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Best podcasts about national conservation training center

Latest podcast episodes about national conservation training center

Decarbonize: The Clean Energy Podcast
Get the Buzz: Research shows solar habitat installations support pollinators

Decarbonize: The Clean Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 70:54


Bees, monarchs, and other critical pollinators are disappearing, and scientists agree that loss of habitat is a primary concern. However, research has found that the renewable energy sector provides a unique opportunity for creating new pollinator habitat.Join Monarch Joint Venture, Connexus Energy, MNL, and Fresh Energy for a webinar recorded on May 18, 2022, as we dig into the new study, “Monitoring Pollinators on Minnesota Solar Installation,” which used field data collection practices to document an abundance of bees, butterflies, moths, flies, and wasps utilizing pollinator-friendly solar habitat in Minnesota. We also discussed seed mixes and biodiversity benefits, how utilities and co-ops can lead, and more.PanelistsLaura Lukens | she/her | Monarch Joint VentureLaura Lukens is the National Monitoring Coordinator for the Monarch Joint Venture, a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving monarch butterflies and their migration. Laura coordinates research projects throughout the US and cultivates a network of researchers and science initiatives to advance monarch conservation priorities.Rob Davis | he/him | Connexus EnergyRob Davis is communications lead at Connexus Energy and chair of the advisory committee to the National Renewable Energy Lab's InSPIRE study into low-impact solar. Davis' work on pollinator-friendly solar has been featured in trainings by the U.S. Department of the Interior's National Conservation Training Center, the U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; in feature stories in Fast Company and Scientific American, and a talk titled “This unlikely 1960s space tech can help save the bees,” on TED.com. Previously, Davis helped launch technology start-ups and created the international crowdsourced campaign that launched the Firefox web browser. He is a graduate of Macalester College.Jake Janksi | he/him | MNLJake Janski is the Director of Field Service Operations and a Senior Ecologist at MNL (Minnesota Native Landscapes). Jake applies his experiences from the past 20+ years in the industry towards the successful restoration and management of our region's plant communities, solar sites, and natural resources. Beyond overseeing MNL's spectrum of ecological services, broadest in the Midwest, Jake has also written and implemented numerous studies, restoration strategies, and vegetation management plans throughout his career. Whenever possible, he enjoys sharing these experiences and perspectives with audiences of his peers, industry groups, and others who share MNL's mission of Healing the Earth.Resources:- YouTube link to the webinar- Report: Monitoring Pollinators on Minnesota Solar Installations- Blog about Monarch Joint Venture's study- Sample Ordinance and Procurement Language- Pollinator-Friendly Solar Scorecards

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Prothonotary Warbler bringing food to its nest in South Carolina, March 2012.  Photo by Mark Musselman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14152/rec/3, as of 5-9-22. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE BIRDS IN THIS EPISODE The scientific names of the birds in this episode are as follows: Baltimore Oriole – Icterus galbula;Northern Parula – Setophaga Americana (formerly Parula americana);Prothonotary Warbler – Protonotaria citrea. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/baltimore_oriole. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Parula/;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Prothonotary_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/balori/cur/introduction; the Northern Parula entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/norpar/cur/introduction; the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/prowar/cur/introduction. Merriam-Webster, “Warble,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/warble. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040348&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040312&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040303&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,”

united states music new york university game world texas earth education college guide water state zoom living tech research society ms government benefits foundation search songs north america environment dark fish press normal web natural tree va rain birds sea disease baltimore climate change ocean animals south carolina cd snow maine citizens trees agency cambridge stream priority richmond plants biology guitar native environmental bay images ash dynamic bio conservation copyright wildlife trio index commonwealth processes penn menu pond arial signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech asheville accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources adaptations msonormal compatibility colorful forestry baltimore orioles times new roman populations ls sections aquatic poison ivy merriam webster watershed organisms zoology chesapeake minn taxonomy policymakers forest service photosynthesis shenandoah shrubs wildlife service songbirds acknowledgment cosgrove cambria math ornithology style definitions worddocument nests xeno saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent shenandoah valley punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority michelle smith qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal audubon society sols bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis forest management bill thompson shepherdstown birdsongs ebird living systems grades k name e wildlife resources light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name date rhododendrons name plain text name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light cumberland gap name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list spanish moss inland fisheries forest resources warble virginia society michigan museum ben cosgrove all about birds audio notes national conservation training center lang elliott 20image stormwater runoff tmdl water center donotshowrevisions lang elliot virginia standards chandler s robbins
She Explores
WorldPride: Revisiting Our Conversation with Elyse Rylander

She Explores

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 43:29


In honor of WorldPride, we're revisiting our 2018 conversation with Elyse Rylander. Elyse is the founder and executive director of OUT There Adventures, a nonprofit dedicated to empowering queer young people through their connection with the natural world. Elyse believes nature is a disruptive force for queer youth and hopes to positively foster their identities and love of the outdoors.She's doing so through her nonprofit, OUT There Adventures. By partnering with existing organizations like Outward Bound and Northwest Youth Corps, she's reaching more queer kids and multiplying the potential impact of OUT There's mission. It takes time, energy, and capital to build a nonprofit. Elyse shares the challenges and rewards of the last five years of work and her vision for years to come.Elyse is also a Co-Creator of the LGBTQ Outdoor Summit and is using this opportunity to announce that there are now dates for the 4th summit! Mark your calendar for April 1 - 4, 2022 at the National Conservation Training Center in West Virginia.You can also find this episode as part of the WorldPride Pod Stage, wherever podcasts are found.Featuring: Elyse Rylander, Founder and Executive Director of OUT There Adventures; Co-creator of the LGBTQ Outdoor SummitHosted & Produced by Gale Straub Sponsored by Goodr, Yonder, Rumpl, & PachamamaJoin the She Explores Podcast community on FacebookVisit She-Explores.com & Follow Us on InstagramResourcesOut There Adventures: Website & InstagramLGBTQ Outdoor SummitElyse's personal instagramWorldPride Pod Stage Sponsor Websites & Discount CodesGoodr: Head over to www.goodr.com and enter EXPLORE15 at checkout for 15% OFF your entire order.Yonder: Book an escape in nature and find your Yonder at Yonder.com.Rumpl: Get 15% off your first order at Rumpl.com with code SHE15 at checkout.Pachamama CBD: Get 40% off Sleep Well CBD Gummies with code EXPLORE at checkout via pachamamaCBD.com.Music is licensed through Musicbed.Episodes air weekly on Wednesdays-- subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
SUPD 20 What is Democracy Good For? David Orr and John Avlon

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2019 72:54


What is Democracy Good For? That is the main question for both of my guests. I met David Orr at the National Conservation Training Center a few years back when we were both addressing young people about climate change, sustainability, government and media. Shortly after meeting him I got my hands on as much of his writing as I could and I have been a massive fan of his mind and voice ever since He has been one of the most respected voices in the environmental movement for over a generation and we had a great talk. I LOVE this collection of his essays https://www.amazon.com/Hope-Imperative-Essential-David-Orr/dp/1597267007/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=david+orr&qid=1576214875&sr=8-4 Then at about 42 minutes I finally got my old friend John Avlon,who is kicking ass on CNN every morning, on the horn he was as smart and thoughtful as always.  Give him a follow on twitter @johnavlon and watch him every day on CNN Get his books too!  https://johnavlon.com/books/  support the show on Patreon.com/petedominick

Experts Only
Rob Davis, Director of the Center for Pollinators in Energy at Fresh Energy

Experts Only

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2019 33:19


This week on the pod, Jon Powers speaks with Rob Davis of Fresh Energy to discuss the link between pollinator insects and solar energy. In their discussion, Davis and Powers explore bees’ impact on the environment and human agriculture, and how solar farm designs can help a pollinator population in crisis. Rob Davis began his career working with technology start-ups and created the international crowdsourced campaign that launched the Firefox web browser. He now works as Director of the Center for Pollinators in Energy at Fresh Energy where he helps accelerate the nation’s transition to the use of clean and renewable energy. Davis’ work on pollinator-friendly solar has been featured in trainings by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Conservation Training Center, U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Resource Institute, and the North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center. Experts Only is hosted by CleanCapital. Learn more: http://www.cleancapital.com/experts-only Follow on Twitter: @CleanCapital_ Learn more about pollinators and solar: https://fresh-energy.org/ Watch Rob’s TED talk: https://fresh-energy.org/beeslovesolar/ Catch Rob at the following upcoming events: Agrivoltaics: Harvesting Multiple Benefits from Solar Sites on April 1: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/agrivoltaics-harvesting-multiple-benefits-from-solar-sites-tickets-56923291096 Read his latest Blog on why #BeesLoveSolar: https://www.organicvalley.coop/blog/bee-friendly-solar-is-win-win-win-for-people-planet-pollinators/

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast
State Level Adaptation Planning: A Podcast with Climate Change Coordinator Davia Palmeri

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2016 69:42


In this episode, host Doug Parsons speaks with Davia Palmeri, Climate Change Coordinator with the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.  Davia talks about the unique role that state agencies play in conserving wildlife. We learn a bit of the history behind wildlife management in the United States.  Doug and Davia then dig into the role state agencies have played in adaptation planning at the state and national level.  Davia explains the role of AFWA’s Climate Change committee and how it provides resources for adaptation planning to the states.  We discuss missed opportunities for long term wildlife funding with the failed Cap and Trade Bill.  Davia also discuss some of her favorite climate change resources, ranging from the Climate Smart report, to the Climate Change Academy hosted by the National Conservation Training Center.  We also discuss the National Fish, Wildlife and Plant Adaptation Strategy: the first of its kind.  Davia also highlights the new National Adaptation Leadership Awards and the upcoming call for nominations.  Finally, we discuss opportunities for rank and file state employees, conservationists from NGOs, and Federal employees, on how they can get involved with adaptation planning in their regions.  Davia was an amazing guest, with a passion for working with states on ways to conserve wildlife in a changing climate. Listen in on all these topics and more!  And stick around to hear what Davia’s favorite wildlife species are, and how they’ll fare under climate change! For more information on this podcast, visit our website at www.americaadapts.org and don't forget to subscribe to this podcast on Itunes. Also, consider following us on Facebook at America Adapts!  Check us out, we’re also on YouTube!

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
A Conversation with Jon Waterman, Author

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2010 9:52


In 1869, John Wesley Powell led a small party down the Green and Colorado Rivers in a bold attempt to explore the Grand Canyon for the first time. After their monumental expedition, they told of raging rapids, constant danger, and breathtaking natural beauty of the American landscape at its most pristine. Jon Waterman combines sheer adventure and environmental calamity in this trailblazing cautionary account of his 2008 trip down the overtaxed, drying Colorado. Dammed and tunneled, forced into countless canals, trapped in reservoirs and harnessed for electricity, what once was untamed and free is now humbled, parched, and so yoked to human purposes that in most years it trickles away 100 miles from its oceanic destination. Waterman writes with informal immediacy in this eye-witness account of the many demands on the Colorado, from irrigating 3.5 million acres of farmland to watering the lawns of Los Angeles. He shows how our profligacy and inexorable climate change spark political conflict, and how we can avert this onrushing ecological crisis. As he follows Powell afloat and afoot, Waterman reaches out both to adventure travelers and to scientists, conservationists, environmentalists, and anyone interested in the fragile interplay between nature and humans. Jonathan Waterman is the author of nine books, has made four television films, and works as a freelance author and filmmaker. In 2004, his writing about the Arctic won the prestigious National Endowment of the Arts Literary Fellowship.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
A Conversation with Jon Waterman, Author

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2010 9:52


In 1869, John Wesley Powell led a small party down the Green and Colorado Rivers in a bold attempt to explore the Grand Canyon for the first time. After their monumental expedition, they told of raging rapids, constant danger, and breathtaking natural beauty of the American landscape at its most pristine. Jon Waterman combines sheer adventure and environmental calamity in this trailblazing cautionary account of his 2008 trip down the overtaxed, drying Colorado. Dammed and tunneled, forced into countless canals, trapped in reservoirs and harnessed for electricity, what once was untamed and free is now humbled, parched, and so yoked to human purposes that in most years it trickles away 100 miles from its oceanic destination. Waterman writes with informal immediacy in this eye-witness account of the many demands on the Colorado, from irrigating 3.5 million acres of farmland to watering the lawns of Los Angeles. He shows how our profligacy and inexorable climate change spark political conflict, and how we can avert this onrushing ecological crisis. As he follows Powell afloat and afoot, Waterman reaches out both to adventure travelers and to scientists, conservationists, environmentalists, and anyone interested in the fragile interplay between nature and humans. Jonathan Waterman is the author of nine books, has made four television films, and works as a freelance author and filmmaker. In 2004, his writing about the Arctic won the prestigious National Endowment of the Arts Literary Fellowship.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Speaking with Nancy Langston - Toxic Bodies: Hormone Disruptors and the Legacy of Rachel Carson

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2010 642:00


Author, Professor at University of Wisconsin In 1941 the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of diethylstilbestrol (DES), the first synthetic chemical to be marketed as an estrogen and one of the first to be identified as a hormone disruptor—a chemical that mimics hormones. Its residues, and those of other chemicals, in the American food supply are changing the internal ecosystems of human, livestock, and wildlife bodies in increasingly troubling ways. In this gripping exploration that forms her new book, Nancy Langston shows how these chemicals have penetrated into every aspect of our bodies and ecosystems. Nancy Langston, a professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology with a joint appointment in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, was president of the American Society for Environmental History in 2007–9.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Speaking with Nancy Langston - Toxic Bodies: Hormone Disruptors and the Legacy of Rachel Carson

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2010 642:00


Author, Professor at University of Wisconsin In 1941 the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of diethylstilbestrol (DES), the first synthetic chemical to be marketed as an estrogen and one of the first to be identified as a hormone disruptor—a chemical that mimics hormones. Its residues, and those of other chemicals, in the American food supply are changing the internal ecosystems of human, livestock, and wildlife bodies in increasingly troubling ways. In this gripping exploration that forms her new book, Nancy Langston shows how these chemicals have penetrated into every aspect of our bodies and ecosystems. Nancy Langston, a professor in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology with a joint appointment in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, was president of the American Society for Environmental History in 2007–9.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Phil Pister Desert Fishes Council - "Ethics and the Environmental Field Biologist "

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2010 9:50


Phil Pister retired in February 1990 following 38 years as a fishery biologist with the California Department of Fish and Game. He studied wildlife conservation and zoology under A. Starker Leopold at the University of California (Berkeley) and has spent virtually his entire career supervising aquatic management and research within an area encompassing approximately a thousand waters of the eastern Sierra/desert regions of California, ranging from the 14,000 foot crest of the Sierra Nevada to the floor of Death Valley lying below sea level. He founded and serves as executive secretary of the Desert Fishes Council and is involved in desert ecosystem preservation throughout the American Southwest and adjoining areas of Mexico. He holds special interest in the fields of conservation biology and environmental ethics and has served on the Board of Governors of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists and Society for Conservation Biology. He also serves on the President's Advisory Committee of the University of California's system-wide White Mountain Research Station. He conducts environmental ethics workshops at the National Conservation Training Center (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) in West Virginia, has lectured at 81 universities in North America and the United Kingdom, and has authored more than 80 published papers and book chapters.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Phil Pister Desert Fishes Council - "Ethics and the Environmental Field Biologist "

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2010 9:50


Phil Pister retired in February 1990 following 38 years as a fishery biologist with the California Department of Fish and Game. He studied wildlife conservation and zoology under A. Starker Leopold at the University of California (Berkeley) and has spent virtually his entire career supervising aquatic management and research within an area encompassing approximately a thousand waters of the eastern Sierra/desert regions of California, ranging from the 14,000 foot crest of the Sierra Nevada to the floor of Death Valley lying below sea level. He founded and serves as executive secretary of the Desert Fishes Council and is involved in desert ecosystem preservation throughout the American Southwest and adjoining areas of Mexico. He holds special interest in the fields of conservation biology and environmental ethics and has served on the Board of Governors of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists and Society for Conservation Biology. He also serves on the President's Advisory Committee of the University of California's system-wide White Mountain Research Station. He conducts environmental ethics workshops at the National Conservation Training Center (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) in West Virginia, has lectured at 81 universities in North America and the United Kingdom, and has authored more than 80 published papers and book chapters.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Steve Chase gives an NCTC Eagle Update - January 29, 2010

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2010 2:54


Hear Steve talk about the replacement of the eagle cam, how the eagles are getting ready for nesting season and internet addresses for viewing the eagle cam.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Steve Chase gives an NCTC Eagle Update - January 29, 2010

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2010 2:54


Hear Steve talk about the replacement of the eagle cam, how the eagles are getting ready for nesting season and internet addresses for viewing the eagle cam.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
A Conversation with Stephen Potter, NPS Archeologist

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2009 18:44


Stephen discusses his presentation "Aboriginal America and the Potomac Frontier, 1607-1676"

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
A Conversation with Stephen Potter, NPS Archeologist

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2009 18:44


Stephen discusses his presentation "Aboriginal America and the Potomac Frontier, 1607-1676"

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
A Talk with John Grabowska, NPS Filmmaker

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2009 9:37


USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
A Talk with John Grabowska, NPS Filmmaker

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2009 9:37


USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Student Climate & Conservation Congress (Sc3). A Conversation with Jena Thompson from the Conservation Fund

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2009 4:48


Jena talks about Go Zero, a program of the Conservation Fund.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Student Climate & Conservation Congress (Sc3). A Conversation with Jena Thompson from the Conservation Fund

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2009 4:48


Jena talks about Go Zero, a program of the Conservation Fund.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Student Climate & Conservation Congress (Sc3). Talking with Case Hicks: Theodore Roosevelt Impersonator

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2009 5:02


How did Case become a Teddy Roosevelt impersonator? Hear his background and other interesting stories.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Student Climate & Conservation Congress (Sc3). Talking with Case Hicks: Theodore Roosevelt Impersonator

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2009 5:02


How did Case become a Teddy Roosevelt impersonator? Hear his background and other interesting stories.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Larry Battson Discusses the Facts and Fictions of Bigfoot

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2009 8:20


Bigfoot is a legendary (some claim 'imaginary') ape-like human who has been reportedly sighted from California to Indiana. Battson will give a presentation on the facts and fictions of Bigfoot including analysis of recordings of Bigfoot and casts of his footprint. Battson’s background as a wildlife educator gives him a unique perspective on Bigfoot as someone experienced in wild creatures. Larry and Cheryl Battson have appeared on television shows and traveled around the country with their wildlife show. They have rescued animals ranging from baboons to snakes to large felines and travel to many schools and public events educating and entertaining children and adults on the natural history of wild animals.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Larry Battson Discusses the Facts and Fictions of Bigfoot

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2009 8:20


Bigfoot is a legendary (some claim 'imaginary') ape-like human who has been reportedly sighted from California to Indiana. Battson will give a presentation on the facts and fictions of Bigfoot including analysis of recordings of Bigfoot and casts of his footprint. Battson’s background as a wildlife educator gives him a unique perspective on Bigfoot as someone experienced in wild creatures. Larry and Cheryl Battson have appeared on television shows and traveled around the country with their wildlife show. They have rescued animals ranging from baboons to snakes to large felines and travel to many schools and public events educating and entertaining children and adults on the natural history of wild animals.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Chuck Dunkerly Discusses Environmental Filmmaking & Changes in the American Landscape

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2009 7:00


Chuck Dunkerly is a Producer and Director for the National Park Service at the Harpers Ferry Center. He has delivered scores of award winning films for National Parks, on topics as diverse as on the Olympic National Park, Homesteading, Voting Rights and Leave No Trace. Currently Chuck is developing films for the USS Arizona Memorial, Lake Mead, and Zion National Park.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Chuck Dunkerly Discusses Environmental Filmmaking & Changes in the American Landscape

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2009 7:00


Chuck Dunkerly is a Producer and Director for the National Park Service at the Harpers Ferry Center. He has delivered scores of award winning films for National Parks, on topics as diverse as on the Olympic National Park, Homesteading, Voting Rights and Leave No Trace. Currently Chuck is developing films for the USS Arizona Memorial, Lake Mead, and Zion National Park.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Geographer Forrest McCarthy Discusses Global Climate Change in Arctic NWR

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2009 6:10


McCarthy’s pioneering work utilized historic photos and contemporary excursions to chronicle the significant changes occurring over the last hundred years in arctic landscapes. Forrest McCarthy has been a wilderness advocate and backcountry skier for more than 20 years. As Public Lands Director for the Winter Wildlands Alliance he couples his zest for backcountry skiing with his passion for conservation.

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts
Geographer Forrest McCarthy Discusses Global Climate Change in Arctic NWR

USFWS/NCTC Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2009 6:10


McCarthy’s pioneering work utilized historic photos and contemporary excursions to chronicle the significant changes occurring over the last hundred years in arctic landscapes. Forrest McCarthy has been a wilderness advocate and backcountry skier for more than 20 years. As Public Lands Director for the Winter Wildlands Alliance he couples his zest for backcountry skiing with his passion for conservation.

This Week in Sea Turtles
TWiST 5: Recovering Ridleys?

This Week in Sea Turtles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2006 40:15


Hosts: Michael Coyne, Manjula Tiwari Manjula and Michael take advantage of the annual Board of DIrectors meeting of the International Sea Turtle Society at the National Conservation Training Center near Shepherdstown, West Virginia. This week we talk to Donna Shaver and Thane Wibbels about Kemp's ridley sea turtles and hopeful signs for their recovery.