Podcasts about morlocks

Fictional future ethnic group

  • 131PODCASTS
  • 181EPISODES
  • 1h 3mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Nov 16, 2022LATEST
morlocks

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about morlocks

Latest podcast episodes about morlocks

Marvelvision
X-MEN TAS: "Captive Hearts"

Marvelvision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 64:55


Gotta let you know up front that there is a character in this episode of X-Men who has a fairly racist name. The 20th century was just kinda like that sometimes. It's not even a particularly good episode! It semi-adapts a great storyline from the comics featuring the Morlocks (many of whom were later brutally slain) but it doesn't have the bonkers je ne sais quoi of the first few eps of the series. That said, this episode is a gold mine of moments that have become modern memes, including the most famous one of all. We talk news and stuff for the first 18 minutes and 35 seconds, so skip that if you don't want to hear our opinions on all the exciting stuff happening in the world of comic book movies. By the way - a new Watch Men drops tomorrow, and we will be talking about Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, You don't want to miss it! It will be available only to subscribers at the $5 and above levels at www.patreon.com/cinemasangha. Join now!

.
The Morlocks Are Coming!

.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 108:00


MAILBAG SHOW * 11.15.2022 -------------------------------------------------------------- TEXAS GOVERNOR DECLARES INVASION AT BORDER https://justthenews.com/government/security/texas-governor-declares-invasion-border-invokes-constitutional-powers-historic COUNTY JUDGE INVASION LETTER https://gov.texas.gov/uploads/files/press/County_Judge_Invasion_Letter.pdf WORLD WILL LOOK DIFFERENTLY AFTER WE HAVE GONE https://yournews.com/2022/11/15/2454203/watch-the-world-will-look-differently-after-we-have-gone/ GLOBAL DIGITAL HEALTH CERTIFICATE https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2022/11/g20-panel-calls-global-digital-health-certificate-acknowledge-track-vaccination-status-video/ TRUMP TO ANNOUNCE PRESIDENTIAL BID TODAY https://www.oann.com/newsroom/trump-to-announce-2024-presidential-bid-today/ -------------------------------------------------------------- Augusto on Brighteon… https://www.brighteon.com/channels/theappearance/playlists?page=1 Augusto's Websites... http://theappearance.com http://theappearance.net Augusto on iTunes... https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast//id1123053712?mt=2 Augusto on MediaFire... https://www.mediafire.com/folder/byndkxqfq7ohj/The_Appearance Contact Info: Augusto Perez POB 465 Live Oak, FL  32064 Larry Taylor Blog: http://larrywtaylor.org POB 317 Talihina, OK  74571-0317 Listen to Larry Taylor, Chuck Wilson and Augusto Perez discuss the latest headline news through the lens of Bible Prophecy in the first hour.

X-Reads
Ep 86: Uncanny X-Men 209 with Kieron Gillen!

X-Reads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 60:55


Writer and architect of the A.X.E. (Avengers | X-Men | Eternals) crossover event, Kieron Gillen, joins the pod to discuss his work on AXE, answer questions from Twitter, talk about Mister Sinister and recap Uncanny X-Men 209. Kieron selected a Nimrod issue as it's one of the first issues he read as a child that made an impact on him. It's an issue packed with the X-Men, The Hellfire Club, the Morlocks, The Body Shop, and more. It has TWO character deaths even! It's an amazing bit of work by Chris Claremont and John Romita Jr.Find us on the AIPT Podcast Network. Follow our show to be alerted when new episodes appear the first and third Wednesday of the month. Check us out on social media @xreadspodcast on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. For business inquiries, email xreadspodcast@gmail.com. Learn more at https://aiptcomics.com

Wish It Was The 90s
X-Men: TAS | Episode 12: The Underwhelming End of Season 4

Wish It Was The 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 62:48


On episode 12 of our #XMenTAS watch through we discuss the diminishing returns on the storytelling. Get stuck in a Bebo blackhole and decide the #Morlocks are infinitely more interesting from an adults perspective. We consider the fact that if this is Jubilee's first X-Men Christmas then it's been an outrageous year for our characters since episode 1. Finally we see the return of many favourite characters and a big old evil plot from #Apocalypse to reshape the universe how he sees it: The Lotus and the Steel Weapon X, Lies and a Videotape Have yourself a Morlock little Christmas Beyond Good and Evil 1-4 Next episode gets into Season 5 and kicks off with: The Phalanx Covenant 1-2 Storm Front 1-2 The Fifth Horseman NOTE: This is episode was scheduled for last week, but our bot Creg let us down. Mortal Kombat will come out in October. Very sorry.

Elite 8 Showdown
The Lost Levels Episode 7 - Best Roleplay Mechanics in a TTRPG w/Lexa White

Elite 8 Showdown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 68:36


This week Tim is joined by the lovely Lexa White from the Morlocks podcast to talk about the most mechanically sound RP mechanics across a large variety of TTRPG systems. From GURPS to Monster Hearts, every style of system is represented and Tim adds a whole bunch of games to his short list. Find more Lexa here: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/morlocks/id1547458330 Twitch: Twitch.tv/professionalcasualnetwork Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfUOaJjpMfgRFWL7Z996lyQ (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfUOaJjpMfgRFWL7Z996lyQ) Bearded Dragon Games (Pick up all your gaming needs): BeardedDragonGames.Online (use code 'professionalcasual' for free shipping in the continental US!) A special thanks to our Patreon backers who helped support us at Patreon.com/professionalcasual : Thank you to our most recent Patrons! Thank you! Sam M., Kristoffer w.,  Luka J., Lexa W., Cyder D., Oliver J., Will J., Joe M., Paul H., Kevin C., Joe W., Alexandre R., Scott F., Nerdtism, Joe L., Richard G., Dani2Time, Michael M, Rich M., Soul Eater, Aaron H., Eric B., Quinn B., John S., William S., Rob M., Rob, Franz B., Film-Lars, Leslie S., Matt F., Paul S., Christopher T., Matt L., Zane T., Thomas T, Joe J., Johan E., Jens R., Oliver H., Mikolaj W., Andrew, Zach C., Justliketheplant, Neil L., Jared S., Mikael N., Taylor M., George F., Tom M., Devin M., Nicholas W., Jonas P.,  Jonathan L., Simon P., Gareth G., Jacob Y.,  Lady_Leah, Devin M., David R., Will B., Stephan S., Sean S., Brian Y., William S., Path, William P., Tim D., Simon W., Jake C., Theo A., Heber R., Ben R., Vaughan A., Daniel S., Lars, Taylor H., Blarin R., Gervasio L., Adam D., Christopher C., Craig G., Kevin C., WreckMyPodcast, Charlie S., Witchdream, Anthony R.,  Sarah B., Dan C., Dani, and Lindsay F. Mailing Address: P.O. Box G, West Oneonta, NY 13861, United States Voicemail: 603-803-3235 (Country Code 001) Drive-Thru RPG: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse.php?affiliate_id=3002007 (https://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse.php?affiliate_id=3002007) Professional Casual Gear: https://teespring.com/stores/professionalcasual (https://teespring.com/stores/professionalcasual) Built Bar (Use link or use code 'professionalcasual' at checkout for discount): https://builtbar.com/ (https://builtbar.com)#?baapp=PROFESSIONALCASUAL Use Code 'professionalcasual' for 15% off RAZE Energy: https://reppsports.com/?rfsn=5472644.3e7a1c&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=5472644.3e7a1c (https://reppsports.com/?rfsn=5472644.3e7a1c&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=5472644.3e7a1c) Skillshare (get 2 months free, or 30% off the annual subscription): skillshare.eqcm.net/Q5mR9 Our Giveaways: Professionalcasual.com/giveaways

The Superhero Show Show
#443: All Hail King Shark!

The Superhero Show Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 135:27


The Superhero Show Show #443All Hail King Shark! We're checking in with Harley Quinn, plus Christmas with the X-Men, and more Battle of the Atom, on an all-new Superhero Show Show! On an all-new, all-different Superhero Show Show, Ryan and Katelynn are in charge, so you know they went and did they're favorite thing: call in James from the Scavenger Network. Together, the threesome are checking in with Harley Quinn! We're at the halfway point for the season, and it's about time for things to kick into gear. Harley's team is back together, and the Joker is now the mayor. Will Ivy and Harley make it out of the season as our favorite TV couple! Join the Taste Buds as they break down the episode, and the season so far. Next, the Friends will cover all of the rest of the shows this week, including the sixth and seventh episodes of Paper Girls, the fourth and fifth episodes of Sandman, the fourth and fifth episodes of Locke and Key, plus this week's Tales of the Walking Dead, Resident Alien, and She-Hulk! Then, the Taste Buds head to X-Tazmania, because the X-Men are celebrating X-Mas! While half of the team stays at the mansion and sets up for the holidays, the other half race to the sewers to help the Morlocks save Leach from a disease! It's a Merry Mutant Morlock Extravaganza, and these mutants aren't afraid to say MERRY CHRISTMAS instead of Happy Holidays! Finally, Mike finishes his conversation with https://twitter.com/arthurstacy (Adam Reck) of https://www.comicsxf.com/category/podcasts/battle-of-the-atom/ (Battle of the Atom)! Every week Zack and Adam take on 3 new X-Men stories in an ongoing battle to determine the best and worst X-Men stories of all time! TV EPISODES DISCUSSED:HARLEY QUINN #307https://www.hbomax.com/series/urn:hbo:series:GXxis0w4EP8N_vAEAAACO?camp=GOOGLE%7cHTS_SEM%7cPID_p72037370257&keyword=harley+quinn+hbo+max&utm_id=sa%7c71700000097708110%7c58700007924052369%7cp72037370257&utm_content=tun&gclid=Cj0KCQjwxIOXBhCrARIsAL1QFCbe5tCO3IBHdQh5d-ezaL-6-aIHXYW4vVAF9i3RxrMyK1CO24VDVUUaAoswEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds (Watch Harley Quinn on HBOMAX) Another Sharkley Adventure LOCKE AND KEY #304https://www.netflix.com/title/80241239 (Watch Locke and Key on Netflix) Bode's sudden attitude change worries his family and friends, Tyler catches up with a co-worker and Gideon forms an unholy alliance. LOCKE AND KEY #305https://www.netflix.com/title/80241239 (Watch Locke and Key on Netflix) Suspicions about Bode's behavior come to a head after an unsettling discovery, while Gideon's patience runs out in his plot to possess the keys. PAPER GIRLS #106https://www.amazon.com/Paper-Girls-Season-1/dp/B09TQ6H4WX (Watch Paper Girls on Amazon Prime) Desperate to find a way home, Tiff leads the girls to her adult self, who accomplished so many of her childhood dreams but she isn't everything that was expected. Together they work to decode Larry's ledger as the Old Watch close in. PAPER GIRLS #107https://www.amazon.com/Paper-Girls-Season-1/dp/B09TQ6H4WX (Watch Paper Girls on Amazon Prime) Tiff confronts her adult self about the choices she's made and KJ tries to help Mac grapple with her future as Larry and Erin call for back-up. RESIDENT ALIEN #211https://www.syfy.com/resident-alien (Watch Resident Alien on SyFy) Asta tells Dan about the shooting while Harry learns what it takes to be a good friend. THE SANDMAN #104https://www.netflix.com/title/81150303 (Watch The Sandman on Netflix) A lead on the whereabouts of his helm compels Morpheus to seek an audience with Lucifer. A confused John receives a helping hand from a good Samaritan. THE SANDMAN #105https://www.netflix.com/title/81150303 (Watch The Sandman on Netflix) With Morpheus caught off guard, John settles in at a diner to watch the people around him - and put his theory about truth

The Lunar Society
37: Steve Hsu - Intelligence, Embryo Selection, & The Future of Humanity

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 141:27


Steve Hsu is a Professor of Theoretical Physics at Michigan State University and cofounder of the company Genomic Prediction.We go deep into the weeds on how embryo selection can make babies healthier and smarter. Steve also explains the advice Richard Feynman gave him to pick up girls, the genetics of aging and intelligence, & the psychometric differences between shape rotators and wordcels.Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform.Subscribe to find out about future episodes!Read the full transcript here.Follow Steve on Twitter. Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.Please share if you enjoyed this episode! Helps out a ton!Timestamps(0:00:14) - Feynman’s advice on picking up women(0:11:46) - Embryo selection(0:24:19) - Why hasn't natural selection already optimized humans?(0:34:13) - Aging(0:43:18) - First Mover Advantage(0:53:49) - Genomics in dating(1:00:31) - Ancestral populations(1:07:58) - Is this eugenics?(1:15:59) - Tradeoffs to intelligence(1:25:01) - Consumer preferences(1:30:14) - Gwern(1:34:35) - Will parents matter?(1:45:25) - Word cells and shape rotators(1:57:29) - Bezos and brilliant physicists(2:10:23) - Elite educationTranscriptDwarkesh Patel  0:00  Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Steve Hsu. Steve, thanks for coming on the podcast. I'm excited about this.Steve Hsu  0:04  Hey, it's my pleasure! I'm excited too and I just want to say I've listened to some of your earlier interviews and thought you were very insightful, which is why I was excited to have a conversation with you.Dwarkesh Patel 0:14That means a lot for me to hear you say because I'm a big fan of your podcast.Feynman’s advice on picking up womenDwarkesh Patel  0:17  So my first question is: “What advice did Richard Feynman give you about picking up girls?”Steve Hsu  0:24   Haha, wow! So one day in the spring of my senior year, I was walking across campus and saw Feynman coming toward me. We knew each other from various things—it's a small campus, I was a physics major and he was my hero–– so I'd known him since my first year. He sees me, and he's got this Long Island or New York borough accent and says, "Hey, Hsu!"  I'm like, "Hi, Professor Feynman." We start talking. And he says to me, "Wow, you're a big guy." Of course, I was much bigger back then because I was a linebacker on the Caltech football team. So I was about 200 pounds and slightly over 6 feet tall. I was a gym rat at the time and I was much bigger than him. He said, "Steve, I got to ask you something." Feynman was born in 1918, so he's not from the modern era. He was going through graduate school when the Second World War started. So, he couldn't understand the concept of a health club or a gym. This was the 80s and was when Gold's Gym was becoming a world national franchise. There were gyms all over the place like 24-Hour Fitness. But, Feynman didn't know what it was. He's a fascinating guy. He says to me, "What do you guys do there? Is it just a thing to meet girls? Or is it really for training? Do you guys go there to get buff?" So, I started explaining to him that people are there to get big, but people are also checking out the girls. A lot of stuff is happening at the health club or the weight room. Feynman grills me on this for a long time. And one of the famous things about Feynman is that he has a laser focus. So if there's something he doesn't understand and wants to get to the bottom of it, he will focus on you and start questioning you and get to the bottom of it. That's the way his brain worked. So he did that to me for a while because he didn't understand lifting weights and everything. In the end, he says to me, "Wow, Steve, I appreciate that. Let me give you some good advice."Then, he starts telling me how to pick up girls—which he's an expert on. He says to me, "I don't know how much girls like guys that are as big as you." He thought it might be a turn-off. "But you know what, you have a nice smile." So that was the one compliment he gave me. Then, he starts to tell me that it's a numbers game. You have to be rational about it. You're at an airport lounge, or you're at a bar. It's Saturday night in Pasadena or Westwood, and you're talking to some girl. He says, "You're never going to see her again. This is your five-minute interaction. Do what you have to do. If she doesn't like you, go to the next one." He also shares some colorful details. But, the point is that you should not care what they think of you. You're trying to do your thing. He did have a reputation at Caltech as a womanizer, and I could go into that too but I heard all this from the secretaries.Dwarkesh Patel  4:30  With the students or only the secretaries? Steve Hsu  4:35  Secretaries! Well mostly secretaries. They were almost all female at that time. He had thought about this a lot, and thought of it as a numbers game. The PUA guys (pick-up artists) will say, “Follow the algorithm, and whatever happens, it's not a reflection on your self-esteem. It's just what happened. And you go on to the next one.” That was the advice he was giving me, and he said other things that were pretty standard: Be funny, be confident—just basic stuff. Steve Hu: But the main thing I remember was the operationalization of it as an algorithm. You shouldn’t internalize whatever happens if you get rejected, because that hurts. When we had to go across the bar to talk to that girl (maybe it doesn’t happen in your generation), it was terrifying. We had to go across the bar and talk to some lady! It’s loud and you’ve got a few minutes to make your case. Nothing is scarier than walking up to the girl and her friends. Feynman was telling me to train yourself out of that. You're never going to see them again, the face space of humanity is so big that you'll probably never re-encounter them again. It doesn't matter. So, do your best. Dwarkesh Patel  6:06  Yeah, that's interesting because.. I wonder whether he was doing this in the 40’–– like when he was at that age, was he doing this? I don't know what the cultural conventions were at the time. Were there bars in the 40s where you could just go ahead and hit on girls or? Steve Hsu  6:19  Oh yeah absolutely. If you read literature from that time, or even a little bit earlier like Hemingway or John O'Hara, they talk about how men and women interacted in bars and stuff in New York City. So, that was much more of a thing back than when compared to your generation. That's what I can’t figure out with my kids! What is going on? How do boys and girls meet these days? Back in the day, the guy had to do all the work. It was the most terrifying thing you could do, and you had  to train yourself out of that.Dwarkesh Patel  6:57  By the way, for the context for the audience, when Feynman says you were a big guy, you were a football player at Caltech, right? There's a picture of you on your website, maybe after college or something, but you look pretty ripped. Today, it seems more common because of the gym culture. But I don’t know about back then. I don't know how common that body physique was.Steve Hsu  7:24  It’s amazing that you asked this question. I'll tell you a funny story. One of the reasons Feynman found this so weird was because of the way body-building entered the United States.  They  were regarded as freaks and homosexuals at first. I remember swimming and football in high school (swimming is different because it's international) and in swimming, I picked up a lot of advanced training techniques from the Russians and East Germans. But football was more American and not very international. So our football coach used to tell us not to lift weights when we were in junior high school because it made you slow. “You’re no good if you’re bulky.” “You gotta be fast in football.” Then, something changed around the time I was in high school–the coaches figured it out. I began lifting weights since I was an age group swimmer, like maybe age 12 or 14. Then, the football coaches got into it mainly because the University of Nebraska had a famous strength program that popularized it.At the time, there just weren't a lot of big guys. The people who knew how to train were using what would be considered “advanced knowledge” back in the 80s. For example, they’d know how to do a split routine or squat on one day and do upper body on the next day–– that was considered advanced knowledge at that time. I remember once.. I had an injury, and I was in the trainer's room at the Caltech athletic facility. The lady was looking at my quadriceps. I’d pulled a muscle, and she was looking at the quadriceps right above your kneecap. If you have well-developed quads, you'd have a bulge, a bump right above your cap. And she was looking at it from this angle where she was in front of me, and she was looking at my leg from the front. She's like, “Wow, it's swollen.” And I was like, “That's not the injury. That's my quadricep!” And she was a trainer! So, at that time, I could probably squat 400 pounds. So I was pretty strong and had big legs. The fact that the trainer didn't really understand what well-developed anatomy was supposed to look like blew my mind!So anyway, we've come a long way. This isn't one of these things where you have to be old to have any understanding of how this stuff evolved over the last 30-40 years.Dwarkesh Patel  10:13  But, I wonder if that was a phenomenon of that particular time or if people were not that muscular throughout human history. You hear stories of  Roman soldiers who are carrying 80 pounds for 10 or 20 miles a day. I mean, there's a lot of sculptures in the ancient world, or not that ancient, but the people look like they have a well-developed musculature.Steve Hsu  10:34  So the Greeks were very special because they were the first to think about the word gymnasium. It was a thing called the Palaestra, where they were trained in wrestling and boxing. They were the first people who were seriously into physical culture specific training for athletic competition.Even in the 70s, when I was a little kid, I look back at the guys from old photos and they were skinny. So skinny! The guys who went off and fought World War Two, whether they were on the German side, or the American side, were like 5’8-5’9 weighing around 130 pounds - 140 pounds. They were much different from what modern US Marines would look like. So yeah, physical culture was a new thing. Of course, the Romans and the Greeks had it to some degree, but it was lost for a long time. And, it was just coming back to the US when I was growing up. So if you were reasonably lean (around 200 pounds) and you could bench over 300.. that was pretty rare back in those days.Embryo selectionDwarkesh Patel  11:46  Okay, so let's talk about your company Genomic Prediction. Do you want to talk about this company and give an intro about what it is?Steve Hsu  11:55  Yeah. So there are two ways to introduce it. One is the scientific view. The other is the IVF view. I can do a little of both. So scientifically, the issue is that we have more and more genomic data. If you give me the genomes of a bunch of people and then give me some information about each person, ex. Do they have diabetes? How tall are they? What's their IQ score?  It’s a natural AI machine learning problem to figure out which features in the DNA variation between people are predictive of whatever variable you're trying to predict.This is the ancient scientific question of how you relate the genotype of the organism (the specific DNA pattern), to the phenotype (the expressed characteristics of the organism). If you think about it, this is what biology is! We had the molecular revolution and figured out that it’s people's DNA that stores the information which is passed along. Evolution selects on the basis of the variation in the DNA that’s expressed as phenotype, as that phenotype affects fitness/reproductive success. That's the whole ballgame for biology. As a physicist who's trained in mathematics and computation, I'm lucky that I arrived on the scene at a time when we're going to solve this basic fundamental problem of biology through brute force, AI, and machine learning. So that's how I got into this. Now you ask as an entrepreneur, “Okay, fine Steve, you're doing this in your office with your postdocs and collaborators on your computers. What use is it?” The most direct application of this is in the following setting: Every year around the world, millions of families go through IVF—typically because they're having some fertility issues, and also mainly because the mother is in her 30s or maybe 40s. In the process of IVF, they use hormone stimulation to produce more eggs. Instead of one per cycle, depending on the age of the woman, they might produce anywhere between five to twenty, or even sixty to a hundred eggs for young women who are hormonally stimulated (egg donors).From there, it’s trivial because men produce sperm all the time. You can fertilize eggs pretty easily in a little dish, and get a bunch of embryos that grow. They start growing once they're fertilized. The problem is that if you're a family and produce more embryos than you’re going to use, you have the embryo choice problem. You have to figure out which embryo to choose out of  say, 20 viable embryos. The most direct application of the science that I described is that we can now genotype those embryos from a small biopsy. I can tell you things about the embryos. I could tell you things like your fourth embryo being an outlier. For breast cancer risk, I would think carefully about using number four. Number ten is an outlier for cardiovascular disease risk. You might want to think about not using that one. The other ones are okay. So, that’s what genomic prediction does. We work with 200 or 300 different IVF clinics in six continents.Dwarkesh Patel  15:46  Yeah, so the super fascinating thing about this is that the diseases you talked about—or at least their risk profiles—are polygenic. You can have thousands of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) determining whether you will get a disease. So, I'm curious to learn how you were able to transition to this space and how your knowledge of mathematics and physics was able to help you figure out how to make sense of all this data.Steve Hsu  16:16  Yeah, that's a great question. So again, I was stressing the fundamental scientific importance of all this stuff. If you go into a slightly higher level of detail—which you were getting at with the individual SNPs, or polymorphisms—there are individual locations in the genome, where I might differ from you, and you might differ from another person. Typically, each pair of individuals will differ at a few million places in the genome—and that controls why I look a little different than youA lot of times, theoretical physicists have a little spare energy and they get tired of thinking about quarks or something. They want to maybe dabble in biology, or they want to dabble in computer science, or some other field. As theoretical physicists, we always feel, “Oh, I have a lot of horsepower, I can figure a lot out.” (For example, Feynman helped design the first parallel processors for thinking machines.) I have to figure out which problems I can make an impact on because I can waste a lot of time. Some people spend their whole lives studying one problem, one molecule or something, or one biological system. I don't have time for that, I'm just going to jump in and jump out. I'm a physicist. That's a typical attitude among theoretical physicists. So, I had to confront sequencing costs about ten years ago because I knew the rate at which they were going down. I could anticipate that we’d get to the day (today) when millions of genomes with good phenotype data became available for analysis. A typical training run might involve almost a million genomes, or half a million genomes. The mathematical question then was: What is the most effective algorithm given a set of genomes and phenotype information to build the best predictor?  This can be  boiled down to a very well-defined machine learning problem. It turns out, for some subset of algorithms, there are theorems— performance guarantees that give you a bound on how much data you need to capture almost all of the variation in the features. I spent a fair amount of time, probably a year or two, studying these very famous results, some of which were proved by a guy named Terence Tao, a Fields medalist. These are results on something called compressed sensing: a penalized form of high dimensional regression that tries to build sparse predictors. Machine learning people might notice L1-penalized optimization. The very first paper we wrote on this was to prove that using accurate genomic data and these very abstract theorems in combination could predict how much data you need to “solve” individual human traits. We showed that you would need at least a few hundred thousand individuals and their genomes and their heights to solve for height as a phenotype. We proved that in a paper using all this fancy math in 2012. Then around 2017, when we got a hold of half a million genomes, we were able to implement it in practical terms and show that our mathematical result from some years ago was correct. The transition from the low performance of the predictor to high performance (which is what we call a “phase transition boundary” between those two domains) occurred just where we said it was going to occur. Some of these technical details are not understood even by practitioners in computational genomics who are not quite mathematical. They don't understand these results in our earlier papers and don't know why we can do stuff that other people can't, or why we can predict how much data we'll need to do stuff. It's not well-appreciated, even in the field. But when the big AI in our future in the singularity looks back and says, “Hey, who gets the most credit for this genomics revolution that happened in the early 21st century?”, they're going to find these papers on the archive where we proved this was possible, and how five years later, we actually did it. Right now it's under-appreciated, but the future AI––that Roko's Basilisk AI–will look back and will give me a little credit for it. Dwarkesh Patel  21:03  Yeah, I was a little interested in this a few years ago. At that time, I looked into how these polygenic risk scores were calculated. Basically, you find the correlation between the phenotype and the alleles that correlate with it. You add up how many copies of these alleles you have, what the correlations are, and you do a weighted sum of that. So that seemed very simple, especially in an era where we have all this machine learning, but it seems like they're getting good predictive results out of this concept. So, what is the delta between how good you can go with all this fancy mathematics versus a simple sum of correlations?Steve Hsu  21:43  You're right that the ultimate models that are used when you've done all the training, and when the dust settles, are straightforward. They’re pretty simple and have an additive structure. Basically, I either assign a nonzero weight to this particular region in the genome, or I don't. Then, I need to know what the weighting is, but then the function is a linear function or additive function of the state of your genome at some subset of positions. The ultimate model that you get is straightforward. Now, if you go back ten years, when we were doing this, there were lots of claims that it was going to be super nonlinear—that it wasn't going to be additive the way I just described it. There were going to be lots of interaction terms between regions. Some biologists are still convinced that's true, even though we already know we have predictors that don't have interactions.The other question, which is more technical, is whether in any small region of your genome, the state of the individual variants is highly correlated because you inherit them in chunks. You need to figure out which one you want to use. You don't want to activate all of them because you might be overcounting. So that's where these L-1 penalization sparse methods force the predictor to be sparse. That is a key step. Otherwise, you might overcount. If you do some simple regression math, you might have 10-10 different variants close by that have roughly the same statistical significance.But, you don't know which one of those tends to be used, and you might be overcounting effects or undercounting effects. So, you end up doing a high-dimensional optimization, where you grudgingly activate a SNP when the signal is strong enough. Once you activate that one, the algorithm has to be smart enough to penalize the other ones nearby and not activate them because you're over counting effects if you do that. There's a little bit of subtlety in it. But, the main point you made is that the ultimate predictors, which are very simple and addictive—sum over effect sizes and time states—work well. That’s related to a deep statement about the additive structure of the genetic architecture of individual differences. In other words, it's weird that the ways that I differ from you are merely just because I have more of something or you have less of something. It’s not like these things are interacting in some incredibly understandable way. That's a deep thing—which is not appreciated that much by biologists yet. But over time, they'll figure out something interesting here.Why hasn’t natural selection already optimized humans?Dwarkesh Patel  24:19  Right. I thought that was super fascinating, and I commented on that on Twitter. What is interesting about that is two things. One is that you have this fascinating evolutionary argument about why that would be the case that you might want to explain. The second is that it makes you wonder if becoming more intelligent is just a matter of turning on certain SNPs. It's not a matter of all this incredible optimization being like solving a sudoku puzzle or anything. If that's the case, then why hasn't the human population already been selected to be maxed out on all these traits if it's just a matter of a bit flip?Steve Hsu  25:00  Okay, so the first issue is why is this genetic architecture so surprisingly simple? Again, we didn't know it would be simple ten years ago. So when I was checking to see whether this was a field that I should go into depending on our capabilities to make progress, we had to study the more general problem of the nonlinear possibilities. But eventually, we realized that most of the variance would probably be captured in an additive way. So, we could narrow down the problem quite a bit. There are evolutionary reasons for this. There’s a famous theorem by Fisher, the father of population genetics (aka. frequentist statistics). Fisher proved something called Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, which says that if you impose some selection pressure on a population, the rate at which that population responds to the selection pressure (lets say it’s the bigger rats that out-compete the smaller rats) then at what rate does the rat population start getting bigger? He showed that it's the additive variants that dominate the rate of evolution. It's easy to understand why if it's a nonlinear mechanism, you need to make the rat bigger. When you sexually reproduce, and that gets chopped apart, you might break the mechanism. Whereas, if each short allele has its own independent effect, you can inherit them without worrying about breaking the mechanisms. It was well known among a tiny theoretical population of biologists that adding variants was the dominant way that populations would respond to selection. That was already known. The other thing is that humans have been through a pretty tight bottleneck, and we're not that different from each other. It's very plausible that if I wanted to edit a human embryo, and make it into a frog, then there are all kinds of subtle nonlinear things I’d have to do. But all those identical nonlinear complicated subsystems are fixed in humans. You have the same system as I do. You have the not human, not frog or ape, version of that region of DNA, and so do I. But the small ways we differ are mostly little additive switches. That's this deep scientific discovery from over the last 5-10 years of work in this area. Now, you were asking about why evolution hasn't completely “optimized” all traits in humans already. I don't know if you’ve ever done deep learning or high-dimensional optimization, but in that high-dimensional space, you're often moving on a slightly-tilted surface. So, you're getting gains, but it's also flat. Even though you scale up your compute or data size by order of magnitude, you don't move that much farther. You get some gains, but you're never really at the global max of anything in these high dimensional spaces. I don't know if that makes sense to you. But it's pretty plausible to me that two things are important here. One is that evolution has not had that much time to optimize humans. The environment that humans live in changed radically in the last 10,000 years. For a while, we didn't have agriculture, and now we have agriculture. Now, we have a swipe left if you want to have sex tonight. The environment didn't stay fixed. So, when you say fully optimized for the environment, what do you mean? The ability to diagonalize matrices might not have been very adaptive 10,000 years ago. It might not even be adaptive now. But anyway, it's a complicated question that one can't reason naively about. “If God wanted us to be 10 feet tall, we'd be 10 feet tall.” Or “if it's better to be smart, my brain would be *this* big or something.” You can't reason naively about stuff like that.Dwarkesh Patel  29:04  I see. Yeah.. Okay. So I guess it would make sense then that for example, with certain health risks, the thing that makes you more likely to get diabetes or heart disease today might be… I don't know what the pleiotropic effect of that could be. But maybe that's not that important one year from now.Steve Hsu  29:17  Let me point out that most of the diseases we care about now—not the rare ones, but the common ones—manifest when you're 50-60 years old. So there was never any evolutionary advantage of being super long-lived. There's even a debate about whether the grandparents being around to help raise the kids lifts the fitness of the family unit.But, most of the time in our evolutionary past, humans just died fairly early. So, many of these diseases would never have been optimized against evolution. But, we see them now because we live under such good conditions, we can regulate people over 80 or 90 years.Dwarkesh Patel  29:57  Regarding the linearity and additivity point, I was going to make the analogy that– and I'm curious if this is valid– but when you're programming, one thing that's good practice is to have all the implementation details in separate function calls or separate programs or something, and then have your main loop of operation just be called different functions like, “Do this, do that”, so that you can easily comment stuff away or change arguments. This seemed very similar to that where by turning these names on and off, you can change what the next offering will be. And, you don't have to worry about actually implementing whatever the underlying mechanism is. Steve Hsu  30:41  Well, what you said is related to what Fisher proved in his theorems. Which is that, if suddenly, it becomes advantageous to have X, (like white fur instead of black fur) or something, it would be best if there were little levers that you could move somebody from black fur to white fur continuously by modifying those switches in an additive way. It turns out that for sexually reproducing species where the DNA gets scrambled up in every generation, it's better to have switches of that kind. The other point related to your software analogy is that there seem to be modular, fairly modular things going on in the genome. When we looked at it, we were the first group to have, initially, 20 primary disease conditions we had decent predictors for. We started looking carefully at just something as trivial as the overlap of my sparsely trained predictor. It turns on and uses *these* features for diabetes, but it uses *these* features for schizophrenia. It’s the stupidest metric, it’s literally just how much overlap or variance accounted for overlap is there between pairs of disease conditions. It's very modest. It's the opposite of what naive biologists would say when they talk about pleiotropy.They're just disjoint! Disjoint regions of your genome that govern certain things. And why not? You have 3 billion base pairs—there's a lot you can do in there. There's a lot of information there. If you need 1000 to control diabetes risk, I estimated you could easily have 1000 roughly independent traits that are just disjoint in their genetic dependencies. So, if you think about D&D,  your strength, decks, wisdom, intelligence, and charisma—those are all disjoint. They're all just independent variables. So it's like a seven-dimensional space that your character lives in. Well, there's enough information in the few million differences between you and me. There's enough for 1000-dimensional space of variation.“Oh, how considerable is your spleen?” My spleen is a little bit smaller, yours is a little bit bigger - that can vary independently of your IQ. Oh, it's a big surprise. The size of your spleen can vary independently of the size of your big toe. If you do information theory, there are about 1000 different parameters, and I can vary independently with the number of variants I have between you and me. Because you understand some information theory, it’s trivial to explain, but try explaining to a biologist, you won't get very far.Dwarkesh Patel  33:27  Yeah, yeah, do the log two of the number of.. is that basically how you do it? Yeah.Steve Hsu  33:33  Okay. That's all it is. I mean, it's in our paper. We look at how many variants typically account for most of the variation for any of these major traits, and then imagine that they're mostly disjoint. Then it’s just all about: how many variants you need to independently vary 1000 traits? Well, a few million differences between you and me are enough. It's very trivial math. Once you understand the base and how to reason about information theory, then it's very trivial. But, it ain’t trivial for theoretical biologists, as far as I can tell.AgingDwarkesh Patel  34:13  But the result is so interesting because I remember reading in The Selfish Gene that, as he (Dawkins) hypothesizes that the reason we could be aging is an antagonistic clash. There's something that makes you healthier when you're young and fertile that makes you unhealthy when you're old. Evolution would have selected for such a trade-off because when you're young and fertile, evolution and your genes care about you. But, if there's enough space in the genome —where these trade-offs are not necessarily necessary—then this could be a bad explanation for aging, or do you think I'm straining the analogy?Steve Hsu  34:49  I love your interviews because the point you're making here is really good. So Dawkins, who is an evolutionary theorist from the old school when they had almost no data—you can imagine how much data they had compared to today—he would tell you a story about a particular gene that maybe has a positive effect when you're young, but it makes you age faster. So, there's a trade-off. We know about things like sickle cell anemia. We know stories about that. No doubt, some stories are true about specific variants in your genome. But that's not the general story. The general story you only discovered in the last five years is that thousands of variants control almost every trait and those variants tend to be disjoint from the ones that control the other trait. They weren't wrong, but they didn't have the big picture.Dwarkesh Patel  35:44  Yeah, I see. So, you had this paper, it had polygenic, health index, general health, and disease risk.. You showed that with ten embryos, you could increase disability-adjusted life years by four, which is a massive increase if you think about it. Like what if you could live four years longer and in a healthy state? Steve Hsu  36:05  Yeah, what's the value of that? What would you pay to buy that for your kid?Dwarkesh Patel  36:08  Yeah. But, going back to the earlier question about the trade-offs and why this hasn't already been selected for,  if you're right and there's no trade-off to do this, just living four years older (even if that's beyond your fertility) just being a grandpa or something seems like an unmitigated good. So why hasn’t this kind of assurance hasn't already been selected for? Steve Hsu  36:35  I’m glad you're asking about these questions because these are things that people are very confused about, even in the field. First of all, let me say that when you have a trait that's controlled by  10,000 variants (eg. height is controlled by order 10,000 variants and probably cognitive ability a little bit more), the square root of 10,000 is 100.  So, if I could come to this little embryo, and I want to give it one extra standard deviation of height, I only need to edit 100. I only need to flip 100 minus variance to plus variance. These are very rough numbers. But, one standard deviation is the square root of “n”. If I flip a coin “n” times, I want a better outcome in terms of the number of ratio heads to tails. I want to increase it by one standard deviation. I only need to flip the square root of “n” heads because if you flip a lot, you will get a narrow distribution that peaks around half, and the width of that distribution is the square root of “n”. Once I tell you, “Hey, your height is controlled by 10,000 variants, and I only need to flip 100 genetic variants to make you one standard deviation for a male,” (that would be three inches tall, two and a half or three inches taller), you suddenly realize, “Wait a minute, there are a lot of variants up for grabs there. If I could flip 500 variants in your genome, I would make you five standard deviations taller, you'd be seven feet tall.”  I didn't even have to do that much work, and there's a lot more variation where that came from. I could have flipped even more because I only flipped 500 out of 10,000, right? So, there's this  quasi-infinite well of variation that evolution or genetic engineers could act on. Again, the early population geneticists who bred corn and animals know this. This is something they explicitly know about because they've done calculations. Interestingly, the human geneticists who are mainly concerned with diseases and stuff, are often unfamiliar with the math that the animal breeders already know. You might be interested to know that the milk you drink comes from heavily genetically-optimized cows bred artificially using almost exactly the same technologies that we use at genomic prediction. But, they're doing it to optimize milk production and stuff like this. So there is a big well of variance. It's a consequence of the trait's poly genicity. On the longevity side of things, it does look like people could “be engineered” to live much longer by flipping the variants that make the risk for diseases that shorten your life. The question is then “Why didn't evolution give us life spans of thousands of years?” People in the Bible used to live for thousands of years. Why don't we? I mean, *chuckles* that probably didn’t happen. But the question is, you have this very high dimensional space, and you have a fitness function. How big is the slope in a particular direction of that fitness function? How much more successful reproductively would Joe caveman have been if he lived to be 150 instead of only, 100 or something? There just hasn't been enough time to explore this super high dimensional space. That's the actual answer. But now, we have the technology, and we're going to f*****g explore it fast. That's the point that the big lightbulb should go off. We’re mapping this space out now. Pretty confident in 10 years or so, with the CRISPR gene editing technologies will be ready for massively multiplexed edits. We'll start navigating in this high-dimensional space as much as we like. So that's the more long-term consequence of the scientific insights.Dwarkesh Patel  40:53  Yeah, that's super interesting. What do you think will be the plateau for a trait of how long you’ll live? With the current data and techniques, you think it could be significantly greater than that?Steve Hsu  41:05  We did a simple calculation—which amazingly gives the correct result. This polygenic predictor that we built (which isn't perfect yet but will improve as we gather more data) is used in selecting embryos today. If you asked, out of a billion people, “What's the best person typically, what would their score be on this index and then how long would they be predicted to live?”’ It's about 120 years. So it's spot on. One in a billion types of person lives to be 120 years old. How much better can you do? Probably a lot better. I don't want to speculate, but other nonlinear effects, things that we're not taking into account will start to play a role at some point. So, it's a little bit hard to estimate what the true limiting factors will be. But one super robust statement, and I'll stand by it, debate any Nobel Laureate in biology who wants to discuss it even,  is that there are many variants available to be selected or edited. There's no question about that. That's been established in animal breeding in plant breeding for a long time now. If you want a chicken that grows to be *this* big, instead of *this* big, you can do it. You can do it if you want a cow that produces 10 times or 100 times more milk than a regular cow. The egg you ate for breakfast this morning, those bio-engineered chickens that lay almost an egg a day… A chicken in the wild lays an egg a month. How the hell did we do that? By genetic engineering. That's how we did it. Dwarkesh Patel  42:51  Yeah. That was through brute artificial selection. No fancy machine learning there.Steve Hsu  42:58  Last ten years, it's gotten sophisticated machine learning genotyping of chickens. Artificial insemination, modeling of the traits using ML last ten years. For cow breeding, it's done by ML. First Mover AdvantageDwarkesh Patel  43:18  I had no idea. That's super interesting. So, you mentioned that you're accumulating data and improving your techniques over time, is there a first mover advantage to a genomic prediction company like this? Or is it whoever has the newest best algorithm for going through the biobank data? Steve Hsu  44:16  That's another super question. For the entrepreneurs in your audience, I would say in the short run, if you ask what the valuation of GPB should be? That's how the venture guys would want me to answer the question. There is a huge first mover advantage because they're important in the channel relationships between us and the clinics. Nobody will be able to get in there very easily when they come later because we're developing trust and an extensive track record with clinics worldwide—and we're well-known. So could 23andme or some company with a huge amount of data—if they were to get better AI/ML people working on this—blow us away a little bit and build better predictors because they have much more data than we do? Possibly, yes. Now, we have had core expertise in doing this work for years that we're just good at it. Even though we don't have as much data as 23andme, our predictors might still be better than theirs. I'm out there all the time, working with biobanks all around the world. I don't want to say all the names, but other countries are trying to get my hands on as much data as possible.But, there may not be a lasting advantage beyond the actual business channel connections to that particular market. It may not be a defensible, purely scientific moat around the company. We have patents on specific technologies about how to do the genotyping or error correction on the embryo, DNA, and stuff like this. We do have patents on stuff like that. But this general idea of who will best predict human traits from DNA? It's unclear who's going to be the winner in that race. Maybe it'll be the Chinese government in 50 years? Who knows?Dwarkesh Patel  46:13  Yeah, that's interesting. If you think about a company Google, theoretically, it's possible that you could come up with a better algorithm than PageRank and beat them. But it seems like the engineer at Google is going to come up with whatever edge case or whatever improvement is possible.Steve Hsu  46:28  That's exactly what I would say. PageRank is deprecated by now. But, even if somebody else comes up with a somewhat better algorithm if they have a little bit more data, if you have a team doing this for a long time and you're focused and good, it's still tough to beat you, especially if you have a lead in the market.Dwarkesh Patel  46:50  So, are you guys doing the actual biopsy? Or is it just that they upload the genome, and you're the one processing just giving recommendations? Is it an API call, basically?Steve Hsu  47:03  It's great, I love your question. It is totally standard. Every good IVF clinic in the world regularly takes embryo biopsies. So that's standard. There’s a lab tech doing that. Okay. Then, they take the little sample, put it on ice, and ship it. The DNA as a molecule is exceptionally robust and stable. My other startup solves crimes that are 100 years old from DNA that we get from some semen stain on some rape victim, serial killer victims bra strap, we've done stuff that.Dwarkesh Patel  47:41  Jack the Ripper, when are we going to solve that mystery?Steve Hsu  47:44  If they can give me samples, we can get into that. For example, we just learned that you could recover DNA pretty well if someone licks a stamp and puts on their correspondence. If you can do Neanderthals, you can do a lot to solve crimes. In the IVF workflow, our lab, which is in New Jersey, can service every clinic in the world because they take the biopsy, put it in a standard shipping container, and send it to us. We’re actually genotyping DNA in our lab, but we've trained a few of the bigger  clinics to do the genotyping on their site. At that point, they upload some data into the cloud and then they get back some stuff from our platform. And at that point it's going to be the whole world, every human who wants their kid to be healthy and get the best they can– that data is going to come up to us, and the report is going to come back down to their IVF physician. Dwarkesh Patel  48:46  Which is great if you think that there's a potential that this technology might get regulated in some way, you could go to Mexico or something, have them upload the genome (you don't care what they upload it from), and then get the recommendations there. Steve Hsu  49:05  I think we’re going to evolve to a point where we are going to be out of the wet part of this business, and only in the cloud and bit part of this business. No matter where it is, the clinics are going to have a sequencer, which is *this* big, and their tech is going to quickly upload and retrieve the report for the physician three seconds later. Then, the parents are going to look at it on their phones or whatever. We’re basically there with some clinics. It’s going to be tough to regulate because it’s just this. You have the bits and you’re in some repressive, terrible country that doesn’t allow you to select for some special traits that people are nervous about, but you can upload it to some vendor that’s in Singapore or some free country, and they give you the report back. Doesn’t have to be us, we don’t do the edgy stuff. We only do the health-related stuff right now. But, if you want to know how tall this embryo is going to be…I’ll tell you a mind-blower! When you do face recognition in AI, you're mapping someone's face into a parameter space on the order of hundreds of parameters, each of those parameters is super heritable. In other words, if I take two twins and photograph them, and the algorithm gives me the value of that parameter for twin one and two, they're very close. That's why I can't tell the two twins apart, and face recognition can ultimately tell them apart if it’s really good system. But you can conclude that almost all these parameters are identical for those twins. So it's highly heritable. We're going to get to a point soon where I can do the inverse problem where I have your DNA  and I predict each of those parameters in the face recognition algorithm and then reconstruct the face. If I say that when this embryo will be 16, that is what she will look like. When she's 32, this is what she's going to look like. I'll be able to do that, for sure. It's only an AI/ML problem right now. But basic biology is clearly going to work. So then you're going to be able to say, “Here's a report. Embryo four is so cute.” Before, we didn't know we wouldn't do that, but it will be possible. Dwarkesh Patel  51:37  Before we get married, you'll want to see what their genotype implies about their faces' longevity. It's interesting that you hear stories about these cartel leaders who will get plastic surgery or something to evade the law, you could have a check where you look at a lab and see if it matches the face you would have had five years ago when they caught you on tape.Steve Hsu  52:02  This is a little bit back to old-school Gattaca, but you don't even need the face! You can just take a few molecules of skin cells and phenotype them and know exactly who they are. I've had conversations with these spooky Intel folks. They're very interested in, “Oh, if some Russian diplomat comes in, and we think he's a spy, but he's with the embassy, and he has a coffee with me, and I save the cup and send it to my buddy at Langley, can we figure out who this guy is? And that he has a daughter who's going to Chote? Can do all that now.Dwarkesh Patel  52:49  If that's true, then in the future, world leaders will not want to eat anything or drink. They'll be wearing a hazmat suit to make sure they don't lose a hair follicle.Steve Hsu  53:04  The next time Pelosi goes, she will be in a spacesuit if she cares. Or the other thing is, they're going to give it. They're just going to be, “Yeah, my DNA is everywhere. If I'm a public figure, I can't track my DNA. It's all over.”Dwarkesh Patel  53:17  But the thing is, there's so much speculation that Putin might have cancer or something. If we have his DNA, we can see his probability of having cancer at age 70, or whatever he is, is 85%. So yeah, that’d be a very verified rumor. That would be interesting. Steve Hsu  53:33  I don't think that would be very definitive. I don't think we'll reach that point where you can say that Putin has cancer because of his DNA—which I could have known when he was an embryo. I don't think it's going to reach that level. But, we could say he is at high risk for a type of cancer. Genomics in datingDwarkesh Patel  53:49  In 50 or 100 years, if the majority of the population is doing this, and if the highly heritable diseases get pruned out of the population, does that mean we'll only be left with lifestyle diseases? So, you won't get breast cancer anymore, but you will still get fat or lung cancer from smoking?Steve Hsu  54:18  It's hard to discuss the asymptotic limit of what will happen here. I'm not very confident about making predictions like that. It could get to the point where everybody who's rich or has been through this stuff for a while, (especially if we get the editing working) is super low risk for all the top 20 killer diseases that have the most life expectancy impact. Maybe those people live to be 300 years old naturally. I don't think that's excluded at all. So, that's within the realm of possibility. But it's going to happen for a few lucky people like Elon Musk before it happens for shlubs like you and me. There are going to be very angry inequality protesters about the Trump grandchildren, who, models predict will live to be 200 years old. People are not going to be happy about that.Dwarkesh Patel  55:23  So interesting. So, one way to think about these different embryos is if you're producing multiple embryos, and you get to select from one of them, each of them has a call option, right? Therefore, you probably want to optimize for volatility as much, or if not more than just the expected value of the trait. So, I'm wondering if there are mechanisms where you can  increase the volatility in meiosis or some other process. You just got a higher variance, and you can select from the tail better.Steve Hsu  55:55  Well, I'll tell you something related, which is quite amusing. So I talked with some pretty senior people at the company that owns all the dating apps. So you can look up what company this is, but they own Tinder and Match. They’re kind of interested in perhaps including a special feature where you upload your genome instead of Tinder Gold / Premium.  And when you match- you can talk about how well you match the other person based on your genome. One person told me something shocking. Guys lie about their height on these apps. Dwarkesh Patel  56:41  I’m shocked, truly shocked hahaha. Steve Hsu  56:45  Suppose you could have a DNA-verified height. It would prevent gross distortions if someone claims they're 6’2 and they’re 5’9. The DNA could say that's unlikely. But no, the application to what you were discussing is more like, “Let's suppose that we're selecting on intelligence or something. Let's suppose that the regions where your girlfriend has all the plus stuff are complementary to the regions where you have your plus stuff. So, we could model that and say,  because of the complementarity structure of your genome in the regions that affect intelligence, you're very likely to have some super intelligent kids way above your, the mean of your you and your girlfriend's values. So, you could say things like it being better for you to marry that girl than another. As long as you go through embryo selection, we can throw out the bad outliers. That's all that's technically feasible. It's true that one of the earliest patent applications, they'll deny it now. What's her name? Gosh, the CEO of 23andme…Wojcicki, yeah. She'll deny it now. But, if you look in the patent database, one of the very earliest patents that 23andme filed when they were still a tiny startup was about precisely this: Advising parents about mating and how their kids would turn out and stuff like this. We don't even go that far in GP, we don't even talk about stuff like that, but they were thinking about it when they founded 23andme.Dwarkesh Patel  58:38  That is unbelievably interesting. By the way, this just occurred to me—it's supposed to be highly heritable, especially people in Asian countries, who have the experience of having grandparents that are much shorter than us, and then parents that are shorter than us, which suggests that  the environment has a big part to play in it malnutrition or something. So how do you square that our parents are often shorter than us with the idea that height is supposed to be super heritable.Steve Hsu  59:09  Another great observation. So the correct scientific statement is that we can predict height for people who will be born and raised in a favorable environment. In other words, if you live close to a McDonald's and you're able to afford all the food you want, then the height phenotype becomes super heritable because the environmental variation doesn't matter very much. But, you and I both know that people are much smaller if we return to where our ancestors came from, and also, if you look at how much food, calories, protein, and calcium they eat, it's different from what I ate and what you ate growing up. So we're never saying the environmental effects are zero. We're saying that for people raised in a particularly favorable environment, maybe the genes are capped on what can be achieved, and we can predict that. In fact, we have data from Asia, where you can see much bigger environmental effects. Age affects older people, for fixed polygenic scores on the trait are much shorter than younger people.Ancestral populationsDwarkesh Patel  1:00:31  Oh, okay. Interesting. That raises that next question I was about to ask: how applicable are these scores across different ancestral populations?Steve Hsu  1:00:44  Huge problem is that most of the data is from Europeans. What happens is that if you train a predictor in this ancestry group and go to a more distant ancestry group, there's a fall-off in the prediction quality. Again, this is a frontier question, so we don't know the answer for sure. But many people believe that there's a particular correlational structure in each population, where if I know the state of this SNP, I can predict the state of these neighboring SNPs. That is a product of that group's mating patterns and ancestry. Sometimes, the predictor, which is just using statistical power to figure things out, will grab one of these SNPs as a tag for the truly causal SNP in there. It doesn't know which one is genuinely causal, it is just grabbing a tag, but the tagging quality falls off if you go to another population (eg. This was a very good tag for the truly causal SNP in the British population. But it's not so good a tag in the South Asian population for the truly causal SNP, which we hypothesize is the same). It's the same underlying genetic architecture in these different ancestry groups. We don't know if that's a hypothesis. But even so, the tagging quality falls off. So my group spent a lot of our time looking at the performance of predictor training population A, and on distant population B, and modeling it trying to figure out trying to test hypotheses as to whether it's just the tagging decay that’s responsible for most of the faults. So all of this is an area of active investigation. It'll probably be solved in five years. The first big biobanks that are non-European are coming online. We're going to solve it in a number of years.Dwarkesh Patel  1:02:38  Oh, what does the solution look like?  Unless you can identify the causal mechanism by which each SNP is having an effect, how can you know that something is a tag or whether it's the actual underlying switch?Steve Hsu  1:02:54  The nature of reality will determine how this is going to go. So we don't truly  know if the  innate underlying biology is true. This is an amazing thing. People argue about human biodiversity and all this stuff, and we don't even know whether these specific mechanisms that predispose you to be tall or having heart disease are the same  in these different ancestry groups. We assume that it is, but we don't know that. As we get further away to Neanderthals or Homo Erectus, you might see that they have a slightly different architecture than we do. But let's assume that the causal structure is the same for South Asians and British people. Then it's a matter of improving the tags. How do I know if I don't know which one is causal? What do I mean by improving the tags? This is a machine learning problem. If there's a SNP, which is always coming up as very significant when I use it across multiple ancestry groups, maybe that one's casual. As I vary the tagging correlations in the neighborhood of that SNP, I always find that that one is the intersection of all these different sets, making me think that one's going to be causal. That's a process we're engaged in now—trying to do that. Again, it's just a machine learning problem. But we need data. That's the main issue.Dwarkesh Patel  1:04:32  I was hoping that wouldn't be possible, because one way we might go about this research is that it itself becomes taboo or causes other sorts of bad social consequences if you can definitively show that on certain traits, there are differences between ancestral populations, right? So, I was hoping that maybe there was an evasion button where we can't say because they're just tags and the tags might be different between different ancestral populations. But with machine learning, we’ll know.Steve Hsu  1:04:59  That's the situation we're in now, where you have to do some fancy analysis if you want to claim that Italians have lower height potential than Nordics—which is possible. There's been a ton of research about this because there are signals of selection. The alleles, which are activated in height predictors, look like they've been under some selection between North and South Europe over the last 5000 years for whatever reason. But, this is a thing debated by people who study molecular evolution. But suppose it's true, okay? That would mean that when we finally get to the bottom of it, we find all the causal loci for height, and the average value for the Italians is lower than that for those living in Stockholm. That might be true. People don't get that excited? They get a little bit excited about height. But they would get really excited if this were true for some other traits, right?Suppose the causal variants affecting your level of extraversion are systematic, that the average value of those weighed the weighted average of those states is different in Japan versus Sicily. People might freak out over that. I'm supposed to say that's obviously not true. How could it possibly be true? There hasn't been enough evolutionary time for those differences to arise. After all, it's not possible that despite what looks to be the case for height over the last 5000 years in Europe, no other traits could have been differentially selected for over the last 5000 years. That's the dangerous thing. Few people understand this field well enough to understand what you and I just discussed and are so alarmed by it that they're just trying to suppress everything. Most of them don't follow it at this technical level that you and I are just discussing. So, they're somewhat instinctively negative about it, but they don't understand it very well.Dwarkesh Patel  1:07:19  That's good to hear. You see this pattern that by the time that somebody might want to regulate or in some way interfere with some technology or some information, it already has achieved wide adoption. You could argue that that's the case with crypto today. But if it's true that a bunch of IVF clinics worldwide are using these scores to do selection and other things, by the time people realize the implications of this data for other kinds of social questions, this has already been an existing consumer technology.Is this eugenics?Steve Hsu  1:07:58  That's true, and the main outcry will be if it turns out that there are massive gains to be had, and only the billionaires are getting them. But that might have the consequence of causing countries to make this free part of their national health care system. So Denmark and Israel pay for IVF. For infertile couples, it's part of their national health care system. They're pretty aggressive about genetic testing. In Denmark, one in 10 babies are born through IVF. It's not clear how it will go. But we're in for some fun times. There's no doubt about that.Dwarkesh Patel  1:08:45  Well, one way you could go is that some countries decided to ban it altogether. And another way it could go is if countries decided to give everybody free access to it. If you had to choose between the two,  you would want to go for the second one. Which would be the hope. Maybe only those two are compatible with people's moral intuitions about this stuff. Steve Hsu  1:09:10  It’s very funny because most wokist people today hate this stuff. But, most progressives like Margaret Sanger, or anybody who was the progressive intellectual forebears of today's wokist, in the early 20th century, were all that we would call today in Genesis because they were like, “Thanks to Darwin, we now know how this all works. We should take steps to keep society healthy and (not in a negative way where we kill people we don't like, but we should help society do healthy things when they reproduce, and have healthy kids).” Now, this whole thing has just been flipped over among progressives. Dwarkesh Patel  1:09:52  Even in India, less than 50 years ago, Indira Gandhi, she's on the left side of India's political spectrum. She was infamous for putting on these forced sterilization programs. Somebody made an interesting comment about this where they were asked, “Oh, is it true that history always tilts towards progressives? And if so, isn't everybody else doomed? Aren't their views doomed?”The person made a fascinating point: whatever we consider left at the time tends to be winning. But what is left has changed a lot over time, right? In the early 20th century, prohibition was a left cause. It was a progressive cause, and that changed, and now the opposite is the left cause. But now, legalizing pot is progressive. Exactly. So, if Conquest’s second law is true, and everything tilts leftover time, just change what is left is, right? That's the solution. Steve Hsu  1:10:59  No one can demand that any of these woke guys be intellectually self-consistent, or even say the same things from one year to another? But one could wonder what they think about these literally Communist Chinese. They’re recycling huge parts of their GDP to help the poor and the southern stuff. Medicine is free, education is free, right? They're clearly socialists, and literally communists. But in Chinese, the Chinese characters for eugenics is a positive thing. It means healthy production. But more or less, the whole viewpoint on all this stuff is 180 degrees off in East Asia compared to here, and even among the literal communists—so go figure.Dwarkesh Patel  1:11:55  Yeah, very based. So let's talk about one of the traits that people might be interested in potentially selecting for: intelligence. What is the potential for us to acquire the data to correlate the genotype with intelligence?Steve Hsu  1:12:15  Well, that's the most personally frustrating aspect of all of this stuff. If you asked me ten years ago when I started doing this stuff what were we going to get, everything was gone. On the optimistic side of what I would have predicted, so everything's good. Didn't turn out to be interactively nonlinear, or it didn't turn out to be interactively pleiotropic. All these good things, —which nobody could have known a priori how they would work—turned out to be good for gene engineers of the 21st century. The one frustrating thing is because of crazy wokeism, and fear of crazy wokists, the most interesting phenotype of all is lagging b

god united states america ceo american new york university spotify founders new york city donald trump google english europe china kids bible nfl japan americans mexico british west professor ai tech nature chinese gold european ohio russian german romans mit evolution medicine elon musk new jersey dna italian san diego north greek indian asian harvard humanity mcdonald tinder loved vladimir putin ufc helps match world war ii singapore stanford ucla nebraska jeff bezos taiwan guys denmark intelligence south korea stepping albert einstein olympians long island consumer stockholm simpsons intel fields consistent nancy pelosi ohio state gym artificial ea michigan state university iq selection boeing gp gdp nobel prize api d d ivf mckinsey cs jiu jitsu estonia pasadena aws ripper ml conquest scandinavian south asian goldman crispr ancestral crimson hemingway sicily asana gosh neanderthals goldilocks ftx east asia us marines neumann genomics langley conformity sri lankan big five advising imo embryos caltech dawkins westwood theoretical suitable sats mathematicians nobel laureates gpt ai ml snp tradeoffs natural selection eloy nordics gattaca iit pua l1 richard feynman lsat margaret sanger h 1b south asians secretaries east german feynman manifold olympiads theoretical physics hsu multiplex roko hour fitness piketty indira gandhi snps conceptually applied physics wonderlic francis crick pagerank selfish gene communist chinese morlocks homo erectus ashkenazi jews uk biobank youa wojcicki gpb hahahah tay sachs fundamental theorem scott aaronson chote gregory clark palaestra gwern
X-Boyz (An X-Men TAS Podcast)
Ep 105: Captive Hearts

X-Boyz (An X-Men TAS Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 56:33


Morlocks? Mo problems. Join the X-Boyz as they get subterranean with Episode 5 of X-Men: The Animated Series. It seems everybody's got a crush on Cyclops (especially Henry). From a picture that inspired a thousand memes to Storm throwing down in a lightsaber battle. THIS is the episode where the pod gets good. For real. Really hope you made it this far! Look at us go! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/xboyzpod/support

The Web Heads Podcast
Mutant Massacre, Vol. 2, Ep. 23

The Web Heads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 76:17


It's precisely what the title says, a Mutant Massacre! The Marauders show up and start the deadly attack on the team of X-Factor and the sewer-dwelling Morlocks. One by one, mutants fall by the waist, and no one can help. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/web-heads/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/web-heads/support

Random Encounter
Pathfinder 2e Abomination Vaults: Episode 024 - Violent Diplomacy

Random Encounter

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 83:23


The discovery of the Water Monster ends in predicable and swift violence. But will this be the end of the Morlocks requirements, or is this just going to end up in some seriously bad diplomancy. We use the following tools as part of the process of making this video: Syrinscape: https://syrinscape.com FoundryVTT: https://foundryvtt.com Discord: https://discord.com OBS: https://obsproject.com Placeit: https://www.placeit.net Subtitles: by Becki at Random Encounter Abominations Vaults and the Pathfinder 2e roleplaying system are properties of Paizo. Random Encounter: Abomination Vaults uses trademarks and/or copyrights owned by Paizo Inc., used under Paizo's Community Use Policy (paizo.com/communityuse). We are expressly prohibited from charging you to use or access this content. Random Encounter is not published, endorsed, or specifically approved by Paizo. For more information about Paizo Inc. and Paizo products, visit paizo.com.

On the Way Down
OTWD #39 - Plant moms

On the Way Down

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 60:42


In this episode: Dave Chappelle being attacked on stage, "normalized violence", The Time Machine, Elois and Morlocks, nowadays-ass people, Mothers day, strawberry waffles, ice cream vs whipped cream, dog moms and plant moms, going to a cheesy R&B concert in Las Vegas, etc. Everything you need: linktr.ee/OTWD

The QuackCast
QUACKCAST 582 - Time travel

The QuackCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 52:25


Let's go forward in time to the past so we can get back to the future and kill our grandfather and be our own ancestor while we step on a bug and change the course of evolution 200 million years in the future and doom the Morlocks to a date with Doctor Who, while Bill and Ted drive a Delorean in the Old West and save Fry's dog as it waits out the front of the Pizza place… Time travel is fun to talk about, but it's easy to mess up because paradoxes in plots pop up all over the place as timelines intersect and cross over and over, getting tangled and logically prevent events that have already happened from happening! Here we chat about some of that as well as our fave time travel stories, like Dr Who, Bill and Ted, The Tomorrow People, Playing Beati Bow, Back to the Future, The Time Machine, A Connecticut Yankee in the Court of King Arthur, Army of Darkness, Outlander etc. Examples abound! Time travel stories can allow us as an audience to visit a distant time with ourselves looking at the future or past through the eyes of the time traveller, or their naive helper like Marty from Back to the Future or one of Dr Who's companions. They can give us outlandish adventures or bizarre and complex mysteries that make the most of the time paradoxes. Time travel is fantasy fiction for us because we can only go forwards at the same rate… but it exists in physics as a logical theory and paradoxes can be overcome in specific ways, so it's a possibility, just one that no one can work out how to usefully achieve. Which is why we have stories! So what are YOUR fave time travel stories and why? This week Gunwallace has given us something different! Rat Test Blues - Gunwallace doing his own thing here! The dangers and worries of CoVid-19 are universal, and New Zealand is no exception. Here Mr Gunwallace gives voice to his and all our apprehensions when faced with a malady when there's a pandemic about… “Do I have Covid or just a cold?” Only the Rapid Antigen Test can say for sure. Awesome blues number, that guitar roars and sings and Gunwallace's vocals are perfect. Topics and shownotes Links Featured comic: Sad W - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/news/2022/may/03/featured-comic-sad-w/ Special thanks to: Gunwallace - http://www.virtuallycomics.com Tantz Aerine - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Tantz_Aerine/ Ozoneocean - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/ozoneocean Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/ PitFace - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/PIT_FACE/ Banes - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/Banes/ Kawaiidaigakusei - https://www.theduckwebcomics.com/user/kawaiidaigakusei/ VIDEO exclusive! Become a subscriber on the $5 level and up to see our weekly Patreon video and get our advertising perks! - https://www.patreon.com/DrunkDuck Even at $1 you get your name with a link on the front page and a mention in the weekend newsposts! Join us on Discord - https://discordapp.com/invite/7NpJ8GS

The Bottlemen
Carbon, Damn Carbon, and Statistics ft. Jess Green

The Bottlemen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 57:36


Jess Green returns to discuss Canada's new budget with Dan and Riley, with a special focus on the climate plans. We're taking the carbon, and we're putting it underground, folks! Down below the planet's crust it will surely only bother Morlocks, and we can continue living our lives in relative ease. Also, check out our Patreon, which is at www.patreon.com/dabottlemen 

Free & Easy
Free & Easy - Episode 123

Free & Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 67:17


Beware ..... O.T.R. present ((( "FREE & EASY" ))) Live Radio Show on Dab+ Le Havre FRANCE , Sunday the 17th - April 2022 - playlist by Wylcliff ( Patryck Albert ) : Procol Harum , Amplifier Heads , spot , Peppermint Kicks , spot , Miss Georgia Peach , spot-jingle , Mad Mojo Jett , Vibravoid , J.Prozac , spot , Cosmic Psychos , Crimson Shadows , spot , Screaming Trees , Yard Trauma , Cosmonautes , Rock E. Rollins , Amplifier Heads , Outta Place , spot , Morlocks , Herman Broods , ..... Rock on !

Faut qu’on parle !
Rencontre avec Jean Luc Jousse de Jostone Traffic

Faut qu’on parle !

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 20:30


Rock&Folk Radio a rencontré Jean Luc Jousse à l'occasion des 30 ans de Jostone Traffic ! 30 ans faire tourner les groupes les plus rock'n'roll comme le Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, les Bellrays ou plus récemment The Bobby Lees. La soirée des 30 ans se passe au Cabaret Sauvage le 29 avril avec The Flamin' Groovies, The Morlocks et 9 Pound Hammer. Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

Previously On X-Men
X-Men: The Animated Series "Out of the Past"

Previously On X-Men

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 46:54


Season 3 begins with the return of the Morlocks, plus someone from Wolverine's past!

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 16 + Epilogue - After the Story - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 37:52


A Reading of Chapter 16 and the Epilogue of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 14 and Chapter 15 - The Further Vision and The Time Traveller's Return - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 43:56


A Reading of Chapter 14 and Chapter 15 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 13 - The Trap of the White Sphinx - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 30:50


A Reading of Chapter 13 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Wish It Was The 90s
X-Men: TAS | Episode 2: Grunts, Growls and Snarls

Wish It Was The 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 86:48


Magneto ponders whether the Prof will have a toupee, we meet the Morlocks, Colossus, and Juggernaut, and head on a family fun holiday to Genosha. Sabretooth gives Meg one of the greatest send-offs in television history. We also discover that Pat does a perfect impersonation of Sabretooth's growl and discuss Meg's smelling powers: Deadly Reunions Captive Hearts Cold Vengeance Slave Island The Unstoppable Juggernaut Episode #3 on April 13th for those watching along: The Cure Come the Apocalypse Days of Future Past I Days of Future Past II The Final Decision

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 12 - In the Darkness - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 40:55


A Reading of Chapter 12 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 11 - The Palace of Green Porcelain - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 40:55


A Reading of Chapter 11 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 10 - When Night Came - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 44:51


A Reading of Chapter 10 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 9 - The Morlocks - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 41:52


A Reading of Chapter 9 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

X-Men: The Audio Drama
Episode 6: The Morlocks

X-Men: The Audio Drama

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 39:03


Angel has gone missing! Beast arrives at Xavier's School to ask the X-Men to help recover him. But with Wolverine still in Japan, and a new uncertain teammate, can they pull it off? New X-Men theme cover by Johnathan McKinney: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Kb_E... Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scytheraudio Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65065... Twitter: @scytherpodcasts

Screw It, We're Just Gonna Talk About Spider-Man
Mutants and Mailbags #19 - X-Men 167-170

Screw It, We're Just Gonna Talk About Spider-Man

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 61:39


Professor Xavier is a jerk, says Kitty Pryde and X-Nation agrees, or at least the Milksops agree. We are into the beautiful Paul Smith epoch of the Claremont era of the X-books and things are cooking. We've got the final showdown with the Brood as the X-Men meet the New Mutants, Kitty (once again) proving herself to be worth of X-man status, and then a very cool and fun adventure in the sewers as the X-Men meet the Morlocks. The Milksops love these issues, and we can't believe how far we've come! We're almost up to the Secret Wars! Plus we get a great email from a fellow alumnus of our high scool, where the mascot was improbably a giant hat. -- SHOW INFORMATION Twitter: @ScrewItComics Instagram: @ScrewItComics Email: ScrewItComics@gmail.com Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Subscribe: Spotify

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 8 - Explanation - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 60:46


A Reading of Chapter 8 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast
Beast Voice Actor George Buza Profile, X-Men The Animated Series S3E1 Thru S3E2 Review and Moon Knight Preparation (A Marvel Comic Universe Podcast) LoS416

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 92:55


The Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Michelle, Agent Chris, Consultant Anthony, and Producer of the show Director SP discuss the 1992 Marvel Entertainment Group X-Men The Animated Series season three episodes “Out of the Past: Part 1” and “Out of the Past: Part 2.” Anthony Sytko from Capes On The Couch podcast joins us to give some extensive background into the Marvel Moon Knight comic book character. The Team debriefs you on National Mario Day, a profile on X-Men The Animated Series Dr. Hank McCoy voice actor George Buza, a Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Previously On in honor of X-Men The Animated Series, episode synopses, additional Wolverine backstory and former lover Lady Deathstrike, Yuriko's blame and motivations, Lady Deathstrike's Disney World merchandizing and augmented phalanges, the X-Men The Animated Series basketball Top Gun volleyball-like shirtless scene, the episode animation anomalies, the Soul Drinker monster, the lesson of the episode, the Reavers in the series, the misuse of the Morlocks, and Wolverine's Adamantium Infusion scene. Stay tuned after the credits for a few minutes of Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. bonus audio.   THIS TIME ON LEGENDS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.:   Marvel Entertainment's X-Men The Animated Series As Shown On Disney+ Discuss the 1992 X-Men Animated Series season 3 episodes 1-2 Background of Dr. Hank McCoy “Beast” Voice Actor George Buza Special Moon Knight Segment Anthony Sytko from Capes On The Couch podcast gives detailed background of Moon Knight   X-MEN THE ANIMATED SERIES S3E1 – S3E2 [5:54]   X-Men The Animated Series Voice Actor George Buza (Beast / Dr. Hank McCoy)   IMDB Credits:  166 Acting credits starting in 1975 Film X-Men (2000) - Trucker A Christmas Horror Story (2015) - Santa Claus / Norman Television Star Wars: Droids (1985) - (voice) Star Wars: Ewoks (1985) - Chief Chirpa (voice) Babar (1989) - Additional voices Maniac Mansion (1990-1993) - Turner Edison X-Men Animated Series (1992-1997) - Beast / Dr. Henry 'Hank' McCoy (voice) Tales from the Cryptkeeper (1993-1994) - William / Mr. Armstrong (voice) Spider-Man (1995) - Beast (voice) The Magic School Bus (1995) - Switch Operator The Neverending Story (1995-1996) - Ogre / East Wind  The Adventures of Sinbad (1996-1998) Honey, I Shrunk the Kids: The TV Show (1998-2000) Beyblade (2001-2005) - Grandpa Granger (voice, English Dub) Franny's Feet (2004-2005) - Grandpa (voice) Video games X-Men: Children of the Atom (1994) - Announcer / Colossus / Juggernaut / Omega Red / Magneto Marvel vs. Capcom 2: New Age of Heroes (2000) - Colossus X-Men: Mutant Academy 2 (2001) - Beast Starlink: Battle for Atlas (2018) - Kharl Zeon Background Younger Days Grew up in Cleveland in the 1950s.  Went to an all boys school.Got in a class play at the all girls school. Mr. Bumble in Oliver; learned to like acting  Read comic books - his mother threw out his comics and baseball cards - still a sore spot for him. Fan of Star Wars.  Getting into voice acting  Great timing - in Toronto, Canada when animation business started to grow Major break: Chief Chirpa from Star Wars: Ewoks, the 1985 animated show. He was able to go from one guest gig to another  X-Men: The Animated Series Projected didn't have the title - had Project X; he saw he was reading for a character called Beast and put it together For most shows, recorded individually. For X-Men, cast recorded together as much as possible  X-Men didn't gear to small kids; like doing an adult series He didn't need to do research because  scripts were tight and concise and rich English major; some references were familiar; some were made up by the writers Favorite - Beauty and the Beast; all about sacrificing his feelings to avoid pain for Carly Playing Beast taught him about control.  Was a big kid; could take out a kid; did once, faced the consequences Bullied as a kid; he became the one who told the jokes Beast used peace over violence; violence only when necessary X-Men film He got a call from his agent At the audition, someone recognized him as the voice of Beast Singer was at the table and said that they were grateful for X-Men the Animated Series because w/o show, probably no X-Men movie Got hired to play the Trucker on the spot 5 days of work with Anna Paquine and Hugh Jackman Impact of the show He's not on social media Had no idea of the impact the show had until he started doing conventions in 2019 Understand if you felt disenfranchised then the show would resonate Sources (https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0125579/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t2#actor) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Buza)  Interview: Who Did That Voice Episode #90 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDvrsHbzO84)  Interview with George Buza (Beast, X-Men Animated Series) - The Nerd Lys https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8PJuEPzlvs  X-Men the Animated Series: Reunited (Cast Reunion) White Bear PR https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5k1a26SWBJM&t=1242s                                   PREVIOUSLY ON LEGENDS OF S.H.I.E.L.D…. [17:19]   X-Men The Animated Series Season Three Episodes 1-2 Premiered on “Fox Kids” (Episode Order As Shown On Disney+, Premiere Dates As Shown On Fox) S3E1 “Out of the Past: Part 1” Saturday July 29th, 1994 S3E2 “Out of the Past: Part 2” Saturday August 5th, 1994 Produced By: Will Meugniot Larry Houston             X-Men The Animated Series Main Cast Cedric Smith                            ...         Professor X / Charles Xavier 117 Credits, best known for X-Men Norm Spencer                          ...         Cyclops / Scott Summers  31 Credits, best known for X-Men Catherine Disher                      ...         Jean Grey / Phoenix 122 Credits, best known for X-Men Alison Sealy-Smith                  ...         Storm / Ororo Munroe 72 Credits, best known for X-Men Iona Morris                              ...         Storm / Ororo Munroe 101 Credits Star Trek TOS (Little Girl) Claudian Grant on Robotech 2xStar Trek: Voyager Lenore Zann                             ...         Rogue 110 Credits, best known for X-Men Cal Dodd                                  ...         Wolverine / Logan 34 Credits, best known for X-Men Alyson Court                            ...         Jubilee / Jubilation Lee 100 Credits, best known for X-Men George Buza                            ...         Beast / Dr. Henry 'Hank' McCoy  163 Credits, best known for X-Men Chris Potter                             ...         Gambit / Remy LeBeau 58 Credits The Pacifier Heartland  Don Francks                           ...         Sabretooth / Graydon Creed Sr.  191 Credits Johnny Mnemonic Heavy Metal Brett Halsey                             ...         Bolivar Trask 154 Credits Barry Flatman                          ...         Henry Peter Gyrich (works with Trask) David Hemblen             ...         Magneto / Erik Magnus Lehnsherr Lawrence Bayne                       ...         Cable / Nathan Dayspring-Summers 127 Credits Randall Carpenter        (She)    ...         Mystique / Raven Darkholme (voice) 13 Credits Lally Cadeau                             ...         Dr. Moira MacTaggert  Stephen Ouimette                    ...         Angel / Warren Worthington III  John Colicos                            ...         Apocalypse / En Sabah Nur Rick Bennett                            ...         Colossus / Piotr Rasputin / Juggernaut / Cain Marko (voice) Philip Akin                               ...         Bishop (voice) (as Phil Aiken) Marc Strange                           ...         Forge (voice) Chris Britton                            ...         Mr. Sinister / Nathaniel Essex  Ron Rubin                                ...         Morph Maurice Dean Wint                   ...         Shadow King Robert Cait                              ...         Colossus / Piotr Rasputin Tara Strong                             ...         Illyana Rasputin  Robert Calt                                ...         Blob / Frederick Dukes Rod Coneybeare                        ...         Avalanche Jennifer Dale                             ...         Mystique / Raven Darkholme  Graham Haley                            ...         Pyro / St. John Allerdyce Roscoe Handford                        ...         Ms. Marvel / Carol Danvers  Robert Bockstael                        ...         Sauron / Dr. Karl Lykos Peter Wildman                           ...         Mojo Rod Wilson                                ...         Longshot John Blackwood                         ...         Hairbag Dan Hennessey                          ...         Ruckus Peter McCowatt                          ...         Amphibius Megan Smith-Harris                    ...         Vertigo / Shanna the She-Devil Rod Wilson                                ...         Gorgeous George   MOON KNIGHT BACKGROUND [45:48]   By Anthony Sytko from Capes On The Couch podcast   https://capesonthecouch.com/    OUTRO AND BONUS AUDIO [1:21:23]   We would love to hear back from you! Call the voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871.                    Join Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. next time as the Agents discuss the 1992 X-Men The Animated Series season 3 episodes 3-7 The Phoenix Saga (As Shown On Disney+). You can listen in live when we record Thursday Evenings at 8:00 PM Eastern time at Geeks.live. Contact Info: Please see http://www.legendsofshield.com for all of our contact information or call our voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871   Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Is a Proud Member Of The GonnaGeek Network (gonnageek.com).   This podcast was recorded on Thursday March 10th, 2022.   Standby for your S.H.I.E.L.D. debriefing ---   Audio and Video Production by SP Rupert of GonnaGeek.com.

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 7 - A Sudden Shock - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 45:53


A Reading of Chapter 7 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 6 - The Sunset of Mankind - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 45:53


A Reading of Chapter 6 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 5 - In the Golden Age - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 17:12


A Reading of Chapter 5 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Roll For Intent
Episode 27 - Morlock Tabernacle Choir

Roll For Intent

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 77:00


Roll For Intent Episode 27 - Morlock Tabernacle Choir The party continues deeper into the sanctum of the Morlocks - will the be ready for whatever they find? This is a Pathfinder 2nd Edition actual play podcast focused on the Abomination Vaults adventure path, published by Paizo Inc. Check out our https://rollforintent.com/ (website), follow us on https://twitter.com/rollforintent (twitter) and join us on https://rollforintent.com/discord (discord)! *** Roll For Intent uses trademarks and/or copyrights owned by Paizo Inc., used under https://paizo.com/communityuse (Paizo's Community Use Policy). We are expressly prohibited from charging you to use or access this content. Roll For Intent is not published, endorsed, or specifically approved by Paizo. For more information about Paizo Inc. and Paizo Products, visit paizo.com *** https://paizo.com/products/btq026kj?Pathfinder-Adventure-Path-163-Ruins-of-Gauntlight (Abomination Vaults : Ruins of Gauntlight) - James Jacobs https://paizo.com/products/btq027jm?Pathfinder-Adventure-Path-164-Hands-of-the-Devil (Abomination Vaults : Hands of the Devil )- Vanessa Hoskins https://paizo.com/products/btq024xm?Pathfinder-Adventure-Path-165-Eyes-of-Empty-Death (Abomination Vaults : Eyes of Empty Death) - Stephen Radney-MacFarland https://paizo.com/products/btq026k1?Pathfinder-Adventure-Troubles-in-Otari (Troubles In Otari) - Jason Keely, Lyz Lidell, Ron Lundeen *** Copyright 2022 Roman Neville Productions Mentioned in this episode: The Patreon is Live! Hey everyone! After months of fans asking, we've finally gone live on a Patreon! There's tiers from $3 to $50, so no matter what you're able to give, you can still become a part of you are willing!!! Check it out at https://rollforintent.com/supportus or https://patreon.com/rollforintent

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 4 - Time Travelling - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 23:18


A Reading of Chapter 4 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 3 - The Time Traveller Returns - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 21:23


A Reading of Chapter 3 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

The Mutant Ages
"Uprising," X-Men Evolution

The Mutant Ages

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 100:26


"Uprising" is perhaps X-Men Evolution's strongest episode when it comes to writing, pacing, and the metaphor of anti-mutant hatred. Evan Daniels, a.k.a. Spyke, has been living with the Morlocks for a while, and in that time, he's grown armor all over his body that he can no longer hide. He now sees himself as the guardian of the Morlocks, who are living off of garbage and facing anti-mutant hate crimes in the streets of Bayville. Meanwhile, Xavier is still worried about Apocalypse's domes, not that he's doing anything to help the humans experimenting on them and getting hurt or killed in the process. This episode gets real specific about the hatred towards mutants rising around the world, and the way that extremist views can become normalized over time. It's heavy shit. Next week's episode: "Ghost of a Chance," X-Men Evolution Visit our STORE: teespring.com/stores/the-mutant-ages E-mail us your feedback at themutantages@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter at TheMutantAges, MIDImyers and RyanPagella. If you like what you hear, please consider supporting us via patreon.com/themutantages. Thanks!

Cyclops is Waiting for Me - An X-Men: The Animated Series Weekly Recap
"Captive Hearts" - Ep. 004 - Cyclops is Waiting for Me - An X-Men: The Animated Series Recap Podcast

Cyclops is Waiting for Me - An X-Men: The Animated Series Weekly Recap

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 34:04


Wondering where we got our name for the podcast? Captive Hearts covers the most meme-tastic episode of X-Men: TAS as we see Wolverine have his heart broken as Jean lets him know, "Cyclops is waiting for me" before a big date. In the most famous shot of the series, Wolverine lusting over the framed photo of Jean & Scott on his bed only to find out they've gone missing, being captured by the Morlocks. There, the team encounters a group of mutants who can't live their day to day lives amongst "normal" humans because of their dramatic physical mutations who have their sights set on Cyclops. Cyclops is Waiting for Me is our weekly podcast series where we are going back and watching EVERY-SINGLE-EPISODE of the original 1992 X-Men: The Animated Series in their original intended script order building up to the release of X-Men 97', coming to Disney Plus. "Cyclops is Waiting for Me" Theme written and performed by Ron Wasserman (ASCAP) and Rod Kim (ASCAP)

Comics Who Love Comic Books
Sexiest Comic Book Characters - Ep 76

Comics Who Love Comic Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 53:35


Brett's guest today is Ann Walker. Who are the Morlocks? How bad is Brett's ADD? What X-Man was Brett surprised to discover had been killed (and it traumatized Ann)? Which villain does Ann hate? Who are the sexiest comic book characters? Is Juggernaut a hottie? What drawing turned Brett on? What happened when Brett did extra work on Gotham? Why doesn't Ann like Harley Quinn? Who is Punchline? What comic stories would Ann and Brett write if they had the chance? If real people got powers how would they react? What is your comic book origin story? What are Eye Boy's powers? Reading tips: X-Men Classic #38 The Bride Of Caliban; D.P. 7; Marvels: Eye of the Camera; Civil War: Front Line; Daredevil by Frank Miller; Watchmen; Megalith (Continuity Comics by Neal Adams); Gladiator by Philip Wylie (novel); Wolverine and the X-Men

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 2 - The Machine - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 13:34


A Reading of Chapter 2 of the Time Machine by H.G. Wells found on Project Gutenberg. The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon
The Time Machine Chapter 1 - Introduction - H.G. Wells

Bedtime Stories with Sonneillon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 15:31


A Reading of Chapter 1 of the Time Machine by HG Wells found on Project Gutenberg The Time Machine Summary A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumbling in, looking disheveled and tired. They sit down after dinner, and the Time Traveller begins his story. The Time Traveller had finally finished work on his time machine, and it rocketed him into the future. When the machine stops, in the year 802,701 AD, he finds himself in a paradisiacal world of small humanoid creatures called Eloi. They are frail and peaceful and give him fruit to eat. He explores the area, but when he returns he finds that his time machine is gone. He decides that it has been put inside the pedestal of a nearby statue. He tries to pry it open but cannot. In the night, he begins to catch glimpses of strange white ape-like creatures the Eloi call Morlocks. He decides that the Morlocks live below ground, down the wells that dot the landscape. Meanwhile, he saves one of the Eloi from drowning, and she befriends him. Her name is Weena. The Time Traveller finally works up enough courage to go down into the world of Morlocks to try to retrieve his time machine. He finds that matches are a good defense against the Morlocks, but ultimately they chase him out of their realm. Frightened by the Morlocks, he takes Weena to try to find a place where they will be safe from the Morlocks' nocturnal hunting. He goes to what he calls the Palace of Green Porcelain, which turns out to be a museum. There, he finds more matches, some camphor, and a lever he can use as a weapon. That night, retreating from the Morlocks through a giant wood, he accidentally starts a fire. Many Morlocks die in the fire and the battle that ensues, and Weena is killed. The exhausted Time Traveller returns to the pedestal to find that it has already been pried open. He strides in confidently, and just when the Morlocks think that they have trapped him, he springs onto the machine and whizzes into the future. The Time Traveller makes several more stops. In a distant time, he stops on a beach where he is attacked by giant crabs. The bloated red sun sits motionless in the sky. He then travels thirty million years into the future. The air is very thin, and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. He sees a planet eclipse the sun. He then returns, exhausted, to the present time. The next day, he leaves again but never returns. Contact me with any comments or requests - bedtimestorieswithsonneillon@gmail.com #sonneillon #bedtimestorieswithsonneillon #adultstories #bedtime --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sonn31llon/message

X-Rated: The X-Men Animated Review Show
S1E5 "Captive Hearts" with guest Dave Mader

X-Rated: The X-Men Animated Review Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 91:35


Join us as hosts Davan and André captivate your hearts while traversing tunnels and mulling over Morlocks!  Is love blind?.. maybe... but it can also punch a hole through a mountain.Special guest:  Dave Mader (Super Mader Bros. Podcast)

Omnus Protocol - A Marvel Crisis Protocol Podcast
Domain of the Dread Dormammu

Omnus Protocol - A Marvel Crisis Protocol Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 59:26


Lexa from the Morlocks podcasts joins me this episode to talk about the new organized play kit. She ran a Dread Dormammu event at Mox and we had such a blast that we needed to talk about it.

Paper Lab Podcast
Episode 89: Deep Inside Marquette Eastman

Paper Lab Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 53:40


Silence of the Marquette's and Rebel with a cereal cause were close runner-ups for the title of this episode. Once this episode is under the belt you'll know why. Curti ‘ahem' I mean Marquette Eastman is our guest for this episode, but what show would be complete without it totally derailing into realms unimaginable. Along for this bumpy train ride are Joel and Ryan, because why not. We tackle food, fun, and everything in between. So sit back relax and listen up, and if you drink cereal with warm milk or orange juice, maybe sit this one out.Available on Amazon Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google Podcasts, Spreaker, Castbox, Deezer, Podcast Addict, and Podchaser.Spicy Beets: https://soundcloud.com/jesse-senpaiPaper Lab Studios: Paperlabstudios.comFollow us on Instagram: @maddogbarsinister @zippertan @paperlabstudiosFollow us on Twitter: @zippertan @paperlabSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/paperlabstudios

Wait! Did I Roll a Wild?
Best Slept on Character w. LEXA WHITE (from The Morlocks Podcast)

Wait! Did I Roll a Wild?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 76:30


Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! Do you know what we're thankful for? A special guest from The Morlocks Podcast Lexa White!! Joining Big Chuck and Tim to discuss how she got into the game, reactions to some of the upcoming changes and we each go over a character you are 100% sleeping on. Twitch: Twitch.tv/professionalcasualnetwork Find Lexa at the Morlocks Podcast: https://morlockmcp.podbean.com/ (https://morlockmcp.podbean.com/) Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfUO... A special thanks to our Patreon backers who helped support us at Patreon.com/professionalcasual :Thank you! Soul Eater, Aaron H., Eric B., Quinn B., John S., William S., Rob M., Rob, Franz B., Film-Lars, Leslie S., Matt F., Kasper S., Paul S., Christopher T., Matt L., Zane T., Thomas T, Joe J., Johan E., Jens R., Oliver H., Mikolaj W., Andrew, Zach C., Justliketheplant, Neil L., Jared S., Mikael N., Taylor M., George F., Tom M., Devin M., Nicholas W., Jonas P., Jonathan L., Simon P., Gareth G., Jacob Y., Lady_Leah, Devin M., David R., Will B., Stephan S., Sean S., Brian Y., William S., Path, William P., Tim D., Simon W., Jake C., Theo A., Heber R., Ben R., Vaughan A., Daniel S., Lars, Taylor H., Blarin R., Gervasio L., Adam D., Christopher C., Craig G., Kevin C., WreckMyPodcast, Charlie S., Witchdream, Anthony R., Sarah B., Dan C., Dani, and Lindsay F Use Code 'professionalcasual' for 15% off RAZE Energy: https://reppsports.com/?rfsn=5472644.... Drive-Thru RPG: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse.p... Professional Casual Gear: https://teespring.com/stores/professi... Bearded Dragon Games (Pick up all your gaming needs): BeardedDragonGames.Online (use code 'PCME10' for 10% off your order!) Built Bar (Use link or use code 'professionalcasual' at checkout for 10% discount): https://builtbar.com#?baapp=PROFESSIO... Skillshare (get 2 months free, or 30% off the annual sunscription): skillshare.eqcm.net/Q5mR9 Our Giveaways: Professionalcasual.com/giveaways

Troubled Minds Radio
Hollow Earth Theory - A 'Black Hole' Was Found On Satellite Images, Could This Be A Portal To Agartha?

Troubled Minds Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 170:17


The hollow Earth theory has been around for a while now, do YOU think there's any truth to this?http://www.troubledminds.org Support The Show! https://rokfin.com/creator/troubledminds https://teespring.com/stores/troubled-minds-store #aliens #conspiracy #paranormalRadio Schedule Mon-Tues-Wed-Thurs 7-9pst - https://fringe.fm/iTunes - https://apple.co/2zZ4hx6Spotify - https://spoti.fi/2UgyzqMStitcher - https://bit.ly/2UfAiMXTuneIn - https://bit.ly/2FZOErSTwitter - https://bit.ly/2CYB71UFollow Nightstocker -- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgB_GSPTPIMTOlPl9NxPg1gFollow Tinfoil Timothy -- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUvcPlGBPdX89xCA3TRsX-w Follow Jennifer -- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdXA9TJW5fE3d9fK0lAcN9gFollow Liam Martin -- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5EADN2Dya5AyD6bUyP9O1wFollow James -- https://salsidoparanormal.podbean.com/Follow TamBam -- https://www.instagram.com/tamlbam/Robert's Book -- https://amzn.to/3GEsFUK----------------------------------------------------------------------------https://archive.vn/w1aHYhttps://www.reddit.com/r/GoogleMaps/comments/q7c6uc/what_the_fuck_this_looks_nothing_like_an_island/https://i.redd.it/lrdktcw788t71.pnghttps://www.livescience.com/60488-secretive-places-on-google-earth.htmlhttps://www.gi.alaska.edu/alaska-science-forum/hollow-earth-theoryhttps://www.hollowearthresearch.org/the-hollow-earth-theoryhttps://www.ancient-code.com/the-hollow-earth-theory/https://www.gaia.com/article/hollow-earth-theory-is-the-subterranean-civilization-of-agartha-realhttps://www.ancient-code.com/11-reasons-why-the-hollow-earth-actually-exists/https://exemplore.com/ufos-aliens/Hollow-Earth-Theory-and-Admiral-Byrds-Flight-to-Agarthahttps://www.liveabout.com/nazis-and-the-hollow-earth-2594410https://www.gaia.com/article/hollow-earth-theory-ancient-civilizations-modern-researchers-and-explorershttps://www.ancient-code.com/the-forbidden-land-of-agartha-the-secrets-of-the-inner-earth/https://www.hollowearthresearch.org/proof-of-agarthahttps://www.infinityexplorers.com/forbidden-land-of-agarthahttps://www.theblackvault.com/documentarchive/operation-highjump/https://coolinterestingstuff.com/operation-highjump-declassified-pictures-ufo-evidencehttps://archive.vn/dUcWjhttps://medium.com/@wows_historians/the-battle-of-antarctica-ebfaeb9b42a0http://blog.de-program.org/what-the-u-s-government-found-then-covered-up-in-antarctica/https://intothelight.news/knowledge-base/hollow-earth-aghartha/admiral-byrd/