that people breathe in every day because of the use of fuels like firewood,” Evan says. “We have almost 5 million kids under the age of five who die every year because of respiratory disease. Still today, we have 2 billion people in the world that don't have safe sanitation. And most reasonable estimates put it at over a billion people still don't have access to clean water.”When Evan launched Virridy while still at NASA, he recognized an essential choice in his life and career. “Am I going to make a career out of being a NASA engineer, or am I going to make a career out of applying that engineering skill to the same basic necessities here on Earth?”He left NASA to focus on global health.These days, he focuses his work on two regions of the world: the Horn of Africa and California.The Horn of Africa“I'll tell you a little bit about the Horn of Africa,” Evan says. “This is a very arid region of the world. It includes Somalia and Ethiopia and northern Kenya. We've been working in that region for about ten years. I just got back from northern Kenya a few weeks ago, where they're suffering from a five-season drought. It's unprecedented.” “You have 40 million people that are relying on rains, rains for their livestock, for themselves, for their agriculture,” he says. “When you have drought, you have crop failure, you have livestock death, you have the displacement of people. And 40 million people are facing food insecurity right now in East Africa.”The challenges in East Africa differ from those in California. While aquifers are drying up in California, groundwater reserves are increasing in Africa.The challenge in Africa is often that water pumps fail due to a lack of resources, so the water isn't accessible to those who need it.“During peak drought, UNICEF estimates that as much as 45 percent of water points are actually broken,” Evan says. “It's not that the water is dried up. The water is still in the ground, but the water points are broken, the water pumps are broken. So we've been working on this seemingly easy but not-so-easy problem of how do we keep these water pumps working?”“We do it with a combination of technology, community partnerships and financing mechanisms to try to increase the maintenance and operation of these water pumps so that people have water access,” he says.“Virridy, our company, invented and has deployed sensors, satellite-connected sensors that are installed on these water pumps so that we can remotely monitor when a pump is working and when it's broken,” Evan says.Partnering with NASA, Virridy connects data from satellites with data from water pumps to help local and national governments—and international donors—determine where water is available and where to offer water trucking or send maintenance teams to repair pumps.“Our technology is currently monitoring millions of people's water supplies in the region every single day,” Evan says.He explains how the business works in Africa:So, how do we monetize that? In Africa, it's a question of making sure the pumps are working so that people have water. When we do that, and we provide clean safe drinking water, we offset the need for people to boil their water with wood. Some people boil their water, which creates a lot of emissions. Other people just drink dirty water, which causes a lot of health problems. We're able to take both of those scenarios, replace them with a company that is providing clean, safe drinking water and then generate and claim carbon credits under voluntary mechanisms that are demonstrating that reduced demand for energy. Those voluntary carbon credits can be sold on the open market; that lets us have a profitable business delivering clean water in Africa.CaliforniaThere are 40 million people facing a water crisis in the Horn of Africa. Similarly, there are 40 million people who rely on the Colorado River in the western U.S.“I'm in Boulder, Colorado,” Evan says. “The Colorado River starts just over the foothills from where I am now. Sometimes it flows to Mexico.”“In between Colorado and Mexico, there are seven states and major cities like LA and Denver that rely on the Colorado River, and it's drying up,” he says. “We're within 40 feet of what's called dead pool behind the Hoover Dam on Lake Mead.”It's as scary as it sounds.“The estimates are if nothing is done by next summer, by less than a year from now, there will be no more water running through the Hoover Dam, delivering water to the lower basin or generating electricity,” Evan says.For decades, Californians have addressed water shortages by pumping water out of the ground. As noted above, California differs from Africa in that groundwater is being depleted.“Those groundwater reserves are being used at a really unsustainable rate,” he says. “There are areas in the Central Valley in California that have physically dropped 40 feet in 80 years. So, just in the past 80 years, in a human lifetime, the level of the ground has dropped 40 feet because we're pumping out that water. It's not sustainable. At some point, we're going to run out of that groundwater.”Evan explains Virridy's work in California using the same technology with an almost opposite goal:Virridy has introduced the same sensors, the same satellite-connected sensors that are monitoring groundwater pumps in Africa are also monitoring groundwater pumps here in Colorado and in California. We're working with landowners, farmers and local irrigation districts and regulators to try to make sense of who's using the water and to see if we can support incentives to conserve that water.We try to better manage groundwater. Well, one of the big challenges with groundwater is data. You can't measure groundwater from space, at least not very easily. So, we use our sensors to instrument these pumps so that we know who's pumping where, when and how. In the United States, it's almost the mirror image [of Africa]. But instead of trying to make sure more water is pumped, we're trying to make sure less water is pumped. Evan explains the model in California:There's the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act that requires conserving water. But you need to actually measure how much water is being used. So we offer a service. More directly out in California—you saw this during the recent heat wave just a few weeks ago—they had ten straight days of almost record heat. When that happens—it's in the middle of the summer—all the agricultural farms and ranches are pumping water. They're pumping groundwater, which takes a lot more energy than pumping surface water, because the surface water is run out during this drought. Everybody in LA, everybody in San Francisco, everybody in San Diego has their season. So the utility gets overwhelmed. There are programs called Demand Response that will pay people to reduce their energy use. Our technology can take control of pumps. So we have customers where we control their water pumps with their permission. We turn them off during peak demand, and the energy utility actually pays us and our customers for the inconvenience of reducing pumping.Tremendous amounts of electricity are used to pump water in California—more so during the drought. “When you have wet years, and you have water in the rivers, gravity helps you,” Evan says. “Gravity helps move the water around. So it doesn't take a lot of energy to maybe move it over small hills or between fields.”“During drought like we have now—22 years of drought—now it's a lot more energy intensive to pump up groundwater—a lot more,” he says. “These are really, really big pumps pumping up a lot of water. We can help those users of that water, conserve the water and get paid because they're also conserving electricity.”In his work, Evan has employed his superpower—finding synergies—to increase his impact.How to Develop Finding Synergies As a SuperpowerEvan used his superpower, “finding the synergies between organizations, between teams, among technologies, among problems,” to significant effect while at NASA. He shares the story of his epiphany that led to the creation of Virridy:About 15 years ago, when I still worked at NASA, we came up with this idea. Can we get carbon credits for water treatment in Africa in a way that generates revenue to pay for a service so that you don't always have to write grants to donors forever? Because that's often how the water sector works. That required thinking about business and public health and engineering and international development. But to implement it, to actually make it happen, we had to be really good at the technology and the implementation, but we also had to be really good at the research. So, in partnership with a number of universities and researchers, we ran a randomized controlled trial of our work in Rwanda, where we experimentally established the health benefits of these water interventions. We showed that we reduced exposure to parasites by almost 50 percent among children, and we reduced diarrheal incidence by over 30 percent. If I were only wearing one hat, the academic hat or the business hat or the implementer hat, we wouldn't have done a comprehensive program like that. You see very few large-scale business businesses, operating programs that also are trying to generate best-in-class research at the same time.His finding synergies superpower was on full display. Learning that skill isn't easy. Teaching t is part of the program he oversees at the University of Colorado. He explains:As much as our students would love to go straight to the machine shop or into the lab to tinker. We don't start there. We start with why does poverty exist? We start with one who is poor in the world today. And why did that happen? It's not random. It's not an accident. It's because of history, and it's because of, unfortunately, exploitation and even more unfortunately, exploitation often done by Western countries like ours. So we go pretty heavy pretty fast. I have 78 freshmen this year, and they're learning about the impact of how how how colonialism still reverberates today in Africa in terms of very basic things, like why is it that a water pump is broken? And so we start there. We don't get to the engineering for a while. We start with the history, the economics, the social issues. Before we even start talking about what some of the solutions could be. So, our students are trained in economics, in public health, in history before they even think about turning a wrench.Evan assigns tremendous value to understanding context to learn to find synergies. He also sees value in developing your own unique superpowers and not relying on your general competence. Your ability to develop his superpower requires the ability to develop your own and put yours in context.There's always a risk in the jack of all trades, master of none. You still need to be really good at a few things in order to add value. If you're just a generalist, you're not necessarily making a big contribution to any team. So it's still important to be really good, at least at a couple of things. But then also conversant, maybe even fluent in a few other things as well. So you understand how your piece of the puzzle fits into the whole picture.You can develop finding synergies as a superpower by following Evan's example and his counsel. Get full access to Superpowers for Good at devinthorpe.substack.com/subscribe

KZMU News
Tuesday November 15, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 9:18


As the uranium tailings pile north of Moab gets smaller and smaller, community visioning for the site's future gets a little more exciting. The 480-acre parcel sits on the banks of the Colorado River, and local leaders currently have visions of a park, trails and gathering spaces. But they once again need the public to weigh in and update that vision. “This is the gateway to our town,” says mayor Joette Langianese. “And we want our community to look back on this and say, ‘I was a part of that.'” Plus, water lessons from Utah's neighbor and a profile of ongoing recovery resources after the most destructive wildfire in Colorado's history. // Show Notes: // Atlas Mill Site 2023 Community Vision & Survey https://grandcountyconnects.com/site-futures // Great Salt Collaborative https://greatsaltlakenews.org // KGNU: Navigating Disasters After The Marshall Fire https://news.kgnu.org/2022/11/navigating-disasters-after-the-marshall-fire/

Your Sleep Guru
Drifting Down the Emerald River | A Sleep Story

Your Sleep Guru

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 31:08 Transcription Available


The sleep story, Drifting Down the Emerald River, is based on an experience I had rafting down a remote section of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon and spending time in the otherworldly, mystical desert region of the Canyonlands. The visualization begins with a simple relaxation exercise and ends with the ambient sound from inside the canyon at night. If you need creativity or a productivity boost, I recommend you check Magic Mind out at www.magicmind.co/sleepguru, and you can also use my discount code SLEEPGURU to get 40% off your first subscription or 20% off your first one-time purchase. This 40% off code only lasts ten days, so hurry up! Download the Your Sleep Guru app. for full access to all episodes, ad-free! Subscribing also gives you access to the Natural Healing course, Behind the Scenes video content and more! Your Sleep Guru is an independent podcast written, narrated, edited and produced by Clara Starr. The nature therapy-guided meditative visualisations are for all age groups.  

The Daily Dive
CPI Report Shows Easing of Inflation in October

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 19:56


Positive sign as inflation cooled slightly to 7.7% in October.  Experts warn not to get too excited as they would like to see more of trend but hope this could be the peak.  Used car prices have dropped, along with airfare and apparel, but rents continue to stay elevated.  The Fed has signaled it will continue to raise rates until inflation drops more, but in smaller increments.  Rachel Siegel, economics reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for the signs that inflation may be easing.   Next, New York City recently became the biggest job market in the country to require employers to list pay ranges in their job ads.  The hope is that it would give job seekers an edge in pay negotiations, but the rollout has had mixed results as companies are posting salary ranges with differences of hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Theo Francis, business reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to know about New York City's pay transparency law.   Finally, the National Park Service put out an advisory asking people to please stop licking the psychedelic toads.  There has not been any indication that people are licking toads to trip out but wanted to send out the warning that it's potentially dangerous and can cause poisonings.  The toads in question are the Sonoran Desert toads also known as the Colorado River toad.  Adela Suliman, reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for what to know.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

blissful hiker ❤︎ walking the world
Arizona Trail: The Grand Canyon

blissful hiker ❤︎ walking the world

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 23:25 Transcription Available


Blissful has one of the most extraordinary experiences of her hiking life – walking into and out of the Grand Canyon.In this episode:With a snowstorm coming and temperatures dropping into the teens, Blissful decides to catch a ride and skip ahead.It's just more ponderosa pine forest and straight to the national park permit office.It's down hill, but steep and hard walking all in direct sun through layer-upon-layer of bright reds and oranges through tourists and rim-to-rim runners. Her itinerary on the Kaibab Trail to Cottonwoods Campground is considered "aggressive" because she's all alone.The path appears to hang in midair as it finally meets the Colorado River, then up to a site she shares with lovely AZT hikers. The next morning is the opposite – finally alone entirely up to the cold and snowy North Rim, through a tight opening with only the song of a canyon wren. After such beauty, the road is a let down and she accepts a hitch back to trail and a night in a muddy meadow. MUSIC: Poema del Pastor Coya by Angel Lasala as played by Alison Young, flute and Vicki Seldon, pianoSupport the show

RoadWorthy Drive Podcast
FIRST LOOK: Ford F-150 Lightning EV; Four Day Work/Five Day Pay; Dead Pool & The Colorado River; PepsiCo Gets Tesla Semis This Year

RoadWorthy Drive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 40:46


During this episode, Ken shares his first impressions in the all-new Ford F-150 Lightning - the automaker's first pure electric full-size pickup truck.  Is Four-Day Work/Five Day Pay movement becoming a thing in the United States?  What does the term "Dead Pool" mean, and why is that bad for the Colorado River?  And finally, beverage maker PepsiCo, will be the first to receive Tesla's new Semis - starting next month. 

RoadWorthy Drive Moments
Dead Pool & The Colorado River

RoadWorthy Drive Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 11:00


What happens when the water level is so low that the river can't flow?  Not only does that pose problems for water consumption, in the case of the Colorado River, it means that hydroelectric plants at Lake Mead and Lake Powell can't generate electricity.  It isn't pretty. 

Is That Even Legal?
THIRSTY! We Are Running Out of Water in the West...

Is That Even Legal?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 27:59


Subdivisions with no water?  Arizona groundwater being sold to benefit Saudi Arabia?Who is charge here? We are in a water crisis in the West, but the building doesn't stop.  How does the law work?What in the law is being done about future calamity?From Arizona State University News Service: The Colorado River provides water for millions of acres of irrigation and some 40 million people in tribes and cities in Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, California, Wyoming, Utah and Mexico. But the literal wellspring of the Southwest region's vitality is drying up, and fast.We're already in the second year of allocation cuts, which directs how much states can draw from the Colorado River, and deeper cuts are on the way. A “Tier 1 shortage” has already been declared, but the feds have recently indicated that a Tier 2 shortage may be declared by the end of this year, mandating larger cuts, especially to Arizona.The Bureau of Reclamation has already asked basin states and tribes to give them suggestions for how to cut 2 million to 4 million more acre-feet of water consumption per year to keep the river's largest storage reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, from falling to dead pool and becoming unusable.Time to talk agua.  Bob's guest is Michele Van Quathem, a leading water lawyer.Listen in!

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2962 - How Republicans Turned From Monsters Into Bigger Monsters w/ Nicole Hemmer

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 77:22


Sam and Emma host Nicole Hemmer, professor of History at Vanderbilt University, to discuss her recent book Partisans: The Conservative Revolutionaries Who Remade American Politics in the 1990's. First, Sam and Emma run through updates on Twitter's Terms of Service strict Elon Musk-enforced parody laws, Biden's talks with Russia, the drying Colorado River, and early voting backlash heading into the midterms. Professor Hemmer then joins as she dives right into a quick overview of the arc of her book, beginning with the Reagan Era's birth of neoliberalism and working through the extreme neoconservative polarization in the '90s and 2000s, before she jumps back to the divide between Reagan's regime and the George H.W. Bush administration, both in terms of geopolitics – with the end of the Cold War – and on the domestic side – with the emergence of conservative political activists. Diving deeper into this reactionary revolution, Sam, Emma, and Nicole look to the shift from Reagan's oddly optimistic spin on conservatism to the party of Gingrich in the 1990s that behaved with the frenetic urgency of minoritarian rule, obstructing government in any way they could while their radicalism was bolstered by the rise of talk radio paranoia and a Democratic party that was chasing them to the right. After briefly tackling the rise of conservative talk radio and its ability to zero in on a particular brand of anger and agreement, Hemmer parses through this ‘90s reactionarianism as a response to a growing mainstream progressive movement that supported people of color and women in leadership roles and (occasionally) took sexual assault and bigotry seriously. The professor then looks to the George W. Bush regime as the end of the true Reagan republicanism, seeing it as a clear bipartisan failure by his departure from office, and leaving the party open for the new right groups (be they Tea Party or Alt-Right) to take hold. Wrapping up, they explore the future of the far-right attempts to normalize their own extremism, looking to right-wing legislatures already attempting to codify their right to the electoral votes. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma discuss how Donald Trump is winning big big big for the Republican nomination for President in 2024, also touching on his DeSantis nickname soft launch before talking with Will from VA about the historical prevalence of Russian imperialism. They also parse through the absolute hilarity of Elon's first week behind the desk at Twit HQ, and Dave Rubin hosting proof-of-COVID Tina Forte ahead of her election against AOC. Tulsi Gabbard continues to be a hollow nationalist, and Chuck from Kentucky asks some questions about US support in Ukraine, plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Nicole's book here: https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/nicole-hemmer/partisans/9781541646872/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the ESVN YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/esvnshow Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here: https://am-quickie.ghost.io/ Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Get the free Majority Report App!: http://majority.fm/app Check out today's sponsors: Sunset Lake CBD: sunsetlakecbd is a majority employee owned farm in Vermont, producing 100% pesticide free CBD products. Sunset Lake is having a ONE DAY ELECTION DAY SALE on Tuesday November 8. All CBD products will be 30% off with coupon “ELECTION”. 10% of proceeds from coupon code “ELECTION” will go to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America. The Majority Report will MATCH the 10% of proceeds and also donate to PP. Go to https://sunsetlakecbd.com/ for more information! LiquidIV: Cooler weather makes it easier to miss signs of dehydration like overheating or perspiration, which means it's even more important to keep your body properly hydrated. Liquid I.V. contains 5 essential vitamins—more Vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a banana. Healthier than sugary sports drinks, there are no artificial flavors or preservatives and less sugar than an apple. Grab your favorite Liquid I.V. flavors nationwide at Walmart or you can get 25% off when you go to https://www.liquid-iv.com/ and use code MAJORITYREP at checkout. That's 25% off ANYTHING you order when you get better hydration today using promo code MAJORITYREP at https://www.liquid-iv.com/. 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Secure your online data TODAY by visiting https://www.expressvpn.com/majority That's https://www.expressvpn.com/majority and you can get an extra three months FREE. Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Check out Ava Raiza's music here! https://avaraiza.bandcamp.com/ The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Backpacker Radio
#174 | Nick Van Buer on Trekking 530 Miles Across the Mojave Desert

Backpacker Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 153:00


In today's episode of Backpacker Radio presented by The Trek, we are joined by Nick Van Buer. Nick is an associate professor specializing in hard-rock geology at Cal Poly Pomona and recently completed a 530-mile hike across the Mojave Desert on what he's dubbed as the Mojave Wilderness Route. We obviously nerd out on rocks, learn more about the history and science of geology at large, and talk in depth about Nick's trek across the most remote parts of the Mojave Desert. We wrap the show with a triple crown of non alcoholic drinks, we are blessed with a wonderful listener poop story via voice mail, and discuss the appropriate time to start and stop sending nudes. RTIC Outdoors: Shop at rticoutdoors.com. Organifi: Use code “backpacker” for 20% off at organifi.com/backpacker. Enlightened Equipment: Use code “trekit20” for a 2 day head start to 20% off and free shipping on November 3 and November 17 at enlightenedequipment.com. Gossamer Gear: Use code “takelesstrekmore” for 15% off at gossamergear.com.  [divider] Interview with Nick Van Buer Nick's Website: Across the Mojave Nick's Youtube series LA Times Article about Nick Time stamps & Questions 00:05:05 - QOTD: At what point in a relationship do you start and stop sending nudes? 00:15:49 - Reminders: Apply to blog or video-blog for the Trek! And check out our new shorts. 00:17:37 - Introducing Nick 00:18:45 - What got you interested in geology? 00:20:51 - Give us a taste of the professor life. 00:23:14 - How do you grind up a rock and find out how old it is? 00:25:38 - Do your students want to take geology? 00:27:20 - What are the most common geology careers? 00:28:37 - Did you use your geology skills during your hike? 00:29:37 - What are the best excuses you've gotten for people not coming to class or turning work in late? 00:31:20 - Can you teach us the basics of your research focus? 00:35:07 - Given your knowledge, on a scale of 1 to 10, what is your earthquake fear level? 00:38:33 - What was the process to get your sabbatical approved? 00:40:00 - Can you paint us a picture of the history of the Mojave Desert? 00:41:42 - Did you have a wishlist of things you were hoping to find during your hike? 00:43:41 - Did you develop the route? 00:45:44 - How long were your water carries and how did you carry it? 00:47:52 - Tell us about the weather you experienced. 00:48:38 - How did you know you'd be able to find water? 00:50:55 - Tell us about hiking through wilderness areas or passing notable interest points? 00:52:39 - Tell us about your previous backpacking experience. 00:55:07 - Were you nervous going into this hike? 00:56:33 - What kind of wildlife did you see? 00:57:35 - Describe to Zach what a geological map looks like. 01:00:40 - Is there one standout rock encounter? 01:03:15 - How often are there large paradigm shifts in geology? 01:04:57 - Was there anything in this hike that surprised you? 01:08:29 - Do you have any hot takes about currently accepted geological ideas? 01:10:39 - What's the process for proving your theory? 01:13:22 - Tell us about the peer review process. 01:14:43 - Have you witnessed a lot of politicking within geology? 01:15:40 - Are there any fun geological facts you can relay to PCT hikers? 01:16:43 - How do you decide to take rocks from the field? 01:20:00 - What part of you just loves the desert, and what part of this is just public service? 01:20:56 - Tell us about swimming across the Colorado River. 01:25:50 - Tell us about the Youtube series that you made. 01:27:39 - Were there any standout stories you got more feedback on? 01:30:20 - How much weight in samples did you take? 01:31:54 - If these people were rocks, what rocks would they be and why? 01:35:01 - Do you have any other backpacking routes you'd like to do? SEGMENTS MG Check-In Trek Propaganda Modifying your Gear List for High Routes and Off Trail Hikes by GPS 9 AT Thru-Hikers Share Their Top Advice by Rachel Shoemaker Triple Crown of non-alcoholic drinks Listener Voicemails (leave us your own!) Mail Bag 5 Star Review [divider] Check out our sound guy @headnodculture. Subscribe to this podcast on iTunes (and please leave us a review)!  Find us on Spotify, Stitcher, and Google Play. Support us on Patreon to get bonus content. Advertise on Backpacker Radio Follow The Trek, Chaunce, Badger, and Trail Correspondents on Instagram. Follow The Trek and Chaunce on YouTube. Follow Backpacker Radio on Tik Tok.  A super big thank you to our Chuck Norris Award winner(s) from Patreon: Andrew, Austen McDaniel, Jason Lawrence, Christopher Marshburn, Sawyer Products, Brad and Blair (Thirteen Adventures), Patrick Cianciolo, Paul Packman Sealy, Matt Soukup, Jason Snailer, Greg Mac,  Tracy “Trigger” Fawns, Mike Poisel, and Kristina Diaz. A big thank you to our Cinnamon Connection Champions from Patreon: Liz Seger, Cynthia Voth, Emily Brown, Dcnerdlet, Jeff LaFranier, Peter Ellenberg, Jacob Northrup, Peter Leven.

Water Rights: Laws, Guns, & Money
Episode 56 NEW MEXICO – STATE NEEDS STUDIES ON WATER

Water Rights: Laws, Guns, & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 21:12


Heavy reliance on groundwater·       Case study on running out of water·       State should track water useAlbuquerque's water supply·       Depends on Colorado River water for recharge and direct use·       Impact of cutting back on Colorado River waterSupport the show

What Matters Water TV and Podcast
#9 - A Collaborative Approach to Colorado River Management

What Matters Water TV and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 90:12


The Colorado River is one of the most important rivers in the United States. It has been in the news a lot lately because of the drought and how it's affecting people and businesses that count on it for drinking water. This episode features an important panel discussion on the collaborative approach to Colorado River management being taken by California water, tribal and community leaders. Guests on this episode are Michael Cohen, Senior Associate, Pacific Institute; Adel Hagekhalil, General Manager, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California; Chris Harris, Executive Director, Colorado River Board of California;  Sandy Kerl, General Manager, San Diego County Water Authority; Henry Martinez, General Manager, Imperial Irrigation District; David Palumbo, Deputy Commissioner – Operations, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; and Thomas Tortez, Jr., Tribal Chairman, Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians. On this special episode of What Matters Water TV + Podcast, our expert panel will talk about what is causing the crisis, how it's affecting our state and others, and most importantly, what can be done to prevent it from getting worse. So please join us as we explore this important issue. View the slides that Chris Harris uses to introduce the issues at this link: https://socalwater.org/wp-content/uploads/Chris-Harris-SCWC-Intro-Slides_DRAFT_10062022.pdf Follow us on Twitter: SCWC: https://twitter.com/SoCalWaterComm Charley Wilson: https://twitter.com/SCWaterman32

Common Sense Digest
The Future of Water in Colorado and the West featuring Jennifer Gimbel and Eric Kuhn

Common Sense Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 30:52


As Colorado continues to grow, one of the key issues the state faces is the reliable availability of water. When investing in our state, developers, businesses, and even the general population all face apprehension with what the future may hold with this key life-giving resource. Water is the lifeblood of any community and how the resource is managed is a subject about which interested entities fight, negotiate, and discuss. On this episode of Common Sense Digest, Host and Chairman Earl Wright welcomes Terry J. Stevinson fellows Jennifer Gimbel and Eric Kuhn to discuss the history, evolution and future of Colorado water. An old saying, incorrectly attributed to Mark Twain, says, "Whiskey's for drinking, water's for fighting." True enough, but the history, reality and path forward for water in Colorado and the West is much more nuanced and fraught than that. Tune in for more detail. Thank you for listening to Common Sense Digest. Please rate, review, and subscribe on your favorite podcatcher. All of our podcasts can be found here.  Jennifer Gimbel is a Senior Water Policy Scholar and former Interim Director and at the Colorado Water Center.  Jennifer has experience in law and policy on national, interstate and state water issues. She was the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Water & Science at the Department of the Interior, overseeing the U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Reclamation. She also was Deputy Commissioner for the Bureau of Reclamation and Counselor to the Assistant Secretary. Jennifer was the Director of the Colorado Water Conservation Board, the water policy agency for Colorado. As a water lawyer, she worked for the Attorney General's Offices in Wyoming and Colorado. She has over 35 years of experience on water issues Eric Kuhn is the retired General Manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District and co-author with John Fleck of Science Be Dammed: How Ignoring Inconvenient Science Drained the Colorado River, University of Arizona Press, 2019. The Colorado River District is the largest and oldest of Colorado's four conservation districts. It covers most of the Colorado River Basin within Colorado. Almost two thirds of the flow at Lee Ferry originates in or flows through the district. Eric started employment with the Colorado River District in 1981 as Assistant Secretary-Engineer. In 1996 he was appointed General Manager, a position he held until his retirement in 2018.  

The Daily Sun-Up
Colorado communities support lawsuit to block Utah oil trains; A riot in Denver

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 16:18


Today - we're talking to outdoor reporter Jason Blevins about Colorado communities supporting a lawsuit to block Utah oil trains along the Colorado River, as well as an update on Telluride ski patrollers reaching a contract to thwart a potential strike.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

H2ORadio
This Week in Water for October 30, 2022

H2ORadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 5:55


Skip This Chore to Help the Climate. That story and more on H2O Radio's weekly news report about water. Headlines: A UN report warns that we need a large-scale, rapid shake-up in transportation and in how we produce food and electricity. Major cuts in Colorado River water allocations to California, Arizona, and Nevada could be coming. According to new research, the climate would be better served if we stopped raking leaves. Itchy fishies get relief from sharks.

Unf*cking The Republic
Unf*cking Flashback: Building the Climate Industrial Complex.

Unf*cking The Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 56:39


The world is more fucked than the United States. And we're pretty fucked, so that's saying a lot. Perhaps there's a way to mitigate this mess by playing upon our worst instincts as a nation and the competitiveness that drives the world. Today we take an alternative view of our response to climate change through the lens of the most dispassionate and powerful observer in the world: The U.S. Military. It's known for decades that the planet is fucked. And they've been preparing in plain sight. Visit the episode's accompanying site page. Resources IPCC- Summary for Policymakers Institute for Policy Integrity- Gauging Economic Consensus on Climate Change Center for Climate and Security- Chronology of Military and Intelligence Concerns About Climate Change World Economic Forum- This is how climate change could impact the global economy Swiss Re- World economy set to lose up to 18% GDP from climate change if no action taken New York Times- 40 Million People Rely on the Colorado River. It's Drying Up Fast. The Black Vault- 1990 U.S. Naval Report Sub Love Adam Tooze- Chartbook Spencer Ackerman- Forever Wars Book Love  Michael T. Klare- All Hell Breaking Loose: The Pentagon's Perspective on Climate Change Pod Love Slate- What Next TBD Global Optimism- Outrage and Optimism Unf*cker Love Daron Davis: An unfortunate name but a profound podcast -- If you like #UNFTR, please leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts: unftr.com/rate and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at @UNFTRpod. Visit us online at unftr.com. Buy yourself some Unf*cking Coffee at shop.unftr.com. Subscribe to Unf*cking The Republic on Substack at unftr.substack.com to get the essays these episode are framed around sent to your inbox every week. Check out the UNFTR Pod Love playlist on Spotify: spoti.fi/3yzIlUP. Visit our bookshop.org page at bookshop.org/shop/UNFTRpod to find the full UNFTR book list. Access the UNFTR Musicless feed by following the instructions at unftr.com/accessibility. Unf*cking the Republic is produced and engineered by Manny Faces Media (mannyfacesmedia.com). Original music is by Tom McGovern (tommcgovern.com). The show is written and hosted by Rick and distributed by Morty. Podcast art description: Image of the US Constitution ripped in the middle revealing white text on a blue background that says, ‘Unf*cking the Republic.'See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

My Climate Journey
Startup Series: CODA Farm Technologies

My Climate Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 43:47


Today's guest is David Wallace, co-founder and CEO of CODA Farm Technologies, which provides remote monitoring and control for agricultural irrigation pumps and irrigation reels. The looming water crisis is often described as one of the major symptoms of climate change. You hear about it in the news, coupled with drought-stricken images of dried up riverbeds and diminishing reservoirs. The Western U.S. is currently facing the largest mega drought in a millennium. The Colorado River, which provides water to approximately 40 million Americans, plus much of the irrigation for some of the most productive agricultural land in the U.S., is in an existential crisis. Lake Mead is at 25% capacity and groundwater across the West is being depleted rapidly. So what's to be done to ensure the future of our water supply and food systems? To understand how farmers across the country are thinking about all of this, CODA Farm Technologies is on the forefront of selling irrigation efficiency tech to farmers. You'll be surprised to hear that cost savings due to water efficiency isn't even a key selling point for David's company, and that's because of how agricultural water is (or is not) priced in much of the U.S. today. Cody and David have a really interesting conversation about the state of agricultural irrigation and how he's helping farmers with time savings and automation that are ultimately driving CODA Farm's current sales.In this episode, we cover: [3:13] David's background and the origin of CODA Farm Technologies[9:28] An overview of farm irrigation [13:21] What's top of mind for farmers today around the U.S. [26:16] Value propositions for different farmers[27:11] Economics of water usage and impacts on a farmer's bottom line[29:18] CODA Farm's technology and pricing[31:27] CODA Farm's go-to-market consumers [34:44] Generational changes on farms and a look at the modern farmer[36:44] How David made the decision to go the venture route for scale and the company's seed round with Lowercarbon[37:32] Data on water savings [40:28] An overview of the irrigation control industry Get connected:Cody's TwitterCODA Farm LinkedIn / TwitterMCJ Podcast / Collective*You can also reach us via email at info@mcjcollective.com, where we encourage you to share your feedback on episodes and suggestions for future topics or guests.Episode recorded on September 12, 2022.

Just Buy Less Coffee, Answering the Deeper Questions of American Politics
Episode 42: #PrimeMinisterJoke #MAGAFascism #WaterWars

Just Buy Less Coffee, Answering the Deeper Questions of American Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 61:04


JBLC breaks down the resignation of Conservative Prime Minister Liz Truss after only 44 days on the job and the promise from right-wing economists that she would save the British economy, discusses MAGA fascist voter intimidation tactics taking place in Arizona and other swing states, and is joined by Teal Lehto, AKA WesternWaterGirl, to discuss the disappearing Colorado River and what that means for the future of the southwest United States, all for less than the price of a cup of coffee...  NPR Article on Imperial Valley water hoarding: https://www.npr.org/2022/10/04/1126240060/meet-the-california-farmers-awash-in-colorado-river-water-even-in-a-drought Reporting voter intimidation: https://azsos.gov/elections/about-elections/guidance-voting-location-conduct

Science Moab
Mountain Snow to Desert Flow

Science Moab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 20:20


Moab is known as a Colorado River town, but the key to its existence is the LaSal Mountains. With peaks over 12,000', the LaSal Mountains contain the snowpack that recharges several aquifers that produce potable water for Moab. Hydrogeologist Tom Lachmar talks about the path water takes from the high peaks of the LaSals to the Colorado River. We also talk with Tom about the several water studies that have been conducted on Moab's aquifers and what the results mean for the future.

Scaling UP! H2O
278 The One with the (don't!) Waste Water Host

Scaling UP! H2O

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 62:58


Trace Blackmore invites Antoine Walter, host of the (don't!) Waste Water Podcast and Senior Business Development Manager at Georg Fisher, on the show to discuss their mutual love of hosting podcasts about water.  What started as a way for Antoine to connect with others during the COVID-19 lockdown has transformed into an inspirational podcast show where water professionals share their fields of expertise and explore the latest water technologies with the (don't) Waste Water listeners. In this Episode Trace asks Antoine: What are the lessons we can learn from Jean-Claude Van Damme when it comes to hosting a podcast? Who is Antoine's dream podcast guest, AKA, the White Whale? What will the future of water look like in 30 years? How have sales changed since the pandemic, and are those changes here to stay? Why start a water treatment podcast?  Where to go for podcast topic inspiration?  What did he wish he knew on his first day as a podcast host? Do podcasts transcend borders? Why does Antoine love wastewater? Bottom line: Antoine Walter shares how he educates, entertains, and inspires water professionals globally weekly with his globally-reaching podcast.   Timestamps:  October's Scaling UP! H2O theme is Water Podcasts and Upcoming Events for Water Treatment Professionals [01:00] Inspiring interview with (don't!) Waste Water podcast host and Senior Business Development Manager, Antoine Walter [08:00] Lightning round questions [46:00]  Thinking On Water With James [01:00:00]   Thinking On Water With James:  In this week's episode, we're thinking about how water quality varies within your area. How do parameters such as hardness, alkalinity, silica, and conductivity vary around your area? How do they change between surface water and groundwater sources? Does the city water quality vary according to the water source they may be using at that time? How does this impact the water treatment programs you are managing? How can it impact the pretreatment, chemistry, and water efficiency? Is the end user aware of these potential impacts? Take this week to think about how water quality varies within your area and the impacts it may have.    Quotes: “A conference is a way to take the temperature of the industry.” - Antoine Walter “If you build storytelling into your podcast episode you'll catch people and have key take-home messages.” - Antoine Walter “I want to be in wastewater. You can do so many rewarding things in this specialty” - Antoine Walter “Water is essential and the bedrock of all other industries.” - Antoine Walter   Connect with Antoine Walter:  Email: antoine.walter@georgfischer.com LinkedIn: in/antoinewalter1 Website: www.georgfischer.com Don't Waste Water Podcast: dww.show  The Water Show with Björn Otto: company/the-water-show/about Subscribe to the (Don't) Waste Water Newsletter: https://www.linkedin.com/newsletters/don-t-waste-water-6884833968848474112/    Events:  Check out our Scaling UP! H2O Events Calendar where we've listed every event Water Treaters should be aware of by clicking HERE  or using the dropdown menu.    Links Mentioned:  Trace's interview on the (don't) Waste Water Podcast Shure SM7B Vocal Dynamic Microphone International Water Association (IWA) SUEZ Water  Sustainable Development Goals - Goal 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all Veolia   253 The One About Biofilms 3 Paths to Reach SDG 6 by 2050: All Our Hopes are on #3! (DWW episode with David Lloyd Owen) What would it Empower, if Water Actually Became a Non Fungible Token? (DWW episode with Katrina Donaghy) Listen Notes: The best podcast search engine The Rising Tide Mastermind Submit a Show Idea   Books Mentioned:  Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River by David Owen The Worth of Water by Gary White & Matt Damon Global Water Funding by David Lloyd Owen SPIN Selling by Neil Rackham Water Always Wins: Thriving in an Age of Drought and Deluge by Erica Gies The Sustainability Puzzle by Alice Schmidt and Claudia Winkler  

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2367: Georgie Clark

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 3:51


Episode: 2367 Georgie Clark and the invention of whitewater rafting.  Today, let's go whitewater rafting.

KZMU News
Wednesday October 19, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 10:28


The Grand County Commission has approved funding to study salinity levels in the Matheson Wetlands Preserve. There's brine — salty water from the Paradox Formation — under a layer of fresh water in that area. Researchers want to know whether using more water in the valley changes that water-brine boundary. Plus, Grand County is denying claims that staff and elected officials illegally attempted to regulate ATVs off the streets. Nonprofit BlueRibbon Coalition and 12 local businesses allege they're owed $1 million in damages after the county and city revised noise and business regulations. Grand County's attorney says their lawsuit contains outdated information. And a new report shows that Wyoming is home to the largest intact sagebrush habitat in the West. // Show Notes: // Photo: A saltier wetlands won't only have an impact on wildlife and vegetation in the area. But it could also contribute to the salinization of the Colorado River. (KZMU) // USGS Salinity Study Brief https://www.grandcountyutah.net/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Item/725?fileID=42435 // Utah Geological Survey Groundwater and Wetlands Program Proposed Matheson Wetlands Preserve Monitoring https://www.grandcountyutah.net/AgendaCenter/ViewFile/Item/744?fileID=42474 // BlueRibbon Coalition Lawsuit https://www.sharetrails.org/blueribbon-coalition-files-lawsuit-against-grand-county-and-moab-city/ // Grand County Response to BlueRibbon Coalition Lawsuit: https://www.kzmu.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/County-Answer-eFILED-10.17.22.pdf // KHOL: Grand Teton National Park restoring native sagebrush to create wildlife habitat https://891khol.org/grand-teton-national-park-restoring-native-sagebrush-to-create-wildlife-habitat-support-migrations/

eyeClarity Podcast
My White Water Rafting Trip

eyeClarity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 13:27


I had a great trip white water rafting on the Colorado River, and I wanted to share my experience, reflections, and some of the things I learned with you. Enjoy the show. You can now text me! Text 'Join' to 1-844-932-1291 to join the community and ask a question!

No Barriers
Lonnie Bedwell Fear Slayer

No Barriers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 62:26


In 2013 Erik Weihenmayer picked up the phone with an idea and a pitch. After 6 years of training, he was ready to throw himself into some of the biggest whitewater in the country... in a kayak. Where? That stretch of the Colorado River flowing through Grand Canyon. Who did he call? Lonnie Bedwell; today's guest. Erik's journey learning to kayak was a bit lonely at times. Where were the other blind kayakers? Eventually he found Lonnie, blind, who had thrown himself into the sport, and with rapid speed, into that big water in Grand Canyon as well. Erik wanted Lonnie to join him on this epic river adventure. His pitch, “One blind descent is an anomaly, but two would be a statement”) Erik and Lonnie indeed tag teamed that descent through the Grand Canyon and inspired others who followed years later. Let's get into Lonnie' story. We'll cover how he lost his sight in a hunting accident, kayaking the Zambezi in Africa, how his experiences in the military on submarines taught him about managing fear, adaptations he's made working in construction whether roofing a house or running electrical, and how he re-learned to mow a lawn, with his daughter, who was 5 at the time, … and much more…

H2ORadio
This Week in Water for October 16, 2022

H2ORadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 5:53


Blowhole Energy Could Be the Cheapest Renewable. That story and more on H2O Radio's weekly news report about water. Headlines: The drying Colorado River is getting help from the Biden administration. Along the Mississippi, barges are getting stuck in the mud. It's raining harder in the U.S. This renewable energy is both predictable and reliable because even when the wind stops blowing or the sun sets, waves just keep on rolling. If you're headed to a pool in France, you'll need to bring your swimsuit, towel, goggles...and a wetsuit.

The Planet Today
Greenwashing at COP27 (already), limiting our food waste with better labeling, & more!

The Planet Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 35:33


Matt and Nick talk about November's COP27, presented by… Coca-Cola (Cop27 climate summit's sponsorship by Coca-Cola condemned as ‘greenwash' | Cop27 | The Guardian),UK Prime Minister Liz Truss opposing agrivoltaics (Liz Truss opposes placing solar panels on farmland, Downing Street says (aol.com)),A utility scale solar, wind, and battery power plant in the US (First clean energy plant using solar, wind & battery storage opens (electrek.co)),Farms using more water than Arizona and Nevada while the Colorado River is experiencing a water shortage (These farms use more Colorado River water than 2 states combined : NPR),And “best by”, “sell by”, and other food labels contributing to food waste (Keep it or toss it? 'Best Before' labels cause confusion | AP News)!

POLITICO Energy
Zinke carries Interior scandal baggage into a new election

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 7:07


Former Trump Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who departed the administration under a cloud of ethics scandals, has struggled to pull away in a three-way Montana race for a House seat. POLITICO's Ben Lefebvre discusses why this congressional race is unique, what's working in Zinke's favor, and how his challengers have brought his record into the spotlight. Plus, the Interior Department has launched a new Colorado River drought spending initiative.   Josh Siegel is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Ben Lefebvre is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer.  Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

Water Rights: Laws, Guns, & Money
Episode 53 INDIAN RESERVATIONS, TRIBES GUARANTEED A SHARE OF THE COLORADO RIVER

Water Rights: Laws, Guns, & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 27:12


Indians may have right to 25% of Colorado River water·        Water rights in the Grand Canyon·        Other Indian water rightsWater rights came with establishment of reservations·        Better to sue or negotiate?·        In any case, wait is so long as to maybe never come·        Moral obligation to supply Indian waterSupport the show

RoadWorthy Drive Moments
A Rubber Tire Alternative

RoadWorthy Drive Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 10:00


The natural rubber compound that is one of the materials used in the manufacturing of vehicle tires accounts for 40 percent of the total.  Currently, it is sourced in the tropics and is one of the leading contributors to the deforestation of the Amazon rain forest - only adding to the severity of climate change.  Bridgestone Americas, a leading tire manufacturer, is looking to the lowly Guayule plant that grows in the United States, as a possible alternative. 

The Road to Autonomy
Episode 108 | Electric Vehicles, Raw Materials and Supply Chains, A Conversation with Alan Ohnsman, Forbes

The Road to Autonomy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 49:17


Alan Ohnsman, Senior Editor, Forbes joined Grayson Brulte on The Road to Autonomy Podcast to discuss the complex supply chains for electric vehicles and the growing shortage of raw materials and refining capacity for those materials. The conversation begins with Alan discussing the shortage of raw materials and the lack of refining capacity to enable an all-electric future. The push to shift to EVs happened faster than any of the major OEMs anticipated. – Alan Ohnsman The major car manufacturers with the exception of Tesla and Chinese OEMs were caught flat footed with the pace of transition from internal combustion engines to electric vehicles. Over the past year, the price of lithium has increased 122% YTD, forcing EV manufacturers to increase the price of EVs by an average of 54.3% due to the increasing costs of raw materials. How did this happen? The major car manufacturers were simply just not prepared for the consumer demand for EVs. What you are seeing with the run-up in prices especially for lithium would be exactly that. There was not a lot of advanced planning and now suddenly whether it's General Motors or Ford, or VW and everyone else saying we need lots of this stuff, we need it now. Well it's supply and demand. The price is going to react to that when demand suddenly spikes. – Alan Ohnsman With the average price of a new electric vehicle in the United States being $66k, does this create an opportunity for the used hybrid market to grow? Could this create an opportunity for Toyota to sell new hybrid models as well? Possibly. Alan breaks down what he calls the Tesla Effect and its effect on the market. While Tesla is having an effect on the market and driving the average price of a new EV higher, there is also the supply chain issue that is causing elevated prices. Furthermore there is a reported shortage of over 384 graphite, lithium, nickel and cobalt mines and an undisclosed shortage of refining capacity for raw materials globally according to Benchmark Minerals. If you look at the scale of demand and where it's going to be throughout the 2020's and into the 2030's, we are not ready. We need far more sources of supply. – Alan Ohnsman One new potential source of supply that could be coming online in the near feature is The Salton Sea lithium deposit in California. For an article that Alan authored for Forbes, titled; California's Lithium Rush For EV Batteries Hinges On Taming Toxic, Volcanic Brine he visited The Salton Sea to learn about the opportunity first-hand. Governor Newson has called The Salton Sea the “Saudi Arabia of Lithium”. Could this indeed be true? Alan shares his first-hand account of what he learned from visiting the region and meeting the lithium producers. This has never really been done before. Getting Lithium from brine is not a new thing. Getting lithium from this particular type of brine is completely new. It has a lot of challenges. It's going to be fascinating to see. If it works, it's so beneficial for everyone, because it would be a more environmentally friendly sustainable way to do this since you are just tapping into a stream that already exists. – Alan Ohnsman While this method is still unproven, the State of California has moved forward and proposed a flat-rate lithium tax which would impose a tax of $400 per tonne for the first 20,000 tonnes of lithium produced annually, $600 per tonne for the next 10,000 tonnes, and $800 per tonne with output of 30,000 tonnes or more. Is this a classic case of putting the cart before the horse? Could this create an opportunity for Nevada to step in and offer economic incentive packages for mining companies to relocate to Nevada and explore their lithium deposits? The market will be defined by economics and business viability. Grayson and Alan discuss what the economic impact of the proposed tax will have on the Salton Sea region. If they perfect the technology, the tax is probably not that big of a deal as time goes on. But in those critical early years, it is a problem and it will add to the expense of what is already a fairly complicated thing. – Alan Ohnsman Prior to becoming a destination for lithium extraction, The Salton Sea was the Speedboat Capital of the World in the 1920's and 30's. It was a destination for Hollywood to escape the hustle and bustle of LA. The sea became toxic over years due to the runoff from agriculture chemicals and a lack of fresh water from the Colorado River. Today, The Salton Sea is no longer a tourist destination. It's a toxic area that is causing health problems for the individuals who live in the region. It's a ghost town. The lithium extraction companies are hoping that they can revive the ghost town and turn into an old fashion mining town that is buzzing with industrial activity. We'll see whether it takes shape. They got to prove that they can really get this lithium out of there and do it in an affordable way. – Alan Ohnsman While investors can point to the Inflation Reduction Act as a catalyst for demand for lithium from The Salton Sea. The effect of the act might not has large of an impact as they were hoping for as Bloomberg Intelligence reports that the IRA will have a negligible effect on EV sales, accounting for less than 1% of an assumed 15 million US automobiles sold annually through 2028, topping out at 1.3% in 2031.The United States is simply not prepared today for the transition to electric vehicles. The U.S. is highly dependent on China as the country refines 85% of the world's raw materials. Leading to geopolitical risks and the potential for EV supply chains to suddenly come to a standstill. China championed their domestic battery market from the beginning. With China being the world's largest automobile market, Alan talks about how the global OEMs missed this trend and failed to put a domestic strategy in place to ensure a stable supply chain for their electric vehicles. Fast forward to today and VW has committed to spend $20.4 billion to build six new gigafactories in Europe for a capacity of 240 GWh/year. Building the gigafactories is the easy part. Souring the raw materials is the hard part. Setting up a new EV plant, building a new battery plant, that's the easy thing. That is what they know how to do. Sourcing of raw materials, cobalt from the Congo and lithium from Chile and nickel from hopefully Canada, or Indonesia or somewhere else, that is a whole different thing. – Alan Ohnsman This is where Tesla continues to lead. Tesla is continuously one step ahead of its competitors as it relates to securing raw materials and managing it's EV supply chain. Now the company is looking to further secure its raw material supply chain by developing their own lithium hydroxide refining facility in Texas. Wrapping up the conversation, Alan shares his thoughts on what has to be done to ensure a sustainable electric vehicle supply chain.Follow The Road To Autonomy on Apple PodcastsFollow The Road To Autonomy on LinkedInFollow The Road To Autonomy on TwitterRecorded on Thursday September 22, 2022See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

POLITICO Energy
California's Colorado River pitch

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 8:05


Last week, California offered to voluntarily cut its use of Colorado River water in exchange for federal money. California is the largest user of the river so the move could potentially reenergize negotiations among the seven states that rely on its water. POLITICO's Annie Snider breaks down the impact of California's proposed cuts, if the plan could actually help set the stage for a deal, and how the Biden administration might impact negotiations. Plus, the Environmental Protection Agency says lead emissions from small aircraft pose a threat, signaling the first step toward regulation.   Josh Siegel is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Annie Snider covers water issues for POLITICO Pro.  Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer.  Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

Big Adventures with Brian Dierker

Lynn Hamilton is the executive director of Grand Canyon River Guides. She sits down with Brian to chat about her educational path, adventures, and GCRG. Enjoy Lynn Hamilton!

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
Season 5, Ep. 3: Historical Struggles for Water: Westwater (Navajo) and the Uinta Reservation (Ute) - Join us @ the Annual History Conference: "Water at the Confluence Past and Present"

Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 34:07


Date: September 19, 2022 (Season 5, Episode 3 - 35 minutes long). Click Here for the Utah Dept. of Culture & Community Engagement version of this Speak Your Piece episode.  Are you interested in other episodes of Speak Your Piece? Click Here.Here are two audio samples from the October 26, 2022 state history conference "WATER AT THE CONFLUENCE OF PAST & FUTURE'' (Provo Marriott Hotel & Convention Center, 101 West 100 North, Provo, Utah). To join Utah's annual history fest click here. In this episode director of Utah's Indian Affairs Dustin Jansen and ethnohistorian Dr. Sondra Jones, offers sneak peeks into their conference session “Native Utahns: The Struggle to Get and Use Water."  This episode was co-produced by James Toledo (Program Manager, Utah Division of Indian Affairs).Jansen relates the recent history of Westwater, San Juan County, Utah, a rural Navajo community on the edge of Blanding, Utah, which has struggled for fifty years to get water and electricity. Jansen speaks to the combined efforts to overcome long standing obstacles, led by Utah Lieutenant Governor Deidre Henderson, along with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Utah State Legislature. Jones speaks of the very long road (1861 to the present) for the Ute people gaining access, then losing by forced sales (eminent domain) and finally gaining ownership to water flowing through the Uinta & Ouray Reservation. This includes the backstory to the Strawberry Valley Reservoir–Utah's first public works project drawing water from the Colorado River drainage system–and the beginning of the federally funded Central Utah Project. The Utah Division of State History and Utah Museums Association are combining their conferences this year (back to back -- museum conference October 24-26 and the Utah history conference October 26). Bio: Dustin Jansen has been since 2019 the director of the Utah Division of Indian Affairs. Originally from Coyote Canyon, New Mexico, he was born and raised on the Navajo Reservation. Attending school at Utah Valley University (UVU, Orem, Utah), BYU (Provo), and at the University of Utah, Dustin then graduated with a Juris Doctorate from the S.J. Quinney College of Law. From 2006 to 2015 he served as a tribal judge at the Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation. In 2015 he was appointed program coordinator for the American Indian Studies program at UVU. Photo courtesy of the S.J. Quinney School of Law, University of Utah. Bio: Dr. Sondra G. Jones has a PhD in history from the University of Utah in American and Native American History. Sondra is an adjunct professor in the History Department at Brigham Young University, and is the author of Being and Becoming Ute: The Story of an American Indian (2019).  She is also the author of numerous other books and articles on the history of the Ute Nation.  Do you have a question or comment, or a proposed guest for “Speak Your Piece?” Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@utah.gov 

H2ORadio
This Week in Water for October 9, 2022

H2ORadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 6:06


How a Town Survived Hurricane Ian Without a Scratch. That story and more on H2O Radio's weekly news report about water. Headlines: California has offered to cut back some of its allocation of Colorado River water. Bitcoin is damaging the climate more than the beef industry and almost as much as gasoline. “America's first solar-powered town” rode out Hurricane Ian without losing power or sustaining significant damage. Wax worm saliva is polyethylene's Kryptonite.

Rivergirl Radio
Lee Udall Bennion

Rivergirl Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 92:36


Lee moved from Merced, CA to Utah in 1974 to study art at Brigham Young University. In 1976, she married Joseph Bennion and moved to Spring City,  Utah.  She and Joe have three daughters together.  She earned a BFA in painting.  She has received numerous honors and awards from the art community. As a 15 year old girl, Lee was left home when her father and brothers went rafting down the Grand Canyon. She wasn't happy.  She promised herself that the first chance she had to go on a rafting trip down the Grand Canyon she would go.  With over 30 Grand Canyon trips and numerous river trips throughout the West, Lee followed through on that promise to herself.Her love of nature, grand places and wild spaces are contagious.Enjoy Lee.Show Notes:Some of Lee's PaintingsMom's StuffTalking Fly Youtube Video of LeeSpring City, UtahBooks:1.  There's this River by Christa Sadler2.  Breaking into the Current: Boatwoman of the Grand Canyon by Louise Teal3.  Sunk Without a Sound by Brad Dimock4.  Canyon by Michael Ghiglieri5.  Grand Obsession: Harvey Butchard  and the Exploration of Grand Canyon by Elisa Butler Tom Myers6.  The Colorado River in the Grand Canyon: A Guide by Larry Stevens  7.  The Doing of the Thing: the Brief Brilliant Whitewater career of Buzz Holstrom by Vince Welch, Cort Conley & Brad DimockVisit my Instagram for photos:  Rivergirl Radiohttps://www.buymeacoffee.com/rivergirlradioSupport the showSupport the show

Bill Handel on Demand
BHS - 7A - Nuclear 'Armageddon' Risk Highest Since '62 and More Water Restrictions On The Way

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 30:06


Immigrants undaunted by DeSantis are heading to Florida to help with Hurricane Ian cleanup. President Biden has warned that the risk of a nuclear 'Armageddon' is at its highest point since 1962. More water restrictions are likely on the way as California has pledged to cut the use of its Colorado River supply. And President Biden has pardoned thousands of people convicted on federal marijuana possession charges.

5 Live
Up the Apples and Pears - Thursday, October 6, 2022

5 Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 52:57


Today on 5 Live: Biden pardons marijuana convictions. Colorado River water savings. OPEC cuts oil production. Amtrak closure. Metro K line opening. Vatican statue vandal. Robert Report at Naughty Vegan. Emily Evans stops by for a UK quiz. And more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

On Land
The Colorado River Crisis with Andy Mueller

On Land

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 54:30


The big news in the West these days is drought, and specifically drought in the Colorado River Basin. In upcoming episodes, we're going to bring you some really interesting conversations with land stewards who are trying really cool things to deal with the drought, save water, and restore watersheds. But today, we wanted to provide listeners with some of the big picture context and some background to better understand this issue. To do that, we turned to Andy Mueller. Andy Mueller is the General Manager of the Colorado River District. The Colorado River District is a public body that serves as the principal water policy and planning agency for the Colorado River Basin within the state of Colorado. They provide legal, technical and political representation regarding Colorado River issues for the communities of 15 counties in Northwest Colorado which includes the headwaters of the mighty river itself. Andy is a veteran water attorney, and a graduate of the University of Colorado Law School's esteemed program in water law. Before becoming the General Manager at CRD, he spent 22 years in private practice representing agricultural water users on the western slope of Colorado, learning about the issues directly from landowners and producers. Andy recently spoke with Lesli Allison, the executive director at Western Landowners Alliance. Lesli spent 16 years managing a private ranch in the headwaters of the Rio Grande before helping to found WLA in 2012. So she's is no stranger to these issues. Enjoy! More about the Colorado River District: https://www.coloradoriverdistrict.org/  On Land is a production of Western Landowners Alliance, a non-profit that advances policies and practices that sustain working lands, connected landscapes and native species. Learn more about WLA here. Produced by Zach Altman Like this episode? Share it with a friend, leave a review wherever you get your podcasts and be sure to subscribe to On Land Magazine. Your support helps us amplify the voices of stewardship in the American West.

The LA Report
Work crews race to restore train service near ocean in O.C. Plus: A west coast climate agreement, the Colorado River water fight, and more

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 5:37


Here's what we're following today: Work crews race to restore train service in O.C. West coast states commit to climate agreement Colorado River water fight DTLA's Grand Park turns 10 This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.  Support the show: https://laist.com

Pharmacy Podcast Network
PAINWeek 2022 Conference Summary | Pain Pod

Pharmacy Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 54:03


Vegas Baby!!! The vibe at PAINWeek 2022 was electric! Electricity flowing through the Cosmo Hotel and Casino on Las Vegas Boulevard (“the strip”), similar to what's generated by the Colorado River, Lake Meade, and a miles and miles of electrical wires! Pain Guy was the beat on the street” strolling through the PAINWeek presentations, exhibit hall, and Cosmo hallways chatting it up with fellow faculty, exhibitors, and attendees alike! Dr. A.J. Gupta (an attendee), Barby Ingle (author, speaker, and overall dynamic iPain exhibitor and attendee), Nicole Hemmenway (CEO of our U.S. Pain Foundation), and Richard Tuorto (Pain Medicine News) join us for energized conversations revolving around what their organizations do for healthcare professionals and patients in pain, pain management in general, and of course, their experiences at PAINWeek 2022. Checkout this mobile mic episode of the Pain Pod as we team up with the folks of PAINWeek to give you, Pain Pod Nation, the audio vibe of the electricity of being there in person. Come one, come all, to the Pain Pod (and PAINWeek 2023)!!! Episode References • PAINWeek: https://www.painweek.org/ • iPain (International Pain Foundation): https://internationalpain.org/ • Barby Ingle: https://barbyingle.com/ • US Pain Foundation: https://uspainfoundation.org/about-us/our-team/ • Pain Medicine News: https://www.painmedicinenews.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Daily Sun-Up
A conversation with the publisher of Colorado Community Media; The Colorado River Storage Project

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 18:51


Today - we're speaking with Linda Shapley, the publisher of Colorado Community Media, about their 26 hyper-local newspapers and their relationship to The Colorado Sun.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fresh Air
The Water Crisis In The American West

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 45:34 Very Popular


40 people rely on water from the Colorado River, but overuse and global warming have combined to create a water emergency. Tough choices must be made soon, or farms and cities will face critical shortages. We talk with ProPublica investigative reporter Abrahm Lustgarten.millionJazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a recording by pianist Mal Waldron.

Fresh Air
The Water Crisis In The American West

Fresh Air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 45:34


40 million people rely on water from the Colorado River, but overuse and global warming have combined to create a water emergency. Tough choices must be made soon, or farms and cities will face critical shortages. We talk with ProPublica investigative reporter Abrahm Lustgarten.millionJazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a recording by pianist Mal Waldron.

Gastropod
Does the Western Megadrought Mean the End of Cheap Cheese and Ice Cream?

Gastropod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 51:12 Very Popular


Imagine a summer's day without the jingle of the ice-cream truck, a pizza without its bubbling layer of melted cheesy goodness, or even a bowl of cereal without milk. It's a shocking prospect, for sure, but the threat to these delights is perhaps even more surprising: The fact that Americans enjoy more than three times their body-weight in dairy products each year is, in no small part, due to a water-hungry plant that's frequently, if counterintuitively, grown in the desert. That plant is alfalfa, and it makes up at least half of the diet of dairy cows all over the world. So why are we growing alfalfa in the arid American Southwest, and watering it from the Colorado River—both of which, as you may have heard on the news, are becoming drier with every passing day? To find out, Gastropod went on a good old-fashioned road trip for some field reporting (literally, in an alfalfa field) and talked to farmers, economists, plant experts, journalists, and exporters about where this surprisingly important plant fits in to a warming world—and how we can prevent a future lacking in lactose without also drying up the West. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Christian Science Monitor Daily Podcast
Tuesday, September 27, 2022 - The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022


The unrest racking Russia and Iran is unlikely to herald the imminent end for either of their autocratic governments. But Vladimir Putin and the ayatollahs would do well to remember the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. Also, today's stories: the progress of an attempt to radically reshape housing in Minnesota, the struggle to balance water needs with water use on the Colorado River, and a look at life in a quaint little town designed by none other than Britain's new king. Join the Monitor's Linda Feldmann and Clara Germani for today's news. You can also visit csmonitor.com/daily for more information.

Kottke Ride Home
Mon. 09/26 - GIFs Are Dead, Long Live the GIF

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 19:34


Thanks to a court filing from the largest search engine of its kind, it's official: GIFs are cringe. How did they fall so far? Plus, the Colorado River is drying up and part of the reason has to do with politicians ignoring the science one hundred years ago.Sponsors:American Musical Supply, Use code COOL at americanmusical.com for $20 off your next purchase of over $100I Am Bio, Subscribe at bio.org/podcastLinks:‘Gifs are cringe': how Giphy's multimillion-dollar business fell out of fashion (The Guardian)Fri. 10/29 - Disease and the Vampire Myth + Hallowmeme History (Cool Stuff Ride Home)How a 100-year-old miscalculation drained the Colorado River (Vox)Science Be Damned: How Ignoring Inconvenient Science Drained the Colorado River by Eric Kuhn and John Fleck As Colorado River Dries, the U.S. Teeters on the Brink of Larger Water Crisis (ProPublica)How to Watch NASA's DART Spacecraft Slam Into an Asteroid (NY Times)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Up First
Wednesday, August 16, 2022

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 12:46 Very Popular


Liz Cheney will continue fighting for democracy after losing her primary over condemnation of former President Trump. The Colorado River is in crisis and states can't agree on necessary water restrictions. 50 million students return to school this month after years of education interrupted and overshadowed by the pandemic.