Podcasts about Global health

Health of populations in a global context

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Best podcasts about Global health

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Latest podcast episodes about Global health

Superpowers School Podcast - Productivity Future Of Work, Motivation, Entrepreneurs, Agile, Creative
E79: Self-Help - Ready for a Fresh Start? Tips for Making Large Life Pivots - Leah Elson (Clinical Development Scientist & Author)

Superpowers School Podcast - Productivity Future Of Work, Motivation, Entrepreneurs, Agile, Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2023 39:56


In each episode, Paddy Dhanda deep dives into a new human Superpower and practical advice on how you can apply it immediately. ⚡️ Ready for a Fresh Start? Tips for Making Large Life Pivots Life is full of unexpected twists and turns, and sometimes it takes a major pivot to get back on track. Making large life pivots can be daunting, but it can also be incredibly rewarding. In this episode, we'll explore the process of making a big life change, from the initial steps to the ultimate reward. Whether you're considering a career change, a lifestyle shift, or something else entirely, this episode will provide the information and resources you need to make the most of your life pivot. Leah Elson (Clinical Development Scientist & Author) Leah is an academically-published scientist and charismatic science communicator. Her 14-year career in medical research has included the fields of orthopedics, novel biotechnology, oncology, and neuroscience. She studied pre-medical sciences at Harvard University, and has earned graduate degrees in the fields of Biotechnology (the Johns Hopkins University), as well as Global Health & Epidemiology (Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California). She is pursuing her doctoral degree in molecular biology. Leah is passionate about inspiring adults to re-discover their childlike awe for the world around them. Book: There Are (No) Stupid Questions... in Science (release date: June 27, 2023) Social media link: Instagram/TikTok @gnarlybygnature Website: www.leahelson.com

The Little Red Podcast
COVID infections: The New Bumper Harvest

The Little Red Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2023 47:57


In a few short months, Chinese officials have gone from COVID cover-up to competing over who has the highest number of infections. After urbanites flocked back to the countryside for lunar New Year, the Party that ran the world's strictest prevention regime now presides over the world's largest and most ambitious experiment in herd immunity. To explore how this dramatic change unfolded, Louisa and Graeme are joined by Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations and the author of Governing Health in Contemporary China and Vivian Wu, co-founder of the Mighty Voice media studio, who has worked at a host of media organizations including BBC Chinese and Initium.  Image: Abandoned Isolation House in Shenzhen with Dynamic Zero Slogan, c/- Wikimedia CommonsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Public Health (Audio)
21st Century Global Health Priorities with Christopher Murray

Public Health (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 87:03


The world has lived through 2+ years of the COVID-19 pandemic, heightening the awareness of the links between health and other aspects of life including education and the economy. Future pandemics are a real risk but there are a number of other threats to human health and well-being as well. These include climate change, the rise of obesity, inverted population pyramids, inter-state conflict, rising inequalities, antimicrobial resistance. Counterbalancing these threats are the opportunities that may come through the health sector and broader innovation. Using a comprehensive future health scenario framework, Christopher Murray, professor and chair of Health Metrics Sciences, University of Washington and director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, explores the range of future trajectories that may unfold in the 21st century. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Business] [Show ID: 38271]

Health and Medicine (Video)
21st Century Global Health Priorities with Christopher Murray

Health and Medicine (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 87:03


The world has lived through 2+ years of the COVID-19 pandemic, heightening the awareness of the links between health and other aspects of life including education and the economy. Future pandemics are a real risk but there are a number of other threats to human health and well-being as well. These include climate change, the rise of obesity, inverted population pyramids, inter-state conflict, rising inequalities, antimicrobial resistance. Counterbalancing these threats are the opportunities that may come through the health sector and broader innovation. Using a comprehensive future health scenario framework, Christopher Murray, professor and chair of Health Metrics Sciences, University of Washington and director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, explores the range of future trajectories that may unfold in the 21st century. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Business] [Show ID: 38271]

UC Berkeley (Audio)
21st Century Global Health Priorities with Christopher Murray

UC Berkeley (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 87:03


The world has lived through 2+ years of the COVID-19 pandemic, heightening the awareness of the links between health and other aspects of life including education and the economy. Future pandemics are a real risk but there are a number of other threats to human health and well-being as well. These include climate change, the rise of obesity, inverted population pyramids, inter-state conflict, rising inequalities, antimicrobial resistance. Counterbalancing these threats are the opportunities that may come through the health sector and broader innovation. Using a comprehensive future health scenario framework, Christopher Murray, professor and chair of Health Metrics Sciences, University of Washington and director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, explores the range of future trajectories that may unfold in the 21st century. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Lectures" [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Business] [Show ID: 38271]

Making Public Health Personal
How can we keep children safe from violence? with Kathleen Cravero (Episode 13)

Making Public Health Personal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 28:21


You may not be surprised, with the level of gun violence in this country, that the US has one of the highest rates of school violence in the world. But violence against children is perpetrated in homes and in schools, in many forms, and in families and countries rich and poor. As the future of our society, either we prevent violence against children while they are young, or we will have to take care of the consequences as they get older. Whether they are your children or someone else's, children are the future of our society, making them everyone's responsibility to keep safe. This includes preventing them from witnessing violence, which also has very serious long-lasting effects. Violence against children is one of the biggest public health problems of our time, and there are dedicated people working to end it on a global scale. But what can we do to help? In this episode of the Making Public Health Personal podcast, we discuss evidence based strategies to prevent and end violence against children. Host Laura Meoli-Ferrigon speaks with today's guest Dr. Kathleen Cravero, Distinguished Lecturer in the Health Policy and Management Department here at CUNY SPH. Dr. Cravero is also the Co-Director of the Center for Immigrant, Refugee and Global Health. She spent 25 years working for the United Nations, including a key role at UNICEF, and dedicates her career to ending violence against women and children. Dr. Cravero will share findings from the CDC's Violence Against Children and Youth Surveys that were collected over 10 years in 24 countries. This includes who is most affected, where they live and how government officials can decide which of the seven evidence based implementations to reduce violence against children should be implemented. No matter what your sphere of influence is, this episode will provide resources to become part of the solution. Episode links: Find out more and connect with Dr. Kathleen Cravero: https://sph.cuny.edu/about/people/faculty/kathleen-cravero/ Keep Kids Safe - Prevention. Healing. Justice: www.keep-kids-safe.org Keeping Children Safe - Let's end child abuse in organisations: https://www.keepingchildrensafe.global/ End Violence: www.end-violence.org End Childhood Sexual Violence: https://www.bravemovement.org/ Download a transcript of this episode here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/56ppuv0kgivrbrc/Ep%2013%20Transcript.docx?dl=0

Boundless Body Radio
Nutrition For Life with the Legendary Dr. Gary Fettke! 407

Boundless Body Radio

Play Episode Play 16 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 74:51


Dr. Gary Fettke is a returning guest on our show! Be sure to check out his first appearance on Boundless Body Radio on episode 314, along with his amazing wife Belinda, who we also hosted on episode 384! Dr. Gary Fettke is an Orthopaedic Surgeon who practiced medicine in Tasmania. Gary is an advocate of a Low Carbohydrate, Healthy Fat (LCHF) lifestyle for the various health benefits, including the reversal of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and many other chronic diseases. Belinda and Gary opened the Nutrition for Life – Diabetes and Health Research Centre, which provides nutritional care around Tasmania and Australia. He has been speaking out on the combined role of sugar (particularly fructose), refined grains, and polyunsaturated oils in the epidemic of inflammation and modern diseases. He had incurred the wrath of several Australian regulatory bodies for his health advice, including reducing sugar for diabetic patients, but he and his wife Belinda actively uncovered the corrupt vested interests and ideologies shaping nutritional guidelines at the policy level in Australia and beyond. Gary is also the author of Inversion: One Man's Answer for World Peace and Global Health.Find Dr. Gary Fettke at-https://isupportgary.com/YT- Gary FettkeYT- Belinda FettkeTW- @fructosenoFB- @belindanofructoseLK- Belinda FettkeCheck out our new Patreon page!Find Boundless Body at- myboundlessbody.com Book a session with us here! Check out our new Patreon page!

Yale Cancer Center Answers
Global Health and Oncology

Yale Cancer Center Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 29:00


Global Health and Oncology with guest Dr. Donna Spiegleman January 29, 2023 Yale Cancer Center visit: http://www.yalecancercenter.org email: canceranswers@yale.edu call: 203-785-4095

The ASCO Post Podcast
Sotorasib in Previously Treated Patients With KRAS G12C–Mutated Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: In Conversation With The ASCO Post

The ASCO Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 7:58


On this episode, Chandrakanth Are, MBBS, MBA, FSSO, FRCS, FACS, Professor of Surgical Oncology and Global Health at University of Nebraska Medical Center, and an editorial advisor for The ASCO Post, holds a conversation with John H. Strickler, MD, a medical oncologist at Duke University Medical Center. The topic is the safety and efficacy of sotorasib, a KRAS G12C inhibitor, in previously treated patients with KRAS G12C–mutated pancreatic cancer, based on Strickler et al's paper published on January 5th in The New England Journal of Medicine.Coverage of stories discussed this week on ascopost.com:Sotorasib in Previously Treated Patients With KRAS G12C–Mutated Advanced Pancreatic CancerTo listen to more podcasts from ASCO, visit asco.org/podcasts.

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Open Philanthropy Shallow Investigation: Tobacco Control by Open Philanthropy

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 69:08


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Open Philanthropy Shallow Investigation: Tobacco Control, published by Open Philanthropy on January 25, 2023 on The Effective Altruism Forum. 1. Preamble This document is a shallow investigation, as described here. As we noted in the civil conflict investigation and telecommunications in LMICs investigation we shared earlier this year, we have not shared many shallow investigations in the last few years but are moving towards sharing more of our early stage work. This investigation was written by Helen Kissel, a PhD candidate in economics at Stanford who worked at Open Philanthropy for 10 weeks in summer 2022 as one of five interns on the Global Health and Wellbeing Cause Prioritization team. We've also included the peer foreword, written by Strategy Fellow Chris Smith. The peer foreword, which is a standard part of our research process, is an initial response to a piece of research work, written by a team member who is not the primary author or their manager. A slightly earlier draft of this work has been read and discussed by the cause prioritization team. At this point, we plan to learn more about this topic by engaging with philanthropists who are already working on tobacco, extending the depth of this research (particularly on e-cigarettes), and digging deeper into countries which have seen big declines in their smoking burden (e.g. Brazil). 2. Peer foreword Written by Chris Smith It was in 1964 that the US Surgeon General published a report which linked smoking cigarettes with lung cancer, building on research going back more than a decade. The report told readers that smokers had a 9-10x relative risk of developing lung cancer; that smoking was the primary cause of chronic bronchitis; that pregnant people who smoked were more likely to have underweight newborns, and that smoking was also linked to emphysema and heart disease. In this shallow, Helen reports that nearly sixty years later, there are ~1.3B tobacco users, and that smoking combustible tobacco remains an extraordinary contributor to the global burden of disease, responsible for some 8 million deaths (including secondhand smoke) and ~230M normative disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) (~173M OP descriptive DALYs) making it a bigger contributor to health damages in our terms than HIV/AIDS plus tuberculosis plus malaria. Moreover, the forward-looking projections are for only modest declines in the total burden as population increases offset a decline in smoking rates. As our framework puts it, we've got an important problem. Helen walks through the conventional orthodoxy on tobacco control at a population level (higher taxes, marketing restrictions, warning labels) and on smoking cessation support (nicotine replacement therapy, pharmaceutical support). She estimates that a campaign for a cigarette tax which increased the retail price of cigarettes in Indonesia by 10% (a large country with a high attributable disease burden) would reduce tobacco consumption (and attributable DALYs) by 5%, having an expected social return on investment (SROI) of ~3,300x, assuming a 3-year speedup, 10% success rate, and $3M campaign cost. Taxes are considered the single most effective policy measure, but going down the ladder to a moderate advertising ban, the subsequent expected 1% reduction in tobacco consumption and associated DALYs would have an SROI of ~500x. As with any of our shallow back-of-the-envelope-calculations (BOTECs), there is room to debate both the structure and the parameter choices. But I think that this is — when combined with the other material — a strong indicator that there could be relatively mainstream tobacco advocacy work which is above our bar in expectation. This suggests a somewhat tractable problem. Ok, but isn't this addressed? Don't people already know that cigarettes are bad for you? We...

Guiding Growth
Jason Gillette

Guiding Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 27:22


Jason Gillette is CEO of Guild Health Group, a public health firm committed to inspiring safe and healthy communities through emergency response planning and research and evaluation services. Jason's path to public health formed from various experiences and efforts over the past twenty years. Helping has been a part of what makes Jason, Jason. From providing humanitarian efforts in communities across the globe while serving in the United States Marines, Jason found his place in the service of others. After serving in the Marines, Jason worked for three fortune 500 companies in Nordstrom, JP Morgan Chase, and FedEx where he focused on relationship management and marketing. Jason has a bachelor's degree in Global Health from Arizona State University. ---------- Guiding Growth: Conversations with Community Leaders Join our hosts, Sarah Watts and Ben Kalkman, as we explore the human journey of leaders - their stories of humility, triumph, roadblocks, and lessons learned - as they reflect on how they became who they are today and share stories of inspiration and hope with listeners. We'll take away the title, just for a moment, and enjoy a connection with the soul. Be sure to subscribe to our show for more interviews with community leaders. This podcast is brought to you by the Gilbert Chamber of Commerce and Modern Moments. Learn more about our show at https://guidinggrowth.co. View our Privacy Policy at https://modernmoments.com/privacy

Health Check
The ‘Endo-Monster inside me'

Health Check

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 27:40


In this week's episode we hear from two women who talk about what life is like with endometriosis, an incredibly common but debilitating condition where tissue similar to the lining of the womb grows in other places in the body. Katherine from Ghana and Dee from Wales describe their long journeys to diagnosis and how the “invisible illness” affects every aspect of their lives, from mental health to work and relationships. We also hear from a researcher in the US who is studying the condition in minute detail in the hope that arming the scientific community with deeper knowledge will help lead to new treatments. Presenter Smitha Mundasad joins a singing group in London which aims to tackle post-natal depression among new mums. She hears how the project, which is rooted in research, is challenging them artistically and helping to reduce symptoms. Also joining us is Matt Fox, Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at Boston University, who'll discuss what progress is being made in the fight to eradicate rabies by 2030 and talk us through a study on the best music to fall asleep to… Zzz… Presenter: Smitha Mundasad Producer: Gerry Holt

Living Well with Multiple Sclerosis
Webinar highlights from The Overcoming MS Handbook: Roadmap to Good Health | S5E2

Living Well with Multiple Sclerosis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 54:04


Welcome to Living Well with MS, the Overcoming MS podcast where we explore all topics relating to living well with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this episode, we are taking you back to the launch of the ‘Overcoming MS Handbook: Roadmap to Good Health' with Professor George Jelinek, Dr Jonathan White and Dr Phil Startin. Together they discussed how the new book was created, the highlights from the book and answered questions from the community. We were excited by the arrival of the new book, as it provides an engaging overview of the Overcoming MS Program combined with stories from the community. This webinar was recorded in February 2022 as part of our Finding Hope with Overcoming MS webinar series. You can watch the whole webinar here or the podcast highlights on YouTube here. Keep reading for the key episode takeaways and George, Jonathan and Phil's bios. Make sure you sign up to our newsletter to hear our latest tips and news about living a full and happy life with multiple sclerosis. And if you're new to Overcoming MS, visit our introductory page to find out more about how we support people with MS. Professor George Jelinek's Bio Professor George Jelinek developed the Overcoming MS Program and founded the Neuroepidemiology Unit at the University of Melbourne's School of Population and Global Health which continues to research its benefits. George's Story: When George was diagnosed with MS in 1999, he was determined to do something. His mother had died as a consequence of her MS, which spurred him on to sort through and assess the medical literature on MS. His career as a Professor in Emergency Medicine and his background as Editor-in-Chief of a major medical journal gave him the tools to do this. It became clear to George that remaining well after a diagnosis of MS is more than just a possibility. He found that with commitment to the right lifestyle changes, there is the real probability that many people with MS can live long, healthy lives, relatively free of the usual problems associated with the illness. These lifestyle recommendations are now referred to as the Overcoming MS Program, which he detailed in his book Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis. The new book in this podcast episode is a newly launched accessible overview of his findings. George has remained free of further relapses, as have many people who follow the Overcoming MS Program. Dr. Jonathan White's Bio Career: Jonathan went to University of Glasgow Medical School, graduating in 2008 (MBChB). He completed a further five years of training in Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a member of the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists (MRCOG). He works at the Causeway Hospital, Coleraine and has a special interest in early pregnancy and recurrent pregnancy loss. In April 2022, Jonathan was awarded “Doctor of the Year” at the inaugural Northern Ireland Health and Social Care Awards. He contributed to the new book in this podcast episode. Overcoming MS and personal life: Jonathan was diagnosed with RRMS in October 2015 and has been following the Overcoming MS Program ever since.  Dr. White assists Overcoming MS as a medical advisor and event facilitator. He lives on the North Coast of Northern Ireland, is married to Jenny and father to Angus and Struan. His interests include the great outdoors, cycling and running (reluctantly), reading, rugby, film and spending time with his family. Dr Phil Startin's Bio Career and Overcoming MS: After a DPhil in Quantum Physics, Phil left his academic roots for a more peripatetic career in management consulting, initially with Price Waterhouse. After years of travelling around the world for both work and pleasure, including a two-year assignment in Geneva, he was diagnosed with Primary Progressive MS (PPMS) in 2007. Phil discovered Overcoming MS in 2011, and coupled with his earlier discovery of mindfulness meditation, it awakened a whole new area in his life. With training and supervision from Bangor University, he now teaches an eight-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course to people with MS and to the general community on a pro-bono basis. He is also a trustee for MS-UK. Personal life: Phil lives in Arrochar, Scotland with his American wife, Cristina, whom he met over a weekend at the Jazz Fest in New Orleans. Phil's completely convinced that the Overcoming MS program and mindfulness have positively affected the trajectory of his condition. Selected Key Takeaways The new book gives different perspectives from the Overcoming MS community Professor George Jelinek said: “After what seems like quite a long time of bringing this message to people, I'm hearing the message come back to me through the filter of all of these different people's lives and experiences, joys and sorrows. It's just a wonderful read for me to sit down and say that all this has been happening in our community and that people have worked out ways of adopting and maintaining this program, many of which I've really never considered given that I've got only my own particular view of the world.” Overcoming MS supports the use of medications alongside lifestyle changes Dr Jonathan White said: “I think sometimes the medical community thinks it's “us or them” [with] lifestyle or medication and that could never be further from the truth. I personally have always chosen to use medication as part of my way of managing MS and I wouldn't change that. But nor would I change using lifestyle to manage my MS. Undoubtedly for many people medication has many benefits and is a huge part of your armor and protection against this disease. But why ignore the underlying things that caused the problem in the first place, you know, stress, lack of exercise, low vitamin D levels, poor diet and processed and altered fats and animal fats in your diet?” The Overcoming MS program is relevant for both relapsing and progressive forms of MS Dr Phil Startin said: “By following the Overcoming MS program, you absolutely can make a difference [to your MS], you can change the trajectory of that condition, and you can improve your quality of life. Through neuroplasticity, you can even recover some functions. The Overcoming MS program is just as relevant for us with a progressive form of the condition as it is for those with those newly diagnosed and with a relapsing form, possibly even more.” Related Links: Overcoming MS Handbook: Roadmap to Good Health Watch the original webinar Don't miss out: Subscribe to this podcast and never miss an episode. You can catch any episode of Living Well with MS here or on your favorite podcast listening app. If you like Living Well with MS, please leave a 5-star review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you tune into the show. Feel free to share your comments and suggestions for future guests and episode topics by emailing podcast@overcomingms.org. Make sure you also sign up to our newsletter to hear our latest tips and news about living a full and happy life with MS. If you enjoy this podcast and want to support the ongoing work of Overcoming MS, you can leave a donation here.

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Calculating how much small donors funge with money that will never be spent by Tristan Cook

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 5:41


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Calculating how much small donors funge with money that will never be spent, published by Tristan Cook on January 16, 2023 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Epistemic status: Confident that the effect is real, though likely smaller than suggested by the toy-model. Summary Small donors should discount the cost effectiveness of their donations to interventions above a large funder's bar if they expect the large funder not to have spent all their capital by the time of AGI's arrival their donation to interventions above the large funder's bar funges with the large funder. In this post I describe a toy model to calculate how much to discount due to this effect. I apply the model to a guess of Open Philanthropy's spending on Global Health and Development (GHD) with Metaculus' AGI timelines (25% by 2029, 50% by 2039). The model implies that small donors should consider interventions above OP's GHD bar, e.g. GiveWell's top charities, are only 55% as cost effective as the small donors first thought. For shorter AGI timelines (25% by 2027, 50% by 2030) this factor is around 35%. I use OP's GHD spending as an example because of their clarity around funding rate and bar for interventions. This discount factor would be larger if one funges with 'patient' philanthropic funds (such as The Patient Philanthropy Fund). This effect is a corollary of the result that most donor's AGI timelines (e.g. deferral to Metaculus) imply that the community spend at a greater rate. When a small donor funges with a large donor (and saves them spending themselves), the community's spending rate is effectively lowered (compared to when the small donor does not funge). This effect occurs when a small donor has shorter timelines than a large funder, or the large funder is not spending at a sufficiently high rate. In the latter case, small donors - by donating to interventions below the large funder's bar - are effectively correcting the community's implicit bar for funding. Toy model Suppose you have the choice of donating to one of two interventions, A which gives a utils per $, or B, which gives b utils per $. Suppose further that the available interventions remain the same every year and that both have room for funding this year. A large funder F will ensure that A is fully funded this year, so if you donate $1 to A, then F, effectively, has $1 more to donate in the future. I suppose that F only ever donates to (opportunities as good as) A. I suppose that F's capital decreases by some constant amount f times their initial capital each year. This means that F will have no assets in 1/f years from now. Supposing AGI arrives t years from now, then F will have spent fraction min(ft,1) of their current capital on A. Accounting for this funging and assuming AGI arrives at time t, the cost effectiveness of your donation to A is then min(ft,1)a utils per $. Then if b>min(ft,1)a, marginal spending by small donors on B is more cost effective than on A. By considering distributions of AGI's arrival time t and the large funder's funding rate f we can get a distribution of this multiplier. Plugging in numbers I take The large funder F to be Open Philanthropy's Global Health and Wellbeing spending on Global Health and Development and intervention A to be Givewell's recommendations. I take 1/f, the expected time until OP's funds dedicated to GHD are depleted to be distributed Normal(20,20) bounded below by 5. I take AGI timelines to be an approximation those on Metaculus. These distributions on AGI timelines and 1/f give the following distribution of the funging multiplier (reproducible here). The ratio of cost effectiveness between GiveWell's recommendations and GiveDirectly, a/b, is approximately 7-8 and so small donors should give to interventions in the (5, 7)x GiveDirectly range. For donors with shorter timeli...

The Word on Medicine
Global Health

The Word on Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 61:11


We have a great show for you which will provide all of the answers you have come to expect from The Word on Medicine. This week's program is on Global Health – how we are helping those in other parts of the world and everything that is going on at the Medical College of Wisconsin to make the world a better place, especially in the Department of Surgery. This will open your eyes and hearts to the need for surgical care across the globe and what amazing things our faculty are doing to address this. Drs. Alexis Bowder, Christopher Dodgion, Dean Klinger, Jim Sanger, Casey Calkins, Lyle Joyce and Taylor Jaraczewski provide a unique insight into surgery in other parts of the world. You will love this show! If you missed a program, fear not: they all exist as podcasts. Please visit our website at mcw.edu/surgery, or simply go to iHeartRadio, iTunes, Podbean, Stitcher and now Spotify and look for "The Word on Medicine" channel.

Under the Wire
Under The Wire: URGENT ALERT! James Roguski on the WHO's attempt to take over global health

Under the Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 68:18


This is an urgent alert! The World Health Organisation (WHO) is planning on amending the International Health Regulations (IHR) this week in such a way that countries which are part of the UN (such as Australia) will lose their sovereignty completely - ceding all rights to that corrupt and pharma-driven body. Join us on Under the Wire where we will be speaking with James Roguski about how to fight against this further medical tyranny. James Roguski is a researcher, author, natural health proponent and activist who believes that the old systems are rightfully crumbling, so we must build their replacements quickly. James uncovered documents regarding proposed amendments to the International Health Regulations and was instrumental in raising awareness about them which resulted in the amendments being rejected. James is now doing everything possible to expose the WHO's hidden agenda behind their proposed "pandemic treaty" as well as the WHO's ongoing attempts to amend the International Health Regulations. You can read more about these issues and share both this link and James' archive widely - we are being heavily censored: https://jamesroguski.substack.com/ http://jamesroguski.substack.com/archive https://jamesroguski.substack.com/p/screw-the-who https://jamesroguski.substack.com/p/the-peoples-treaty

The Problem With Jon Stewart
A Nuanced Conversation About COVID Vaccines (Yes, Really!)

The Problem With Jon Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 77:29 Very Popular


It's 2023 and we're coming in hot with a conversation about COVID vaccines! We're joined by Dr. Gregory A. Poland (director of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group), Dr. Saad Omer (director of the Yale Institute for Global Health), and Zeynep Tufekci (professor at Columbia University), who bring something that's often lacking from these conversations: nuance. We talk through why many non-crazy people are hesitant to get vaccinated, how our public health institutions have failed to communicate effectively with the masses, and why it should be perfectly okay to ask questions about the risks and benefits of any vaccine. Plus, writers Tocarra Mallard and Kasaun Wilson bring us up to speed on the latest Harry and Meghan drama. Season 2 is now streaming on Apple TV+.CREDITS
Hosted by: Jon Stewart Featuring, in order of appearance: Kasaun Wilson, Tocarra Mallard, Gregory A. Poland, Saad Omer, Zeynep Tufekci Executive Produced by Jon Stewart, Brinda Adhikari, James Dixon, Chris McShane, and Richard Plepler.Lead Producer: Sophie EricksonProducers: Zach Goldbaum, Caity GrayAssoc. Producer: Andrea Betanzos Sound Engineer: Miguel CarrascalSenior Digital Producer: Freddie MorganDigital Producer: Cassie MurdochDigital Coordinator: Norma HernandezSupervising Producer: Lorrie BaranekHead Writer: Kris AcimovicElements Producer: Kenneth HullClearances Producer: Daniella PhilipsonSenior Talent Producer: Brittany MehmedovicTalent Manager: Marjorie McCurryTalent Coordinator: Lukas ThimmSenior Research Producer: Susan Helvenston Theme Music by: Gary Clark Jr.The Problem With Jon Stewart podcast is an Apple TV+ podcast, produced by Busboy Productions. https://apple.co/-JonStewart

Explore Global Health with Rob Murphy, MD
Improving Global Health Across Disciplines with Keith Martin, MD

Explore Global Health with Rob Murphy, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 21:49


As the founding executive director of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH), Dr. Keith Martin, is working to break down silos and connect research, education, advocacy and service to help create meaningful change for people and our planet. He talks with Dr. Murphy about his career in medicine and politics and why he thinks reforming academia can help solve some of the great challenges facing our world today.

Ex Terra: The Journal of Space Commerce
Stellar Singularity: Navigating the Spacefaring Economy

Ex Terra: The Journal of Space Commerce

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 30:48


It's like 1492 all over again, but this time with rockets. Yes, the age of commercial space exploration is upon us—so what does that mean? That's the theme of "Stellar Singularity: Navigating the Space Economy" by bestselling author Elizebeth Varghese. She's our guest on this edition of The Ex Terra Podcast A futurist and the bestselling author of "[Block]Chain Reaction: The Future of How We Live and Work", Elizebeth invites us to view the dawn of the spacefaring economy with optimism. She outlines how every organization will need to understand, leverage, and operate in space, and how every company is becoming a space company. In Stellar Singularity, Elizebeth discusses how space exploration improves life on Earth, and how our definition of life and sentience needs to expand, making the case for an “Interstellar Magna Carta” to act as the framework for collaboration across countries and companies. She articulates “Principles to Navigate Space as Global Commons” and outlines the four leadership qualities needed during the space age…and much more. Praise for Stellar Singularity “A Grand Tour of the issues, options, promises, and challenges! Elizebeth touches every side of the multifaceted, and daunting, notion of a spacefaring economy. A fascinating read!” Dan Geraci, President, Voyager Space Services, Chairman, The Planetary Society. “A thoughtful, personal, well-researched, and timely piece of our human space exploration efforts… Read more about the space industry's history, cultural connections, influential socioeconomic factors, key technological drivers, and how space exploration benefits all.., directly and indirectly, in from Elizebeth's must-read latest work.” Dr. S. Anand Narayanan, Research Professor, Florida State University, Expert in Space and Medical Physiology, Global Health, Interdisciplinary STEAM Research and Education, NASA Fellow “Elizebeth Varghese may not be the first space philosopher, but she certainly deserves the title. Stellar Singularity integrates the technological aspects of our expansion into space with imperatives for human behavior—particularly economic, diplomatic and ethical behavior. Knowledgeable people outside of the traditional space enterprise can and must contribute to this next phase of human development. Stellar Singularity is the work they should begin with to appreciate its challenges and opportunities.” Gordon Roesler, Ph.D., President, Robots in Space LLC, and former DARPA space robotics program manager “This book is a must-read..it provides a great summary of historical and technological developments through to shifts in democratization, policy and value chain realization.” Steve Ramage, Chief Engagement Officer - Group on Earth Observations (GEO), Governing Board - Digital Earth Africa, Earth Observation Advisory Committee - UK Space Agency Elizebeth Varghese is a futurist, people & technology strategist, senior executive, and bestselling author. She is a Board member and Co-Chair of the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Committee at Columbia Business School, Women's Circle. She is also on the Council of Advisors at the SETI Institute. Elizebeth was recognized as among the top experts and inspirational leaders of 2022 per The HR Gazette and she has also been recognized as among The Outstanding Asian Americans in Business in 2021. She lives in New York City with her husband and two daughters.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.10.23

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 63:17 Very Popular


Videos: BOMBSHELL docs reveal Covid-19 COVER-UP goes straight to the top | Redacted with Clayton Morris – Whiselblower Sasha Latypova My Apology Letter Regarding My Friendship with Jordan Peterson (THE SAAD TRUTH_1365) Harari: “With this kind of surveillance [under the skin], (you can detect dissent). I mean, you watch the big President, the big leader, give a speech on television — the television could be monitoring you and knowing whether you're angry or not just by analyzing the cues.” MacDonald Brainwashed (Tom words of wisdom) – The Rap   Eating almonds daily boosts exercise recovery molecule by 69% among ‘weekend warriors' Appalachian State University, January 6, 2023 For those who exercise regularly, eating almonds each day might be the ideal new year's resolution. A randomized controlled trial in Frontiers in Nutrition showed that female and male participants who ate 57g almonds daily for one month had more of the beneficial fat 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (12,13-DiHOME) in their blood immediately after a session of intense exercise than control participants. This molecule, a so-called oxylipin (oxidized fat) is synthetized from linoleic acid by brown fat tissue, and has a beneficial effect on metabolic health and energy regulation. Corresponding author Dr. David C Nieman, a professor and director of the Appalachian State University Human Performance Laboratory at the North Carolina Research Campus, said, “Here we show that volunteers who consumed 57g of almonds daily for one month before a single ‘weekend warrior' exercise bout had more beneficial 12,13-DiHOME in their blood immediately after exercising than control volunteers. They also reported feeling less fatigue and tension, better leg-back strength, and decreased muscle damage after exercise than control volunteers.” The clinical trial involved 38 men and 26 women between the ages of 30 and 65, who didn't engage in regular weight training. Approximately half were randomized to the almond diet group, and the other half to the control group, who daily ate a calorie-matched cereal bar. The researchers took blood and urine samples before and after the four-week period of dietary supplementation. Performance measures included a 30 second Wingate anaerobic test, a 50 meter shuttle run test, and vertical jump, bench press, and leg-back strength exercises. Additional blood and urine samples were taken immediately after this 90 minute session of ‘eccentric exercise' and daily for four days afterwards.  As expected, the 90 minute exercise led to an increase in the volunteers' self-reported feeling of muscle damage and muscle soreness, as well as an increased POMS score, indicating self-reported decreased vigor and increased fatigue, anxiety, and depression. The exercise also resulted in transient elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and MCP-1 in the blood, consistent with minor muscle damage. However, these changes in cytokines were equal in the almond and cereal bar groups. Importantly, immediately after exercise, the concentration of the beneficial 12,13-DiHOME was 69% higher in blood plasma of participants in the almond group than in participants in the control group. 12,13-DiHOME is known to increase the transport of fatty acid and its uptake by skeletal muscle, with the overall effect of stimulating metabolic recovery after exercise. The reverse pattern was found for another oxylipin, the mildly toxic 9,10-Dihydroxy-12-octadecenoic acid (9,10-diHOME), which was 40% higher immediately after exercise in the blood of the control group than in the almond group. Unlike 12,13-DiHOME, 9,10-diHOME has been shown have negative effects on overall health and the body's recovery to exercise. Nieman and colleagues concluded that daily consumption of almonds leads to a change in metabolism, downregulating inflammation and oxidative stress from exercise and enabling the body to recover faster. “We conclude that almonds provide a unique and complex nutrient and polyphenol mixture that may support metabolic recovery from stressful levels of exercise. Almonds have high amounts of protein, healthy types of fats, vitamin E, minerals, and fiber. And the brown skin of almonds contains polyphenols that end up in the large intestine and help control inflammation and oxidative stress,” said Nieman. Omega-3 supplements can prevent childhood asthma Copenhagen University Hospital, December 29, 2022 Taking certain omega-3 fatty acid supplements during pregnancy can reduce the risk of childhood asthma by almost one third, according to a new study from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) and the University of Waterloo. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that women who were prescribed 2.4 grams of long-chain omega-3 supplements during the third trimester of pregnancy reduced their children's risk of asthma by 31 per cent. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, which include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are found in cold water fish, and key to regulating human immune response. “We've long suspected there was a link between the anti-inflammatory properties of long-chain omega-3 fats, the low intakes of omega-3 in Western diets and the rising rates of childhood asthma,” said Professor Hans Bisgaard of COPSAC at the Copenhagen University Hospital. “This study proves that they are definitively and significantly related.” The testing also revealed that women with low blood levels of EPA and DHA at the beginning of the study benefitted the most from the supplements. For these women, it reduced their children's relative risk of developing asthma by 54 per cent. “The proportion of women with low EPA and DHA in their blood is even higher in Canada and the United States as compared with Denmark. So we would expect an even greater reduction in risk among North American populations,” said Professor Stark. “Identifying these women and providing them with supplements should be considered a front-line defense to reduce and prevent childhood asthma.” “Asthma and wheezing disorders have more than doubled in Western countries in recent decades,” said Professor Bisgaard. “We now have a preventative measure to help bring those numbers down.” Currently, one out of five young children suffer from asthma or a related disorder before school age. Study shows gardening may help reduce cancer risk, boost mental health University of Colorado at Boulder, January 6, 2023 The first-ever, randomized, controlled trial of community gardening found that those who started gardening ate more fiber and got more physical activity—two known ways to reduce risk of cancer and chronic diseases. They also saw their levels of stress and anxiety significantly decrease. The findings were published in The Lancet Planetary Health. “These findings provide concrete evidence that community gardening could play an important role in preventing cancer, chronic diseases and mental health disorders,” said senior author Jill Litt, a professor in the Department of Environmental Studies at CU Boulder. “No matter where you go, people say there's just something about gardening that makes them feel better,” said Litt, who is also a researcher with the Barcelona Institute for Global Health. Some small observational studies have found that people who garden tend to eat more fruits and vegetables and have a healthier weight. But it has been unclear whether healthier people just tend to garden, or gardening influences health. Only three studies have applied the gold standard of scientific research, the randomized controlled trial, to the pastime. None have looked specifically at community gardening. To fill the gap, Litt recruited 291 non-gardening adults, average age of 41, from the Denver area. More than a third were Hispanic and more than half came from low-income households. The gardening group received a free community garden plot, some seeds and seedlings, and an introductory gardening course through the nonprofit Denver Urban Gardens program and a study partner. By fall, those in the gardening group were eating, on average, 1.4 grams more fiber per day than the control group—an increase of about 7%. The authors note that fiber exerts a profound effect on inflammatory and immune responses, influencing everything from how we metabolize food to how healthy our gut microbiome is to how susceptible we are to diabetes and certain cancers. While doctors recommend about 25 to 38 grams of fiber per day, the average adult consumes less than 16 grams. “An increase of one gram of fiber can have large, positive effects on health,” said co-author James Hebert, director of University of South Carolina's cancer prevention and control program. The gardening group also increased their physical activity levels by about 42 minutes per week. Public health agencies recommend at least 150 minutes of physical activity per week, a recommendation only a quarter of the U.S. population meets. With just two to three visits to the community garden weekly, participants met 28% of that requirement. Study participants also saw their stress and anxiety levels decrease, with those who came into the study most stressed and anxious seeing the greatest reduction in mental health issues. The study also confirmed that even novice gardeners can reap measurable health benefits of the pastime in their first season. As they have more experience and enjoy greater yields, Litt suspects such benefits will increase. Researchers shed light on how exercise preserves physical fitness during aging Joslin Diabetes Center, December 6, 2023 Proven to protect against a wide array of diseases, exercise may be the most powerful anti-aging intervention known to science. However, while physical activity can improve health during aging, its beneficial effects inevitably decline. The cellular mechanisms underlying the relationship among exercise, fitness and aging remain poorly understood.   In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center investigated the role of one cellular mechanism in improving physical fitness by exercise training and identified one anti-aging intervention that delayed the declines that occur with aging in the model organism. Together, the scientists' findings open the door to new strategies for promoting muscle function during aging.   “Our data identify an essential mediator of exercise responsiveness and an entry point for interventions to maintain muscle function during aging.”  That essential mediator is the cycle of fragmentation and repair of the mitochondria, the specialized structures, or organelles, inside every cell responsible for producing energy. Mitochondrial function is critical to health, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics  the cycle of repairing dysfunctional mitochondria and restoring the connectivity among the energy-producing organelles — has been linked to the development and progression of chronic, age-related diseases, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes.   “As we perceive that our muscles undergo a pattern of fatigue and restoration after an exercise session, they are undergoing this mitochondrial dynamic cycle,” said Blackwell, who is also acting section head of Immunobiology at Joslin. “In this process, muscles manage the aftermath of the metabolic demand of exercise and restore their functional capability.”  “We determined that a single exercise session induces a cycle of fatigue and physical fitness recovery that is paralleled by a cycle of the mitochondrial network rebuilding,” said first author Juliane Cruz Campos, a postdoctoral fellow at Joslin Diabetes Center. “Aging dampened the extent to which this occurred and induced a parallel decline in physical fitness. That suggested that mitochondrial dynamics might be important for maintaining physical fitness and possibly for physical fitness to be enhanced by a bout of exercise.”   Finally, the researchers tested known, lifespan-extending interventions for their ability to improve exercise capacity during aging. Worms with increased AMPK — a molecule that is a key regulator of energy during exercise which also promotes remodeling of mitochondrial morphology and metabolism — exhibited improved physical fitness. They also demonstrated maintenance of, but not enhancement of, exercise performance during aging. Worms engineered to lack AMPK exhibited reduced physical fitness during aging as well as impairment of the recovery cycle. They also did not receive the age-delaying benefits of exercise over the course of the lifespan.   Nighttime electronic device use lowers melatonin levels Brigham and Women's Hospital, December 24 2022.  The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science published the findings researchers at Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital of a suppressive effect for evening use of light-emitting electronic devices on sleep and melatonin secretion. “Electronic devices emit light that is short-wavelength-enriched light, which has a higher concentration of blue light — with a peak around 450 nm — than natural light,” explained lead author Anne-Marie Chang. “This is different from natural light in composition, having a greater impact on sleep and circadian rhythms.”  Twelve healthy adults were randomized to read a light-emitting eBook or a printed book in dim room light approximately four hours before bedtime for five evenings. At the end of the five day period, participants switched their assignments. Blood samples collected during portions of the study were analyzed for melatonin levels.  Sleep latency, time and efficiency were assessed via polysomnography.  eBook reading was associated with more time needed to fall asleep and less rapid eye movement sleep in comparison with reading a printed book. Evening melatonin levels were suppressed by an average of 55.12% in eBook readers, while those who read printed books had no suppression. Compared to printed book reading, the onset of melatonin release in response to dim light occurred 1 ½ hours later the day following reading of an eBook. “Our most surprising finding was that individuals using the e-reader would be more tired and take longer to become alert the next morning,” Dr Chang reported. “This has real consequences for daytime functioning, and these effects might be worse in the real world as opposed to the controlled environment we used.”  “We live in a sleep-restricted society, in general,” she added. “It is important to further study the effects of using light-emitting devices, especially before bed, as they may have longer term health consequences than we previously considered.” Iron deficiency anemia associated with hearing loss Penn State University, December 29, 2022 In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Kathleen M. Schieffer, B.S., of the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pa., and colleagues examined the association between sensorineural hearing loss and conductive hearing loss and iron deficiency anemia in adults ages 21 to 90 years in the United States. Approximately 15 percent of adults report difficulty with hearing. Because iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common and easily correctable condition, further understanding of the association between IDA and all types of hearing loss may help to open new possibilities for early identification and appropriate treatment. For this study, using data obtained from deidentified electronic medical records from the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pa., iron deficiency anemia was determined by low hemoglobin and ferritin levels for age and sex in 305,339 adults ages 21 to 90 years; associations between hearing loss and IDA were evaluated. Of the patients in the study population, 43 percent were men; average age was 50 years. There was a 1.6 percent prevalence of combined hearing loss (defined as any combination of conductive hearing loss [hearing loss due to problems with the bones of the middle ear], sensorineural hearing loss, deafness, and unspecified hearing loss) and 0.7 percent prevalence of IDA. Both sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL; when there is damage to the cochlea or to the nerve pathways from the inner ear to the brain) (present in 1.1 percent of individuals with IDA) and combined hearing loss (present in 3.4 percent) were significantly associated with IDA. Analysis confirmed increased odds of SNHL and combined hearing loss among adults with IDA. “An association exists between IDA in adults and hearing loss. The next steps are to better understand this correlation and whether promptly diagnosing and treating IDA may positively affect the overall health status of adults with hearing loss,” the authors write.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Oncology, Etc. – Global Cancer Policy Leader Dr. Richard Sullivan (Part 1)

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 25:18


Battling cancer takes place in many parts of the world and our next guest has led initiatives to do just that. In Part One of this Oncology, Etc. Podcast episode, Dr. Richard Sullivan, Professor of Cancer and Global Health at King's College London, shares with us his intriguing life trajectory, encompassing a childhood in various parts of the world, aspirations for a veterinary career that turned to basic science, medicine, health policy (4:27), and even a long-term stint with the British Army Intelligence (12:22). Dr. Sullivan, who served as Director of Cancer Research UK for nearly a decade also discusses traits he looks for in a cancer investigator (19:21), and how to be happy (21:16)! Guest Disclosures Dr. Richard Sullivan: Honoraria – Pfizer; Consulting or Advisory Role – Pfizer Dr. David Johnson: Consulting or Advisory Role – Merck, Pfizer, Aileron Therapeutics, Boston University Dr. Patrick Loehrer: Research Funding – Novartis, Lilly Foundation, Taiho Pharmaceutical If you liked this episode, please follow. To explore other episodes, as well as courses visit https://education.asco.org. Contact us at education@asco.org. TRANSCRIPT  Pat Loehrer: Hi, I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm director of the Center of Global Oncology and Health Equity at Indiana University Cancer Center.   Dave Johnson: And I'm Dave Johnson at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas.   Pat Loehrer: And this is Oncology, Etc. Dave, what book have you read this last month?   Dave Johnson: I have one I wanted to recommend to you. It's very interesting. It's by Steven Johnson, not of the syndrome fame. It's entitled Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer. You may have heard of this because PBS made a special documentary about this particular book. But in it, Johnson talks about the remarkable increase in human lifespan, especially over the 20th century, and the various factors that contributed to increased years of life from on average in the United States of about 48-49 in 1900 to just about 80 in the year 2000. So that beats anything in the history of mankind before.   And he has a chapter about each of the factors that contribute to this, and some of which I think we all recognize. Things like antibiotics playing a role, but some of the things that I hadn't thought about were improved drug regulation and the development of randomized controlled trials, which all of us have participated in. How important that is.   He also talked about, at least in the United States, the importance of automotive safety. And I'm sure some of us on this podcast are old enough to remember cars that did not have safety belts and certainly not other safety maneuvers that have really improved lifespan in that regard. So I found it a fascinating book. I think our listeners who are interested in medical history would also enjoy this text.   Pat Loehrer: Did he mention this podcast?   Dave Johnson: No, actually it wasn't mentioned, and I thought that was a tremendous oversight. So, I've sent him a letter and recommended that he add it.   Pat Loehrer: We may not live longer, but it just seems like we're living longer. When you listen to this podcast, time stands still.   Pat Loehrer: Well, it's my real great pleasure to introduce our interviewee today, Richard Sullivan. I met Richard several years ago through the late Professor Peter Boyle in Leon, and it's one of the greatest highlights of my life to be able to know Richard.   Professor Richard Sullivan's Research Group studies health systems and particularly chronic disease policy and the impact of conflict on health. He's a professor of cancer and Global Health at King's College in London and director of the Institute of Cancer Policy and Co-director of Conflict and Health Research Group. As well as holding a number of visiting chairs, Richard is an NCD advisor to the WHO, a civil military advisor to the Save the Children Foundation, and a member of the National Cancer Grid of India. His research focuses on global cancer policy and planning and health system strengthening, particularly in conflict ecosystems. He's principal investigative research programs ranging from automated radiotherapy planning for low resource settings to the use of augmented or virtual reality for cancer surgery through the political economy to build affordable equitable cancer control plans around the world.   Richard has led more Lancet Oncology commissions than anyone else. In fact, Lancet is talking about calling it the Sullivan Commissions. He's led five Lancet Oncology commissions and worked on four others. He's currently co-leading the Lancet Oncology Commission on the Future of Cancer Research in Europe and Cancer Care and Conflict in the conflict systems. His research teams have had major programs in capacity building in conflict regions across the Middle East and North Africa. He's done studies on the basic packages of health services in Afghanistan and worked in Pakistan, Syria, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. He's been a member of the British Army, intelligence and security, and in that capacity he's worked many years in biosecurity and counterterrorism issues. I think in some ways, this is the most interesting man in the world, and it's our pleasure today to have Richard join us. Richard, thank you for coming.   Richard Sullivan: Pat, Dave, you're really too kind. Marvelous to be with you. Thank you for the invitation.   Pat Loehrer: Can you tell us a little about your upbringing and early life before you became Dr. James Bond?   Richard Sullivan: I'm not sure that's anywhere close to the truth, sadly. But, yeah, I have had a very interesting, eclectic life. I was born in Aden just on the cusp of where the British Aden Protectorate met a country which actually no longer exists, the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. Because after the British left Aden, essentially the East Germans, and what was then the Soviet Union took over southern Yemen. So I was born in a very unusual part of the world, which sadly, since then has just deteriorated. I spent many years of my life with my parents, who were in the diplomatic service and doing other things, wandering around the globe, mainly in the Middle East and East Africa. We spent quite a lot of time, strangely enough, we washed up on the shores in the USA once as well. Dayton, Ohio, and eventually-   Pat Loehrer:  Not to interrupt you, Richard, there are no shores in Dayton, Ohio. So just correct you there.   Richard Sullivan: That is so true. My memory - cornfields everywhere. I had a wonderful dog then, that's how I remember it so well. And I didn't really come back to the UK until, oh, gosh, I was nearly 10-11 years old. So, coming back to the UK was actually a bit of a culture shock for me. And then relatively classical in terms of the UK, sort of minor public school and then into medical school. In the old days when it was in the 80's. I had a fabulous childhood, going all over the place, seeing lots of things, being exposed to lots of different cultures. I think it remained with me all my life. I never really feel a foreigner in a foreign land. That's nice. That's really unique and it's been marvelous being able to tie in the passion for global health with my upbringing as well. So, yeah, I had a wonderful childhood.   Dave Johnson: Would you mind expanding on your medical training, Richard? Tell us a little bit about that.   Richard Sullivan: Yeah, so when I, when I went to medical school in the UK, we were still running the old system. And by the old system, I mean, you know, these small medical schools with entries of, you know, 70, 80 individuals, particularly in London, you had that St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, which is where I went, Charing Cross, Guy's, St. Thomas', and they were all individual medical schools. Now, most of these now have merged together into these super medical schools. But certainly when I went to medical school, I'll be absolutely honest with you, I wanted to be a vet to begin with, but actually discovered I wasn't bright enough to be a vet. It was harder to become a vet than it was to become a doctor. In my day going into medicine, and people listening to this, or some people who understand the A level system in the UK will recognize if you're offered a BCD, that's quite low grades to get into medical school. So I went to Mary's, to be absolutely honest with you, because I heard that they took people that played rugby, and I came from a rugby-playing school. And sure enough, 90% of the interview was based on my rugby prowess, and that was St. Mary's Hospital Medical School. So it was wonderful.   And we'd already had people going there who were big rugby players. And again, it was, I remember thinking to myself, am I making the right decision here? But it was interesting, as soon as I went into medical school, I realized that was the life for me. I had done myself a favor by not going into veterinary science, which I would have been awful at. We had six years of very, very intensive pre-medicine, the classical medical rotations, and then that movement into the old schools of pre registration house officers, registrar jobs. We were quite an early stage. I kind of slightly went off-piste and started doing more academic work. Interestingly, most of my academic early days academic work was not in health policy and research. It was actually in very hard core cell signaling. So my doctorate was in biochemistry, and we worked on small GTPases, calcium-sensing proteins.   There were some really extraordinary heady days, and I'm talking here about the early nineties and the mid-nineties of tremendous discovery, real innovation. I was at UCL at the time, but mixing and matching that up with a sort of surgical training, and again, surgical training in those days was pretty classical. You went into your general surgery, then sort of specialized. It was really, really interesting but it was full on. I mean, you spent your entire life working. Morning to night so these were the days of 100 hours week rotations. You were doing one in twos, one in threes. That's every other night and every other weekend on call. It was incredibly intense, but there was a lot more diversity and plasticity in those days. You could dip in and out of medicine because of the way you were chosen and how you were recruited. So it suited my personality because I liked moving around and doing different things and that sort of took me through, really until the late 1990s.   Pat Loehrer: You became a urologist, right?   Richard Sullivan: That's right. Exactly. So I trained up until the late 1990s, it was all pretty standard, I would say. And then I decided I was bored and moved into the pharmaceutical industry and I went to work in for Merck Damstadt at the time, which was relatively small. I was going to say family owned, but it was quite family-owned pharmaceutical company that was just moving into oncology. And because I'd done the background in cell signaling and cell signaling was really the backbone of the new era of targeted therapies, this seemed like a great move. To be absolutely blunt with you, I didn't last very long, less than a couple of years, I think, mainly because I just found the whole environment way too constraining. But what it did provide me with was a springboard to meet the wonderful late Gordon McVie, who I met at a conference. And he said to me, ‘You're absolutely wasting your time and life by staying in the pharmaceutical industry. Why don't you come out, get an academic job at University College London and become my head of clinical programs?” - for what was then the Cancer Research Campaign. This Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund were the forerunners of Cancer Research UK. So, you know, this was an offer that was too good to be true.   So I jumped ship immediately, went back into academic life and joined CRC. And really the next ten years was this extraordinary blossoming of the merger of CRC with the Imperial College Research Fund, the creation of Cancer Research UK, and that was Paul Nurse, and obviously Gordon and me, bringing that all together. And it was the heady days of that resurgence of cancer, the importance of cancer care and research in the UK. And coupled with that, of course, it was the blossoming of my interest, really then into the global health aspects of cancer, which really, Gordon, people like you mentioned already, the late, wonderful Peter Boyle, all those individuals were already engaged in and they were the ones that really kind of catapulted me into a more international scene.   Dave Johnson: Did you know Dr. McVie before you met him at this conference, or was it just a chance encounter?   Richard Sullivan: No, he actually met me via John Mendelson, because John had picked up a paper I'd been writing on basically the very early versions of Rituximab that we were working on and we were looking for pharmacodynamic endpoints. And of course, one of the things I noticed with the patients is they were getting all these skin rashes on their faces, and I thought, that's terrific. Just seemed to be the skin rashes seemed to be together with those individuals that had better responses. And I remember writing this paper for Signal, which was a kind of relatively minor journal, and I think it was John Mendelson who picked it up and must have mentioned something to Gordon. Gordon hunted me out down at a particular conference, said, "How on earth do you know about this, that you're not anything more than a surgeon?" He was absolutely right about, goodness sake, what do you know about pharmacodynamic endpoints, and I kind of had to sort of confess that I've gone kind of slightly off-piste by doing biochemistry and cells signaling and working with these extraordinary people. And that's how I essentially met Gordon. He was very good for spotting slightly unusual, eclectic human beings.   Pat Loehrer: I'm very curious about the intersection of your work and how you got into the British Army and Intelligence with medicine and how that even may continue even today. So explain that story, that part of your life a little bit to us.   Richard Sullivan: Yeah, it was very early on, as I went into medical school, one of the key concerns was making money. I looked around for ways of doing something interesting to make money, and most of the jobs on offer were bar jobs, et cetera. Then I thought, what about the Territorial Army, which, in the early days of the 1980s, was, and still is, a very large component of the UK Armed Forces. So I actually joined the Royal Army Medical Corps, as you would expect for someone going into medicine. I thought, okay, I'll join the Royal Army Medical Corps, and I was a combat Medical Training Technician, et cetera. So I went along, signed up, and I think I was about three months into training when I was at a place called Kew Barracks and some chap came up to me and handed me a little bit of paper. It said "Intelligence Security Group" and gave a phone number. He said, "This is more your line of work. Why don't you give them a ring?"   It was interesting because, in those early days, they were looking for analysts who could work on lots of different areas. In those days, most of the work was domestic.. Of course, there was counterterrorism with Northern Ireland, but there was also the Soviet Union, and the fallout from the Warsaw Pact, so they were still actively recruiting into that area. There are lots of details I can't talk about, but it was relatively, to begin with, quite hard work and low level. It was a lot of learning foreign equipment recognition. It was what we consider to be standard combat intelligence. But the more time you spend in it, the more interesting it gets.   One of the areas they were looking to recruit into, which I didn't realize at the time but only later, was bioweapons and biosecurity. They needed people who understood biotechnology and the language of science, and who could be taught the language of infectious disease on top of that. That is quite a difficult combination to find. It's very easy to teach people trade craft and intelligence, it's very hard to teach them subject matter expertise. And they were really missing people who specialized in that area.   It was interesting because it was still a relatively open domain. There was still a lot of work going on in the counterterrorism front with biological weapons, and a lot around the Verification of the Biological Weapons and Toxin Convention. And it was an interesting, and I'd almost say parallel life. But your medical knowledge and the scientific knowledge I had already gained and was gaining was what was being looked for. So that was very early on and it has expanded over the years. More and more now we talk about health security and intelligence so that goes beyond what you would consider classic medical intelligence or Armed Forces - this is more about putting together the disciplines of intelligence with the securitized issues of, for example Ebola. That is a classic example. The big outbreaks in West Africa, the DRC, these are sort of the classic security intelligence issues - even COVID 19 for example - and mostly around the world, what we've seen is the intelligence apparatus taking front and center in that, whether you're looking at states like South Korea, et cetera. So I've moved more into that, and we do a lot of work and research into this as well. So we look at, particularly now, how to improve human intelligence in this area, the pros and cons of signal intelligence collection. And we go as far as to kind of ask sort of deep ethical and moral issues, for example, about how far should these sorts of apparatus of state be applied to public good issues like health. Because at the end of the day, when you're talking about the armed forces security sector, their primary job is for defense of the realm. So applying them in other areas obviously comes with a whole load of moral and ethical challenges. So, yes, it's been a fascinating journey, which, as I said, it extends all the way back to the late 1980s. It's been both complementary and different.   Dave Johnson: So, Richard, there's so many things in your resume that warrant exploration, but you served as Clinical Director of Cancer Research UK for nearly a decade. What was that experience like, and what accomplishment are you most proud of?   Richard Sullivan: It was an enormous privilege. In your life, you always look at some jobs and you think, “How lucky I was to be there at that time with those people.” I think, first of all, enormous respect for the people that ran both Cancer Research Campaign, Imperial Cancer Research Fund – I mean, Paul Nurse and Gordon McVeigh, Richard Treisman – I mean, some extraordinary people who were leading both of these charities. And so to be there at that moment when they both came together, but more importantly as well, they had this most amazing global network of literally the illuminati of cancer research, spanning from basic science all the way through to epidemiology, public health, health systems. And in those days, of course, those individuals would come on site visits to the UK to look at the different units and evaluate them. So you can imagine when you're bringing those sorts of individuals across, you get a chance to go out with them, go drinking, talk to them, learn about their research, and also learn about the extraordinary breadth of research that was there in the UK. So you're condensing almost a lifetime's worth of learning into a few years. It was an absolute privilege to have been able to serve the community like that.   What I'm most proud of? Gosh, I like to think I suspect that most proud of trying to help a lot of the fellows get through to where they were going to actually get the most out of their careers. When I look back, there are lots and lots of names of people who started at a very early stage with funding from Cancer Research Campaign or the Imperial College Research Fund, who are now very, very senior professors and global research leaders. And I like to think that we did a little bit to help them along that way and also help to support individual research programs actually reach their full potential. Because I think research management and planning is often overlooked. People think of this as very transactional – it's not transactional. It's an incredibly important, serious discipline. It requires very careful handling to get the very best out of your research ecosystem. You've really, really got to get under the skin and really have a clear view of how you're going to help people. So I think that's what I'm most proud of – is the individuals who made it all the way through and now these great leaders out there.   But it was also, let's be honest, it was halcyon days. Great innovations, great discoveries, new networks growing, incredible expansion of funding in the UK, in Europe, in the USA. They were very, very good days. And it was, as I said, it was a real privilege to be there almost at the center for nearly a decade.   Dave Johnson: Let me follow up on that, if I may, just for a moment. You have had such an incredible influence. What characteristics do you think are most desired in a cancer investigator? What sorts of things do you look for, especially when you're thinking about funding someone?   Richard Sullivan: Creativity. I think creativity is really important. We talk about the word innovation a lot, and it's an interesting engineering term, but creativity is that spark that you can see it in people, the way they talk about what they're doing. They have this really creative approach. And with that, I think you have to have the passion. Research careers are long and difficult, and I'd probably suggest there's probably more downs than there are ups, and you have to have that passion for it. And I think along with that passion is the belief in what you're doing – that first of all, you have that belief that actually drives you forward, that what you know you're doing is good work, and that you're really dedicated to it. But obviously, hand on heart, when you're looking at researchers, it's that passion and that creativity.   I think it's a brave person to judge how any person's career or program is going to go. I don't think any of us are prophets. Even in our own land. We might be able to see slightly into the future, but there are so many elements that make up  “success”. It's funny when I look back and I think those who've been successful, it's people who've also been generally happy in their lives. They've found their careers in whatever shape or form, fulfilling, and they've generally been happy human beings, and they've managed to create a life around research which has given them meaning.   Pat Loehrer: Richard, you have reinvented yourself a number of times – this transition of going from like a basic scientist, a surgeon, moving into public policy and global policy. Tell me a little bit about the journey that's been in terms of academics. How do you learn? What were the transition points in each of these things to get you now to be, as I mentioned before, kind of the key person for Lancet's commissions to somebody who was a rugby player?   Richard Sullivan: I suppose if you're being mean, you say, he clearly gets bored easily. But it's not that. Actually, I'm not very instrumental about life either. I mean, there are many people you will meet who have got their lives and strategies mapped out. They know they're going to do X next year, Y the following year. And for me, it's never been like that. For me, it's that excitement, that creativity of working on new and interesting things, but also knowing when you've run out of road in a particular area, where it no longer gets you out of bed in the morning, where you no longer feel happy, where you no longer feel you're contributing. All of us talking today have the great privilege of having choice about our lives, about what direction our lives should take. And it's not a privilege one should squander lightly because many people do not have choices about their lives. It's all about chance. And having that choice to be able to move into different areas is really important because I said you can stick in the same thing because you think you have to. And you can become an unhappy, miserable human being. And that makes you a miserable researcher to be around. It makes you a terrible doctor. Probably makes you a terrible person, actually, generally, if you're having a miserable life.   So finding new things, that really you're passionate about how you do it, there's no shortcut in this. It's hard work. Readily admit I went back to law school of economics, retaught myself lots of things. There are no shortcuts for. Deciding if you're going to a new area is learning, learning, practice, practice, practice, and just doing the hard work. I think that's an ethos that was probably drilled into us quite early anyway in medical school, because that's how you approach medicine. That's how you approach science when I was growing up. And it was that idea of humility that you can never have enough learning, you will always learn off other people. That's probably what drove me and how I've managed to change and as I say, who knows what the future is? I don't know. Maybe one day I'll think about doing a bit of poetry.   Dave Johnson: Your comments about happiness and work resonate with Pat and me. I think we both feel like humor is really important for happiness and career success. And, you know, Osler once said, “The master word of medicine is work.” You can't get around that. It is what it is. And I think you just reaffirmed that.   Well, this concludes part one of our interview with Richard Sullivan, professor of Cancer and Global Health at King's College, London and director of the King's Institute of Cancer Policy and co-director of the Conflict and Health Research Group. In the second part of this episode, Professor Sullivan will speak about the progress of global health, especially in conflict areas, and the need for young people to enter into the world of oncology and oncology research.   Thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into Oncology, Etc. This is an ASCO educational podcast where we will talk about just about anything and everything. So if you have an idea for a topic or a guest you would like us to interview, please email us at education@asco.org. Thank you again for listening.  Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the Comprehensive Education Center at education ASCO.org. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience and conclusions. Statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.  

High-Impact Growth
Must-Listen Guidance for Technologists in Global Health from Malawi's Head of Digital Health, Simeon Yosefe: Dispatches from the 2022 Global Digital Health Forum

High-Impact Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 20:59


“For us as a country, we want to implement and deploy comprehensive systems. A system that actually encompasses everything. Not only focusing on one company. HIV may be a starting point, but we want these resources not only to be limited to HIV, but they should cover everything. And by doing that, we ensure that we are taking care of everything. If a mother is pregnant, is HIV positive, or also has TB - all these will actually be taken care of because we have brought all this work together and those who are providing the care will actually provide this care within the same framework and the same environment. That will definitely improve the situation.” - Simeon Yosefe, Head of Digital Health, Ministry of Health of Malawi Jonathan Jackson talks to Simeon Yosefe, Head of Digital Health for the Ministry of Health of Malawi, to discuss the challenges and opportunities of digitally transforming Malawi's health system. You'll hear about the importance of aligning digital health systems closely to the vision and digital health strategy of the government, how Malawi is creating policy guidance to ensure that its digital health systems work for Malawi, and why we need to take a comprehensive approach to digital systems. Malawi has been a leader in digital health laying out a bold digital health strategy and this episode is a must listen for any digital health practitioners working or wanting to work with Ministries of Health.

The Successful Screenwriter with Geoffrey D Calhoun: Screenwriting Podcast

Character Database: NeuroscientistLeah Elson is a clinical development scientist with a 13-year career in medical research which has included the fields of orthopedics, novel biotechnology, oncology, and neuroscience. Leah has 87 peer-reviewed, collaborative publications, including manuscripts, book chapters, and supplements. She studied pre-medical sciences at Harvard University and has earned graduate degrees in the fields of Biotechnology (the Johns Hopkins University), as well as Global Health & Epidemiology (Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California). Leah is the author of There Are (No) Stupid Questions… In Science and host of The String Theory Podcast.Leah Elson on IG gnarlybygnatureYou can find her at https://www.leahelson.comFor the full uncut video (59mins) and access to our entire character database become a Monthly or Pro member at The Successful Screenwriter.--> https://www.thesuccessfulscreenwriter.com

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW
The invisible force that could be lurking in your arteries and threatening your life. (Part # 3) A framework on how to protect yourself and those you love. Special Guest Dr Alta Schutte (The George Institute for Global Health)

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 45:21


Click here to access our new membership portal and the FREE 5 hour mini -series OUTSMART OBESITY, HEART DISEASE & CANCER EVENTSClick here to get the OUTSMART BOOKClick here to get the OUTSMART HEALTH LABClick here to get the OUTSMART CLASSROOMClick here if you are a teacherClick here if you are a Cardiology practice or allied health professionalClick here to learn about Shane.In today's episode, I have a phenomenal treat that I've never done before. You are going to meet Professor Alta Schutte. In addition to this, you were going to get access to the full video episode with animation overlay describing what Dr Schutte and I talk about in the interview.Here is the background of todays' guest. Alta (Aletta E.) Schutte PhD FESC FRRSAf ISHF is SHARP Professor and Principal Theme Lead of Cardiac, Vascular and Metabolic Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine and Health at UNSW Sydney, Australia; with a joint appointment as Professorial Fellow at the George Institute for Global Health. She is a NHMRC Investigator Grant Leadership Fellow.She has extensive experience in working in clinical and population-based studies with a focus on raised blood pressure, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. She has been the Chief Investigator of several multidisciplinary studies, published >400 papers in the field of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, and supervised over 85 postgraduate students. She is involved in numerous international consortia, such as the Global Burden of Disease study (Washington DC), the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (London), May Measurement Month initiative of the International Society of Hypertension, and was one of 20 invited authors to join the Lancet Commission of Hypertension. She is the senior author of the 2020 International Society of Hypertension Global Hypertension Guidelines.She has been acknowledged for her work as winner of the Distinguished Woman Scientist in the Natural, Engineering and Life Sciences award, presented by the South African Department of Science and Technology; the NSTF South 32 TW Kambule Award; the British Association Medal from the Southern Africa Association for the Advancement of Science, the Meiring Naude Medal from the Royal Society of South Africa, the AU-TWAS (African Union & The World Academy of Sciences) Award, the 2019 African Union Kwame Nkrumah Regional Award for Scientific Excellence, 2020 KIFRA Prize in Science and 2022 Harriet Dustan Award of the American Heart Association's Hypertension Council.She serves as Associate Editor of Hypertension and the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology and is on the Editorial Board of cardiovascular journals, such as the Journal of Hypertension, Hypertension Research, Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Journal of Human Hypertension, Current Hypertension Reports and BMC Medicine. She is a Board Member of the Australian Cardiovascular Alliance, Fellow of the European Society of Cardiology, the International Society of Hypertension and the Royal Society of South Africa; the Past President of the Southern African Hypertension Society (SAHS); and Past President of the International Society of Hypertension (ISH).

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW
The invisible force that could be lurking in your arteries and threatening your life. (Part # 2) A framework on how to protect yourself and those you love. Special Guest Dr Alta Schutte (The George Institute for Global Health)

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 21:13


Click here to access our new membership portal and the FREE 5 hour mini -series OUTSMART OBESITY, HEART DISEASE & CANCER EVENTSClick here to get the OUTSMART BOOKClick here to get the OUTSMART HEALTH LABClick here to get the OUTSMART CLASSROOMClick here if you are a teacherClick here if you are a Cardiology practice or allied health professionalClick here to learn about Shane.In today's episode, I have a phenomenal treat that I've never done before. You are going to meet Professor Alta Schutte. In addition to this, you were going to get access to the full video episode with animation overlay describing what Dr Schutte and I talk about in the interview.Here is the background of todays' guest. Alta (Aletta E.) Schutte PhD FESC FRRSAf ISHF is SHARP Professor and Principal Theme Lead of Cardiac, Vascular and Metabolic Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine and Health at UNSW Sydney, Australia; with a joint appointment as Professorial Fellow at the George Institute for Global Health. She is a NHMRC Investigator Grant Leadership Fellow.She has extensive experience in working in clinical and population-based studies with a focus on raised blood pressure, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. She has been the Chief Investigator of several multidisciplinary studies, published >400 papers in the field of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, and supervised over 85 postgraduate students. She is involved in numerous international consortia, such as the Global Burden of Disease study (Washington DC), the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (London), May Measurement Month initiative of the International Society of Hypertension, and was one of 20 invited authors to join the Lancet Commission of Hypertension. She is the senior author of the 2020 International Society of Hypertension Global Hypertension Guidelines.She has been acknowledged for her work as winner of the Distinguished Woman Scientist in the Natural, Engineering and Life Sciences award, presented by the South African Department of Science and Technology; the NSTF South 32 TW Kambule Award; the British Association Medal from the Southern Africa Association for the Advancement of Science, the Meiring Naude Medal from the Royal Society of South Africa, the AU-TWAS (African Union & The World Academy of Sciences) Award, the 2019 African Union Kwame Nkrumah Regional Award for Scientific Excellence, 2020 KIFRA Prize in Science and 2022 Harriet Dustan Award of the American Heart Association's Hypertension Council.She serves as Associate Editor of Hypertension and the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology and is on the Editorial Board of cardiovascular journals, such as the Journal of Hypertension, Hypertension Research, Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Journal of Human Hypertension, Current Hypertension Reports and BMC Medicine. She is a Board Member of the Australian Cardiovascular Alliance, Fellow of the European Society of Cardiology, the International Society of Hypertension and the Royal Society of South Africa; the Past President of the Southern African Hypertension Society (SAHS); and Past President of the International Society of Hypertension (ISH).

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW
The invisible force that could be lurking in your arteries and threatening your life. A framework on how to protect yourself and those you love. Special Guest Dr Alta Schutte (The George Institute for Global Health)

MY CHILD'S HEALTHY LIFE RADIO SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 37:28


Click here to access our new membership portal and the FREE 5 hour mini -series OUTSMART OBESITY, HEART DISEASE & CANCER EVENTSClick here to get the OUTSMART BOOKClick here to get the OUTSMART HEALTH LABClick here to get the OUTSMART CLASSROOMClick here if you are a teacherClick here if you are a Cardiology practice or allied health professionalClick here to learn about Shane.In today's episode, I have a phenomenal treat that I've never done before. You are going to meet Professor Alta Schutte. In addition to this, you were going to get access to the full video episode with animation overlay describing what Dr Schutte and I talk about in the interview.Here is the background of todays' guest. Alta (Aletta E.) Schutte PhD FESC FRRSAf ISHF is SHARP Professor and Principal Theme Lead of Cardiac, Vascular and Metabolic Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine and Health at UNSW Sydney, Australia; with a joint appointment as Professorial Fellow at the George Institute for Global Health. She is a NHMRC Investigator Grant Leadership Fellow.She has extensive experience in working in clinical and population-based studies with a focus on raised blood pressure, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. She has been the Chief Investigator of several multidisciplinary studies, published >400 papers in the field of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, and supervised over 85 postgraduate students. She is involved in numerous international consortia, such as the Global Burden of Disease study (Washington DC), the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (London), May Measurement Month initiative of the International Society of Hypertension, and was one of 20 invited authors to join the Lancet Commission of Hypertension. She is the senior author of the 2020 International Society of Hypertension Global Hypertension Guidelines.She has been acknowledged for her work as winner of the Distinguished Woman Scientist in the Natural, Engineering and Life Sciences award, presented by the South African Department of Science and Technology; the NSTF South 32 TW Kambule Award; the British Association Medal from the Southern Africa Association for the Advancement of Science, the Meiring Naude Medal from the Royal Society of South Africa, the AU-TWAS (African Union & The World Academy of Sciences) Award, the 2019 African Union Kwame Nkrumah Regional Award for Scientific Excellence, 2020 KIFRA Prize in Science and 2022 Harriet Dustan Award of the American Heart Association's Hypertension Council.She serves as Associate Editor of Hypertension and the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology and is on the Editorial Board of cardiovascular journals, such as the Journal of Hypertension, Hypertension Research, Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Journal of Human Hypertension, Current Hypertension Reports and BMC Medicine. She is a Board Member of the Australian Cardiovascular Alliance, Fellow of the European Society of Cardiology, the International Society of Hypertension and the Royal Society of South Africa; the Past President of the Southern African Hypertension Society (SAHS); and Past President of the International Society of Hypertension (ISH).

Emerging Infectious Diseases
Building on Capacity Established through US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Global Health Programs to Respond to COVID-19, Cameroon

Emerging Infectious Diseases

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 22:51


Dr. Emily Kainne Dokubo, the CDC Country Director for the Jamaica/Caribbean Regional Office, and Sarah Gregory discuss leveraging CDC global health programs to respond to COVID-19 in Cameroon.

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)
Culture Community and Career Plans with Vianey Valdez

University of California Audio Podcasts (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:43


Vianey Valdez grew up knowing she loved to learn. When it came time to pick a college, she found herself outside her comfort zone at UC San Diego. She shares how she found her place, created community, and learned how to balance schoolwork and a social life. A recent graduate who studied global health and human development, she discusses how she turned her interests into a career. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 38290]

UC San Diego (Audio)
Culture Community and Career Plans with Vianey Valdez

UC San Diego (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:43


Vianey Valdez grew up knowing she loved to learn. When it came time to pick a college, she found herself outside her comfort zone at UC San Diego. She shares how she found her place, created community, and learned how to balance schoolwork and a social life. A recent graduate who studied global health and human development, she discusses how she turned her interests into a career. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 38290]

Education Issues (Video)
Culture Community and Career Plans with Vianey Valdez

Education Issues (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:43


Vianey Valdez grew up knowing she loved to learn. When it came time to pick a college, she found herself outside her comfort zone at UC San Diego. She shares how she found her place, created community, and learned how to balance schoolwork and a social life. A recent graduate who studied global health and human development, she discusses how she turned her interests into a career. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 38290]