Podcasts about Aquatic

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  • 749PODCASTS
  • 1,333EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • May 20, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Aquatic

Show all podcasts related to aquatic

Latest podcast episodes about Aquatic

Montana Public Radio News
FWP is closing three aquatic invasive species check stations in low-risk areas

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 1:22


This season, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is closing down watercraft inspection stations in areas where risk of aquatic invasive species coming from out-of-state boats is considered low.

Aquatics Today
Episode 16 - What Is An Aquatic Partner?

Aquatics Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 5:49


Episode 16 will help you think outside the box and open your eyes to all of the possibilities that are out there. Jamal challenges you to consider what you are missing, and how an aquatics partner can help fill that void. With so many options available, Episode 16 is a must-listen for anyone looking to start or expand their aquatics program.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. DAVID GUGGENHEIM - The Ocean Doctor

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 41:27


Dr. David E. Guggenheim is a marine scientist, conservation policy specialist, submarine pilot and ocean explorer. He is president of 1planet1ocean, a project of The Ocean Foundation where he is a Senior Fellow and director of its Cuba Marine Research and Conservation Program. He is currently leading a major project to elevate collaboration in marine science and conservation among Cuba, Mexico and the U.S. to a new level and leading the first-ever comprehensive research and conservation program in Cuba's Gulf of Mexico region, a joint effort with the University of Havana. Also known as the "Ocean Doctor" and host of the ExpeditionCasts podcast series, Dr. Guggenheim is currently engaged in a special "expedition" to all fifty U.S. states visiting schools and bringing special programs about ocean exploration and conservation to young students. So far he has traveled more than 35,000 miles, visited 13 states, made 39 speeches and reached more than 10,000 students in schools ranging from the northernmost community in North America, Barrow, Alaska, to Macksville, Kansas, close to the geographic center of the lower 48 states, to the southern tip of Florida. In 2007 he served as a scientific advisor to Greenpeace for its expedition to map deepwater corals in the Bering Sea where he piloted the first-ever manned submersible dives into the Bering Sea's largest underwater canyons. Guggenheim played a lead role in building the recently-formed Gulf of Mexico Alliance, a partnership among the U.S. Gulf states and 13 federal agencies and Mexico. Guggenheim is also working to introduce cutting-edge technologies for sustainable aquaculture practices to the Americas to reduce pressure on overfished wild fish stocks. Guggenheim previously served as Vice President at The Ocean Conservancy, President & CEO of The Conservancy of Southwest Florida, co-chair of the Everglades Coalition and president of the Friends of Channel Islands National Park. Guggenheim holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Public Policy from George Mason University in Virginia, a Master's in Aquatic and Population Biology from University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Master's in Regional Science and Bachelor's in Environmental Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. For additional information, please see: www.1planet1ocean.org and www.OceanDoctor.org.******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The Best of The 'X' Zone Radio/TV Show with Rob McConnell
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. DAVID GUGGENHEIM - The Ocean Doctor

The Best of The 'X' Zone Radio/TV Show with Rob McConnell

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 41:27


Dr. David E. Guggenheim is a marine scientist, conservation policy specialist, submarine pilot and ocean explorer. He is president of 1planet1ocean, a project of The Ocean Foundation where he is a Senior Fellow and director of its Cuba Marine Research and Conservation Program. He is currently leading a major project to elevate collaboration in marine science and conservation among Cuba, Mexico and the U.S. to a new level and leading the first-ever comprehensive research and conservation program in Cuba's Gulf of Mexico region, a joint effort with the University of Havana. Also known as the "Ocean Doctor" and host of the ExpeditionCasts podcast series, Dr. Guggenheim is currently engaged in a special "expedition" to all fifty U.S. states visiting schools and bringing special programs about ocean exploration and conservation to young students. So far he has traveled more than 35,000 miles, visited 13 states, made 39 speeches and reached more than 10,000 students in schools ranging from the northernmost community in North America, Barrow, Alaska, to Macksville, Kansas, close to the geographic center of the lower 48 states, to the southern tip of Florida. In 2007 he served as a scientific advisor to Greenpeace for its expedition to map deepwater corals in the Bering Sea where he piloted the first-ever manned submersible dives into the Bering Sea's largest underwater canyons. Guggenheim played a lead role in building the recently-formed Gulf of Mexico Alliance, a partnership among the U.S. Gulf states and 13 federal agencies and Mexico. Guggenheim is also working to introduce cutting-edge technologies for sustainable aquaculture practices to the Americas to reduce pressure on overfished wild fish stocks. Guggenheim previously served as Vice President at The Ocean Conservancy, President & CEO of The Conservancy of Southwest Florida, co-chair of the Everglades Coalition and president of the Friends of Channel Islands National Park. Guggenheim holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Public Policy from George Mason University in Virginia, a Master's in Aquatic and Population Biology from University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Master's in Regional Science and Bachelor's in Environmental Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. For additional information, please see: www.1planet1ocean.org and www.OceanDoctor.org.******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

Maine Calling
How to identify and control harmful invasive plants, both terrestrial and aquatic

Maine Calling

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 50:51


How to identify and control harmful invasive plants, both terrestrial and aquatic

Outdoors Radio with Dan Small
Show 1720: Cohos are biting on Lake Michigan. LeRoy Butler visits Florence County and you should, too. High water impedes aquatic vegetation. Casting For Kids raises funds for cancer research. Jeff reports on his son's first turkey hunt. Dan attends the

Outdoors Radio with Dan Small

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 50:00


Charter captain Dumper Dan Welsch reports that cohos are starting to show up along the Lake Michigan coast and should reach Sheboygan soon. (dumperdan.com, craft30pub.com) Wendy Gehlhoff, executive director of Florence County Economic Development, announces a new four county ATV trail alliance and reports on upcoming events in Florence County, including an afternoon with Packers Hall-of-Famer LeRoy Butler. (exploreflorencecounty.com, quadcountytrails.com) Wisconsin Wildlife Federation Region 5 director Justin Loehrke describes the impact of recent high water levels on aquatic vegetation on the Lake Winnebago chain. (wiwf.org/landing/) In the Madison Outdoors Report, pro angler Duffy Kopf announces upcoming events on the Madison chain, including the annual Capital City Chapter of Muskies Inc. tournament, May 14, and the Mark Osieki Casting for Kids (facebook.com/CapCityMuskies, casting4kids.org)

Com d'Archi
S3#73

Com d'Archi

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 15:33


In this issue of Com d'Archi, the architecture firm Ateliers 2/3/4/ located in Paris, France, tells us about the "Aquatic Centre Paris 2024" project in Saint-Denis, France, that they designed. The architects, give their vision of this very emblematic project they won in front of big, famous and international teams. Image DR © Ateliers 2/3/4/Sound engineering : Julien Rebours___If you like the podcast do not hesitate:. to subscribe so you don't miss the next episodes,. to leave us stars and a comment :-),. to follow us on Instagram @comdarchipodcast to find beautiful images, always chosen with care, so as to enrich your view on the subject.Nice week to all of you ! Voir Acast.com/privacy pour les informations sur la vie privée et l'opt-out.

What's New in Adapted Physical Education
Adapted Aquatics and APE Teaching Tips

What's New in Adapted Physical Education

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 54:25


Listen in on the May NCPEID APE Collaborative, featuring two well-experienced guest veterans in the field of APA, to discuss current issues in adapted aquatics as well as lessons and tips for adapting, innovating, and inventing in the APE field. Dr. Monica Lepore (@MonicaLepore), retired APE professor from West Chester University will be discussing current issues in adapted aquatics. Ann Griffin (@GWAEA_AdaptedPE), retired APE teacher and consultant from Grant Wood Area Education Agency in east central Iowa will be sharing her knowledge and expertise on the challenges and lessons she's learned from her 40 years of experience in the field.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Prothonotary Warbler bringing food to its nest in South Carolina, March 2012.  Photo by Mark Musselman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14152/rec/3, as of 5-9-22. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE BIRDS IN THIS EPISODE The scientific names of the birds in this episode are as follows: Baltimore Oriole – Icterus galbula;Northern Parula – Setophaga Americana (formerly Parula americana);Prothonotary Warbler – Protonotaria citrea. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/baltimore_oriole. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Parula/;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Prothonotary_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/balori/cur/introduction; the Northern Parula entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/norpar/cur/introduction; the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/prowar/cur/introduction. Merriam-Webster, “Warble,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/warble. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040348&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040312&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040303&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,”

united states music new york university game world texas earth education college guide water state zoom living tech research society ms government benefits foundation search songs north america environment dark fish press normal web natural tree va rain birds sea disease baltimore climate change ocean animals south carolina cd snow maine citizens trees agency cambridge stream priority richmond plants biology guitar native environmental bay images ash dynamic bio conservation copyright wildlife trio index commonwealth processes penn menu pond arial fort worth signature ludwig virginia tech asheville accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources adaptations msonormal compatibility colorful forestry baltimore orioles times new roman populations ls sections aquatic poison ivy merriam webster watershed organisms zoology chesapeake minn taxonomy policymakers forest service photosynthesis shenandoah shrubs wildlife service songbirds acknowledgment cosgrove cambria math ornithology style definitions worddocument nests xeno saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent shenandoah valley punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc wrapindent intlim narylim virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority michelle smith qformat lsdexception locked semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal audubon society sols bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis forest management bill thompson shepherdstown birdsongs living systems ebird grades k name e light accent dark accent colorful accent wildlife resources name list name date rhododendrons name plain text name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light cumberland gap name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list spanish moss inland fisheries forest resources warble virginia society michigan museum ben cosgrove all about birds audio notes lang elliott 20image stormwater runoff tmdl national conservation training center water center donotshowrevisions lang elliot virginia standards chandler s robbins
Propulsion Swimming Podcast
E109 - ASH MORRIS: Hamilton Aquatics Dubai

Propulsion Swimming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 39:06


On this week's episode of the Propulsion Swimming Podcast, is the Director of Swimming at Hamilton Aquatics Dubai, Ash Morris. Hamilton Aquatics is home to a comprehensive aquatics programme in swimming, competitive swimming, artistic swimming and water polo. With over 30 locations in the UAE and Qatar, & over 5000 swimmers in the program, they provide high-quality aquatics provisions. We speak with Ash about the benefits of training out in Dubai, how the business model of the club helps support the elite squad, and managing a multi-national squad; including the challenges of racing around the world. As well as touching upon one of Hamilton Aquatics' most successful alumni, Lewis Burras. ✔️ SUBSCRIBE to Propulsion Swimming: http://bit.ly/PropulsionSwimming

Lachlansavestheworld
TE #112 Reptilian Channel, Alpha Draconian Empire, Dinosaurs, Hybridization Programs & Galactic Federation Of Lies With Anthony - Canadian Awareness

Lachlansavestheworld

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 91:40


Anthony is an authentic Reptilian Extraterrestrial Contactee & Channeler, providing suppressed insight on the Interstellar Intelligence & Ancient Civilizations, Spirituality & UFOlogy, Extraterrestrial Contact and Consciousness, Telepathy and Channeling, fraudulent Galactic Federations and Councils..Anthony has had the pleasure of interacting and experiencing ET connections by Aquatic, Zeta Reticuli, Humanoid and Avian races as well as Reptilian races from Theta Tauri, Bootes, Teoto, Rigel, Parallel 33, Capella, Alpha Draconian Empire including Ciakar, Vortak, Kalask and DeMonGa.Having participated in ceremonial Reptilian training programs and initiation processes with an alliance of 5th and 6th density Reptilian races, Anthony proudly shares his current ambassadorship role and prideful partnership with the Theta Tauri White Reptilian race and Teoto Reptilian race, as well as their opinions on subjects such as: humanity, human fear and trauma, spiritual and channeling industry, fraudulent galactic federations and councils, pride and honour, suicide and depression, dreams and astral hijackings, abductions and free will, Alpha Draconian Empire and hierarchy within, integrating Reptilian energy and making benevolent Extraterrestrial connections including Reptilian connections.Connect With Anthony:https://www.canadianawareness.ca/bio.htmlhttps://www.youtube.com/c/CanadianAwareness/videosThankyou to all the co-produces investing and supporting the showValue For Value Funding Model:https://pod.fan/transcending-explorations-with-lachlan-dunTo Share Your Time + Talents / Collab Email me: Lachlandunn23@gmail.comPRODUCT DISCOUNTSMedicinal Mushrooms And Superfoods: https://teelixir.com/  Code lachlan10StoneAge Supplement Discounts 15% Store Wide: http://www.stoneagehealth.com.au?afmc=4a10% off grounding and emf protection products : https://www.earthingoz.com.au/?ref=lachlandunnWork With Me: https://calendly.com/lachlandunn23/callTopics Discussed:Earth is a school realmEarth is like a biolab for creation of creaturesAnnunaki DNA manipulation of humansHow many DNA contributions to human avatarReptilian donations / Alpha draconian empire Earth based reptiliansGFL Cult Artificial IntelligenceAre some of these races post biological3 Levels to earth based repitliansHybridisation programs and much more I hope you guys love this episode. Appreciate any ratings and reviews in return

Working In The Weeds
Inspired by Steve Irwin with a Passion for the Environment with Dr. Candice Prince

Working In The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 15:05


This week, Dr. Candice Prince joins us to talk about her role as an teacher and researcher. Dr. Prince is a triple Gator graduate with a passion for environmental issues and natural resource conservation. — Working In The Weeds is a podcast by the University of Florida/IFAS Center for Aquatics and Invasive Plants. This series connects scientists with stakeholders to clarify and discuss issues surrounding aquatic and invasive plants, while also highlighting the research being conducted at the Center. Do you have topics or questions you would like us to discuss on this podcast? Email us at caip@ifas.ufl.edu. For more information and resources, visit our website. Follow UF/IFAS CAIP on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Ghouls Next Door
Underwater (2020): Aquatic Horrors & Lovecraftian Creatures

Ghouls Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 66:41


Ghouls are talking about the aquatic creature feature, Underwater. Gabe dives into the horrors of being trapped underwater where the environment wants to kill you. She also discusses the dystopian, villainous company that awakens the beasts below. Kat shares their fears of the ocean and tells us about all the monstrous fish just waiting to kill you. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-ghouls-next-door/support

Sitting Dockside
Episode 73- Special Guest Steven Bardin is talking Cormorants, Crappie, and more!

Sitting Dockside

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 65:54


Today we sit down with the elite fisheres biologist, Steven Bardin. Steven returns to the show to talk about:Are cormorants eating all my fish?Should I stick crappie? And what  he is doing with major league fishing. The great opportunity for young biologist and Pond enthusiast, And a whole lot more cool stuff about Pond and Lake management.Come sit with us on Sitting Dockside.I hope you love this podcast as much ae we did.  If so will you hit the 5 stars button.Have questions or want to tell us your thoughts on this subject? Join our Facebook Community:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/PWNRA/  Want help with in your area with your pond or lake Aquatic vegetation and more?  Check out our trusted industry sponsors at our P.W.N.R.A Sponsor Directory .Golden Sponsor Society of Lake Manegment Professionalshttp://www.lakeprofessionals.org    Support the show (http://www.pwnra.org)

Terry for Breakfast - Triple M Central Wheatbelt & Avon Valley
Shire of Northam president Chris Antonio makes an announcement regarding opening hours for the Northam Aquatic Facility

Terry for Breakfast - Triple M Central Wheatbelt & Avon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 1:10


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Uncut Jamz
Phish Phans Get Their Aquatic Phill, A$AP Rocky Arrested & Billie Eillish Eats Shit

Uncut Jamz

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 18:14


Welcome to Uncut Jamz "What's Going On?" News & Announcements Episode #92. This episode we react to the incredible visual experience that was Phish's return show back at MSG, A$AP Rocky getting arrested for murder, and Billie Eillish took a huge fall during her final Coachella concert. We discuss those topics and more as well as give you some upcoming live music dates and new music releases.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 626 (4-25-22): A Sampler of Trees Inhabiting Soggy Virginia Sites

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:49).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-22-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of April 25 and May 2, 2022.  This episode is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, that excerpt of “Baldcypress Swamp,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Va., sets the stage for exploring some of Virginia's tree species found in or near water, along with some of the water places those trees inhabit.  We start with a series of guest voices calling out 16 native Virginia tree species that can be found around watery habitats.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds. VOICES and INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC - ~27 sec - “American Sycamore.  Atlantic White-cedar.  Baldcypress.  Black Gum.  Black Willow.  Boxelder.  Eastern Hemlock.  Hackberry.  Overcup Oak.  Red Maple.  Red Spruce.  River Birch.  Silver Maple.  Swamp Tupelo.  Water Hickory.  Water Tupelo.” Those 16 and other tree species can be found in a wide variety of water-related habitats in Virginia.  The Virginia Department of Conservation's 2021 report, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” lists over 30 community types associated with aquatic habitats.  Tree species are a characteristic of the vegetation in over 15 of those community types, ranging from Piedmont/Mountain Small-stream Alluvial Forests, to Coastal Plain/Piedmont Bottomland Forests, to Coastal Plain Depression Swamps and Ponds, to Maritime Swamps.  More generally speaking, you can find native Virginia trees beside small streams in uplands, for example, Eastern Hemlock; beside large rivers in the mountains or Piedmont, for example, American Sycamore and Silver Maple; beside large Coastal Plain rivers, for example, Overcup Oak and Water Hickory; and in a variety of swamps and other wetlands, for example, Baldcypress, Atlantic White-cedar, and Swamp Tupelo. Here's to Virginia's many tree species, its many water habitats, and the many combinations of those two groups of natural resources.  Thanks to seven Virginia Tech colleagues for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Baldcypress Swamp.” MUSIC – ~15 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Baldcypress Swamp,” from the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright 2004 by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  The “Virginia Wildlife” album was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources).  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 479, 7-1-19, on the Dismal Swamp.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/. Virginia Water Radio thanks the seven Virginia Tech colleagues who recorded tree names on April 21, 2022. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) River Birch photographed at Fredericksburg, Va., April 13, 2022.  Photo by iNaturalist user pfirth, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/111309642(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Swamp Tupelo photographed at First Landing State Park in Virginia Beach, Va., July 9, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user karliemarina, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/86317064(as of 4-25-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Black Willow trees along Toms Creek in Montgomery County, Va., August 18, 2011. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TREE SPECIES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Following are the scientific names (in parentheses) of the tree species mentioned in this episode, in alphabetical order according to the species' common names. Atlantic White-cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides)Baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)Black Gum (Nyssa syvatica)Black Willow (Salix nigra)Boxelder (Acer negundo)Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis)Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)Live Oak (Quercus virginiana)Overcup Oak (Quercus lyrata)Red Maple (Acer rubrum)Red Spruce (Picearubens)River Birch (Betula nigra)Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum)Swamp Tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora) – a variety of Black GumWater Hickory (Carya aquatica)Water Tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) SOURCES Used for Audio Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Program, “The Natural Communities of Virginia: Ecological Groups and Community Types,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/natural-communities/document/comlist07-21.pdf. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Common Native Trees of Virginia,” Charlottesville, Va., 2016.  (The 2020 edition is available online [as a PDF] at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Common-Native-Trees-ID_pub.pdf.) A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Penn State Extension, “Trees, Shrubs, and Groundcovers Tolerant of Wet Sites,” October 22, 2007, online at https://extension.psu.edu/trees-shrubs-and-groundcovers-tolerant-of-wet-sites. Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. Anita K. Rose and James S. Meadows, “Status and Trends of Bottomland Hardwood Forests in the Mid‑Atlantic Region,” USDA/Forest Service Southern Research Station, Asheville, N.C., November 2016; available online at https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/53238. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/benefits-of-tree/;“Forest Management and Health/Insects and Diseases,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/forest-management-health/forest-health/insects-and-diseases/;Tree and Forest Health Guide, 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://dof.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/Tree-and-Forest-Health-Guide.pdf;“Trees for Clean Water Program,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/urban-community-forestry/urban-forestry-community-assistance/virginia-trees-for-clean-water-grant-program/;“Virginia Statewide Assessment of Forest Resources,” November 2020, online (as a PDF) at https://www.stateforesters.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/2020-VA-Statewide-Assessment.pdf;“Tree Identification,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/education-and-recreation/learn-about-education-recreation/tree-identification/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject categoryFollowing are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22. American Sycamore – Episode 624, 4-11-22. American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14. Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17 and Episode 625, 4-18-22.

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The Blue Fish Radio Show
A Win For Upper St. Lawrence River Muskie

The Blue Fish Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 51:26


A Win For Upper St. Lawrence River MuskieBlue Fish Canada is pleased to introduce you to four of the advocates behind the push to end the development of Blind Bay on the Upper St. Lawrence River. Each tells their portion of the advocacy that successfully ended plans to commercially develop prime Muskie spawning habitat. Together Host Lawrence Gunther explores with the four guests what needs to come next.Guests include:John Peach, Upper St. Lawrence Riverkeeper and Executive Director of Save the RiverJeff Garnsey 3rd generation Muskie guide and Chair of Save The RiverDr. John Farrell, Professor of Aquatic and Fisheries Science & Director, Thousand Islands Biological StationJake Tibbles Executive Director Thousand Island Land Trust

BigTankHank’s FISHY DEN !
STEENFOTT AQUATICS IS IN THE DEN !

BigTankHank’s FISHY DEN !

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 71:31


Who is bob steenfott ? Tune in and find out ! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

120 Outdoors
Aquatic Invasive Invaders - Part 2 The Hated Hydrilla

120 Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 56:24


Chris and Don interview, Curt Wagner from Ohio Division of Wildlife where he is the District 3 Fishery Management Supervisor. Our other guest is Mark Warmen.  He is the Aquatic Invasive Species Project Coordinator for the Cleveland Metro Parks & Ohio Department Of Natural Resources. They discuss the history and life cycle of hydrilla and how it effects our lakes. They review the current treatment and the funding process. Curt shares the changes the ODNR implemented because of the hydrilla and talks about what we can do to slow the spread. Hydrilla story @2:00.  Hydrilla life cycle @7:00.  Hydrilla effects on fishing @9:30.  Treatment of hydrilla @18:46.  Are fish and game safe to eat? @24:08.  Current treatment plans for Pymatuning & Mosquito Lakes @28:15. The cost of treatment @33:25.  Changes in fish management @43:18. How can we stop the spread @48:07.

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends
Making Water Safety More Inclusive in Prince George's County, Maryland — May Bonus Episode

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 37:50


The May issue of Parks & Recreation magazine is out now, and on today's bonus episode of the podcast, we're diving deeper into one of this month's feature stories, “Recognizing Water Safety Month.” In celebration of May being National Water Safety Month, the article explores best practices for safety in and around the water, with an emphasis on equity and inclusion. On today's show, I am joined by the author of the article, Tara Eggleston Stewart, CPRE, division chief for aquatics and athletic facilities for the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission (M-NCPPC) in Prince George's County, Maryland. Tara has been in the aquatics profession since she was 15 years old, and as she has grown in the profession, she has always relied on her passion for aquatics and making a difference to drive her interests and growth, versus focusing on how she might be perceived by a profession where few people looked like her or had a similar background. Aside from her work at Maryland-National Capital, Tara has also served on NRPA's Aquatics Network, the American Red Cross' National Training Services, the Association of Aquatic Professionals, and Diversity in Aquatics. Tune in to the full episode below to learn more about Tara, how she got into the field of parks and recreation, and why making water safety programs more equitable and inclusive is so important. You'll also learn: Why drowning is a national public health crisis that disproportionately impacts communities of color and people with disabilities How park and recreation professionals play a role in ending the drowning crisis How M-NCPPC is fostering and supporting the development of a “water-well” community through its various programs and partnerships How M-NCPPC's new Southern Regional Aquatic Wellness Center was designed with accessibility in mind How agencies can hire and retain qualified and diverse lifeguarding staff How to engage our communities in critical conversations and activities around water safety during National Water Safety month and beyond, and much more! Related Links and Resources: The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Department of Parks and Recreation – Prince George's County, Maryland Aquatics at M-NCPPC Department of Parks and Recreation Southern Regional Aquatic Wellness Center Virtual Grand Opening (video) May is National Water Safety Month NRPA Aquatics Resources American Red Cross Lifeguard & Water Safety Training The Association of Aquatic Professionals Diversity in Aquatics   Pictured: An aquatics staff member from Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission's (M-NCPPC) Department of Parks and Recreation in Prince George's County, Maryland, provides swim lessons to a child at a Make A Splash event at the Sports and Learning Complex. Photo by Cassi Hayden.

Think Out Loud
Mystery worm is affecting oysters in Washington

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 8:14


Mud worms are parasites that live in oyster shells. They bore into the shell and make a home there, which gets filled with mud and excrement from the tiny worms. While they are not harmful to humans, mud worms can make oysters less appealing and also affect the shellfish's ability to grow. These effects are a problem for the industry. While mud worms have been found in oysters in California and Oregon, for a long time, Washington aquaculture farms were spared. That changed a few years ago. But the mud worms affecting oysters off of Washington's coast are a different species than scientists have ever seen before. Researchers at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences are trying to find out whether the new species is invasive, or an ancient native species that has lain dormant for centuries. Julieta Martinelli is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington. She joins us to share her efforts to solve the mud worm mystery.

Working In The Weeds
Hippos and Hyacinth: The American Hippo Bill

Working In The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 22:07


As water hyacinth became a bigger and bigger problem, leaders believed African hippopotamuses might be the answer. In this bonus episode, center director Dr. Jay Ferrell and education and training specialist Christine Krebs discuss The American Hippo Bill and how hippos almost called the US south their new home. Additional Resources Library of Congress – Hippopotamus Steak: Topics in Chronicling America Biological Control Development The Atavist Magazine – American Hippopotamus: A bracing and eccentric epic of espionage and hippos Smithsonian Magazine – Pablo Escobar's Pooping Hippos Are Polluting Colombia's Lakes — Working In The Weeds is a podcast by the University of Florida/IFAS Center for Aquatics and Invasive Plants. This series connects scientists with stakeholders to clarify and discuss issues surrounding aquatic and invasive plants, while also highlighting the research being conducted at the Center. Do you have topics or questions you would like us to discuss on this podcast? Email us at caip@ifas.ufl.edu. For more information and resources, visit our website. Follow UF/IFAS CAIP on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Tales from the Stinky Dragon
Paralyte's Poison - Ep 46 - Strife Aquatic

Tales from the Stinky Dragon

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 62:15


The Interns regroup after their harrowing encounter and search for Elleve and Grislee with help from an old friend. But when danger strikes again, can's Mudd's quick thinking save the day?

Fish Out of Water: The SwimSwam Podcast
Paralympian Jamal Hill Talks US Para Team, LA28, and Aquatics Equity Summit

Fish Out of Water: The SwimSwam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 33:01


We sat down with 2020 Paralympian Jamal Hill, who won a bronze medal in the 50 free at the Tokyo 2020. Hill discusses how Team USA is shaping up for the 2022 World Champs as well as the state of para swimming worldwide through the war in Ukraine. Hill is a spokesperson for the LA 2028 Olympic Games and takes us through what he's doing even now, 6 years out from those USA Olympics.  On top of all of that, Hill is the Managing Director for Aquatics Today, which is hosting the inaugural Aquatics Equity Summit virtually on April 20, 2022 (this Wednesday) at 10:30 am PST. Register now for this free event at AquaticsEquity.com. An All-Access Pass to watch the recordings with your team can be purchased if you are unable to attend the live event. Several other aquatics-related summits are scheduled for the year. SWIMSWAM PODCAST LINKS Click here to listen and subscribe on Spotify Click here to listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts Click here to listen and subscribe on Podbean Click here to listen and subscribe on Google Click here to listen and subscribe on YouTube Click here to listen and subscribe on Listen Notes Click here to listen and subscribe on Stitcher Click here to listen and subscribe on iHeartRadio Click here to listen and subscribe on Amazon Click here to listen and subscribe on Pandora Music: Otis McDonald www.otismacmusic.com

Charlottesville Community Engagement
April 16, 2022: Good raised the most money in 5th District race in first quarter; Work continues to reopen Smith Aquatic Center

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 14:14


We are now halfway through the fourth month of the year, and when the clock strikes midnight later on, 29.77 percent of 2022 will have passed. Seven out of ten days of the year are still to come. Is this is a good place and time to take stock? That answer is up to you, but I can tell you that this is another installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement. Thanks for reading, and please send it on to someone else! On today’s program:Campaign finance reports are in for candidates in the Fifth District An update from the Charlottesville Parks and Recreation DepartmentAn area grocery chain is set to eliminate plastic bags A Jefferson Elm is planted on Grounds to mark UVA’s long term landscape architectFirst shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign It’s springtime, and the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign wants you to know they are grassroots initiative of motivated citizens, volunteers, partner organizations, and local government who want to promote the use of native plants. This spring the group is working with retailers across the region to encourage purchase of plants that belong here and are part of an ecosystem that depends on pollination. There are plenty of resources on the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page, so sign up to be notified of lectures, plant sales, and more! Good leads in fundraising totals for 5th District candidatesRepublican incumbent Bob Good has raised the most money among candidates seeking election to Virginia’s new 5th District for the U.S. House of Representatives. According to the Federal Election Commission, Good raised $152,092.13 in the first three months of 2022. His campaign spent $144,310.62 during the period and has spent total of $431,328.87 over the course of the campaign. Good has raised a total of $675,964.49 and had $376,792.76 on hand at the end of March. Republican Dan Moy raised $114,046 in the first quarter and spent $66,106.12, and has $47,939.88 to spend. He did not file a report for activity prior to this year. The Republican nominee will be selected in a convention at Hampden-Sydney College on May 21. On the Democratic side, Josh Throneburg raised $37,524.33 and spent $106,726.72 in the quarter and reported a $50,000 debt. He’s raised $307,678 over the course of the campaign, and had $149,037.30 in his account on March 31. This week the Democrats announced that Throneburg was the sole nominee who turned in enough qualified signatures to make the ballot for the June 21 primary. Andy Parker failed to make the ballot for the Democratic Primary, but raised $178,314.37 between January 1 and March 31. He spent $26,010.45 and had $152,303.92 in the bank.  Park told reporters this week he is considering a challenge of the results. A third Democratic candidate, Warren McClellan, raised $2,900 in the period and a total of $13,901.18 over the campaign. A fourth Democratic candidate, Lewis Combs, dropped out of the race raised $5,155 in the period. Combs raised a total of $227,018 during his campaign and has disbursed $184,832, leaving $42,186.01 in his account as of March 31. COVID-19 updateThe Virginia Department of Health reported another 1,538 COVID-19 cases yesterday and a seven-day percent positivity of 5.4 percent. The total death toll over two years has now risen to 20,022. The VDH no longer reports data by localities on their dashboard, and the Blue Ridge Health District’s dashboard last reports data from April 13. However, an email update sent out last night shows 22 new cases in Albemarle this week, and 16 in Charlottesville. While those figures may be lower than the actual number due to at-home testing, there does not appear to be a significant public health threat from COVID at this time. “What we’re not seeing is a significant spike or a significant increase in case counts at the hospital of people diagnosed with COVID,” said Dr. Costi Sifri, the director of hospital epidemiology at the University of Virginia Medical Center. “Particularly with people diagnosed with severe COVID.  Second boosters are now recommended for those over the age of 50 or those who are immunocompromised. Those who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and booster may want to consider a switch.“In general, for most patients we’d recommend if they received a Johnson and Johnson vaccine initially, that we steer them towards a [messenger]RNA vaccine, the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines,” Dr. Sifri said. For more information on vaccinations, visit the Blue Ridge Health District website. Wegman’s to eliminate single-use plastic bagsAs Albemarle County and Charlottesville both consider levying a tax on plastic bags, a major grocery chain has announced they will phase out their use by the end of this calendar year. “With this decision, the company’s goal is to shift all customers to reusable bags, the best option to solve the environmental challenge of single-use grocery bags,” reads a press release on the company’s website.Wegmans will begin to charge five cents per paper bag, with proceeds going to local food banks or United Way chapters. The company has already eliminated plastic bags in New York, where they were banned ini 2019 by that state’s legislature. Wegmans has also experimented with eliminating them from some stores around Richmond. The release makes the claim that making the transition will eliminate over 345 million bags from going into circulation each year. Albemarle County will hold a public hearing Wednesday evening on imposing a five-cent tax per bag. (staff report)Charlottesville City Council will hold a work session on climate action at 4 p.m. on Monday. Second shout-out goes to Camp AlbemarleToday’s second subscriber-supported public service announcement goes out to Camp Albemarle, which has for sixty years been a “wholesome rural, rustic and restful site for youth activities, church groups, civic events and occasional private programs.”Located on 14 acres on the banks of the Moorman’s River near Free Union, Camp Albemarle continues as a legacy of being a Civilian Conservation Corps project that sought to promote the importance of rural activities. Camp Albemarle seeks support for a plan to winterize the Hamner Lodge, a structure built in 1941 by the CCC and used by every 4th and 5th grade student in Charlottesville and Albemarle for the study of ecology for over 20 years. If this campaign is successful, Camp Albemarle could operate year-round. Consider your support by visiting Donate to Camp Albemarle. Charlottesville Parks and Recreation still seeking lifeguards; no date yet for Smith reopeningThis week, Charlottesville’s Parks and Recreation Advisory Board got an update on preparations underway to get the city’s pools and spraygrounds ready. “We are currently still developing our operational hours and what that’s going to look like at our outdoor facilities,” said Gator Batton is the interim manager of aquatics for the department. “The goal is to open Washington Park, Onesty, and Smith.” Of those three, only Washington Park opened last summer. Onesty Park didn’t open because of a shortage of lifeguards and Smith Aquatic Center has remained closed for the duration of the pandemic due to repairs to address air quality issues. Hours and operations will depend on having lifeguards in place, and Batton said there are currently 65 set up for the summer. “We have looked at some creative ways of recruiting and trying to bring in certified lifeguard staff as well encouraged current staff to stay with us throughout the summer,” Batton said. These include waiving fees for certification courses, $250 signing bonuses, and a second bonus at the end of the summer. The city is also looking to outsource operations of Onesty Pool and there’s a request for proposals on the street. Vic Garber, the deputy director of the department, said they need at least 25 more lifeguards for full operations this summer. Garber said testing has been completed at Smith Aquatic Center. “This included the filtration and chemical feed system,” Garber said. “We had National Pools do that. We basically passed that with flying colors.” Air qualities have been conducted by two different firms. “It should be totally sound from any type of chloramines or chlorine smell,” Garber said. Tests will continue to be conducted after the pool opens and people are using it. An opening date will be announced after the results of a third test. Garber also said the equipment in the fitness room is being replaced.“When people come in, they need to smile and stay as long as they want and be happy,” Garber said. Batton said the hope is to have the spraygrounds at Belmont, Greenbrier, Tonsler, and Forest Hills Parks operational in less than a month. “The goal is over the next two weeks to test out water features, balance water chemistry, and our project opening for those is May 14,” Batton said. Elm planted at UVA Lawn for Mary HughesThe University of Virginia celebrated its founding Wednesday with a tree-planting ceremony to mark the career of retired landscape architect Mary Hughes. Hughes stepped down in January after serving in the position for over a quarter of a century. UVA Today reports that President Jim Ryan spoke at the event. “While at UVA, she expanded awareness of the landscape beyond the Academical Village, both developed and wild lands,” Ryan said. “She secured funding for a multiyear research project on the history of land-use and landscape design of the University Grounds, which resulted in summer internship opportunities for UVA landscape architecture students and enriched the cultural landscape curriculum.”During her time as landscape architect, Hughes directed a study of local waterways and UVA stormwater system, which led to the creation of the Dell. Hughes also studied the history of enslaved workers and served on the President’s Commission on Slavery and the University, which resulted in the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers. A Jefferson Elm was planted outside of Pavilion III in Hughes’ honor. For a full list of memorial trees on Grounds, visit the Office of the Architect’s website. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 624 (4-11-22): Sycamores are Sizable and Scenic at Streamsides

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:57).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-8-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 11, 2022.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, we feature a musical selection inspired in part by one of Virginia's largest and most distinctive riverside plants.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 34 sec – instrumental.You've been listening to part of “Sycamore Rapids,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va., on a 2002 album also called “Sycamore Rapids.”  The album was inspired by the trees of Virginia's state parks and forests, and the “Sycamore Rapids' tune honors particularly James River and Shenandoah River state parks.  According to the composer, the tune's progressions are meant to signify changes a paddler might experience from small riffles to larger rapids to smooth water. At any of those water features throughout the eastern United States, part of a paddler's scenery is often the American Sycamore tree.  Of the three sycamore species native to North America, the American Sycamore is the most familiar and by far the most widespread, ranging from New England to the Midwest and down to Texas, including all of Virginia.  Common in floodplain areas along rivers and streams, the sycamore's distinctive features are large, often hollow trunks; peeling, patterned bark; crooked limbs; large root masses visible along stream banks; and spherical fruits persisting on leafless twigs long into winter. Virginia riversides are of course commonly home to other tree species, too, such as Black Willow, Silver Maple, and Eastern Cottonwood.  But with its large size and distinctive bark, the American Sycamore is perhaps the Commonwealth's most noticeable waterway marker. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Sycamore Rapids.” MUSIC – ~ 16 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 176, 8-26-13. “Sycamore Rapids,” from the 2002 album of the same name, is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Fruit on an American Sycamore beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va. (Montgomery County), March 19, 2022.American Sycamore beside Sinking Creek in Newport, Va., (Giles County), April 10, 2022.American Sycamore roots along the James River near Wingina, Va., along the Nelson-Buckingham county line, July 12, 2009.Hollow trunk of American Sycamore beside the New River in Radford, Va., October 4, 2009.American Sycamores beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va., November 5, 2016.SOURCES Used for Audio eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1.  The American Sycamore entry is online at http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200010589. William C. Grimm, The Book of Trees, Hawthorn Books, New York, N.Y., 1962. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. University of Texas at Austin/Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, ‘Plant Database: Platanus occidentalis,” online at https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ploc. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home.  The American Sycamore entry is online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=PLOC. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia State Parks,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/.  The James River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/james-river; the Shenandoah River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/shenandoah-river. Virginia Department of Forestry, Common Native Trees of Virginia, Charlottesville, 2016. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/.) Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology” online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/vtree.htm.  At this site, one can search for trees by common or scientific name. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20.Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21.Tree buds – Episode 622, 3-28-22. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.Episode 407, 2-12-18