Podcasts about RI

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Best podcasts about RI

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Latest podcast episodes about RI

Vinyl & Vision
V&V Episode 056 Mattie Lea & Chloe Rose(Killer Kin) and New York Dolls

Vinyl & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 116:17


Hope everyone is having a great and Happy Thanksgiving! It's my pleasure to bring to you today, the founding members and backbone of New Haven's most enthralling and energetic band, Killer Kin! With the type of raw unbridled energy they bring, it's no wonder that they'd choose an album with the same infectious, hook laden, sexual fury as this debut album by the New York Dolls. And if you don't believe me, listen to their new 7" vinyl single on Pigbaby Records here: https://killerkin.bandcamp.com/album/sonic-love-narrow-mind and if you want to try to get your hands on a copy, you can do that here: https://pigbabyrecords.com/store.html They'll be playing in Providence, RI at The Parlour on Saturday Nov. 27! Get yourself a shot of Rock n' Roll fury! If you dig the show, support us by buying anything at psychicstatic.net Theme music written and recorded by Jeff Robbins of 123 Astronaut.

Legacy Church RI
More Spirit More Life | Pastor Ron Termale

Legacy Church RI

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 40:44


We pray that this podcast increases your faith and strengthens your walk with Jesus Christ, our Lord, and Savior. You can join us in person at 9am or 11am at 125 Circuit Drive, North Kingstown, RI or you can tune in live on Sunday at 9am, 11am, 3pm, 6pm, 8pm and 10pm by visiting www.LegacyChurchRI.com/live*Take a moment to LIKE and SHARE this podcast with family & friends!

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness
Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness - Ep 64

Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 111:58


Hello, hello and thanks for checking in to Norm Nathan’s Vault of Silliness. Please sit down and get comfortable as we bring you another 2-part show which I’ve titled ‘Two Pairs and a Bunch of Jokers.’ There’s a whole heck of a lot to tell you about so let’s get started. We begin with a DBG from November 20th, 1993. After that we will mosey on to the post-game 4-5am hour and our regularly scheduled NNS already in progress. The players for this game are: Betty in Sudbury maybe a first-time player? Betty from Hyde Park definitely, a first-time player Alan from Medford but working in Watertown Jack from Cumberland, RI another first-timer Tony Nesbitt in studio A stressed and strained Jack Harte from the Pru Sid Whittaker – producing, playing and later, uncovering a family secret The Birthdays: Alistair Cooke Dick Smothers Bo Derek Richard Dawson Veronica Hamel Sean Young Estelle Parsons And Judy Woodruff We hear some events, but they are NOT part of the game. And we are informed of some birthdays of the dead. We close that hour with a post-game caller from Mike in Medford. After a brief intermission we return with our second act. Beginning with a fade in of a Gold Bond commercial Accuwx w/Paul Pastelok and Norm provides a temperature that meteorologists everywhere are still researching. Then we are joined by WCVB Ch. 5’s Steve Sbraccia who was bringing coffee to his wife, WBZ Radio’s Susan Rist! Norm has known both since they were just wee little news reporters. Now comes the promenade of caller persons: Al in Framingham Glenn from Brighton Mick from Boardman, Ohio This next call is one of the best: The warm, toasty and flirty Marie from Revere. So much riotous laughter. Brad in Lapeer, Michigan John in Lynn Generosa joins us to give John directions to the St. Adelaide’s Craft Show and could there be a love connection as well? They make plans on how to identify each other and Norm has some recommendations for Generosa. Helen from New Bedford - She asks Norm what he would do were he President and the list is impressive. Especially the last entry. Ed from Cambridge – Tells story of when he met a couple practicing their golf swing across the street from WBZ that turned out to be Steve and Susan! And we close with Beverly. She came to Massachusetts from Cannon Beach, Oregon in 1961. Always listened to Norm. Moved back to Oregon about 7 years ago and happens to was back visiting to sell some property. She just had to tell Norm how special he is to her. Our sponsors! Baby Gold Bond twice. First with Jackie Black from New Castle, IN and then Gwendolyn Jones of Ft. Lauderdale, FL ADT Security twice, voiced by Jay McQuaide A VERY excited Paul Grassi of Valley Stream, NY for Classic Ovaltine. WBZ Afternoon News Promo voiced by Diane Stern WBZ and Wonderland Park is giving you a chance to win a trip for two to the ProBowl in Hawaii – voiced by Bob Raleigh AutoMax Classified Television Program on WLVI TV 56 Bill Marlowe with another mouth-watering commercial for Floramo’s And the former dizzy and nauseated Hazel Dew of Houston, TX for Marezine. Episode 64, ‘Two Pairs and a Bunch of Jokers’ is ready to roll. Email the show normnathanvos@gmail.com Castos https://norm-nathans-vault-of-silliness.cast

Cheap Talk Wrestling
CTW 51: AEW FULL GEAR REACTIONS|The Press Conference|Eddie Kingston next Stone Cold|Cowboy Shit!!!|

Cheap Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 59:56


Down Time with Cranston Public Library
82 - Our Historical Fiction Picks

Down Time with Cranston Public Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 41:44


This week Tayla is joined by Robin from the William Hall Branch and Deb from the Tiverton Public Library to talk all things historical fiction. They discuss what they like about historical fiction as a genre and give some historical fiction recommendations. They also talk about Wes Andreson movies, the Good Place, and Elvis Costello. During The Last Chapter they discuss: what book/series that you discussed today would you most like to see made into a TV show or movie? Like what you hear? Rate and review Down Time on Apple Podcasts or your podcast player of choice! If you'd like to submit a topic for The Last Chapter you can send your topic suggestions to downtime@cranstonlibrary.org. Our theme music is Day Trips by Ketsa and our ad music is Happy Ukulele by Scott Holmes. Thanks for listening! Books The Colorado Kid by Stephen King (audiobook) The Searcher by Tana French The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern The Dictionary of Lost Words by Pip Williams (eaudiobook) How to Play Guitar and Y by Elvis Costello (Audible) The Magic Fish by Trung Le Nguyen Tracks by Peter Tarsi (play) AV Haven (2010-2015) The French Dispatch (2021) Isle of Dogs (2018) New Tricks (2003-2015) The Good Place (2016-2020) Historical Fiction Picks The Exiles by Christina Baker Kline Dear Mrs. Bird by A. J. Pearce Yours Cheerfully by A. J. Pearce Painting the Light by Sally Cabot Gunning The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem by Maryse Conde The Darwin Affair by Tim Mason Her Hidden Genius by Marie Benedict Other Avon Cinema, Providence, RI

CA Podcast
Episode 5 | Bodily Fluids

CA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 88:48


5 Weeks Podcasting and We're Back! *Listen to the podcast audio on Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, and Google Podcasts here, click down below! https://linktr.ee/ca_pod ----------- - Intro 0:00 Welcome back! - Astroworld Tragedy Update 2:00 Death toll keeps rising (Recorded before the 10th causality was unfortunately announced) Travis went to Drake's after-party at Dave and Busters 100 lawsuits currently filed against him Cops lied about syringes! Artists at concerts now concerned with fan safety more than ever 9:55 - Lady pees on a fan at a concert 16:55 - Drake & Kanye end beef cause of J Prince & Larry Hoover 22:20 - Kanye West Drink Champs Pt 2 highlights 37:28 Kanye watches Onlyfans illegally Speaks on cancel culture He faked being a "backpack" rapper - Youtube is removing dislikes! 48:10 - Mr. Beast's Youtube takeover 52:50 Created A Squid Game Set Has Multiple Language Channels - Kyle Rittenhouse crying is outshining Jacob Blake's legacy 56:48 - Will Smith and Jada's Open Relationship 1:07:36 Will was jealous of Jada dating Tupac 1:16:00 - Kendrick back performing at DayNVegas and Section 80 songs, also says he's back soon 1:22:30 - Donda Deluxe coming (Recorded before it dropped) 1:26:00 - CLB Deluxe? 1:27:40 Make sure to follow our Podcast Clip Page here on YouTube @CAPCLIPS | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSPJ... and subscribe! Also, follow the Podcast Instagram @CA_Pod | https://www.instagram.com/ca_pod/ Merch Available Here - https://complexambition.shop ----------------------------------------------------------- Want a promo snippet of your song at the beginning of the video? Email us if interested in business! - ComplexAmbition401@Gmail.com - ------------------------------------------------------------ Want To Send Us Something? 820 ELMWOOD AVE P.O. Box 27533 PROVIDENCE, RI 02907 ------------------------------------------------------------- R.I.P. Nipsey, Mac, XXXtentacion, Juice, Pop, Von and DMX -------------------------------------------------------------- FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA SOUND: https://www.instagram.com/itsavibe/?h...... Marloon: https://www.instagram.com/itshotinthi...... Y.I: https://www.instagram.com/evenbetters...... --------------------------------------------------------------------- COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER ALL RIGHTS BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cambition/support

True To You Chats
You‘ve Already Proven Yourself! [Life Update Post-Move]

True To You Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 30:12


Welcome to TRUE TO YOU CHATS! Hosted by Kasey Brown where we chat all things being true to you in the fitness and wellness space. Your support means the world if you could subscribe, leave a review, & leave a comment below! This will help us grow and offer YOU way more content. ------------ In this episode, Kasey is solo and chatting about a life update post-move from RI to PA! We go back to the theme of "You've already proven yourself" when you feel that you need to do more or be more. -------------- Questions or podcast ideas? TRUETOYOUCHATS@GMAIL.COM   Follow True To You Chats on Instagram & Kasey @powercakes on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, & her blog.

Victory Church Providence

A Sermon by Pastor Richard Sfameni, Lead Pastor of Victory Church in Providence, RI.     Isaiah 26:3 NKJV You will keep him in perfect peace, Whose mind is stayed on You, Because he trusts in You.   Luke 10:5 NKJV But whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house.'   Numbers 6:22-27 22And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying: 23“Speak to Aaron and his sons, saying, ‘This is the way you shall bless the children of Israel. Say to them: 24“The Lord bless you and keep you; 25The Lord make His face shine upon you, And be gracious to you; 26The Lord lift up His countenance upon you, And give you peace.” ' 27“So they shall put My name on the children of Israel, and I will bless them.”

Ivan Kosogor Podcast
Kako biti srećan? — Siniša Ubović | Ivan Kosogor Podcast Ep.128

Ivan Kosogor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 104:16


Siniša Ubović je autor nekoliko besteseler knjiga i trener ličnog razvoja na polju motivacije, savremenog liderstva i primenjene duhovnosti. Kroz svoj rad pomaže ljudima da otkriju svoj pun potencijal i ostvare napredak u karijeri, ljubavi, finansijama, zdravlju... Imao je priliku da sarađuje i da lično uči od najvećih i najpriznatijih svetskih stručnjaka našeg vremena, kao što su Lujza Hej, dr Vejn Dajer, Šeril Ričardson, Brendon Burčard, dr Patriša Krejn, Rid Trejsi, Mabel Katz i mnogi drugi. Link za vebinar: https://www.sinisaubovic.com/vebinar-oprastanje/

Nourish Balance Thrive
How to Continually Improve Your Brain Health, Body Composition, Energy, and Athletic Performance Using a Simple Blood Test and Machine Learning

Nourish Balance Thrive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 70:24


Each month for the past year we've offered our bloodsmart.ai group program. It's an opportunity to use machine learning to predict—from a pretty simple blood test—what is likely happening inside your body (and what might be going wrong) along with expert feedback on the results from NBT Scientific Director and Coach, Megan Hall and me. The program has been very popular, not to mention a lot of fun, and people are going through more than once to measure their ongoing progress. On this podcast, Megan provides detailed feedback on the bloodsmart.ai report belonging to NBT Coach Clay Higgins. What you'll hear is very similar to what goes on during our group coaching sessions. It's a review of exactly what's going well and where there's opportunity for improvement - along with specific steps to take right now to improve overall health, based on the data, symptoms, and personal history. If you'd like to participate in a group program please email NBT support for details and be sure to let us know where in the world you live so we can tailor our response to your needs. Here's the outline of this episode with Megan Hall and Clay Higgins: [00:00:33] Clay's combined bloodsmart.ai report. [00:05:13] Overall wellness score and PhenoAge. [00:07:30] Marker Detail View Page. [00:08:12] NutriSense continuous glucose monitoring. [00:12:03] Calculated red blood cell survival and HbA1C. [00:13:52] Eight Sleep. [00:16:33] Uric acid. [00:25:10] Potential oxidative stress: N. Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) may help. [00:26:58] Calcium a bit low; consider following up with a blood parathyroid test and/or supplement with magnesium. [00:32:56] HDL Cholesterol a little high and what that might mean. [00:34:26] Red blood cell indices and low oxygen deliverability suggest possible nutrient deficiencies. [00:35:53] Digestive enzymes: Thorne Biogest or Betaine HCl. [00:38:05] HomocysteX Plus. [00:40:33] Reticulocyte production index and RDW. [00:43:44] Low neutrophils (neutropenia) could suggest low copper level. [00:46:36] Nose to Tail. [00:48:00] Bloodsmart.ai forecasts. [00:48:32] Environmental toxin exposure; Quicksilver Blood Metals Testing. [00:51:53] Supporting detoxification: sauna, binders, supporting detox pathways. [00:53:45] Mitigating toxins in the environment. Skin Deep app; Think Dirty Shop Clean app. [00:55:59] Forecasted iodine deficiency; sea vegetables are a good source. [00:57:06] Forecasted issues with immune system/gut. [00:58:28] Designs for Health GI Revive. [00:59:35] Lucy Mailing, PhD; Lucy on previous NBT podcasts: 1, 2, 3. [01:01:49] Homocysteine forecasted to be high - B vitamins are important, as well as glycine, creatine. [01:01:50] Join our bloodsmart.ai group program to get Megan's feedback on your blood chemistry.  In the US, click here to get started. $198 includes blood testing, a bloodsmart.ai report, and access to 4 group coaching sessions with Megan. (Note: Residents of NY, NJ, RI and those living outside the US - pricing and availability varies. Please contact us for assistance.)

Cheap Talk Wrestling
CTW 50: Special Guest Bobby Ocean!!

Cheap Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 80:09


On this Unedited, Uncensored, Raw Exclusive Interview with Bobby Ocean and we break it all down with him!! Bobby talks about his phone number that you as fans can text him at 860-200-2160!! We break down his Career so far and how he got started in pro wrestling!! Bobby talks about some of the wrestling legends he's been up against in his career!! Bobby talks about his mind set going into matches and working with other wrestlers in the business!! TJ and Bobby talk about the current news with Ring of Honor released talent. The two also break down the current release situation in the WWE!! TJ and Bobby Reminisce on Autumn Annihilation 2020 when it was Bobby vs Vega for the SPW Championship and how it was working the camera vs fans!! Bobby talks about some of the top wrestlers in the business that inspired him at a young age!! To end the show Bobby breaks down some of his best moments in the ring and as a champion!!! Make sure to follow Bobby Ocean on all forms of Social media @Bobbyocean!!!

The Wendy Love Edge Show
Season 5, Episode 23: Let's Talk About PTSD

The Wendy Love Edge Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 53:52


The Wendy Love Edge Show does not dispense medical advice and all you health choices are your own. The opinions expressed on the show are not necessarily those of the producer, A. Edge Productions. Co-Host: Candis Dyer, Host of Cannacorner and Founder of The Human Solution International Texas Chapter. Guests: Nique Pichette, RN "My name is Nurse Nique. I am a Veteran of the United States Marine Corps. I have been a registered nurse for 26 years. I am a two time breast cancer survivor and during my second battle with breast cancer I was introduced to Cannabis as Medicine. I am a founding member of the Cannabis Nurses Network, a Psychiatric Nurse at an acute care hospital in Massachusetts, and a Doctoral Candidate at Salve Regina University, Newport, RI where my research is collecting data on Cannabis Use Disorder. I am passionate about my advocacy to change the perception of cannabis and mental health diagnoses." Nurse Nique, The Perception Coach Cannabis Nurse Navigator Founding Member, Cannabis Nurses Network Mobile: (760) 613-6258 Website: www.positivelyprocessingperception.com “Change your perception, change your life ~ Pinkie Swear” Amy Hernandez Amy defines herself as a hope dealer and naturopathic minded critical thinker. She has a health journey she is on, and a supplement business. Reach her here: https://www.facebook.com/AmyClementHernandezHopeDealer Musical Guest: Edi Callier https://www.officiallyedi.com Cannabis Expert MD: Dr. Brian Nichol https://cannabisexpertmd.com Miss Teddi #FIMM @learnfromteddi The Wendy Love Edge Show is created and written by Wendy Love Edge. Producer: A. Edge Productions Editing:Flint Woods Sponsors The Relevnt App Karas Healthcare Go Green Delivery/Go Green Botanicals 131 Inclusion Gallery Purely Natural CBD Highlands Residential Mortgage Lit Premium Smoking Supplies --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thewendyloveedgeshow/support

Fidelity Viewpoints: Market Sense
11/9: Are we heading for stagflation?

Fidelity Viewpoints: Market Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 24:07


Market Sense takes on stagflation this week. Host Jim Armstrong talks with Jurrien Timmer and Leanna Devinney about why it's a relevant, real-world topic now, as well as what stagflation means to your wallet and investments — and how to plan for it. Read the full transcript. Watch the video replay. Read more about this topic. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, RI 02917

Screaming in the Cloud
Building a Partnership with Your Cloud Provider with Micheal Benedict

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 54:44


About Micheal Micheal Benedict leads Engineering Productivity at Pinterest. He and his team focus on developer experience, building tools and platforms for over a thousand engineers to effectively code, build, deploy and operate workloads on the cloud. Mr. Benedict has also built Infrastructure and Cloud Governance programs at Pinterest and previously, at Twitter -- focussed on managing cloud vendor relationships, infrastructure budget management, cloud migration, capacity forecasting and planning and cloud cost attribution (chargeback). Links: Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com Teletraan: https://github.com/pinterest/teletraan Twitter: https://twitter.com/micheal Pinterestcareers.com: https://pinterestcareers.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You know how git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really. Please ask someone else!Corey: Thats all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best way I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's git based workflows mean you don't have to play slap and tickle with integrating arcane non-sense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for pets startup, to global fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them, because you don't have to, they get why self service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y.comCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Every once in a while, I like to talk to people who work at very large companies that are not in fact themselves a cloud provider. I know it sounds ridiculous. How can you possibly be a big company and not make money by selling managed NAT gateways to an unsuspecting public? But I'm told it can be done here to answer that question. And hopefully at least one other is Pinterest. It's head of engineering productivity, Micheal Benedict. Micheal, thank you for taking the time to join me today.Micheal: Hi, Corey, thank you for inviting me today. I'm really excited to talk to you.Corey: So, exciting times at Pinterest in a bunch of different ways. It was recently reported—which of course, went right to the top of my inbox as 500,000 people on Twitter all said, “Hey, this sounds like a ‘Corey would be interested in it' thing.” It was announced that you folks had signed a $3.2 billion commitment with AWS stretching until 2028. Now, if this is like any other large-scale AWS contract commitment deal that has been made public, you were probably immediately inundated with a whole bunch of people who are very good at arithmetic and not very good at business context saying, “$3.2 billion? You could build massive data centers for that. Why would anyone do this?” And it's tiresome, and that's the world in which we live. But I'm guessing you heard at least a little bit of that from the peanut gallery.Micheal: I did, and I always find it interesting when direct comparisons are made with the total amount that's been committed. And like you said, there's so many nuances that go into how to perceive that amount, and put it in context of, obviously, what Pinterest does. So, I at least want to take this opportunity to share with everyone that Pinterest has been on the cloud since day one. When Ben initially started the company, that product was launched—it was a simple Django app—it was launched on AWS from day one, and since then, it has grown to support 450-plus million MAUs over the course of the decade.And our infrastructure has grown pretty complex. We started with a bunch of EC2 machines and persisting data in S3, and since then we have explored an array of different products, in fact, sometimes working very closely with AWS, as well and helping them put together a product roadmap for some of the items they're working on as well. So, we have an amazing partnership with them, and part of the commitment and how we want to see these numbers is how does it unlock value for Pinterest as a business over time in terms of making us much more agile, without thinking about the nuances of the infrastructure itself. And that's, I think, one of the best ways to really put this into context, that it's not a single number we pay at the end [laugh] of the month, but rather, we are on track to spending a certain amount over a period of time, so this just keeps accruing or adding to that number. And we basically come out with an amazing partnership in AWS, where we have that commitment and we're able to leverage their products and full suite of items without any hiccups.Corey: The most interesting part of what you said is the word partner. And I think that's the piece that gets lost an awful lot when we talk about large-scale cloud negotiations. It's not like buying a car, where you can basically beat the crap out of the salesperson, you can act as if $400 price difference on a car is the difference between storm out of the dealership and sign the contract. Great, you don't really have to deal with that person ever again.In the context of a cloud provider, they run your production infrastructure, and if they have a bad day, I promise you're going to have a bad day, too. You want to handle those negotiations in a way that is respectful of that because they are your partner, whether you want them to be or not. Now, I'm not suggesting that any cloud provider is going to hold an awkward negotiation against the customer, but at the same time, there are going to be scenarios in which you're going to want to have strong relationships, where you're going to need to cash in political capital to some extent, and personally, I've never seen stupendous value in trying to beat the crap out of a company in order to get another tenth of a percent discount on a service you barely use, just because someone decided that well, we didn't do well in the last negotiation so we're going to get them back this time.That's great. What are you actually planning to do as a company? Where are you going? And the fact that you just alluded to, that you're not just a pile of S3 and EC2 instances speaks, in many ways, to that. By moving into the differentiated service world, suddenly you're able to do things that don't look quite as much like building a better database and start looking a lot more like servicing your users more effectively and well.Micheal: And I think, like you said, I feel like there's like a general skepticism in viewing that the cloud providers are usually out there to rip you apart. But in reality, that's not true. To your point, as part of the partnership, especially with AWS and Pinterest, we've got an amazing relationship going on, and behind the scenes, there's a dedicated team at Pinterest, called the Infrastructure Governance Team, a cross-functional team with folks from finance, legal, engineering, product, all sitting together and working with our AWS partners—even the AWS account managers at the times are part of that—to help us make both Pinterest successful, and in turn, AWS gets that amazing customer to work with in helping build some of their newer products as well. And that's one of the most important things we have learned over time is that there's two parts to it; when you want to help improve your business agility, you want to focus not just on the bottom line numbers as they are. It's okay to pay a premium because it offsets the people capital you would have to invest in getting there.And that's a very tricky way to look at math, but that's what these teams do; they sit down and work through those specifics. And for what it's worth, in our conversations, the AWS teams always come back with giving us very insightful data on how we're using their systems to help us better think about how we should be pricing or looking things ahead. And I'm not the expert on this; like I said, there's a dedicated team sitting behind this and looking through and working through these deals, but that's one of the important takeaways I hope the users—or the listeners of this podcast then take away that you want to treat your cloud provider as your partner as much as possible. They're not always there to screw you. That's not their goal. And I apologize for using that term. It is important that you set that expectations that it's in their best interest to actually make you successful because that's how they make money as well.Corey: It's a long-term play. I mean, they could gouge you this quarter, and then you're trying to evacuate as fast as possible. Well, they had a great quarter, but what's their long-term prospect? There are two competing philosophies in the world of business; you can either make a lot of money quickly, or you can make a little bit of money and build it over time in a sustained way. And it's clear the cloud providers are playing the long game on this because they basically have to.Micheal: I mean, it's inevitable at this point. I mean, look at Pinterest. It is one of those success stories. Starting as a Django app on a bunch of EC2 machines to wherever we are right now with having a three-plus billion dollar commitment over a span of couple of years, and we do spend a pretty significant chunk of that on a yearly basis. So, in this case, I'm sure it was a great successful partnership.And I'm hoping some of the newer companies who are building the cloud from the get-go are thinking about it from that perspective. And one of the things I do want to call out, Corey, is that we did initially start with using the primitive services in AWS, but it became clear over time—and I'm sure you heard of the term multi-cloud and many of that—you know, when companies start evaluating how to make the most out of the deals they're negotiating or signing, it is important to acknowledge that the cost of any of those evaluations or even thinking about migrations never tends to get factored in. And we always tend to treat that as being extremely simple or not, but those are engineering resources you want to be spending more building on the product rather than these crazy costly migrations. So, it's in your best interest probably to start using the most from your cloud provider, and also look for opportunities to use other cloud providers—if they provide more value in certain product offerings—rather than thinking about a complete lift-and-shift, and I'm going to make DR as being the primary case on why I want to be moving to multi-cloud.Corey: Yeah. There's a question, too, of the numbers on paper look radically different than the reality of this. You mentioned, Pinterest has been on AWS since the beginning, which means that even if an edict had been passed at the beginning, that, “Thou shalt never build on anything except EC2 and S3. The end. Full stop.”And let's say you went down that rabbit hole of, “Oh, we don't trust their load balancers. We're going to build our own at home. We have load balancers at home. We'll use those.” It's terrible, but even had you done that and restricted yourselves just to those baseline building blocks, and then decide to do a cloud migration, you're still looking back at over a decade of experience where the app has been built unconsciously reflecting the various failure modes that AWS has, the way that it responds to API calls, the latency in how long it takes to request something versus it being available, et cetera, et cetera.So, even moving that baseline thing to another cloud provider is not a trivial undertaking by any stretch of the imagination. But that said—because the topic does always come up, and I don't shy away from it; I think it's something people should go into with an open mind—how has the multi-cloud conversation progressed at Pinterest? Because there's always a multi-cloud conversation.Micheal: We have always approached it with some form of… openness. It's not like we don't want to be open to the ideas, but you really want to be thinking hard on the business case and the business value something provides on why you want to be doing x. In this case, when we think about multi-cloud—and again, Pinterest did start with EC2 and S3, and we did keep it that way for a long time. We built a lot of primitives around it, used it—for example, my team actually runs our bread and butter deployment system on EC2. We help facilitate deployments across a 100,000-plus machines today.And like you said, we have built that system keeping in mind how AWS works, and understanding the nuances of region and AZ failovers and all of that, and help facilitate deployments across 1000-plus microservices in the company. So, thinking about leveraging, say, a Google Cloud instance and how that works, in theory, we can always make a case for engineering to build our deployment system and expand there, but there's really no value. And one of the biggest cases, usually, when multi-cloud comes in is usually either negotiation for price or actually a DR strategy. Like, what if AWS goes down in and us-east-1? Well, let's be honest, they're powering half the internet [laugh] from that one single—Corey: Right.Micheal: Yeah. So, if you think your business is okay running when AWS goes down and half the internet is not going to be working, how do you want to be thinking about that? So, DR is probably not the best reason for you to be even exploring multi-cloud. Rather, you should be thinking about what the cloud providers are offering as a very nuanced offering which your current cloud provider is not offering, and really think about just using those specific items.Corey: So, I agree that multi-cloud for DR purposes is generally not necessarily the best approach with the idea of being able to failover seamlessly, but I like the idea for backups. I mean, Pinterest is a publicly-traded company, which means that among other things, you have to file risk disclosures and be responsive to auditors in a variety of different ways. There are some regulations to start applying to you. And the idea of, well, AWS builds things out in a super effective way, region separation, et cetera, whenever I talk to Amazonians, they are always surprised that anyone wouldn't accept that, “Oh, if you want backups use a different region. Problem solved.”Right, but it is often easier for me to have a rehydrate the business level of backup that would take weeks to redeploy living on another cloud provider than it is for me to explain to all of those auditors and regulators and financial analysts, et cetera why I didn't go ahead and do that path. So, there's always some story for okay, what if AWS decides that they hate us and want to kick us off the platform? Well, that's why legal is involved in those high-level discussions around things like risk, and indemnity, and termination for convenience and for cause clauses, et cetera, et cetera. The idea of making an all-in commitment to a cloud provider goes well beyond things that engineering thinks about. And it's easy for those of us with engineering backgrounds to be incredibly dismissive of that of, “Oh, indemnity? Like, when does AWS ever lose data?” “Yeah, but let's say one day they do. What is your story going to be when asked some very uncomfortable questions by people who wanted you to pay attention to this during the negotiation process?” It's about dotting the i's and crossing the t's, especially with that many commas in the contractual commitments.Micheal: No, it is true. And we did evaluate that as an option, but one of the interesting things about compliance, and especially auditing as well, we generally work with the best in class consultants to help us work through the controls and how we audit, how we look at these controls, how to make sure there's enough accountability going through. The interesting part was in this case, as well, we were able to work with AWS in crafting a lot of those controls and setting up the right expectations as and when we were putting proposals together as well. Now, again, I'm not an expert on this and I know we have a dedicated team from our technical program management organization focused on this, but early on we realized that, to your point, the cost of any form of backups and then being able to audit what's going in, look at all those pipelines, how quickly we can get the data in and out it was proving pretty costly for us. So, we were able to work out some of that within the constructs of what we have with our cloud provider today, and still meet our compliance goals.Corey: That's, on some level, the higher point, too, where everything is everything comes down to context; everything comes down to what the business demands, what the business requires, what the business will accept. And I'm not suggesting that in any case, they're wrong. I'm known for beating the ‘Multi-cloud is a bad default decision' drum, and then people get surprised when they'll have one-on-one conversations, and they say, “Well, we're multi-cloud. Do you think we're foolish?” “No. You're probably doing the right thing, just because you have context that is specific to your business that I, speaking in a general sense, certainly don't have.”People don't generally wake up in the morning and decide they're going to do a terrible job or no job at all at work today, unless they're Facebook's VP of Integrity. So, it's not the sort of thing that lends itself to casual tweet size, pithy analysis very often. There's a strong dive into what is the level of risk a business can accept? And my general belief is that most companies are doing this stuff right. The universal constant in all of my consulting clients that I have spoken to about the in-depth management piece of things is, they've always asked the same question of, “So, this is what we've done, but can you introduce us to the people who are doing it really right, who have absolutely nailed this and gotten it all down?” “It's, yeah, absolutely no one believes that that is them, even the folks who are, from my perspective, pretty close to having achieved it.”But I want to talk a bit more about what you do beyond just the headline-grabbing large dollar figure commitment to a cloud provider story. What does engineering productivity mean at Pinterest? Where do you start? Where do you stop?Micheal: I want to just quickly touch upon that last point about multi-cloud, and like you said, every company works within the context of what they are given and the constraints of their business. It's probably a good time to give a plug to my previous employer, Twitter, who are doing multi-cloud in a reasonably effective way. They are on the data centers, they do have presence on Google Cloud, and AWS, and I know probably things have changed since a couple of years now, but they have embraced that environment pretty effectively to cater to their acquisitions who were on the public cloud, help obviously, with their initial set of investments in the data center, and still continue to scale that out, and explore, in this case, Google Cloud for a variety of other use cases, which sounds like it's been extremely beneficial as well.So, to your point, there is probably no right way to do this. There's always that context, and what you're working with comes into play as part of making these decisions. And it's important to take a lot of these with a grain of salt because you can never understand the decisions, why they were made the way they were made. And for what it's worth, it sort of works out in the end. [laugh]. I've rarely heard a story where it's never worked out, and people are just upset with the deals they've signed. So, hopefully, that helps close that whole conversation about multi-cloud.Corey: I hope so. It's one of those areas where everyone has an opinion and a lot of them do not necessarily apply universally, but it's always fun to take—in that case, great, I'll take the lesser trod path of everyone's saying multi-cloud is great, invariably because they're trying to sell you something. Yeah, I have nothing particularly to sell, folks. My argument has always been, in the absence of a compelling reason not to, pick a provider and go all in. I don't care which provider you pick—which people are sometimes surprised to hear.It's like, “Well, what if they pick a cloud provider that you don't do consulting work for?” Yeah, it turns out, I don't actually need to win every AWS customer over to have a successful working business. Do what makes sense for you, folks. From my perspective, I want this industry to be better. I don't want to sit here and just drum up business for myself and make self-serving comments to empower that. Which apparently is a rare tactic.Micheal: No, that's totally true, Corey. One of the things you do is help people with their bills, so this has come up so many times, and I realize we're sort of going off track a bit from that engineering productivity discussion—Corey: Oh, which is fine. That's this entire show's theme, if it has one.Micheal: [laugh]. So, I want to briefly just talk about the whole billing and how cost management works because I know you spend a lot of time on that and you help a lot of these companies be effective in how they manage their bills. These questions have come up multiple times, even at Pinterest. We actually in the past, when I was leading the infrastructure governance organization, we were working with other companies of our similar size to better understand how they are looking into getting visibility into their cost, setting sort of the right controls and expectations within the engineering organization to plan, and capacity plan, and effectively meet those plans in a certain criteria, and then obviously, if there is any risk to that, actively manage risk. That was like the biggest thing those teams used to do.And we used to talk a lot trade notes, and get a better sense of how a lot of these companies are trying to do—for example, Netflix, or Lyft, or Stripe. I recall Netflix, content was their biggest spender, so cloud spending was like way down in the list of things for them. [laugh]. But regardless, they had an active team looking at this on a day-to-day basis. So, one of the things we learned early on at Pinterest is that start investing in those visibility tools early on.No one can parse the cloud bills. Let's be honest. You're probably the only person who can reverse… [laugh] engineer an architecture diagram from a cloud bill, and I think that's like—definitely you should take a patent for that or something. But in reality, no one has the time to do that. You want to make sure your business leaders, from your finance teams to engineering teams to head of the executives all have a better understanding of how to parse it.So, investing engineering resources, take that data, how do you munch it down to the cost, the utilization across the different vectors of offerings, and have a very insightful discussion. Like, what are certain action items we want to be taking? It's very easy to see, “Oh, we overspent EC2,” and we want to go from there. But in reality, that's not just that thing; you will start finding out that EC2 is being used by your Hadoop infrastructure, which runs hundreds of thousands of jobs. Okay, now who's actually responsible for that cost? You might find that one job which is accruing, sort of, a lot of instance hours over a period of time and a shared multi-tenant environment, how do you attribute that cost to that particular cost center?Corey: And then someone left the company a while back, and that job just kept running in perpetuity. No one's checked the output for four years, I guess it can't be that necessarily important. And digging into it requires context. It turns out, there's no SaaS tool to do this, which is unfortunate for those of us who set out originally to build such a thing. But we discovered pretty early on the context on this stuff is incredibly important.I love the thing you're talking about here, where you're discussing with your peer companies about these things because the advice that I would give to companies with the level of spend that you folks do is worlds apart from what I would advise someone who's building something new and spending maybe 500 bucks a month on their cloud bill. Those folks do not need to hire a dedicated team of people to solve for these problems. At your scale, yeah, you probably should have had some people in [laugh] here looking at this for a while now. And at some point, the guidance changes based upon scale. And if there's one thing that we discover from the horrible pages of Hacker News, it's that people love applying bits of wisdom that they hear in wildly inappropriate situations.How do you think about these things at that scale? Because, a simple example: right now I spend about 1000 bucks a month at The Duckbill Group, on our AWS bill. I know. We have one, too. Imagine that. And if I wind up just committing admin credentials to GitHub, for example, and someone compromises that and start spinning things up to mine all the Bitcoin, yeah, I'm going to notice that by the impact it has on the bill, which will be noticeable from orbit.At the level of spend that you folks are at, at company would be hard-pressed to spin up enough Bitcoin miners to materially move the billing needle on a month-to-month basis, just because of the sheer scope and scale. At small bill volumes, yeah, it's pretty easy to discover the thing that spiking your bill to three times normal. It's usually a managed NAT gateway. At your scale, tripling the bill begins to look suspiciously like the GDP of a small country, so what actually happened here? Invariably, at that scale, with that level of massive multiplier, it's usually the simplest solution, an error somewhere in the AWS billing system. Yes, they exist. Imagine that.Micheal: They do exist, and we've encountered that.Corey: Kind of heartstopping, isn't it?Micheal: [laugh]. I don't know if you remember when we had the big Spectre and the Meltdown, right, and those were interesting scenarios for us because we had identified a lot of those issues early on, given the scale we operate, and we were able to, sort of, obviously it did have an impact on the builds and everything, but that's it; that's why you have these dedicated teams to fix that. But I think one of the points you made, these are large bills and you're never going to have a 3x jump the next day. We're not going to be seeing that. And if that happens, you know, God save us. [laugh].But to your point, one of the things we do still want to be doing is look at trends, literally on a week-over-week basis because even a one percentage move is a pretty significant amount, if you think about it, which could be funding some other aspects of the business, which we would prefer to be investing on. So, we do want to have enough rigor and controls in place in our technical stack to identify and alert when something is off track. And it becomes challenging when you start using those higher-order services from your public cloud provider because there's no clear insights on how do you, kind of, parse that information. One of the biggest challenges we had at Pinterest was tying ownership to all these things.No, using tags is not going to cut it. It was so difficult for us to get to a point where we could put some sense of ownership in all the things and the resources people are using, and then subsequently have the right conversation with our ads infrastructure teams, or our product teams to help drive the cost improvements we want to be seeing. And I wouldn't be surprised if that's not a challenge already, even for the smaller companies who have bills in the tunes of tens and thousands, right?Corey: It is. It's predicting the spend and trying to categorize it appropriately; that's the root of all AWS bill panic on the corporate level. It's not that the bill is 20% higher, so we're going to go broke. Most companies spend far more on payroll than they do on infrastructure—as you mentioned with Netflix, content is a significantly larger [laugh] expense than any of those things; real estate, it's usually right up there too—but instead it's, when you're trying to do business forecasting of, okay, if we're going to have an additional 1000 monthly active users, what will the cost for us be to service those users and, okay, if we're seeing a sudden 20% variance, if that's the new normal, then well, that does change our cost projections for a number of years, what happens? When you're public, there starts to become the question of okay, do we have to restate earnings or what's the deal here?And of course, all this sidesteps past the unfortunate reality that, for many companies, the AWS bill is not a function of how many customers you have; it's how many engineers you hired. And that is always the way it winds up playing out for some reason. “It's why did we see a 10% increase in the bill? Yeah, we hired another data science team. Oops.” It's always seems to be the data science folks; I know I'd beat up on those folks a fair bit, and my apologies. And one day, if they analyze enough of the data, they might figure out why.Micheal: So, this is where I want to give a shout out to our data science team, especially some of the engineers working in the Infrastructure Governance Team putting these charts together, helping us derive insights. So, definitely props to them.I think there's a great segue into the point you made. As you add more engineers, what is the impact on the bottom line? And this is one of the things actually as part of engineering productivity, we think about as well on a long-term basis. Pinterest does have over 1000-plus engineers today, and to large degree, many of them actually have their own EC2 instances today. And I wouldn't say it's a significant amount of cost, but it is a large enough number, were shutting down a c5.9xl can actually fund a bunch of conference tickets or something else.And then you can imagine that sort of the scale you start working with at one point. The nuance here is though, you want to make sure there's enough flexibility for these engineers to do their local development in a sustainable way, but when moving to, say production, we really want to tighten the flexibility a bit so they don't end up doing what you just said, spin up a bunch of machines talking to the API directly which no one will be aware of.I want to share a small anecdote because when back in the day, this was probably four years ago, when we were doing some analysis on our bills, we realized that there was a huge jump every—I believe Wednesday—in our EC2 instances by almost a factor of, like, 500 to 600 instances. And we're like, “Why is this happening? What is going on?” And we found out there was an obscure job written by someone who had left the company, calling an EC2 API to spin up a search cluster of 500 machines on-demand, as part of pulling that ETL data together, and then shutting that cluster down. Which at times didn't work as expected because, you know, obviously, your Hadoop jobs are very predictable, right?So, those are the things we were dealing with back in the day, and you want to make sure—since then—this is where engineering productivity as team starts coming in that our job is to enable every engineer to be doing their best work across code building and deploying the services. And we have done this.Corey: Right. You and I can sit here and have an in-depth conversation about the intricacies of AWS billing in a bunch of different ways because in different ways we both specialize in it, in many respects. But let's say that Pinterest theoretically was foolish enough to hire me before I got into this space as an engineer, for terrifying reasons. And great. I start day one as a typical software developer if such a thing could be said to exist. How do you effectively build guardrails in so that I don't inadvertently wind up spinning up all the EC2 instances available to me within an account, which it turns out are more than one might expect sometimes, but still leave me free to do my job without effectively spending a nine-month safari figuring out how AWS bills work?Micheal: And this is why teams like ours exist, to help provide those tools to help you get started. So today, we actually don't let anyone directly use AWS APIs, or even use the UI for that matter. And I think you'll soon realize, the moment you hit, like, probably 30 or 40 people in your organization, you definitely want to lock it down. You don't want that access to be given to anyone or everyone. And then subsequently start building some higher-order tools or abstraction so people can start using that to control effectively.In this case, if you're a new engineer, Corey, which it seems like you were, at some point—Corey: I still write code like I am, don't worry.Micheal: [laugh]. So yes, you would get access to our internal tool to actually help spin up what we call is a dev app, where you get a chance to, obviously, choose the instance size, not the instance type itself, and we have actually constrained the instance types we have approved within Pinterest as well. We don't give you the entire list you get a chance to choose and deploy to. We actually have constraint to based on the workload types, what are the instance types we want to support because in the future, if we ever want to move from c3 to c5—and I've been there, trust me—it is not an easy thing to do, so you want to make sure that you're not letting people just use random instances, and constrain that by building some of these tools. As a new engineer, you would go in, you'd use the tool, and actually have a dev app provisioned for you with our Pinterest image to get you started.And then subsequently, we'll obviously shut it down if we see you not being using it over a certain amount of time, but those are sort of the guardrails we've put in over there so you never get a chance to directly ever use the EC2 APIs, or any of those AWS APIs to do certain things. The similar thing applies for S3 or any of the higher-order tools which AWS will provide, too.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. 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Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: How does that interplay with AWS launches yet another way to run containers, for example, and that becomes a valuable potential avenue to get some business value for a developer, but the platform you built doesn't necessarily embrace that capability? Or they release a feature to an existing tool that you use that could potentially be a just feature capability story, much more so than a cost savings one. How do you keep track of all of that and empower people to use those things so they're not effectively trying to reimplement DynamoDB on top of EC2?Micheal: That's been a challenge, actually, in the past for us because we've always been very flexible where engineers have had an opportunity to write their own solutions many a times rather than leveraging the AWS services, and of late, that's one of the reasons why we have an infrastructure organization—an extremely lean organization for what it's worth—but then still able to achieve outsized outputs. Where we evaluate a lot of these use cases, as they come in and open up different aspects of what we want to provide say directly from AWS, or build certain abstractions on top of it. Every time we talk about containers, obviously, we always associate that with something like Kubernetes and offerings from there on; we realized that our engineers directly never ask for those capabilities. They don't come in and say, “I need a new container orchestration system. Give that to me, and I'm going to be extremely productive.”What people actually realize is that if you can provide them effective tools and that can help them get their job done, they would be happy with it. For example, like I said, our deployment system, which is actually an open-source system called Teletraan. That is the bread and butter at Pinterest at which my team runs. We operate 100,000-plus machines. We have actually looked into container orchestration where we do have a dedicated Kubernetes team looking at it and helping certain use cases moved there, but we realized that the cost of entire migrations need to be evaluated against certain use cases which can benefit from being on Kubernetes from day one. You don't want to force anyone to move there, but give them the right incentives to move there. Case in point, let's upgrade your OS. Because if you're managing machines, obviously everyone loves to upgrade their OSes.Corey: Well, it's one of the things I love savings plans versus RIs; you talk about the c3 to c5 migration and everyone has a story about one of those, but the most foolish or frustrating reason that I ever saw not to do the upgrade was what we bought a bunch of Reserved Instances on the C3s and those have a year-and-a-half left to run. And it's foolish not on the part of customers—it's economically sound—but on the part of AWS where great, you're now forcing me to take a contractual commitment to something that serves me less effectively, rather than getting out of the way and letting me do my job. That's why it's so important to me at least, that savings plans cover Fargate and Lambda, I wish they covered SageMaker instead of SageMaker having its own thing because once again, you're now architecturally constrained based upon some ridiculous economic model that they have imposed on us. But that's a separate rant for another time.Micheal: No, we actually went through that process because we do have a healthy balance of how we do Reserved Instances and how we look at on-demand. We've never been big users have spot in the past because just the spot market itself, we realized that putting that pressure on our customers to figure out how to manage that is way more. When I say customers, in this case, engineers within the organization.Corey: Oh, yes. “I want to post some pictures on Pinterest, so now I have to understand the spot market. What?” Yeah.Micheal: [laugh]. So, in this case, when we even we're moving from C3 to C5—and this is where the partnership really plays out effectively, right, because it's also in the best interest of AWS to deprecate their aging hardware to support some of these new ones where they could also be making good enough premium margins for what it's worth and give the benefit back to the user. So, in this case, we were able to work out an extremely flexible way of moving to a C5 as soon as possible, get help from them, actually, in helping us do that, too, allocating capacity and working with them on capacity management. I believe at one point, we were actually one of the largest companies with a C3 footprint and it took quite a while for us to move to C5. But rest assured, once we moved, the savings was just immense. We were able to offset any of those RI and we were able to work behind the scenes to get that out. But obviously, not a lot of that is considered in a small-scale company just because of, like you said, those constraints which have been placed in a contractual obligation.Corey: Well, this is an area in which I will give the same guidance to companies of your scale as well as small-scale companies. And by small-scale, I mean, people on the free tier account, give or take, so I do mean the smallest of the small. Whenever you wind up in a scenario where you find yourself architecturally constrained by an economic barrier like this, reach out to your account manager. I promise you have one. Every account, even the tiny free tier accounts, have an account manager.I have an account manager, who I have to say has probably one of the most surreal jobs that AWS, just based upon the conversations I throw past him. But it's reaching out to your provider rather than trying to solve a lot of this stuff yourself by constraining how you're building things internally is always the right first move because the worst case is you don't get anywhere in those conversations. Okay, but at least you explored that, as opposed to what often happens is, “Oh, yeah. I have a switch over here I can flip and solve your entire problem. Does that help anything?”Micheal: Yeah.Corey: You feel foolish finding that out only after nine months of dedicated work, it turns out.Micheal: Which makes me wonder, Corey. I mean, do you see a lot of that happening where folks don't tend to reach out to their account managers, or rather treat them as partners in this case, right? Because it sounds like there is this unhealthy tension, I would say, as to what is the best help you could be getting from your account managers in this case.Corey: Constantly. And the challenge comes from a few things, in my experience. The first is that the quality of account managers and the technical account managers—the folks who are embedded many cases with your engineering teams in different ways—does vary. AWS is scaling wildly and bursting at the seams, and people are hard to scale.So, some are fantastic, some are decidedly less so, and most folks fall somewhere in the middle of that bell curve. And it doesn't take too many poor experiences for the default to be, “Oh, those people are useless. They never do anything we want, so why bother asking them?” And that leads to an unhealthy dynamic where a lot of companies will wind up treating their AWS account manager types as a ticket triage system, or the last resort of places that they'll turn when they should be involved in earlier conversations.I mean, take Pinterest as an example of this. I'm not sure how many technical account managers you have assigned to your account, but I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that the ratio of technical account managers to engineers working on the environment is incredibly lopsided. It's got to be a high ratio just because of the nature of how these things work. So, there are a lot of people who are actively working on things that would almost certainly benefit from a more holistic conversation with your AWS account team, but it doesn't occur to them to do it just because of either perceived biases around levels of competence, or poor experiences in the past, or simply not knowing the capabilities that are there. If I could tell one story around the AWS account management story, it would be talk to folks sooner about these things.And to be clear, Pinterest has this less than other folks, but AWS does themselves no favors by having a product strategy of, “Yes,” because very often in service of those conversations with a number of companies, there is the very real concern of are they doing research so that they can launch a service that competes with us? Amazon as a whole launching a social network is admittedly one of the most hilarious ideas I [laugh] can come up with and I hope they take a whack at it just to watch them learn all these lessons themselves, but that is again, neither here nor there.Micheal: That story is very interesting, and I think you mentioned one thing; it's just that lack of trust, or even knowing what the account managers can actually do for you. There seems to be just a lack of education on that. And we also found it the hard way, right? I wouldn't say that Pinterest figured this out on day one. We evolved sort of a relationship over time. Yes, our time… engagements are, sort of, lopsided, but we were able to negotiate that as part of deals as we learned a bit more on what we can and we cannot do, and how these individuals are beneficial for Pinterest as well. And—Corey: Well, here's a question for you, without naming names—and this might illustrate part of the challenge customers have—how long has your account manager—not the technical account managers, but your account manager—been assigned to your account?Micheal: I've been at Pinterest for five years and I've been working with the same person. And he's amazing.Corey: Which is incredibly atypical. At a lot of smaller companies, it feels like, “Oh, I'm your account manager being introduced to you.” And, “Are you the third one this year? Great.” What happens is that if the account manager excels, very often they get promoted and work with a smaller number of accounts at larger spend, and whereas if they don't find that AWS is a great place for them for a variety of reasons, they go somewhere else and need to be backfilled.So, at the smaller account, it's, “Great. I've had more account managers in a year than you've had in five.” And that is often the experience when you start seeing significant levels of rotation, especially on the customer engineering side where you wind up with you have this big kickoff, and everyone's aware of all the capabilities and you look at it three years later, and not a single person who was in that kickoff is still involved with the account on either side, and it's just sort of been evolving evolutionarily from there. One thing that we've done in some of our larger accounts as part of our negotiation process is when we see that the bridges have been so thoroughly burned, we will effectively request a full account team cycle, just because it's time to get new faces in where the customer, in many cases unreasonably, is not going to say, “Yeah but a year-and-a-half ago you did this terrible thing and we're still salty about it.” Fine, whatever. I get it. People relationships are hard. Let's go ahead and swap some folks out so that there are new faces with new perspectives because that helps.Micheal: Well, first off, if you had so many switches in account manager, I think that's something speaks about [laugh] how you've been working, too. I'm just kidding. There are a bu—Corey: Entirely possible. In seriousness, yes. But if you talk to—like, this is not just me because in my case, yeah, I feel like my account manager is whoever drew the short straw that week because frankly, yeah, that does seem like a great punishment to wind up passing out to someone who is underperforming. But for a lot of folks who are in the mid-tier, like, spending $50 to $100,000 a month, this is a very common story.Micheal: Yeah. Actually, we've heard a bit about this, too. And like you said, I think maintaining context is the most thing. You really want your account manager to vouch for you, really be your champion in those meetings because AWS, like you said is so large, getting those exec time, and reviews, and there's so many things that happen, your account manager is the champion for you, or right there. And it's important and in fact in your best interest to have a great relationship with them as well, not treat them as, oh yet another vendor.And I think that's where things start to get a bit messy because when you start treating them as yet another vendor, there is no incentive for them to do the best for you, too. You know, people relationships are hard. But that said though, I think given the amount of customers like these cloud companies are accruing, I wouldn't be surprised; every account manager seems to be extremely burdened. Even in our case, although I've been having a chance to work with this one person for a long time, we've actually expanded. We have now multiple account managers helping us out as we've started scaling to use certain aspects of AWS which we've never explored before.We were a bit constrained and reserved about what service we want to use because there have been instances where we have tried using something and we have hit the wall pretty immediately. API rate limits, or it's not ready for primetime, and we're like, “Oh, my God. Now, what do we do?” So, we have a bit more cautious. But that said, over time, having an account manager who understands how you work, what scale you have, they're able to advocate with the internal engineering teams within the cloud provider to make the best of supporting you as a customer and tell that success story all the way out.So yeah, I can totally understand how this may be hard, especially for those small companies. For what it's worth, I think the best way to really think about it is not treat them as your vendor, but really go out on a limb there. Even though you signed a deal with them, you want to make sure that you have the continuing relationship with them to have—represent your voice better within the company. Which is probably hard. [laugh].Corey: That's always the hard part. Honestly, if this were the sort of thing that were easy to automate, or you could wind up building out something that winds up helping companies figure out how to solve these things programmatically, talk about interesting business problems that are only going to get larger in the fullness of time. This is not going away, even if AWS stopped signing up new customers entirely right now, they would still have years of growth ahead of them just from organic growth. And take a company with the scale of Pinterest and just think of how many years it would take to do a full-on exodus, even if it became priority number one. It's not realistic in many cases, which is why I've never been a big fan of multi-cloud as an approach for negotiation. Yeah, AWS has more data on those points than any of us do; they're not worried about it. It just makes you sound like an unsophisticated negotiator. Pick your poison and lean in.Micheal: That is the truth you just mentioned, and I probably want to give a call out to our head of infrastructure, [Coburn 00:42:13]. He's also my boss, and he had brought this perspective as well. As part of any negotiation discussions, like you just said, AWS has way more data points on this than what we think we can do in terms of talking about, “Oh, we are exploring this other cloud provider.” And it's—they would be like, “Yeah. Do tell me more [laugh] how that's going.”And it's probably in the best interest to never use that as a negotiation tactic because they clearly know the investments that's going to build on what you've done, so you might as well be talking more—again, this is where that relationship really plays together because you want both of them to be successful. And it's in their best interest to still keep you happy because the good thing about at least companies of our size is that we're probably, like, one phone call away from some of their executive team, where we could always talk about what didn't work for us. And I know not everyone has that opportunity, but I'm really hoping and I know at least with some of the interactions we've had with the AWS teams, they're actively working and building that relationship more and more, giving access to those customer advisory boards, and all of them to have those direct calls with the executives. I don't know whether you've seen that in your experience in helping some of these companies?Corey: Have a different approach to it. It turns out when you're super loud and public and noisy about AWS and spend too much time in Seattle, you start to spend time with those people on a social basis. Because, again, I'm obnoxious and annoying to a lot of AWS folks, but I'm also having an obnoxious habit of being right in most of the things I'm pointing out. And that becomes harder and harder to ignore. I mean, part of the value that I found in being able to do this as a consultant is that I begin to compare and contrast different customer environments on a consistent ongoing basis.I mean, the reason that negotiation works well from my perspective is that AWS does a bunch of these every week, and customers do these every few years with AWS. And well, we do an awful lot of them, too, and it's okay, we've seen different ways things can get structured and it doesn't take too long and too many engagements before you start to see the points of commonality in how these things flow together. So, when we wind up seeing things that a customer is planning on architecturally and looking to do in the future, and, “Well, wait a minute. Have you talked to the folks negotiating the contract about this? Because that does potentially have bearing and it provides better data than what AWS is gathering just through looking at overall spend trends. So yeah, bring that up. That is absolutely going to impact the type of offer you get.”It just comes down to understanding the motivators that drive folks and it comes down to, I think understanding the incentives. I will say that across the board, I have never yet seen a deal from AWS come through where it was, “Okay, at this point you're just trying to hoodwink the customer and get them to sign on something that doesn't help them.” I've seen mistakes that can definitely lead to that impression, and I've seen areas where they're doing data is incomplete and they're making assumptions that are not borne out in reality. But it's not one of those bad faith type—Micheal: Yeah.Corey: —of negotiations. If it were, I would be framing a lot of this very differently. It sounds weird to say, “Yeah, your vendor is not trying to screw you over in this sense,” because look at the entire IT industry. How often has that been true about almost any other vendor in the fullness of time? This is something a bit different, and I still think we're trying to grapple with the repercussions of that, from a negotiation standpoint and from a long-term business continuity standpoint, when your faith is linked—in a shared fate context—with your vendor.Micheal: It's in their best interest as well because they're trying to build a diversified portfolio. Like, if they help 100 companies, even if one of them becomes the next Pinterest, that's great, right? And that continued relationship is what they're aiming for. So, assuming any bad faith over there probably is not going to be the best outcome, like you said. And two, it's not a zero-sum game.I always get a sense that when you're doing these negotiations, it's an all-or-nothing deal. It's not. You have to think they're also running a business and it's important that you as your business, how okay are you with some of those premiums? You cannot get a discount on everything, you cannot get the deal or the numbers you probably want almost everything. And to your point, architecturally, if you're moving in a certain direction where you think in the next three years, this is what your usage is going to be or it will come down to that, obviously, you should be investing more and negotiating that out front rather than managed NAT [laugh] gateways, I guess. So, I think that's also an important mindset to take in as part of any of these negotiations. Which I'm assuming—I don't know how you folks have been working in the past, but at least that's one of the key items we have taken in as part of any of these discussions.Corey: I would agree wholeheartedly. I think that it just comes down to understanding where you're going, what's important, and again in some cases knowing around what things AWS will never bend contractually. I've seen companies spend six weeks or more trying to get to negotiate custom SLAs around services. Let me save everyone a bunch of time and money; they will not grant them to you.Micheal: Yeah.Corey: I promise. So, stop asking for them; you're not going to get them. There are other things they will negotiate on that they're going to be highly case-dependent. I'm hesitant to mention any of them just because, “Well, wait a minute, we did that once. Why are you talking about that in public?” I don't want to hear it and confidentiality matters. But yeah, not everything is negotiable, but most things are, so figuring out what levers and knobs and dials you have is important.Micheal: We also found it that way. AWS does cater to their—they are a platform and they are pretty clear in how much engagement—even if we are one of their top customers, there's been many times where I know their product managers have heavily pushed back on some of the requests we have put in. And that makes me wonder, they probably have the same engagement even with the smallest of customers, there's always an implicit assumption that the big fish is trying to get the most out of your public cloud providers. To your point, I don't think that's true. We're rarely able to negotiate anything exclusive in terms of their product offerings just for us, if that makes sense.Case in point, tell us your capacity [laugh] for x instances or type of instances, so we as a company would know how to plan out our scale-ups or scale-downs. That's not going to happen exclusively for you. But those kind of things are just, like, examples we have had a chance to work with their product managers and see if, can we get some flexibility on that? For what it's worth, though, they are willing to find a middle ground with you to make sure that you get your answers and, obviously, you're being successful in your plans to use certain technologies they offer or [unintelligible 00:48:31] how you use their services.Corey: So, I know we've gone significantly over time and we are definitely going to do another episode talking about a lot of the other things that you're involved in because I'm going to assume that your full-time job is not worrying about the AWS bill. In fact, you do a fair number of things beyond that; I just get stuck on that one, given that it is but I eat, sleep, breathe, and dream about.Micheal: Absolutely. I would love to talk more, especially about how we're enabling our engineers to be extremely productive in this new world, and how we want to cater to this whole cloud-native environment which is being created, and make sure people are doing their best work. But regardless, Corey, I mean, this has been an amazing, insightful chat, even for me. And I really appreciate you having me on the show.Corey: No, thank you for joining me. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and how you think about things, where can they find you? Because I'm also going to go out on a limb and assume you're also probably hiring, given that everyone seems to be these days.Micheal: Well, that is true. And I wasn't planning to make a hiring pitch but I'm glad that you leaned into that one. Yes, we are hiring and you can find me on Twitter at twitter dot com slash M-I-C-H-E-A-L. I am spelled a bit differently, so make sure you can hit me up, and my DMs are open. And obviously, we have all our open roles listed on pinterestcareers.com as well.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:49:45]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Micheal: Thank you, Corey. It was really been great on your show.Corey: And I'm sure we'll do it again in the near future. Micheal Benedict, Head of Engineering Productivity at Pinterest. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a long rambling comment about exactly how many data centers Pinterest could build instead.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

No Visuals Podcast
#13 — "For People & The Planet" - Sustainability and Healing with The Heal Room

No Visuals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 54:39


On this week's episode of #AlchemizedGlory, I am joined by Ana Duque and Karen Mejias of The Heal Room, the first Zero Waste and Wellness shop in Rhode Island. The Heal Room is a safe space to eco-shop and educate yourself to heal your body and our planet. Ana and Karen are two women minority business founders and long-time friends. This magical shop is packed with zero waste items, the biggest refill station in Rhode Island, an herb bar, healing books and tools and so much more!The Heal Room whos motto is "For the People & The Planet", this wellness and sustainability shop is a community conversation starter and an extremely warm environment once you walk-in. Ana and Karen are well versed in helping their conscious community to introduce small solutions that can help you take individual action and make better choices regarding your health and the planet's health. The Heal Room is truly a gem in the smallest state and a one-stop-shop for all your conscious lifestyle needs.Join me this week, as we dive into their upbringing and connections to sustainability, creating community, healing, stepping into our gifts and so much more. Please support the @TheHealRoom (Instagram) by shopping zero waste at their home frequency store located in Pawtucket, RI, and at their upcoming classes and events including live meditations and community clean-ups. Refer to their page and links for more details!Website: https://thehealroom.coEmail: thehealroomri@gmail.comStore Hours: Mon-Frid: 11am~7pm and Sat & Sun: 10am~6pm Resources: The EWG is a great resource for looking at the purity of your products/ how toxic they really are: https://www.ewg.org/skindeep/Braiding sweetgrass is a great book that ties indigenous knowledge to mindfulness and sustainability: https://amzn.to/30k7Bm6Gaia TV is the spiritual "Netflix" a great way to start on your awakening journey: https://www.gaia.com/Share this episode with some you think would resonate with this message. If you'd like to support the podcast, please rate and comment in Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts and subscribe to be notified of new episodes!@AlchemizedGloryCo (IG and Facebook)https://alchemizedglory.co —  website coming soon!Take good care!

Stereo Embers: The Podcast
Stereo Embers The Podcast: Erin McKeown

Stereo Embers: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 70:16


“Kiss Off, Kiss Off” The Virginia -born Erin McKeown is best categorized as un-categorizable.Whether she's playing guitar with the Mountain Goats, tearing through big band music in a tailored suit or writing an off-Broadway musical, McKeown pretty much does it all. A graduate of Brown, McKeown, over the course of her over 20 year career, has put out almost 15 solo albums, toured with Andrew Bird, Thea Gilmore, Josh Ritter and the Indigo Girls, played Bonnaroo and Glastonbury, had her music appear in commercials and TV shows, was a resident artist at Providence, RI's revolutionary community arts organization AS220 and she was the 2011-2012 fellow at Harvard's Berkman Klein Center For Internet & Society. Yes, she's busy. The recipient of a 2016 writing fellowship from The Studios of Key West and a 2018 residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. McKeown is currently a 2020-21 Professor of the Practice at Brown University. Her new album KISS OFF KISS OFF is a raw blast of nervy rock and roll that's got street smart grooves and real poetic grit. It's fast and catchy and it swerves with all the lippy snarl of early Joan Jett. In this chat, McKewon talks to Alex about sports, creativity, self-preservation and why she won't answer emails after 6pm. www.erinmckeown.com www.bombshellradion.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers Twitter: @emberseditor IG: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)
Matt Brown and Cynthia Mendes are Running for Governor and Lt. Governor of Rhode Island

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 29:15


Bill Bartholomew welcomes back RI gubernatorial candidate Matt Brown and Lt. Gubernatorial candidate Cynthia Mendes, this time as a unit, for a discussion on their efforts to elect a slate of progressive candidates (themselves, included) via the Rhode Island Political Cooperative.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bartholomewtown?fan_landing=true)

Down Time with Cranston Public Library
81 - Book Gift Giving Guide

Down Time with Cranston Public Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 39:04


This week Tayla is joined by Lisa Valentino from Ink Fish Books in Warren and Steven Porter from Stillwater Books in Pawtucket to bring you an extra dose of book recommendations for your holiday gift giving! We also discuss enjoying books new and old, Netflix binge watching, and Norwegian sci-fi dramas. During the Last Chapter they discuss: if you could change one thing about literature, what would it be? Like what you hear? Rate and review Down Time on Apple Podcasts or your podcast player of choice! If you'd like to submit a topic for The Last Chapter you can send your topic suggestions to downtime@cranstonlibrary.org. Our theme music is Day Trips by Ketsa and our ad music is Happy Ukulele by Scott Holmes. Thanks for listening! Books Five Tuesdays in Winter by Lily King The Fatal Shore by Robert Hughes Ball Four by Jim Bouton Cheer Up! Love and Pompoms by Crystal Frasier, Val Wise, & Oscar O. Jupiter You by Caroline Kepnes State of Terror by Hillary Rodham Clinton & Louise Penny Wish You Were Here by Jodi Picoult For the Best by Vanessa Lillie Ruby Falls by Deborah Goodrich Royce People We Meet On Vacation by Emily Henry Best Wishes, Warmest Regards by Daniel Levy & Eugene Levy Call Us What We Carry by Amanda Gorman Change Sings by Amanda Gorman The Paper Palace by Miranda Cowley Heller The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict & Victoria Christopher Murray Beauty in the Street by Scott Turner Rhode Island Stories by Michael Fine Swan Song by Elizabeth B. Splaine AV Squid Game (2021) You (2018- ) Bridgerton (2020- ) What If…? (2021- ) Beforeigners (2019- ) Other Ink Fish Books, Warren, RI Stillwater Books, Pawtucket, RI

CA Podcast
Episode 4 | Blame Game

CA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 115:04


This episode is dedicated to the 8 lives lost at the Astroworld Festival on November 5th, 2021. We send our energy and prayer to families of Mirza Baig age 27, Rodolfo Peña age 23, Madison Dubiski age 23, Franco Patiño age 21, Jacob Jurinke age 20, John Hilgert age 14, Axel Acosta Avila age 21, and Brianna Rodriguez age 16. Welcome Back to CAP 0:00 Full Breakdown of Astroworld Tragedy 1:25 Honoring the Fans That Died 3:14 Our Experience at Travis Scott concerts/festivals 6:10 Reviewing the Evidence of the Travis Scott Festival Accident 8:55 Someone Injecting Needles In Crowd 13:35 Travis Scott Apologizes 18:00 Roddy Ricch and Kanye Honor The Victims 29:50 What Will Travis Do Now 33:00 Summarizing Kanye's Best Interview Ever (Drink Champs) 39:30 Kanye Clears Up Drake Beef 46:58 Beanie Sigel Invented "Yeezy" 1:02:50 Kanye vs the World (Soulja, Big Sean, Common, Just Blaze) 1:05:45 Travis Scott Dropped 2 Songs Before The Festival 1:22:50 Summer Walker Dropped R&B Album of the Year 1:23:45 Weekly Sports Recap 1:29:00 UFC 268 & Canelo 1:29:15 Wild Henry Ruggs Story 1:32:10 MLB Champs? 1:40:30 Eminem Acting on 50 Cent's show “BMF” 1:47:24 Starz vs 50 Cent 1:51:10 See You Next Week! 1:54:00 *Listen to the podcast audio on Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, and Google Podcasts here, click down below! https://linktr.ee/ca_pod ----------- Make sure to follow our Podcast Clip Page here on YouTube @CAPCLIPS | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSPJ... and subscribe! Also, follow the Podcast Instagram @CA_Pod | https://www.instagram.com/ca_pod/   Merch Available Here - https://complexambition.shop----------------------------------------------------------- Want a promo snippet of your song at the beginning of the video? Email us if interested in business!  - ComplexAmbition401@Gmail.com - ------------------------------------------------------------ Want To Send Us Something? 820 ELMWOOD AVE P.O. Box 27533 PROVIDENCE, RI 02907 ------------------------------------------------------------- R.I.P. Nipsey, Mac, XXXtentacion, Juice, Pop, Von and DMX -------------------------------------------------------------- FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA SOUND:  https://www.instagram.com/itsavibe/?h...... Marloon: https://www.instagram.com/itshotinthi...... Y.I: https://www.instagram.com/evenbetters......  --------------------------------------------------------------------- COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER    ALL RIGHTS BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cambition/support

Real Estate Addicts
#74 Jeff Fullerton, Sound Advice on Multifamily Construction

Real Estate Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:16


This week we are joined by Jeff Fullerton, a veteran acoustics expert and Department Manager at Intertek in Boston. Jeff shares his secrets on ensuring your next multifamily project achieves acoustic privacy, a major topic of growing importance in our industry. Jeff shares how your project team can improve acoustics at the design stage, how the building code addresses acoustical performance, the difference between STC and IIC and how they are measured, the paradox of background noise, floor/ceiling and wall design acoustic principles. As a developer, you can spend almost unlimited money on achieving sound separation, so we spend the back half of the episode talking through the various sound control solutions currently on the market from resilient channel to HushFrame, gypsum floor underlayment's, damping compounds, laminated drywall and evaluate the pros and cons of each. Thank you as always for rating and reviewing the Real Estate Addicts Podcast! Podcast Sponsor: First Boston Capital Partners www.grossmanco.com/private-lending/ Trusted partner & private lender providing loans to builders, developers and real estate investors in MA, CT, RI, NH & NY.

Breaking Money Silence®
Don’t Look in the Rearview Mirror! An Interview with Rob Auclair, CFP® | Episode 135

Breaking Money Silence®

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 32:25


Don't Look in the Rearview Mirror! An Interview with Rob Auclair, CFP® Episode 135 Today's podcast episode is the second in the Breaking Money Silence® with Your Younger Self series. I interviewed Robert Auclair, CFP®  about his passion for financial education, his financial struggles at the beginning of his career, and what advice he would give his younger self about money.  Rob founded Balanced Wealth Management (BWM) in 2015 and he serves as principal/managing partner. BWM integrates investment planning, financial planning, and technology with the psychology of motivating people to help clients reach their life and financial goals. Rob currently hosts Successful Living, a television show that airs on Fox in Providence, RI. Read more. Here are 5 things you will learn by listening to this episode: Why financial professionals struggle with money too! The role of curiosity in living a financially balanced life Why you need to stop looking out the rearview mirror  How to face your money fears and visualize your future Ways to help kids avoid repeating their parents' money mistakes Want to connect with Rob? Here's how:  Balanced Wealth website Successful Living TV show Social: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter Check out the financial app Rob uses with his kids:  Greenlight Special offer: A complimentary education session to get your financial questions answered. Click here to schedule.   A special thank you to our episode sponsor, Plan Well. Be Well.   Plan well. Be Well is a place that connects your financial well-being to your personal well-being. It's a place to inspire and learn. To define aspirations. To begin articulating what well-being looks like for you. And a place to provide the financial tools needed to achieve your financial goals and live your intended life. Because when you plan well, you can be well. Now and in the future. For more information, visit PlanWellBeWell.com  Apply for the Master Class on Negotiating: Join me for this small group coaching experience and learn how to remove psychological roadblocks to earning your true worth. A new group starts January 2022. Space is limited so register today. Click here to register. .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content { background-color: #146a7d !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container .et_bloom_form_header { background-color: #146a7d !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content button { background-color: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content .et_bloom_fields i { color: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content .et_bloom_custom_field_radio i:before { background: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_content button { background-color: #f58023 !important; } .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container h2, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container h2 span, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container h2 strong { font-family: "Open Sans", Helvetica, Arial, Lucida, sans-serif; }.et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container p, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container p span, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container p strong, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container form input, .et_bloom .et_bloom_optin_1 .et_bloom_form_container form button span { font-family: "Open Sans", Helvetica, Arial, Lucida, sans-serif; } Submit your question for the Breaking Money ...

Victory Church Providence
His Body Was Broken for you.

Victory Church Providence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 24:01


A Sermon by Pastor Richard Sfameni, Lead Pastor of Victory Church in Providence, RI.   Share in Holy Communion with us. 

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network
The Story Walking Radio Hour with Wendy Fachon

Dreamvisions 7 Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 57:16


Blue Mind: Loving Our Blue Planet Guests: John Marsland, founder and President of the Blackstone River Watershed Council, and Dr. Wallace J. Nichols, marine biologist and author of Blue Mind The term “blue mind” describes the mildly meditative state we fall into when near, in, on or under water. It's the antidote to what we refer to as “red mind,” which is the anxious, over-connected and over-stimulated state that defines modern life. We are drawn to water, whether it's a bathtub, a pool, a stream, a pond or an ocean. Water makes us calmer, happier and healthier. Once we form a personal connection with a river, a lake, a beach or an island, we take better care of that special place. We protect what we love. The 50-year  "Zap the Blackstone Project" is one great example of how thousands of volunteers are working together to monitor and clean up the waters they love. Guest John Marsland introduced me to the concept of "blue mind," while we were walking along the Blackstone River. John is the founder and President of the Blackstone River Watershed Council, which started out as the all-volunteer non-profit Friends of the Blackstone in 1990. John can often be found canoeing on the river, leading guided Blue Mind walks, or giving Corridor Chats at the Sycamore Landing property in Manville, RI. A passionate conservationist, John is the longest serving volunteer with the National Park Service – having served 31 years. Dr. Wallace J. Nichols is the author of Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, and Better at What You Do. In J's own words, he is a marine biologist, water-lover, turtle nerd, embarrassing Dad & creator of useful words. Formerly a Senior Scientist at Ocean Conservancy, J. Nichols holds a B.A. degree from DePauw University in Biology and Spanish, a Master of Engineering Management degree in Natural Resource Economics and Policy from Duke University, and a Ph.D. degree in Wildlife Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Arizona. INFORMATION RESOURCES Blackstone River Watershed Council: A 'Blue Mind' frame of mind - https://blackstoneriver.org/ Zap the Blackstone - https://zaptheblackstone.com/ SWRH Podcast: Keep Blackstone Valley Beautiful - https://dreamvisions7radio.com/keep-earth-beautiful-recycle-ecotourism/ SWRH Podcast: Following the Flow to Clean Up our Waters - https://dreamvisions7radio.com/following-in-the-flow-to-clean-up-our-waters-with-guest-bonnie-combs-marketing-director-blackstone-heritage-corridor/ Wallace J Nichols - https://www.wallacejnichols.org/ South Carolina Green Steps and Adopt-a-Stream program information – https://eeasc.org/Green-Step-Schools/ https://www.clemson.edu/public/water/watershed/scaas/ Learn more at www.storywalking.com ,  https://netwalkri.com email wendy@netwalkri.com or call 401 529-6830. Connect with Wendy to order copies of Fiddlesticks, The Angel Heart or Storywalker Wild Plant Magic Cards. Subscribe to Wendy's blog Writing with Wendy at www.wendyfachon.blog. Join Wendy on facebook at www.facebook.com/groups/StoryWalkingRadio

For the Sake of the Child
Stable Educational Opportunities for Military Families

For the Sake of the Child

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 15:14


We chat with Lisa Molinari, Vice President of Operations at Orion Military Scholarship, about the opportunity for military kids to experience a stable high school experience through boarding school. Then we will have Riley, an Orion Scholar, share why he decided to try boarding school and how being a military kid has made this transition easier. Show Notes: https://www.orionmilitary.org/   Bio: Lisa Molinari - VICE PRESIDENT, Operations Lisa is a licensed attorney and military family columnist for Stars and Stripes, the newspaper for the US Armed Forces at home and abroad. As Navy spouse to Francis for 24 years, and as a mother of three, Lisa understands the impact of frequent PCS moves on military children, and the challenges of finding good educational opportunities.   Riley Attends St. George's School (Newport, RI) beginning Fall 2021 Active-duty Army family Currently stationed in Cuba Moved seven times, attended eight schools Science enthusiast, interested in Microbiology Interests include distance running, skiing, guitar, surfing, sailing, mountain biking, stock market This podcast was made possible thanks to the generous support from the Mildenhall Spouses' Association and Military Spouses' Association 29 Palms. https://www.mildenhallspousesassociation.com/ https://www.msa29palms.org/

Cheap Talk Wrestling
CTW 49: “The Shoot” | ROH in Trouble ?! | Battle For The Interstate Exclusive? | Bad Haas New??? |

Cheap Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 47:22


This weeks addition is a SHOOT!!! TJ is joined by Former CTW Champ CARR. TJ puts the New Champion the former Intern Jake Golding on notice. No guest this week but we do give you an EXCLUSIVE on how The Battle For The Interstate was shot and everything that happened from behind the scenes to the final briefcase pick. “The Provider” is giving the fans the exclusive so make sure to tune in an listen to who TJ has to thank for the making of the BFTI !! With everything going on in the wrestling world we reflect on the current situation for Ring Of Honor and the releasing of the ENTIRE ROSTER!! Who know maybe WWE can help with that cool Million that they will be getting from Brock Lesnar?!? TJ talks about how interested of a fine and suspension for Brock they could have worked that angle another way! Bray Wyatt is finally released from the 90 protocol and what can we expect from the best mind in the business, TJ and Carr break it down. Make sure to listen all the way to the end for some Bad Haas News for Dec 9th!!

The Plan for Special Needs Trusts
Special Olympics Massachusetts: The Power of Inclusive Sports

The Plan for Special Needs Trusts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 18:12


In this episode, hear from Mary Beth McMahon, President and CEO of Special Olympics Massachusetts, as she highlights just how special this organization is. Special Olympics Massachusetts strives to spread inclusion through year-round sports training and competition while changing the way the world views individuals with intellectual disabilities. She also highlights the importance of their partnership with PLAN of MA & RI. 

Screaming in the Cloud
That Datadog Will Hunt with Dann Berg

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 41:24


About DannDann Berg is a Senior CloudOps Analyst at Datadog, and has nearly a decade of experience working in the cloud and optimizing multi-million dollar budgets. He is also an active member of the larger technical community, hosting the monthly New York City FinOps Meetup, and has been published multiple times in places such as MSNBC, Fox News, NPR, and others. When he's not saving companies millions of dollars, he's writing plays, and has had two full-lengh plays produced in New York City and China.Links: Datadog: https://www.datadoghq.com Personal Website: https://dannb.org LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dannberg/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/dannberg Monthly newsletter: https://dannb.org/newsletter/ Previous SITC episode with Dann Berg, Episode 51: https://www.lastweekinaws.com/podcast/screaming-in-the-cloud/episode-51-size-of-cloud-bill-not-about-number-of-customers-but-number-of-engineers-you-ve-hired/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. If there's one thing that I love, it is certainly not AWS billing, but for better or worse, that's where my career has led me. Way back in Episode 51, I had Dann Berg, the CloudOps analyst at Datadog. And now he's back for more. Things have changed. He's now a senior CloudOps analyst, and I'm hoping my jokes have gotten better. Dann, thanks for being bold enough to come out and find out.Dann: Yeah. I'm excited to see if these jokes have gotten better. That's the main reason for coming back.Corey: Exactly. Because it turns out that death, taxes, and AWS bills are the things that are inevitable and never seem to change.Dann: Yeah. They just keep coming. They never stop, and they're always slightly different than you expect. I guess, just like death and taxes.Corey: So, when we spoke back in, I want to say 2019 is when it aired, so probably that—ish—is when we had the conversation, if not a little bit before that, you were effectively a team of one, and as mentioned, had the CloudOps analyst title. Now, you're a senior CloudOps analyst, which I assume just means you're older. Is the team larger as well? What does that process look like? How has it evolved in the last couple years?Dann: Yeah, it's been interesting, especially being a single organization and that organization being Datadog, that to be able to grow the team a little bit. So, as you said, it was just me. Now, it's a total of four people, including myself, so three others. And, yeah, it's been interesting just in terms of my own professional development, being able to identify what needs to be done, how much capacity I have, and being able to grow it over time, especially in this fairly new space of being specifically focused on cloud cost billing. So, kind of that bridge between engineering and finance, which itself is kind of a fairly new space, still.Corey: It is. And my favorite part of having these conversations with folks who have no idea what this space is, is learning—when I was starting—out how to talk about this in a way that didn't lead down weird paths. It's, “Oh, you save money on Amazon bills? Can you help me save money on socks?” It's like, “No. Well, yes. Get the Prime card, it gives you 5% off. But no.” And yeah, I talk about camelcamelcamel and other ways of working around the retail side, but that's not really what I do.It's similar to back when I was doing SRE-style work. I made it a point never to talk about being someone involved in working in tech, or suddenly you're the neighborhood printer repair person. Similarly, you have, I guess, gone in a strange direction because you weren't, to my recollection, someone who had a strong SRE background. That's not where you came from in the traditional sense, is it?Dann: No, not an SRE background at all. Yeah, I mean, it's really interesting. So, talking about this space, I mean, people are calling it a lot of different things, cloud economics, the term FinOps—financial operations—is being used a lot, now—Corey: Cloud financial management is another popular one. Oh, swing a dead cat, you'll hit 15 different words, and I give—my advice on that, even though I hate some of the terms is, cool. If people are going to pay you to have a title, even if you think it's ridiculous, you can take the money or you can die on a petty naming hill and here we are.Dann: Yeah. And it's interesting because the role that I was hired for at Datadog was very much this niche, very specific role that I didn't realize was a niche, very specific role at the time. So previously, I was at a company and I was building out their data centers, so I was working with vendors, buying servers, sometimes going on-site, installing, racking those, dealing with RMAs. And I was getting more involved as their cloud usage was growing and bringing some of those hardware capitalization cost procedures to the cloud. And so I found myself in this kind of niche role in my previous company.And a Datadog, they basically had the exact same role that was dealing with all of the billing stuff around the cloud—kind of from an engineering perspective because it was on the engineering team—but working closely with finance, and I was like, “Oh, these are the skills that I have.” And it kind of fit perfectly. And it wasn't until after I got to Datadog and was doing more research about this specific space that I discovered just how wide open it was. And I mean, meeting you was one of the earliest things that I did in the industry. Discovering the FinOps Foundation and a few other things has kind of like opened my eyes to this as an actual career path.Corey: It's an expensive problem that isn't going away anytime soon, and it is foundational and core to the entire rest of how companies are building things these days. My argument has been for a while that when it comes to cloud, cost and architecture are the exact same thing. You don't have the deep SRE architect background, but you're also now a member of a four-person team. Does everyone in the team have the same skill set as you, or do you wind up effectively tagging in subject matter experts from different areas? How is the team composed? People love to ask me this question, and I strongly believe there's no one way to do it. But what's your answer?Dann: Yeah, I mean, the team works very much in terms of everybody kind of taking on tasks that they need to do, but we did hire for specific skill sets when we tried to find people. So, the first person that we hired, we wanted them to have more of a developer engineer type background, writing code, stuff like that. The third hire, we were looking for somebody that was more of a generalist. I've seen myself more as a generalist in the space; anything that's going on, I can pick it up and make some progress on it and build something out. And then the fourth person, we were lacking some of the deeper FP&A or FinOps experience, and so we found somebody with more of that kind of background and less of the engineering experience, but they were eager to, kind of, move from finance into more of an engineering role. And I feel like this is the perfect role for that because I feel like there are a lot of non-engineers that want to break into engineering and don't really know how to do it. And if you are in finance, in FP&A, finding one of these more cloud-cost-optimization-specific roles is the great way to bridge that gap, I feel.Corey: The last time we spoke, I was independent, doing this all myself, and it turns out that taking all of the things that make me and trying to find those in other people is a relatively heavy lift, even if you discount the things like ‘obnoxious on Twitter.' So, how do you start decomposing that? Well, now we're a dozen people and we've found ways to do it. But by and large in our experience, for the way that we interact—and I want to get to that in a second—is that it's easier for us to teach engineers how finance works than it is the opposite direction. And there are exceptions to that, and as we scale, I can easily see a day in the near future where that is no longer the case.However, we also have two very specific styles of engagement. We do our cost optimization projects, where we go into an environment and, “Oh, fix this. Turn that thing off. Do you really need eight copies of those four petabytes of data? Oh, you didn't realize they were there. Great, maybe delete it.” And we look like wizards from the future and things are great.The other project that we do is contract negotiation with AWS, especially at large scale. It's never as simple as people would have you believe because, “Oh, you're doing co-marketing efforts, and you have a very specific use case, and there are business partnerships on 15 different levels, and that all factors into how this works.” It's nuanced and challenging, and of course, because it's a series of anecdata, I can't really tell too many stories in public about that. But those are the two things that we wind up focusing on. You are focusing on a very different problem.You're not moving from company to company, basically reimplementing the same global problem, solving it locally for them. You are embedded in an account for the duration, almost four years now by my count. And, “Okay, I guess I could just do a whole bunch of cost optimization projects on a quarterly basis in an environment like that,” doesn't seem like it solves the problem in any meaningful way. What does your team do?Dann: Yeah. Well, I mean, that's such an interesting question. Just in terms of—yeah, if you're doing consulting, you're starting from square one every time you get a new contract, a new engagement, and being at the same company for, like you said, about four years, going on four years now, you really have a chance to dive in and think about, “Okay, what does it mean to work cloud cost optimization into just the regular business cycle of how it works?” Because I mean, you have the triangle that everybody's familiar with: things can either be cheaper, faster, efficient and at different stages in the product lifecycle, you want to be focusing on these areas, more or less. And so, on our team, the different things that I'm thinking about is, first is visibility, is you want to provide engineers visibility into their cost. And not just numbers, right? Actionable visibility where if something needs to change, they need to do something, they know what that is.And a lot of the times, that means not just costs, but also efficiency. So, these are the metrics that this particular application should be scaling against. As this application grows, as usage grows, are we remaining as cost-efficient? Then there's also the piece—as you're saying—like discovering things within the infrastructure that, “Hey, if we make this change, or if you turn this off, if we do things this way, we'll save a bunch of money. Let's do those.”There's things like reservations, committed use discounts for GCP, all of those kinds of things we manage. And then dealing closely with verifying our bill, working with finance—FP&A—on cost modeling forecasting, both short-term—like, within a month; like, what are we going to be at the end of this month and it's the 10th right now?—and also, what does our next quarter look like? What are our next two years look like? And that bleeds into the contract negotiations, those kind of things as well.So, I mean, it's setting up the cycles of how do you prioritize this work? What is the company focusing on at the time? And what can you do when the company is not focusing explicitly on deciding to save money?Corey: One of the more interesting aspects of my work that I didn't expect is, whenever I wind up starting an engagement, or even in the prospect stage, I love asking the dumbest possible questions I can think of because it turns out they're not. And the most common one that I always love to start with is, “Oh, okay. Your AWS bill is too high. Why do you care?” And that often takes people aback, but once you dig down underneath the surface just a little bit, it becomes pretty clear that the actual goal is not that it's too much money—because spoiler, payroll always cost more than infrastructure—instead, it's, “How do I think about this? How do I rationalize what the additional costs are going to be per thousand monthly active users or whatever metric it is you're choosing to use?”And how do you wind up forecasting that because the old days of data centers where you—“Well, we're going to spend a boatload of money, and then we'll have capacity for the next, ehh, two years, maybe down to eighteen months, depending on growth,” that's easier for companies to rationalize around, rather than this idea of incremental cost on a per-unit basis, but not exactly because it also turns out that architecture changes, problems of scale, AWS pricing changes from time to time, all tend to impact that. What I think is not well understood in this space is that yeah, if you have a 20% overage this month, people are going to have some serious questions, but they're also going to have those same questions if you're 20% low.Dann: Yeah. I mean, understanding why people care about the cost is definitely the first step because with a single company, so it's just constantly looking at the numbers rather than understanding exactly what motivations a company has to contact somebody like you, like a consultant, right? Because usually, I imagine that it's going to be a bill, maybe two bills, three bills come in, and they keep going up and up and up, and they need to go down. And they're going to have an explicit reason why it needs to go down; finance is going to say, “Margins are x, y, and z,” or, “Revenue has done this; our costs can't do this.” There's going to be explicit reasons because if there aren't reasons, then they shouldn't necessarily be focusing on costs at that moment in time.What you want to do is have—I mean, this is way more complicated than just saying it out loud, but have a culture of cloud cost mindfulness, where people aren't just spinning up resources willy nilly. But also, my goal is for people not to have to really think about cost that much other than just in a way that helps them do their work. Because I mean, I want engineers to be able to build stuff and build stuff fast—that's what the cloud is all about—but I also want to be able to do it in a way that isn't inappropriately high in cost.Corey: I have my thoughts on this, and I've shared them before and I'll dive into them again, but how do you approach that? If Datadog makes a grievous error and hires me to write code somewhere as an engineer, what is the, I guess, cost approach training for me as I wind up going through my onboarding as part of an SRE team or an application team?Dann: I mean, this feels so basic as to not even be the right answer, but honestly, visibility is the easiest and best thing that you can give people, and so we've built out some visibility reports that engineers get on a regular basis. We also meet with our top—what is it—ten or fifteen spending internal engineering teams on a monthly basis to go over those costs so that they understand what they're looking at so that we understand the context behind it, so that we can understand what's on the roadmap going forward so that when things in the cost happen, we're aware. And then we're just staying on top of things. And if we have questions, we have an open dialogue with engineers and things like that.In an ideal space, it would be great to have cost, I guess, more fit into the product development lifecycle in a more deeply ingrained way, but at the same time, I really don't want to serve as a gatekeeper. Our goal is not to stop any sort of engineering process. And we haven't needed to do anything like that although I guess every company is going to be different in terms of what their needs are. But yeah, I'm totally happy to being a little bit more reactionary in terms of looking at the numbers and responding, and then proactive just in terms of the regular communication with people.Corey: I tend to take the perspective that engineers need to know enough about cost to maybe fill an index card at most because you don't want them, I guess, over-fixating on it. Left to my own devices in my personal account, I'll see a $7 a month bill and, “Oh, I'm going to spend two weeks knocking that down to $4.” And of course, I can do it, but is that the best use of my time? Absolutely not.Very often what is a lot of money to an engineer is absolutely not to the business. And vice versa when you bring in a data science team; it's, “Oh, yeah, we need at least four more exabytes of data because we never learned to do a join properly.” Yeah, maybe don't do that. Understanding the difference between those two approaches is key. But I've always been of the mindset that I would rather bias for letting developers build and experiment and have things that catch outsized things quickly, then trying to wind up putting a culture of fear around cost because I'd much rather see whether the thing they're trying to build is possible to build, then go back and optimize it later, once that's proven out. But again, this is a nuanced thing.Everyone seems to think I have this back pocket answer that will apply to all companies. And you've been doing this at Datadog for almost four years with a team of people. I am an outsider; I see the global trend, I see what works in different ways in different companies, but the idea that I can sit down and say, “Oh. Well, clearly the thing you're doing is completely wrong because that's not how I think about it,” is the hallmark of a terrible consultant. There are reasons that things are the way that they are and it's generally not that people are expecting to do a terrible job today. You know, unless they work in the Facebook ethics department, which is neither here nor there.Dann: Yeah, I mean, like I said, the product lifecycle, when you're building something new, you want to go as fast as possible. When you're launching it, you want it to be as reliable as possible. Once you're launched, once you're reliable, then you can start focusing on costs is, kind of like, not the universal rule, but kind of the flow that I tend to see. So, as you're at a company that is regularly innovating, creating new products, going through that cycle, you're going to have these kind of periods.As well as you have the products that have been around. There's a lot of legacy code, there's a lot of stuff going on, that maybe isn't the best, or some efficiency work that has been deprioritized for whatever reason, that maybe it's time to start considering doing this. So, keeping track of all of that. And like I said, if for whatever reason the business wants to focus on cloud cost efficiency, or a team has decided that in a particular quarter or for a particular reason they want to focus on that, being able to assist as much as you can, being able to save all that work so that there's kind of like a queue that you can go to when it is time to focus on cost efficiency stuff.Corey: So, here's a fun one for you. As of the time of this recording, it's a couple weeks old, but if you're anything like what we do here for some of our more sophisticated clients, we do occasionally build out prediction models, models of economics that wind up defining how some architectural patterns should be addressed, et cetera, et cetera. What's always fun is the large clients who have this significant level of spend on an outlier service. Every once in a while—it was great that we got to do a deep dive into the Washington Post's use of Lambda because normally, Lambda is a rounding error on the bill; they had a specific challenge and they did a whole blog post on this for the AWS blog. I believe the Monitoring Tools blog, but don't take that at face value; I never remember which AWS blog is which because AWS doesn't speak with a single voice on anything.But yeah, most of the time is block, tackle, baseline stuff that is the big driver of spend, but a few weeks ago, they change the pricing dimensions for S3 intelligent tiering, where there's no longer a monitoring charge for objects that are smaller than 128 kilobytes, and there's no 30-day minimum. So, the fact that those two things went away removed almost every caveat that I can picture for using S3 intelligent tiering, which means that for most use cases, that should now be the default. I imagine you caught that change as well, since that's one of those wake up and take notice, no matter what time of the world [laugh] it is where you are when that gets dropped. How did that change your modeling? Or did that not significantly shift how you view any of this?Dann: No, I mean, I think part of our role within the organization is to pay attention to stuff like that, and then you just have those conversations with the teams that I know were either exploring intelligent tiering. We do some pricing modeling for different products, S3 storage for different types, so updating those and being like, “Hey, this might be something we want to actually use and explore now.” Similar and I guess, more of something that I actively worked on that I consider in the same category is when Amazon announced savings plans as replacing convertible reservations. Because at first they announced, and being like, “Okay, well, it's going to automatically rebalance between… different instance families across regions, too”—which convertible RIs could never do it—“And it's going to be the exact same price for a compute savings plan as a convertible RI.” And we were kind of like, what's the catch? And we spent a few weeks doing a deep dive working with our data science team, kind of like being, “Where is the catch here?”Corey: Yeah, the real catch is that you can't sell it on the secondary market if it—Dann: Yeah.Corey: —turns out you bought the wrong thing, which if that's your Plan A, then good luck.Dann: Yeah. We definitely don't use that secondary market. I don't have as much experience there, although I'm sure some people can use it to their advantage.Corey: Almost no one does. In fact, the reason that it exists—my pet theory—is that once upon a time, companies would try and classify some of the reserved instance purchases as capital expenditures, which there has since been guidance from regulatory authorities not to do that. But at the time, the fact that you could sell it to a third-party on the secondary market would help shore up that argument. If you're listening to this, and you're classifying some of your RIs as CapEx, please don't do that. Feel free to reach out to me, I can dig out the actual regulation and send it to you. There are two of them. It's a nuanced topic. If you're listening to this and have no idea what I'm talking about, God, do I envy you.Dann: [laugh]. Yeah, definitely don't do that. [laugh].Corey: There was a lot that was interesting about savings plans. When I was read in the month or so in advance of them being announced, it was, “Great. I want to see this and this and these other things, too.” And some of those things came to pass. It was extended to work with Lambda.Now, I don't believe that is financially useful in almost every case, but it doesn't need to be because so much of cloud economics from where I sit is psychological in nature, where, “Oh, we have this workload that lives on EC2 instances and we want to move it to Lambda, but we already bought the reserved instances so we're not going to do it because of sunk cost fallacy.” Which is not much of a fallacy when it's that kind of money, in some cases. Okay, great. Now, if it can migrate to Lambda and still wind up getting the discounts you've paid for it, you have removed an architectural barrier. And that's significant.Now, I want to see that same thing apply to oh if you move from EC2 to RDS, or DynamoDB or anything else, that should be helpful, too. But whatever you do, don't do what SageMaker did and launch their own separate savings plan that is not compatible with the compute savings plans, so effectively, it's great; you're locked-in architecturally to one or the other because machine learning is, once again, a marvelously executed scam to sell pickaxes into a digital gold rush.Dann: I mean, I like savings plans a lot and we've been slowly, as convertible RIs have expired, replacing them with savings plans. And I think that it is pushing the other cloud providers forward—because we're definitely multi-cloud—and so that's really useful and I hope more people will take on the compute savings plan type model, just because it makes our lives so much easier. Or it makes my life so much easier in terms of planning it, selling the commitment internally, just everything about it has made my life easier. So, I mean, how many years later are we? I definitely haven't found any big gotchas, I guess, from the secondary market. But that doesn't really impact me.Corey: Yeah, I spent a lot of time looking forward, too, doing deep analyses of okay, for which instance classes in which regions is there a price discrepancy? And I finally got someone to go semi on record and say, “Yeah. There should not be any please ping us if you find one.” “Oh, okay, great. That is enough for me to work with.”Dann: Exactly, we got that, too. I didn't believe it so we were downloading price sheets and doing comparisons, doing all that stuff.Corey: Oh, trust but verify. And when we're talking this kind of money, I don't trust very far. They make mistakes on billing issues from time to time. And I get it; it's hard, but there are challenges here and there. I am glad you mentioned a minute ago that you are multi-cloud because my position on that has often been misconstrued.I think that designing something from day one to work on multiple cloud providers is generally foolish. I think that unless you have a compelling reason not to go all-in on one cloud provider, that's what you should do. Pick a cloud—I don't care which—and go all-in. Conversely, you have a product like Datadog where your customers are in multiple clouds, and first, no one wants to pay egress to send all the telemetry from where they are into AWS, and secondly, they're not going to put up, in many cases, with their data going to a cloud provider they have explicitly chosen not to work with, so you have to meet your customers where they are. In your case, it is absolutely the right thing to do. And Twitter often gets upset and calls me hypocrite on stuff like this because Twitter believes that two things that take opposite visions cannot possibly both be true, but the world is messy.Dann: Yeah. And I mean, the nice thing about us being in multiple clouds is we are our own biggest user. And that's actually one of the reasons why I love working at Datadog is because I get to use Datadog all the time. And not only that, Datadog is on everything and we have all of our products. I'm very spoiled [laugh] with all of this. But I mean, we are running in these different cloud providers; we are using Datadog in those different cloud providers, and that is just helping everything overall, too. In addition to supporting customers that are in each cloud because that is a huge reason as well.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: One of the problems that I keep running into across the board is that with things like Datadog—and again, not to single you out; every monitoring vendor to some extent has aspects of this problem—it's that when I'm a customer and I'm hooking my accounts up to Datadog, I want you to tell me about things that are going on, but the CloudWatch charges can be so egregious on the customer side, where it is bizarre and, frankly, abhorrent to me when I wind up paying more for the CloudWatch charges than I am for Datadog. And let's be clear here; I am, in fact, a Datadog customer. I pay you folks money. Not a lot of money, but I pay you money because I have certain things that I need to know are working for a variety of excellent reasons.And the problem that I keep smacking into on this is—it's not your fault; there's not anything you can do. In fact, you are one of the better providers as far as not only not being egregious with the way that you slam the CloudWatch endpoints, but also in giving guidance to customers on how to tune it further. And I really wish that more folks in your space would do things like that. It always bugs me when I wind up using a tool that tries to save money that in turn winds up costing me more than it saves.Dann: Yeah. Yeah, it's tricky there. I have less experienced myself setting up Datadog and running it in my own infrastructure as I'm more digging deep into the cost stuff and us using the cloud, so I can't speak to that specifically. But yeah, you're not the first person that I've heard have that experience. [laugh].Corey: And again, it's not your fault at all. I've been beating up the CloudWatch team for years on this, and I will continue to do so until I'm safely dead, which—depending on Amazon's level of patience—might be in mere minutes.Dann: In the larger-picture-wise, we have to remember that we're super early in the cloud adoption, even looking at the cloud economics FinOps cloud cost optimization world. I feel like most businesses at this stage in their journey are still in data centers and they're dealing with the problem of how do we move to the cloud and do it cost-efficiently? How do we set everything up? And that's where the world is right now.And I think that dealing with, “Okay, we are one hundred percent running in the cloud. What are the processes that we have in place? How do we think of finance and the finance organization not through the lens of ‘we once had data centers and now we don't,' but how do we look through that in the lens of ‘okay, we are cloud-native from day one? What does the finance department look like?'” And dealing with those problems is really interesting because Datadog has never been in a data center. We are cloud-native from the very beginning, and so it was interesting for me to join the company and build up a lot of these processes because it is different than what a lot of other people were dealing with and doing. And it presents some really interesting problems and questions that I think are going to be the foundation for the next decade of building companies and operating in the cloud.Corey: I always love having conversations with folks who are building out teams to handle these things because usually the folks I keep talking to, or who want to have conversations like this are building tools themselves to solve this problem through the miracle of SaaS, where they will bend over backwards to avoid ever talking to a customer. And we're all dealing with the same AWS APIs; there's not that much of a new spin you can put on most of these things. But understanding what customers are actually trying to do instead of falling down the rabbit hole trap of, “Hey, turn off those idle instances that are all labeled ‘drsite' because you probably don't need them,” is foolish. And after a few foolish recommendations, tooling doesn't get there. I am a big believer that tools can assist the process and narrow down what to look at.I believe they shouldn't have to exist; I think that the billing dashboard should be a hell of a lot better natively than having to pay a third party to make sense of it for me. But by and large, I do believe this is a problem that is best solved from a consultative approach. When I started this place, I was planning to build out some software, tried doing it—called DuckTools—and wound up mothballing the whole thing because what we were building was not what the industry claimed to want and, frankly, educating people into a position where then they see the value and only then will they buy is never been a game that I wanted to play.Dann: Yeah, I really liked that article that you guys published about exploring that product and the reason why you decided not to pursue it. But it's super interesting in terms of where the industry is going and building out those tools because I found that there isn't really any new thing that you can do with the tools. All the tools that exist for looking at your costs are largely the same. The main differences that I've seen is that the UI is slightly different and they have different sales teams. And if the sales teams are better, they're going to get more of the market share. And if the sales teams are not as good, it's going to be a smaller market share. And it's weird, too, be in this industry for as long as we have been, and seeing okay, well, Andreessen Horowitz just funded this new company, and this other company got invited into Y Combinator, or all of these things that are happening, and I'm kind of like, okay, but what is this tool really doing differently? And there are a few of them that are; that are doing something innovative and different, but there's also a few that are just like, this is a space where people are in, there's money here, we're doing the same thing, but we got our sales team, and we'll carve out our little corner, and then we'll get acquired, and that'll be that. Although I guess we're just at that stage of innovation in this space, I guess.Corey: Yeah, I have no earthly idea what the story is around how these companies plan to differentiate because it seems to me that they're directly attempting to compete with Cost Explorer, which—Dann: Yeah.Corey: —it's taken some time for that thing to improve to the point where it is now and it'll take further time for it to improve beyond it, but long-term, I don't think you're going to outrun AWS on a straight line like that.Dann: Yeah, I mean, when you work for one of these third-party cost tooling things, and you're working with one of your customers, and they're like, “How do I view this?” And it's kind of like, that is the easiest thing to find in Cost Explorer as well, it's—I can't imagine being like, “Well, you should pay me thousands, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of dollars a month to view it here,” when Cost Explorer is free. And I think Cost Explorer, it doesn't do everything, but it's gotten a lot better at what it does, and it could probably solve 90% of people's problems without using a third-party tool.Corey: You are at significant scale in multiple clouds, so the answer that these companies always give is, “Ah, but we provide a single dashboard so that you can look at costs across multiple providers in one place.” Is that even slightly useful to you?Dann: Man, if you need dashboards, get a dashboard tool. Don't get this crazy cost analysis tool. I mean, there are some great dashboard solutions that you can get where you can connect your detailed billing, cost and usage report—whatever cloud provider is calling it, but, like, that really detailed gigabytes per hour report—and then visualize it, build reports, do all that kind of stuff because that's not something that the tooling does well right now, in terms of building out cost dashboards and stuff. But that's also right now. It could in the future.Corey: Yeah. If you're a BI tool, wind up passing out templates that normalize these things? I am so tired of building it all from scratch in Tableau myself. If you're Tableau, sell me a whole bunch of things that I can use to view this stuff through, so I don't have to wind up continually reinventing that particular wheel.Dann: Yeah.Corey: Oh, I like your approach. I didn't know the answer when I was asking the question. I was about to learn something if you'd gone the other direction, but nope, but it's good to know that my impressions remain intact.Dann: Yeah, I mean, I've used different tools in the past. Again, I hesitate to name any of them, but there's a few in this space that I feel like everybody—if they're in this space, they know which tools I'm talking about—Corey: Yes, we do.Dann: —and… yeah, I've used them. They're okay—a few of them are okay, a few of them are better than others, but I mean, I was trying to evaluate the value-add over me manually setting some things up and having some sort of visualization, and just the value-add in terms of what they were charging, even if it was like a significantly smaller percent of the bill because that alone, like, percent of bill is such a difficult cost model—Corey: Oh—Dann: —to do.Corey: I hate that. Pricing is hard. Let's start there.Dann: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, yeah.Corey: I hate the percent of bill because then it's, “Let me get this straight. I'm paying you a percentage of things like data transfer charges that I know are fixed, that I can't optimize? I'm paying you a percentage of my AWS enterprise support subscription? I'm paying you a percentage of the marketplace?” And so on and so forth. And it doesn't work. At some point of scale as well it's, I could hire a team of 20 people and save money versus what you're charging me. The other side of it though, “Ah, we'll charge you percentage of savings.” Well, then you wind up with people doing a whole bunch of things like before they bring you in, they'll make a bunch of ill-advised reserved instance purchases or savings plan purchases you have to then unwind after the fact. When I was setting this place up, I looked long and hard at different billing models and the only thing I found that worked is fixed fee. The end. Because at that point, suddenly everyone's on board with, “Hey, let's solve the problem and then get out as soon as possible.” We're not trying to build ourselves a forever job nestled in the heart of your company. And it's the only model I found that removes a whole swath of conflicts of interest. And that's the hard part. We have no partners with anyone in this space—including AWS themselves—just because as soon as we do, it becomes extremely disingenuous when we suggest doing something for your sake that happens to benefit them, such as, “Maybe back that S3 bucket up somewhere.” Well, okay, if we're partnered with them, does that mean we're trying to influence spend in the other direction? And it just becomes a morass that I never found it worth the time to deal with.Dann: Yeah, I—Corey: But that doesn't work for SaaS.Dann: Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. And I haven't actually thought about pricing model for consulting in this space that closely, but I mean, when you're charging a percent of bill or percent of savings, you have the opportunity to screw the customer, right, through all the things that you were saying. If you charge a fixed fee, you have the possibility of undervaluing yourself, which the only one that's screwed in that case is you, potentially, and if you're okay with that risk and you're okay with those dollars, that's great. Because yeah, if you're able to be like, “Okay, here's the services that I do, here's the fixed costs.” “Done.” “Done.” That just sets everybody's expectations for the relationship in a much better way that you're not constantly worried about, like, upsells and other things that might happen along the way that screws the customer.Corey: And that's the hardest part, I think, is that people lose sight of the entire customer obsession piece of it. That's one of the things Amazon gets super right. I wish more companies embrace that. Dann, I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to suffer my slings, and arrows, and half-formed opinions. If people want to learn more about who you are and what you're up to, where can they find you?Dann: Yeah, I have a website you guys can go to that links everywhere else. It is dannb.org. And I spell my name with two ns, so D-A-N-N-B dot org. And I have LinkedIn, I have Twitter, I have a monthly newsletter that is not really about FinOps or anything, but I really enjoy it; I've been doing it for a year, now, that you should sign up for.Corey: And links to that will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:36:26]. Dann, thanks again for your time. I really appreciate it.Dann: Yeah. Thanks so much for having me again. It's been a blast.Corey: It really has. Dann Berg, senior CloudOps analyst at Datadog. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment featuring a picture of several corkboards full of post-it notes and string, and a deranged comment telling me that you have in fact finally found the catch in savings plans.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

STEAM Box's Podcast
Episode 11: Homecoming

STEAM Box's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 77:40


Candidate for RI Governor - CF Warrior Luis Daniel Munoz, and Bella, the Narragansett Tribal Elder join the STEAM Box Warriors from Central Falls to talk about serious issues plaguing RI, including Bella's nation-wide efforts to support victims of human trafficking.  They and STEAM Box also shout out teachers making a difference like Bechlin, Lapierre, Knots, and my personal favorite, Mr. Upegui.  Prince was also celebrated, albeit all too quickly.

CA Podcast
Episode 3 | Halloween Night

CA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 107:12


CAP 3 | Timestamps - Halloween night / our 5 Year Youtube Anniversary 0:00 - Lil Durk beefing with French Montana? Amnesia? 6:20 - Is Chance The Rapper's career over 15:20 - Why is Big Sean not as relevant anymore 23:15 - Big Lato & Damian Lillard dropped freestyles 31:40 - A$AP Rocky's 10-year anniversary Live Love Asap 35:44 - Free Fetty Wap, arrested at Rolling Loud 44:56 - NBA Youngboy finally out of jail 52:27 - Playboi Carti and Uzi reunite at Rolling Loud 54:49 - J. Cole performed in the rain Rolling Loud 56:54 - Why does the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame matter 1:05:00 - Drake hosts URL Caffeine Rap Battle 1:10:40 - Dominican star El Alfa sells out MSG 1:13:35 - J Balvin's controversial music video deleted 1:17:05 - Melania rolls eyes at Trump, why are they married 1:24:00 - Famous criminal Alpo gets killed in Harlem 1:28:38 - Squid Games / Insecure / Curb / TV Show update 1:33:44 - WTF happened here 1:39:00 *Listen to the podcast audio on Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, and Google Podcasts here, click down below! https://linktr.ee/ca_pod ----------- Make sure to follow our Podcast Clip Page here on YouTube @CAPCLIPS | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSPJ... and subscribe! Also, follow the Podcast Instagram @CA_Pod | https://www.instagram.com/ca_pod/ Merch Available Here - https://complexambition.shop ----------------------------------------------------------- Want a promo snippet of your song at the beginning of the video? Email us if interested in business! - ComplexAmbition401@Gmail.com - ------------------------------------------------------------ Want To Send Us Something? 820 ELMWOOD AVE P.O. Box 27533 PROVIDENCE, RI 02907 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cambition/support

Legacy Church RI
Remember When... | Jarred Burrows

Legacy Church RI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 30:45


We pray that this podcast increases your faith and strengthens your walk with Jesus Christ, our Lord, and Savior. You can join us in person at 9am or 11am at 125 Circuit Drive, North Kingstown, RI or you can tune in live on Sunday at 9am, 11am, 3pm, 6pm, 8pm and 10pm by visiting www.LegacyChurchRI.com/live

Victory Church Providence
Spiritual S.N.A.P.

Victory Church Providence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 37:00


A Sermon by Pastor Mike O'Brien, Associate Pastor and Director of Student Ministries and Communications at Victory Church in Providence, RI.      Jesus came to realign us, to put us back to our original track once we've hit life's potholes. When we have veered away from God's will we feel strain and pressure, His truth must be our focus. Refocus your efforts for kingdom building. Let the Holy Spirit redirect us when we deviate.     Numbers 15:37-41 ESV    Tassels on Garments   37 The LORD said to Moses, 38 “Speak to the people of Israel, and tell them to make tassels on the corners of their garments throughout their generations, and to put a cord of blue on the tassel of each corner. 39 And it shall be a tassel for you to look at and remember all the commandments of the LORD, to do them,  not to follow after your own heart and your own eyes, which you are inclined to whore after. 40 So you shall remember and do all my commandments, and be holy to your God. 41 I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt to be your God: I am the LORD your God.”

Chàng-Ngốc-Già
Có thiệt là bạn hiểu Bảo hiểm Nhân thọ ? #No.49

Chàng-Ngốc-Già

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 19:15


Bảo hiểm là bảo vệ tài chính khi không may có rủi ro. Riêng Bảo hiểm Nhân thọ còn có chức năng tích lũy/đầu tư. Nhưng không phải trường hợp xảy ra rủi ro nào cũng được chi trả, vì trong hợp đồng bảo hiểm có các điều khoản loại trừ. Ngoài ra thì số tiền bảo hiểm cũng quyết định số tiền tối đa được chi trả trong từng trường hợp. Bảo Hiểm Nhân thọ cần hiểu đúng mua đủ để không bị thất vọng. Cần lưu ý các điều khoản loại trừ, quyền lợi chính. Cần chất vấn/hỏi người tư vấn cho mình càng nhiều càng tốt.

The Westerly Sun
Westerly Sun - 2021-10-29: Paul Francois Guay, Armory Halloween ball, and Margaret Mary Clark

The Westerly Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 2:53


You're listening to the Westerly Sun's podcast, where we talk about the best local events, new job postings, obituaries, and more. First, a bit of Rhode Island trivia. Today's trivia is brought to you by Perennial. Perennial's new plant-based drink “Daily Gut & Brain” is a blend of easily digestible nutrients crafted for gut and brain health. A convenient mini-meal, Daily Gut & Brain” is available now at the CVS Pharmacy in Wakefield. Now, some trivia. Did you know that Rhode Island native, Paul Francois Guay is a retired professional ice hockey player who played for the Flyers, the Kings, the Bruins, and the Islanders? Paul played for the 1984 US Olympic team and scored one goal with the team. He is now a captain in the Pawtucket Fire Department. Next, an event that you should know about… Tonight from 7 to 11pm the Westerly Armory is holding a Halloween ball. Admission is $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Wear a costume! See you there! Next, Are you interested in a new opportunity? Look no further, we're here again with another new job listing. Today's posting comes from the City of Norwich. They're looking for 911 Emergency Dispatchers and your responsibility will be to handle and keep accurate communications of calls made to the emergency system.  Pay starts at $51,000 per year. If you're interested, you can read more and apply by using the link in our episode description. https://www.indeed.com/jobs?l=Westerly%2C%20RI&mna=5&aceid&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpf2IBhDkARIsAGVo0D2S3gEb-328GyRpBuTTeeKPdn3-klOh0KYAsfete6MEZmI5S4qTg-4aAnQkEALw_wcB&vjk=c91650dde4931e5f Today we're remembering the life of Margaret Mary Clark. Margaret was born in Pawtucket in 1931. She married the love of her life, Jerry Clark in 1949 and they had two children together. Margaret's favorite work was as a Direct Support Professional at the Frank Olean Center. She was awarded the OSARR Direct Support Professional Award in 2003 and was proud of the fact that she worked until she was 75 years old. In addition to her daughter, she leaves behind 5 grandchildren, as well as 7 great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews.  She was predeceased by her beloved granddaughter, Kayla Rae Cher-kas-Clark of Longmeadow, MA. Margaret's family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to the devoted staff at the Westerly Health Center for their exemplary, compassionate care over the past six years, as well as to the St. Andrew Lutheran Church Care Team who visited her regularly. A Celebration of Life will be held at St. Andrew Church, 15 East Beach Rd., Charlestown, RI at 11:00 am on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021. A private burial will take place at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Frank Olean Center, 93 Airport Rd., Westerly, RI. 02891. For online condolences, please go to  Lastly, remember that reporting the local news is an important part of what it means to live here. Head over to Westerlysun.com and help us tell the stories of our community each and every day. Digital access starts at just 50 cents a day and makes all the difference in the world. That's it for today, we'll be back next time with more! Also, remember to check out our sponsor Perennial, Daily Gut & Brain, available at the CVS on Main St. in Wakefield! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)
On The Pushback Against a LGBTQ+ Graphic Novel and CRT, with North Kingstown, RI School Committee Member Jenni

The Bartholomewtown Podcast (RIpodcast.com)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 24:40


Bill Bartholomew welcomes North Kingstown, RI school committee member Jennifer Lima for a discussion on recent turmoil in the district regarding inclusion of the graphic novel "Gender Queer" in the school's library, as well as push back against so-called Critical Race Theory in the district.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bartholomewtown?fan_landing=true)

Fidelity Viewpoints: Market Sense
10/26: End of 2021 tax moves to consider

Fidelity Viewpoints: Market Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 24:25


Host Jim Armstrong is joined by Fidelity's Jurrien Timmer and Leanna Devinney for a discussion on potential end-of-year tax ideas. Plus, we take a look at what we know about the Biden tax plans -- and their expected impact on the markets and on individuals -- as we look ahead to 2022. Read the full transcript Watch the video replay Read about 3 key tax moves to consider Keep in mind that investing involves risk. The value of your investment will fluctuate over time, and you may gain or lose money. Views expressed are as of the date indicated, based on the information available at that time, and may change based on market or other conditions. Unless otherwise noted, the opinions provided are those of the speaker or author and not necessarily those of Fidelity Investments or its affiliates. Fidelity does not assume any duty to update any of the information. This podcast is intended for U.S. persons only and is not a solicitation for any Fidelity product or service. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, RI 02917 © 2021 FMR LLC. All rights reserved.

New England Legends Podcast
Halloween 2021: The Vampire's Desire

New England Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 26:40


In Episode 219, Jeff Belanger and Ray Auger receive a strange Halloween message with an address in Rhode Island and the promise of seeing a monster. Jeff and Ray follow the clues and wind up trapped in a house with a murdered body and a vampire! Will they make it out alive?!

Ghost Hunting In New England
The Conjuring House in Harrisville, RI

Ghost Hunting In New England

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 44:44


HAPPY HALLOWEEN! Thank you all for a great season five! Join us this week as we chit chat all about The REAL Conjuring House down in Harrisville, RI!! That's a wrap for the season folks but we will see all of you once again in Spring 2022! In the meanwhile be sure to check out Lost Souls of America Podcast dropping into your podcast apps December 1st!

Suite Run
54 | Providence, RI with Matt Chittim: The Smallest State in the U.S. Shows Off It's New England Charm

Suite Run

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 75:15


Ladies and Gentlemen, the Rambling Runner himself is our guest the Suite Run Podcast! We have a blast talking to Matt Chittim about everything from running to podcasting. Then we change lanes and talk all about living and running in Providence, RI! Matt gives us great recommendations on the best places to RUN, fun places to dine out, grab a beer, go to the legendary beaches and more. The smallest state in the U.S. is indeed mighty - let's go visit!Don't miss this great conversation!Click HERE for the complete show notes. This episode is sponsored by:InsideTrackerInsideTracker is a personalized health and wellness platform like no other.What's their secret? First, InsideTracker uses its patented algorithm to analyze your body's data and offer you a clearer picture than you've ever had before of what's going on inside you. Then, InsideTracker provides you with a concrete, science-backed, trackable action plan for reaching your performance goals and being your healthy best.  InsideTracker is offering 25% off its store for our listeners and let us recommend the Essentials Package for just $189! It's perfect for runners to elevate their training. Just visit insidetracker dot com slash SUITE RUN.Where to find Matt Chittim:The Rambling Runner PodcastMatt Chittim on InstagramThe Rambling Runner on YouTubeWhere to find Natalie and Jerold:Natalie's InstagramSuite Run InstagramNatalie's TwitterSuite Run TwitterNatalie's FacebookSuite Run WebsiteSuite Run Facebook

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti
Stantec's Sustainability Design Leader: Blake Jackson

The Green Building Matters Podcast with Charlie Cichetti

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 31:03


Blake Jackson is a licensed architect (RI) with over 18 years of industry experience in various roles, having obtained a B-Arch from Kennesaw State University (2005) and an M-Arch in Sustainable Environmental Design from the AA Graduate School in London (2008). He is an Associate and the US Northeast Sustainability Design Leader with Stantec, a global built environment practice, working out of Boston, MA. His focus is on the nexus between sustainability, well-being and resiliency, serving as a company-wide resource, particularly with projects seeking third-party certifications. He's active within the northeast regional design community, including being a past board member of A Better City, as former co-chair of the BSA COTE, as a former BSA VP of Advocacy, and as an adjunct faculty at both the Boston Architectural College and Mount Ida College (now UMass Dartmouth). In 2015 He was honored as one of BD+C Magazine's "40 Under 40" Class. Show Highlights Leapfrog US sustainability academic options and experience.  Unique approach to becoming an architectural entrepreneur. Stantec - sustainable design leader. Create “Yes” opportunities to open doors.  Adaptive Reuse Projects break from traditional and typical. Components every architect student should be exposed to. Green bonds for LEED certification to push multi-family building.  The trends of operational carbon and embodied carbon and materials. The challenge for healthy buildings and the rating systems that support them.   Blake's (suggested) PhD project to close loopholes that threaten green building.  “Saying 'yes' to opportunities opens up doors for things that you couldn't possibly anticipate. I think that habit of saying 'yes' to opportunities, whether I know why they presented themselves or not, has been a bit of a superpower.” -Blake Jackson   Blake Jackson Transcript   Blake Jackson's Show Resource and Information  Atlas Shrugged Linkedin   Connect with Charlie Cichetti and GBES Charlie on LinkedIn Green Building Educational Services GBES on Twitter Connect on LinkedIn Like on Facebook Google+ GBES Pinterest Pins GBES on Instagram   GBES is excited our membership community is growing. Consider joining our membership community as members are given access to some of the guests on the podcasts that you can ask project questions. If you are preparing for an exam, there will be more assurance that you will pass your next exam, you will be given cliff notes if you are a member, and so much more. Go to www.gbes.com/join to learn more about the 4 different levels of access to this one-of-a-kind career-advancing green building community!   If you truly enjoyed the show, don't forget to leave a positive rating and review on iTunes.  We have prepared more episodes for the upcoming weeks, so come by again next week! Thank you for tuning in to the Green Building Matters Podcast!   Copyright © 2021 GBES

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
There is a Red, Yellow, and White Onion Mega Recall

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 2:16


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/PoYnub-BRgo   The FDA, Keeler Family Farms, ProSource Produce LLC, Everyplate, Hello Fresh, and Potandon Produce have recalled MVP, Big Bull, Peak Fresh Produce, Sierra Madre, Markon First Crop, Markon Essentials, Rio Blue, ProSource, Rio Valley, Sysco Imperial, and Green Giant red, yellow, and white onions as well as onions in Everyplate and Hello Fresh meal kits.  These onions are contaminated with salmonella.  This bacterium causes serious and possibly fatal infections in the young, elders, and those with weak immune systems.  Even otherwise healthy individuals can experience gastroenteritis with diarrhea, fever, nausea, and vomiting, and the infection may progress into systemic sepsis.  These onions have been sold in AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, FL, GA, IA, IL, ID, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MN, MO, MS, NC, ND, NE, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WI, WV, and in the Ontario and Quebec provinces of Canada.  If you purchased ANY red, yellow, or white onions do not consume them.  Immediately discard them and decontaminate any surfaces that have come in contact with these onions.  Those with questions may contact Keeler Farms at 1-575-652-5405, ProSource at 1-208-928-4959, Everyplate at everyplate.com/contact, HelloFresh at hellofresh.com/contact-page, and Potandon at 1-800-637-8084.   https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/keeler-family-farms-recalls-red-white-and-yellow-onions-due-possible-health-risk https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/everyplate-issues-recall-notice-products-containing-onions-due-possible-health-risk https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/hellofresh-issues-recall-notice-products-containing-onions-due-possible-health-risk #onions #red #white #yellow #keeler #prosource #everyplate #hellofresh #greengiant #salmonella #gastroenteritis #sepsis #recall  

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft
Email Lists for Growth | Bri Lawson | Episode 778

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:44


As a BFA graduate from UW-River Falls, Bri Lawson creates functional pottery on the wheel with imagery and bright colors. Originally from MN, Bri relocated to RI in 2018 for a residency at The Steel Yard. Bri currently works in her studio at the Nicholson File Artist Community in Providence, RI.

Victory Church Providence
Your Breakthrough May Be Closer Than You Think!

Victory Church Providence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 32:52


A Sermon by Pastor Richard Sfameni, Lead Pastor of Victory Church in Providence, RI.   A breakthrough can be a process. Don't be discouraged if it is not immediate. We have to learn patience. God is a God of restoration. Encourage yourself, pray for direction, and pursue your breakthrough!    Romans 15:4   4 For whatever things were written before were written for our learning, that we through the patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope.     I Samuel 30:1-8  David's Conflict with the Amalekites  30 Now it happened, when David and his men came to Ziklag, on the third day, that the Amalekites had invaded the South and Ziklag, attacked Ziklag and burned it with fire, 2 and had taken captive the women and those who were there, from small to great; they did not kill anyone, but carried them away and went their way. 3 So David and his men came to the city, and there it was, burned with fire; and their wives, their sons, and their daughters had been taken captive. 4 Then David and the people who were with him lifted up their voices and wept, until they had no more power to weep. 5 And David's two wives, Ahinoam the Jezreelitess, and Abigail the widow of Nabal the Carmelite, had been taken captive. 6 Now David was greatly distressed, for the people spoke of stoning him, because the soul of all the people was grieved, every man for his sons and his daughters. But David strengthened himself in the Lord his God. 7 Then David said to Abiathar the priest, Ahimelech's son, “Please bring the ephod here to me.” And Abiathar brought the ephod to David. 8 So David inquired of the Lord, saying, “Shall I pursue this troop? Shall I overtake them?” And He answered him, “Pursue, for you shall surely overtake them and without fail recover all.”

Funk Factory Radio
Episode 334: Funk Factory Radio Ep. 334

Funk Factory Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:03


Meek Mill feat. Lil...  | Sharing LocationsNardo Wick | Who Want Smoke 42 Dugg feat. Future  | MaybachGunna feat. Future  | Too Easy Jack Harlow | SUVS Moneybagg Yo  | Wockesha Joyner Lucas | Your Heart 24kGoldn | PradaBlxst feat. Ty Dolla...  | ChosenCapella Grey | GYALIS Wale feat. J. Cole  | Poke It Out Kent Jones feat. Ri...  | Bout That Pop Smoke feat. C... | Woo Baby

DOSIS DIARIA ROKA
Ríndete

DOSIS DIARIA ROKA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 6:48


Ríndete by Roka Stereo

Rhode Island Liberty Report
RILA 26 – Mckee has a Plan, Farmer Needs a Permit, Some Basic Economics

Rhode Island Liberty Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 93:24


In this episode we talk about Gov McKee's 10 year plan for RI, the farmer in Exeter that has been told to stop building his greenhouse and some basic economics discussion. Continue reading RILA 26 – Mckee has a Plan, Farmer Needs a Permit, Some Basic Economics at Liberty RI.

Real Estate Addicts
#73 Nick Schiffer of NS Builders

Real Estate Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 55:07


In this episode we are joined by our good friend Nick Schiffer, owner of NS Builders, co-host of the Modern Craftsman Podcast and overall great guy! Nick has built a highly admired construction company focused on providing top quality craftsmanship to the high-end residential market. In this episode we discus the pressures of managing a job from clients to sub-contractors to schedule. Nick shares his views on making construction a more collaborative experience, his (strong) views on ensuring that design is deliberate and thoughtful, the challenges of running your own company, managing employees, as well as aligning team member incentives and expectations. Finally, we foray into Nick's vision for his company and get his take on real estate development and how he envisions taking his skills, experience, and team he's built and apply them to developing his own unique projects. Where to find our Guest: Nick Schiffer https://www.instagram.com/nsbuilders/ https://bit.ly/nsbuildersyoutube Thank you as always for rating and reviewing the Real Estate Addicts Podcast! Podcast Sponsor: First Boston Capital Partners www.grossmanco.com/private-lending/ Trusted partner & private lender providing loans to builders, developers and real estate investors in MA, CT, RI, NH & NY.

Tea For Two
Ep 53. Lessons Learned In Leadership FT. Em Hening

Tea For Two

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:17


In today's episode we go through tons of lessons learned in leadership. Em Hening is a mother, wife, millionaire award recipient and has been in the industry, at the top, for 6+ years. Ri & Em go through a list of things like: placement, drama, ego, popularity, idolization, leading from the front, how to approach training different individuals with different personalities, influencing over impressing, and even more. This episode is for the folks in this industry that are trying to be a leader they'd like to have. Share this with your leadership team!

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: 209 Forrest Gander

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:20


Born in the Mojave Desert in Barstow, California, Forrest Gander grew up in Virginia and spent significant years with the poet CD Wright, in San Francisco, Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico, Eureka Springs, AR, and Providence, RI. With CD Wright, he has a son, the artist Brecht Wright Gander. Forrest holds degrees in both geology and English literature. He lives now in northern California with the artist Ashwini Bhat.Gander's book Be With was awarded the 2019 Pulitzer Prize. Concerned with the way we are revised and translated in encounters with the foreign, his book Core Samples from the World was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Gander has collaborated frequently with other artists including photographers Sally Mann, Graciela Iturbide, Raymond Meeks, and Lucas Foglia, glass artist Michael Rogers, ceramic artists Rick Hirsch and Ashwini Bhat, artists Ann Hamilton,Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, dancers Eiko & Koma, and musicians Vic Chesnutt and Brady Earnhart, among others. The author of numerous other books of poetry, including Redstart: An Ecological Poetics and Science & Steepleflower, Gander also writes novels (As a Friend; The Trace), essays(A Faithful Existence) and translates. His most recent translations are Alice Iris Red Horse: Poems of Gozo Yoshimasu, Then Come Back: the Lost Neruda Poems and Fungus Skull Eye Wing: Selected Poems of Alfonso D'Aquino. His most recent anthologies are Pinholes in the Night: Essential Poems from Latin American (selected by Raúl Zurita) and Panic Cure: Poems from Spain for the 21st Century.Gander's books have been translated and published in more than a dozen other languages. He is a United States Artists Rockefeller Fellow and has received fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim, Whiting, and Howard Foundations. In 2011, he was awarded the Library of Congress Witter Bynner Fellowship. Gander was the Briggs-Copeland poet at Harvard University before becoming The Adele Kellenberg Seaver Professor of Literary Arts and Comparative Literature at Brown University where he taught courses such as Poetry & Ethics, EcoPoetics, Latin American Death Trip, and Translation Theory & Practice. He is a Chancellor for the Academy of American Poets and an elected member of The Academy of Arts & Sciences.

PodCacher: Geocaching Goodness
Show 769.0: TravelCaching New England (MA, ME, RI, CT)

PodCacher: Geocaching Goodness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 48:27


On our special geocaching podcast today, we'll take you along with us to New England. We love it when we can create travel-caching episodes for you. We share the sights, sounds and experiences of a new place. These special shows are full of adventure, humor, tips, creative caches and fun. We're going to take you […] The post Show 769.0: TravelCaching New England (MA, ME, RI, CT) appeared first on PodCacher: Geocaching Goodness.

Obstacle Running Adventures
250. Ryan Woods on Retirement Rumors, Penalties, Being a Chiropractor, and More!

Obstacle Running Adventures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 67:42


We did it!  We finally had Ryan Woods on the show after missing him in New Jersey at a Spartan Race, again at North American OCR Championships in Vermont, and World's Toughest Mudder in Atlanta, GA! We discuss his profession as a chiropractor, his thoughts on Spartan penalties and the emotional toll that it takes, as well as addressing the rumors about him retiring from obstacle course racing! 0:00 - 2:24 - Intro 2:24 - 9:35 - Quick News 9:35 - 10:00 - Content Preface 10:00 - 1:02:16 - Ryan Woods Interview 1:02:16 - End - Outro ____ News Stories: 25% off OCRWC 2022 Registration Emilee Stevens' New Gym Kempson's Dad Death Spartan Games Roster Spartan Atlanta Super Podiums Spartan Atlanta Sprint Podiums Spartan Ocean City Sprint Podiums Spartan Big Bear Beast Podiums Spartan Big Bear Ultra Podiums Spartan Big Bear Super Podiums: Men and Women Tougher Mudder Washington DC Podiums Meme Secret Link Quote ____ Related Episodes: We never had Ryan Woods on the show before! ____  Next episode we plan to cover FIT Challenge's 24 hour trail race in Cumberland, RI.  At the very least Mike will be running the 4 hour multi-lap course which is similar but different! ____ The OCR Report Sponsored Athletes: Javier Escobar and Kelly Sullivan! Support us on Patreon for exclusive content and access to our Facebook group For a podcast shirt, send $20 to Katelyn-Ritter-8 on Venmo with your size and address Check out our Threadless Shop Use coupon code "adventure" for 10% off MudGear products Use coupon code "ocrreport20" for 20% off Caterpy products Like us on Facebook: Obstacle Running Adventures Follow our podcast on Instagram: @ObstacleRunningAdventures Write us an email: obstaclerunningadventures@gmail.com Subscribe on Youtube: MStefano Running Intro music - "Streaker" by: Straight Up Outro music - "Iron Paw" by: Dubbest