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Best podcasts about inland fisheries

Latest podcast episodes about inland fisheries

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 609 (12-27-21): A Year of Water Sounds and Music – 2021 Edition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:31).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 27, 2021.  SOUND - ~ 5 sec That's the sound of a Belted Kingfisher at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., on December 21, 2021.  The year-end chattering of Virginia Water Radio's favorite bird sets the stage for our annual look-back on Water Radio's year.  We start with a medley of mystery sounds and voices from six episodes in 2021.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds, and see how many you recognize. SOUNDS – ~38 sec If you guessed all of most of those, you're a water-sound world champion! You heard Brimley's Chorus Frog;Virginia Tech graduate Maddy Grupper discussing her research on public trust in water systems;Virginia Tech's siren used for tornado warnings;names of some 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclones;Canvasback ducks; andice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for permission to use the chorus frog sound; to Lang Elliott for the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs; to Maddy Grupper for the episode on her research; and to Blacksburg friends for the tropical cyclone name call-outs. We close out 2021 with a two-minute sample of music heard in episodes this year.  Here are excerpts of “Wade in the Water,” by Torrin Hallett; “Racing the Sun,” by the Faux Paws; “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann; “John Ashe's Spring,” by New Standard; “The Coming Spring,” by Andrew VanNorstand with vocalist Kailyn Wright; and “On a Ship,” by Kat Mills, with violinist Rachel Handman. Thanks to those musicians for permission to use their music. So long, soon, to 2021, and here's hoping for a safe, sound, and sufficiently hydrated 2022. MUSIC – ~105 sec From “Wade in the Water” - ~18 sec – instrumental. From “Racing the Sun” - ~20 sec – instrumental. From “All Creatures Were Meant to be Free” - ~10 sec – instrumental. From “John Ashe's Spring” - ~13 sec – instrumental. From “The Coming Spring” - ~20 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin' on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” From “On a Ship” - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sounds Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The Belted Kingfisher sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., December 21, 2021. The sound of Brimley's Chorus Frog was from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of February 5, 2021, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/.  This sound was used in Episode 563, 2-8-21. Virginia Tech 2020 graduate Maddy Grupper discussed her research on public trust in water systems in Episode 564, 2-15-21. The tornado-warning siren was recorded in Blacksburg, Va., in the early morning of April 28, 2011.  This sound was used in Episode 568, 3-15-21. The call-out of Atlantic tropical cyclone names for the 2021 season were recorded by Blacksburg friends of Virginia Water radio in June 2021.  The voices were sued in Episode 580, 6-7-21. The sounds of Canvasback ducks were sound were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, online at https://musicofnature.com/.  These sounds were used in Episode 604, 11-22-21. The Claytor Lake ice sound was recorded at the Sloan Creek inlet of the lake, near Draper in Pulaski County, Va., on January 6, 2018. This sound was used in Episode 606, 12-6-21. Musical Selections Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used in Episode 566, 3-1-21, water in U.S. civil rights history. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used in Episode 561, 1-25-21, on the Northern Harrier. “John Ashe's Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used in Episode 576, 5-10-21, an introduction to springs. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/.  Information on accompanying artists on “The Coming Spring” is online at https://andrewvannorstrandmusic.bandcamp.com/track/the-coming-spring.  This music was used in Episode 572, 4-12-21, on warblers and spring bird migration. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanying artists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. IMAGESAn Image Sampler from Episodes in 2021 From Episode 561, 1-25-21: Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 12-27-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 563, 2-8-21: Brimley's Chorus Frog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, February 28, 2019.  Photo by iNaturalist user jkleopfer, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20834796(as of 2-8-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 580, 6-7-21: Predictions for the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “NOAA Predicts Another Active Atlantic Hurricane Season,” 5/20/21, online at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-another-active-atlantic-hurricane-season.From Episode 602, 11-8-21: Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.From Episode 606, 12-6-21: Thin ice on a pond in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., December 9, 2021.SOURCES Please see the episodes mentioned and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” for sources of information about the topics of the individual episodes. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance o

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 607 (12-13-21): A Winter Holidays History of Counting Birds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-10-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 13, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2015 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUNDS – 7 secThis week, the sound of Mallard ducks on a December day in Blacksburg, Va., is the call to explore the annual Christmas Bird Count, organized by the National Audubon Society.Since 1900, the Society has helped organize volunteers to hold local daylong bird counts between December 14 and January 5.  On any single day within that period, volunteer counters follow specific routes within a 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear.  The count provides a snapshot both of the species encountered and of the numbers of individuals within each species.  According to the Society, this effort is the “longest running community science bird project” in the United States, and it actually takes place now in over 20 countries in the Western Hemisphere.  The results of such a long-term inventory help show the status of bird populations and the impacts of changes in habitat, climate, and other environmental conditions. Of course, birds living around water and wetlands are part of the annual count; in fact, the Audubon Society's founding in the late 1800s was due largely to concerns over commercial use of plumes from egrets and other wading birds.  [Additional note, not in audio: This refers to the founding in 1896 of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, the first state-level affiliate of the National Audubon Society, founded in 1905.  For more information on this history, see the Extra Information section below.] So what kinds of water-related birds might Virginia Christmas bird counters find?  Have a listen for about 20 seconds to this sample of four possible species.SOUNDS - 23 secThe Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs are among the many water-related birds that inhabit parts of Virginia during winter, including shorebirds, ducks, herons, and lots of others.  Keeping track of these and other feathered Virginia winter residents is a holiday tradition for many Commonwealth citizens with patience, binoculars, and attentive eyes and ears.Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the eagle, kingfisher, gull, and yellowlegs sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs. Here's hoping that Virginia's Christmas bird counters find good variety and high numbers this year.  We close with a U.S. Fish and Wildfire Service recording of another Virginia water-related winter resident, the Common Loon, a species that some diligent coastalVirginia counter might spot or hear on a winter day or night. SOUNDS - ~6 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 294, 12-14-15. The Mallard sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Virginia Tech Duck Pond in Blacksburg on December 10, 2015. The sounds of the Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern RegionCD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Common Loon sounds were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific URL for the loons recording was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/57/rec/1, as of 12-13-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Mallards (several males, plus one female on right) on Virginia Tech Duck Pond, Blacksburg, December 10, 2015.Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 16, 2021.Canada Geese beside a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 11, 2021. EXTRA INFORMATION On Bird Counts Another nationwide count is the Great Backyard Bird Count, held each February and organized by Audubon, the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, and Birds Canada.  This count calls on volunteers to watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over four days (February 18-21 in 2022), and record the species and numbers of all the birds seen or heard.  Its results also contribute to large-scale and long-term understanding of bird species distribution and health.  For more information, visit http://gbbc.birdcount.org/.On Audubon Society History and Waterbirds “Outrage over the slaughter of millions of waterbirds, particularly egrets and other waders, for the millinery trade led to the foundation, by Harriet Hemenway and Mina Hall, of the Massachusetts Audubon Society in 1896.  By 1898, state-level Audubon Societies had been established in Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, Illinois, Maine, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Minnesota, Texas, and California. ...In 1901, state-level Audubon groups joined together in a loose national organization....  In 1905, the National Audubon Society was founded, with the protection of gulls, terns, egrets, herons, and other waterbirds high on its conservation priority list.” – National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation, online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation.On Loon Calls in Winter“Generally loons are silent on the wintering grounds, but occasionally on a quiet winter night one will hear their primeval, tremulous yodel.” – Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay (Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006), p. 285.“All calls can be heard in migration and winter, but compared to the breeding season, they are uncommon.” – Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists' Union, “Birds of North America Online/Common Loon/Sounds,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/comloo/cur/sounds (subscription required for access to this Web site). SOURCES Used in Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required for this site). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Audubon Society, online at http://www.audubon.org/. National Audubon Society, “Christmas Bird Count,” online at http://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count. Kathy Reshetiloff, “Listen for the haunting call of loons on Bay's frigid winter waters,” Bay Journal, 12/8/14, updated 3/31/20. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Bald Eagle entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040093&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Belted Kingfisher entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040220&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Ring-billed Gull entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040170&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Common Loon entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040001&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online athttps://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird.  Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes for Winter American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.&l

new york science society bay humans university agency california guide music ice broad indiana christmas natural relationships state audio game college history north america frost world change surviving modern illinois accent texas animals cd dark tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain united states pond press research ocean tennessee government education birds plants foundation maine pennsylvania ring chesapeake bay native rhode island connecticut baltimore new jersey ohio fish chesapeake snow wisconsin environment images green new hampshire va cambridge minnesota columbia outrage msonormal commonwealth generally stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens hawk environmental counting dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology union scientific teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript demonstrate ornithology mallard virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k populations name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes gull western hemisphere audubon zoology blacksburg minn national audubon society taxonomy cosgrove great blue heron msohyperlink wildlife resources bay journal audubon society bald eagles all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback bird conservation lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp acknowledgment virginia department christmas bird count michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press mallards cumberland gap winter holidays tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems canada geese virginia standards water center audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 604 (11-22-21): Canvasbacks Come Back to the Chesapeake as Winter Approaches

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 22, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That's the landing sound of a large, distinctive duck that can be found in winter on Virginia's coastal waters.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to some more of this species' sounds, and see if you know this bird.  And here's a hint: the bird's name, and the male's beautiful color, may remind you of a painting.SOUND – ~12 secIf you guessed a Canvasback, you're right!  Canvasbacks breed on water bodies in the prairies of Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in large sections of the U.S. and Mexico, with one concentration in the Chesapeake Bay area.  According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, at one time almost half of North America's Canvasbacks wintered around the Chesapeake, but that number has decreased to about 20 percent because of reductions in Bay submerged aquatic vegetation, or Bay grasses, a valuable winter food for this species.  Canvasbacks are diving ducks, meaning they typically go completely underwater to obtain food and avoid predators.  In winter, Canvasbacks feed largely on plant roots and buds, while in summer they'll add to their plant diet a variety of aquatic insects and other animals.  Predators on adult and young Canvasbacks include mink, coyotes, foxes, owls and other birds, some reptiles and fish, and human hunters, while Canvasback eggs are eaten by various mammals and birds. The Canvasback is considered one of the most distinctive North American ducks.  The following quote from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site describes how the bird stands out.  Quote: “This exclusively North American species is considered the ‘aristocrat of ducks.'  The male's striking appearance—rich chestnut-red head and neck, black chest, white back, and long, sloping, blackish bill—along with its large size distinguish it in the field.”  Unquote. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 50 seconds of music appropriate for the Canvasback's Chesapeake Bay connection.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 197, 1-20-14, and the sounds segment of Episode 50, 1-24-11. Emily Whitesell helped write this original script for this episode during a Virginia Tech English Department internship in Spring 2011 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. The Canvasback sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESMale Canvasback (location and date not identified).  Photo by Lee Karney, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/1645/rec/2), as of 11/22/21.Female Canvasback in Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in May 2005.  Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14/rec/9), as of 11/22/21.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CANVASBACK DUCKS The scientific name of the Canvasback is Aythya valisineria. Here are some points about Canvasbacks, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Canvasback,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949.Physical Description “The adult male has a head that is rusty red, shading to almost black near the bill.  The breast is grayish-black and the sides and back are light gray to white.  The wings and speculum are gray, and the eye is red.  The bill is long and sloping, black, with decidedly long sloping profile that clearly distinguishes it from the redhead. …The adult female head is light brown.  The sides and breast are olive-brown to gray-brown, and the underparts are light gray. The back is gray, finely barred with darker gray, and the wings are grayish brown.  …They have short wings, and a rapid wingbeat.  This species has difficulty leaving the water.  It is one of the fastest flying ducks.  …It is one of the largest ducks.”Breeding “The breeding season is from May to June… This species breeds in Alaska, western Canada, northwest United States, western North America from the prairie provinces of Canada, south into the central and western states and occasionally as far east as Hudson Bay with a few as far north as Alaska.  Spring and early summer they are found in marshes with shallow waters [and in] flooded farmland.  In mid-summer they frequent large marshes and lakes, sloughs, and swampy areas.” Migration and Winter Habitat and Behavior “During migration, they fly in large ‘V' shaped flocks at high altitudes. … They are also associated with larger bodies of water.  …Late migration is in the fall, and early migration in the spring.  This species migrates cross country from the northwestern United States to the Atlantic Coast, principally the Chesapeake Bay.  The migration corridors shift annually, and they have a strong tendency to return to the same breeding ground.  … The heaviest flight is from the Canada pothole country to the Chesapeake Bay. … They arrive at Chesapeake Bay later than most other ducks.  The Chesapeake Bay fall migration is from October 15 to December 15, with a peak from November 15 to December 15.  The spring migration is from February 20 to May 1, with the peak from March 1 to March 30.  They occupy specific and traditional rivers, lakes, and marshes on migratory areas.  … This species winters to Mexico [and to the] Atlantic and Gulf Coast.  ...Virginia is one of best areas for canvasbacks.  …  They are found in lakes, salt bays and estuaries, brackish and alkaline waters near the coast, estuaries and shallow bays, [and] rarely on the open sea. … The optimum in Chesapeake Bay areas is in fresh and brackish estuarine bays with extensive beds of submerged plants or abundant invertebrates, primarily in brackish rather than salt or freshwater areas. … There has been a 53% decline in wintering populations in the United States.  There has also been a decrease in the Atlantic flyway.”  [Population decreases have been caused by several factors, including drainage of breeding marshland, food supplies being depleted by carp and swan, pollution of wintering areas, disappearance of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay, droughts on breeding grounds, oil spills, and illegal hunting and trapping.] Diet “This species dives and obtains food from the bottoms of ponds, lakes, large rivers, open marshes, and muddy bottoms.  Plants are uprooted and the roots are eaten.  This species dives to 20-30 feet. … Important foods include…aquatic plants…, molluscs, insects, caddisfly and midge larvae, dragonflies, [and] small fish.  Chesapeake Bay foods include wild celery, widgeon grass, eelgrass, pondweed, clams and mud crabs.  Juvenile foods include caddisfly larvae, midge larvae, and mayfly nymphs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Mike Burke, “The big, beautiful canvasback: What's not to love?”  Bay Journal, November 2021, available online at https://www.bayjournal.com/eedition/page-43/page_136f4325-b978-5e55-bcec-907f0a04b1fc.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all; the Canvasback entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/canvasback. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/.  The Canvasback entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription may be required).  The Canvasback entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/canvas/cur/introduction. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Canvasback entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disas

new york canada society bay university agency mexico guide music ice photo natural halloween earth state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving sound accent animals cd dark north american tech water xeno web index fall land rain alaska united states pond press research ocean weather government education diet birds behavior plants foundation chesapeake bay native baltimore spring ohio fish chesapeake snow environment images green oberlin college cambridge dewhurst migration adaptations msonormal new year commonwealth atlantic important stream menu robbins normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial predators environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading population biology gulf coast conservatory teal comeback grade special olympics oberlin colorful md brant yale school signature bio breeding wild turkey manhattan school scales freezing watershed transcript ornithology approaches virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes zoology minn taxonomy msohyperlink juveniles wildlife resources relyonvml bay journal lang elliot runoff audubon society all about birds sections life sciences birdsongs stormwater canvasback hudson bay lang elliott loons policymakers bmp new standard acknowledgment atlantic coast virginia department michigan museum cornell lab robert l cripple creek johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols unquote tmdl virginia society polar plunge torrin inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

new york society bay university agency guide music ice broad natural earth fire state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving map accent animals cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain pond press research ocean weather government education birds plants foundation voice chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment images green va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices hawk environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k observatory name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries harrisonburg ar sa eastern shore zoology minn taxonomy cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback delmarva peninsula lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols kevin mcguire northampton county tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 590 (8-16-21): Osprey Rescue Reinforces Role of Fishing-line Recycling

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (4:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This is a revised version of an episode from August 2013. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental That's part of “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” an adaptation of a traditional tune called “Fisher's Hornpipe,” by Williamsburg musician Timothy Seaman on his 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.”  The music sets the stage for a “reel” story about fishing equipment and a summer bird of prey.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can guess how the first two sounds add up to the third. And here's a hint: misplaced line makes for a tangled, feathered fisher.SOUNDS - ~19 secIf you guessed, an Osprey running afoul of some fishing line, you're right!  You heard he call of an Osprey, or “Fish Hawk,”; the sound of fishing line, being reeled in; and part of a rescue of an Osprey chick stuck in fishing line.  The latter sound was taken from the “Osprey Cam,” the Chesapeake Conservancy's real-time video transmission from an Osprey nest on Kent Island, Maryland.  On July 29, 2013, the camera showed that one of that year's three chicks had gotten its legs caught in fishing line.  Some viewers of the bird's predicament went to the site, waded out to the nest with a ladder, and climbed up and disentangled the chick. Unwittingly, this lucky Osprey chick had starred in a documentary about the value of fishing-line recycling stations.  Birds, sea turtles, and other animals can get stuck in, or eat, improperly discarded fishing line, nets, or other plastic items.  Such material can also get caught in boat propellers or intakes.  Recycling programs for fishing line are one way to help reduce these threats.  Virginia began a statewide fishing-line recycling program in 2009, run jointly by the Department of Wildlife Resources—formerly the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries—and the Marine Resources Commission.  Recycling is now available at many boat ramps, parks, and marinas, as well as at some outdoor-equipment businesses.  At those locations, anglers can look for the distinctive plastic tubes with a curved top, and help put plastic back to use, instead of on a beak or fin. Thanks to Lang Elliot and the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, to Timothy Seaman, and to the Chesapeake Conservancy, respectively, for permission to use this week's sounds of an Osprey, fishing line, and the Osprey chick rescue.  Thanks also to Mr. Seaman for this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Bass Fisherman's Reel.” MUSIC – ~20 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 175, 8-19-13.The Osprey call sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The fishing line sound and musical excerpt from “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” on the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.The sounds of the rescue of an Osprey chick caught in fishing line were taken from a video recorded by the Chesapeake Conservancy's “Osprey Cam,” available online at http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/Osprey-Cam, used with permission.  For more information about the camera or the Conservancy, contact the Conservancy at 716 Giddings Avenue, Suite 42, Annapolis, Maryland 21401; phone (443) 321-3610; e-mail: info@chesapeakeconservancy.org. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Young Osprey in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.  Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), made available for public use by the USFWS' National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12049/rec/9, as of 8-16-21.Osprey in flight, 2016 (location not identified).  Photo by Alvin Freund, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17870/rec/11, as of 8-16-21.Fishing-line recycling container at South Holston Lake, Washington County, Virginia, April 15, 2013. SOURCES Used for Audio Boat US Foundation, online at https://www.boatus.org/clean-boating/recycling/fishing-line-recycling/. Chesapeake Conservancy, “Webcams/Osprey,” online at https://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/ospreycam. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation, “Commission, “Reel. Remove. Recycle – Don't Leave Your Line Behind,”online at https://mrrp.myfwc.com/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Osprey entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/.  Video from an Osprey camera at Savannah, Georgia, is available online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/savannah-ospreys/. Outdoor News, “State Agencies Initiate Fishing Line Recycling Program,” 2/10/09. [Easton, Md.] Star Democrat, Osprey cam chick Ozzie is rescued, 8/7/13. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Osprey entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18845; “Recycle Your Fishing Line” is online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/fishing/recycle-your-line/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, “Introducing the Virginia Fishing Line Recycling Program,” online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/rec_assessment/VFLRP_AD.shtm. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds,” ‘Overall Importance of Water,” and “Recreation” subject categories. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Civics and Economics CourseCE.3 – Citizenship rights, duties, and responsibilities.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. Government CourseGOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.

society bay humans university agency music recycling photo natural relationships state video audio living game college world rescue accent cd dark tech water xeno web index rain pond research ocean government education public recreation birds foundation maryland native fish chesapeake snow environment suite organisms images reel msonormal commonwealth stream menu normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens fishing williamsburg arial environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading remove commission biology civics grade citizenship colorful resource md signature bio ozzie scales washington county govt watershed transcript earth sciences conservancy unwittingly ornithology freshwater hornpipe virginia tech ls annapolis atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service usfws grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes ar sa seaman zoology national audubon society taxonomy msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences birdsongs stormwater lang elliott policymakers bmp reinforces new standard acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum cripple creek cumberland gap sols outdoor news florida fish kent island tmdl virginia society wildlife conservation inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Guides Gone Wild
Do Something For Yourself: Emily MacCabe, Becoming an Outdoors Woman/Maine IFW (GGW051)

Guides Gone Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 50:03


Today I have the distinct pleasure of being able to fawn all over the woman behind one of my most favorite things in the world. I feel like I talk about the BOW, Becoming an Outdoors Woman, at least once every 3 or 4 episodes, and Emily MacCabe, who is the Director of Information and Education for Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, is the wo-MAN when it comes to BOW.Emily grew up loving the outdoors, and thought she’d have to become a game warden if she wanted to make a career out of that. Good thing for all of us that she got into education and communications along the way - Emily’s happier, because she gets to stay in her warm bed when some knucklehead hiker gets lost on a winter night; and any of us who’ve enjoyed a BOW day or weekend are happy, because we’re able to push ourselves and try new things through the program that Emily helped steward and grow over the past 15+ years.One minute we’re talking parenting, the next it’s Northwoods Law, and then she talks me into a trip to Montana and drops a gear recommendation that had my credit card out before I was even off the Zoom call… so much good stuff.If you're as excited about BOW as I am, I hope you'll keep an eye on Becoming an Outdoors Woman - Maine for upcoming dates and offerings.And while you're online, check out these other fun links from our convo:University of Maine 4-H Camp & Learning Center at Bryant PondMaine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (IFW)Unity CollegeGGW Episode 20 with Judy Camuso, Commissioner of Maine IFWNorthwoods LawLove Maine AdventuresGGW Episode 06 with Danielle DorrieSustainME programCamp North WoodsThermacellStay tuned, we might just be dropping some more BOW goodness in the next day or so... ;-)

Clare FM - Podcasts
Lough Derg Visitor Experience Development Plan Launched

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021 13:22


A new plan to deliver and elevate ‘Destination Lough Derg’ has been launched today. The Lough Derg Visitor Experience Development Plan sets out the overall approach to destination planning in the area for the next five years, illustrating the unique attractions of Lough Derg and how best to develop visitor experiences across the region to place Lough Derg as a holiday destination of choice both nationally and when appropriate internationally. It was developed in collaboration with Fáilte Ireland and Waterways Ireland, Clare, Tipperary and Galway Councils, Inland Fisheries, the Leader Programme and Coillte. On Wednesday's Morning Focus, Gavin Grace spoke to Joan Tarmey, Tourism Officer for Clare County Council about the plan.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 572 (4-12-21): Warblers Announce Spring Bird Migration

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:26) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 12, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2013 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 18 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin’ on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” That’s part of “The Coming Spring,” on Andrew VanNorstand’s 2019 album, “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” featuring Kailyn Wright on vocals.  It opens an episode about the feathered “changes in the air” that take place each spring in Virginia.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds, and see if you can guess what’s making these three different high-pitched songs, each heard just once.  And here’s a hint: These small creatures make big journeys, twice a year.SOUNDS  - ~12 sec If you guessed warblers, you’re right!  And if you’re an experienced birder, you may have recognized the songs of a Bay-breasted Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Tennessee Warbler.  These three species breed in Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in Central and South America, and they’re among the birds that may pass through Virginia during spring or fall migration.  Virginia’s location along the Atlantic coast and Chesapeake Bay allows Commonwealth birders to have a chance to see songbirds, waterfowl, and birds of prey that migrate along the broad, eastern North American route known as the Atlantic Flyway, one of four main migratory routes on this continent.  For example, while about 100 bird species breed in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina, over 200 species have been identified there, particularly during the spring migration from April to June. The Colorado-based organization Environment for the Americas, which has helped coordinate an annual World Migratory Bird Day, has called bird migration, quote, “one of the most important and spectacular events in the Americas.”  Virginia’s part of that spectacle, every spring and fall. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the three warbler species sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “The Coming Spring.”  We close with part of another song, whose title captures how many people may feel about spring’s arrival after a long winter.  Here’s about 20 seconds of “At Long Last,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, from their 2011 album, “Live at Goose Creek.” MUSIC – ~ 22 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 157, 4-15-13, The sounds of the Bay-breasted Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Tennessee Warbler were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  The music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 509, 1-27-20.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/. “At Long Last,” from the 2011 album “Live at Goose Creek,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESNorth American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 4/9/21.    Bay-breasted Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 154).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/bay-breasted-warbler. Palm Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 163).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/palm-warbler.Tennessee Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 154).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/tennessee-warbler. SOURCES Used for Audio Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bay-breasted_Warbler.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Palm_Warbler.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tennessee_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required).The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/babwar/cur/introduction.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/palwar/cur/introduction.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/tenwar/cur/introduction. Environment for the Americas, “World Migratory Bird Day,” online at http://www.birdday.org/birdday. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Great Dismal Swamp National Refuge, “Wildlife and Habitat,” online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Great_Dismal_Swamp/wildlife_and_habitat/index.html.  The Refuge’s bird brochure, with checklist, is online (as a PDF) at https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/Region_5/NWRS/South_Zone/Great_Dismal_Swamp_Complex/Great_Dismal_Swamp/GDSbirds.pdf. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Migratory Bird Program,” online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/index.php.  Information on bird migratory flyways is online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Warblers are online at this link.The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040324&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040329&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040309&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726. ___, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes.  (Please note: some of these may be redone in spring 2021.  As that occurs, the links below will include directions to the blog post for the updated episodes.) Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring arrival episode – Episode 569, 3-22-21.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 212, 5-5-14.Spring Peepers – Episode 570, 3-29-21.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring signals for fish – Episode 571, 4-5-21.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”

new york canada society bay university agency america guide music natural colorado state audio game college live north america world change map modern accent south america cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index rain united states pond press research ocean government education birds plants north carolina chesapeake bay native spring fish chesapeake snow habitat environment organisms images va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth americas atlantic stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental frogs refuge dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading wildlife biology colorful signature bio scales warblers watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes harrisonburg zoology minn national audubon society taxonomy spring peepers msohyperlink wildlife resources warbler announce at long last lang elliot audubon society all about birds sections life sciences birdsongs bird migration stormwater john james audubon lang elliott policymakers bmp rockingham county new standard acknowledgment virginia department goose creek michigan museum great dismal swamp cripple creek coming spring cumberland gap sols tmdl virginia society inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 570 (3-29-21): Peepers Sound a Chorus that Signals Spring and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021


Click to listen to episode (3:49) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 3-26-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 29, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2012 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. SOUND  – ~ 6 sec This week, we feature an amphibious, sign-of-spring mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 10 more seconds, and see if you recognize this chorus, which you may have heard on spring evenings in areas near standing water. SOUND  - 10 sec If you guessed Spring Peeper frogs, you’re right!  Spring Peepers, occurring throughout the eastern and central United States and Canada, are one of seven native chorus frogspecies in Virginia.  Their choruses are the combination of mating calls produced by many individual males when air in a throat pouch is drawn across the voice box.  The mating calls occur in Virginia from February to June, but Spring Peeper sounds often can be heard again in the Commonwealth in fall as days shorten and temperatures cool. Like other frogs, toads, and salamanders, Spring Peepers are amphibians, and they rely on water for reproduction.  Winter and spring precipitation provide ephemeral– or temporary – ponds and pools, where many amphibians’ eggs transform into tadpoles and eventually into adults that, in many species, move onto land.  For Spring Peepers, breeding takes place in a variety of water bodies and wetlands near trees, shrubs, or other vegetation on which females deposit their eggs.  After hatching into tadpoles—known scientifically as larvae—Spring Peeper’s metamorphosisto adult takes about three months, after which the adults move into woodlands. As tadpoles, Spring Peepers feed on material suspended in the water.  The adults feed on a variety of insects, spiders, and other invertebrates.  Predators on Spring Peeper tadpoles include giant water bugs, predaceous diving beetles, and dragonflies, while the adults may fall prey to salamanders, spiders, snakes, owls, and other birds. You’re not likely to see these one-inch-long frogs, but their loud mating calls are prevalent across the Commonwealth in spring and early summer, reminding us of the presence and importance of wetlands and small seasonal bodies of water. We close by letting Spring Peepers have the last call—a springtime chorus that I hope resounds at some water near you. SOUND  - ~7 sec SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The episode is a revised version of Episode 105, 4-2-12.  Virginia Water Radio thanks Heather Longo (formerly Heather Vereb) for researching and writing that episode. The Spring Peeper sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., on March 21, 2020. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Spring Peeper, photographed at Virginia Beach, Virginia, September 23, 2017.  Photo by user Rae1211, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/8082565(as of 3-26-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT SPRING PEEPERS The scientific name of Spring Peeper is Pseudacris crucifer. The following information on Spring Peepers is taken from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Spring Peeper,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020071&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18711.  Physical Description “This species ranges in length from 19-35 mm (0.75-1.5 in).  Dorsal coloration can be yellow, tan, brown, gray, or olive with a distinctive dark X-shaped mark.  The northern subspecies found here in Virginia has a plain or virtually plain belly.  There is typically a dark bar-like marking between the eyes.  Males have dark throats and are usually smaller and darker than the females.” Reproduction “This species breeds from February through May in woodland ponds, swamps, and ditches.  Choral groups are found where trees or shrubs are standing in water or nearby.  Mating call is a high piping whistle repeated about once every second.  A large chorus resembles the sound of sleigh bells.  Sometimes an individual exhibits a trilling peep in the background of a large chorus.  Females lay an average of 900 eggs per clutch.  Eggs are laid singly and attached to submerged vegetation or other objects.  Eggs hatch in an average of 6 days.  Metamorphosis occurs in an average of 45 days though a range of 3 to 4 months is also reported.  Individuals typically reach sexual maturity at 1 year.” Behavior “This species inhabits woodlands under forest litter or within brushy undergrowth.  They are particularly abundant in brushy secondary growth or cutover woodlots if they are close to small temporary or semi-permanent ponds or swamps.  Specimens are rarely seen outside of the breeding season though occasionally an individual can be found traveling through the woods by day in wet weather.  Their diet consists primarily of small arthropods. This species may fall prey to large spiders.  This species has been shown to tolerate temperatures of -6 degrees Celsius for 5 days.  At the end of that period, approximately 35% of body fluids were frozen.  This and other species that tolerate extreme cold temperatures were shown to have high levels of glycerol in body tissues during the winter.  Glycerol is absent from body tissues in the summer.  …This species requires marshy ponds, ditches, and swamps with proximal shrubs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Lang Elliott, The Calls of Frogs and Toads, Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg, Penn., 2004. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Richmond, 2011. Bernard S. Martof et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. Robert Powell et al., Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston and New York, 2016. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org.  The Spring Peeper entry is online at https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Pseudacris_crucifer/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  The Spring Peeper entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020071&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18711.  Entries for Virginia’s seven chorus frog species (in the genus Pseudacris) are at this link.  Entries for amphibians in Virginia are at this link.  ___, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Herpetological Society, (VHS), “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm.  The Spring Peeper entry is online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/northern-spring-peeper/northern_spring_peeper.php.  (The VHS supports the scientific study of amphibians (frogs, toads, and salamanders) and reptiles (lizards, snakes, and turtles.) ___, “Virginia Frog Phrenology (Calling/Breeding Periods), online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/_phenology/va-frog-and-toad-phenology.pdf. For More Information about Amphibians in Virginia and Elsewhere AmphibiaWeb, online at https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html.  The Spring Peeper entry is online at https://amphibiaweb.org/cgi/amphib_query?where-genus=Pseudacris&where-species=crucifer&account=amphibiaweb. Kathleen Gaskell, Chesapeake Challenge—Spring peepers will trill you to pieces, Bay Journal, March 2021. J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Frog Friday: Where Do Frogs Go in Winter?” December 11, 2015, online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/blog/frog-friday-where-do-frogs-go-in-the-winter/. ___, “Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/. ___, “Wildlife Information,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/.  This site lists wildlife animals found in Virginia, with links to species accounts. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” subject category. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes.  (Please note: several of these may be redone in spring 2021.  As that occurs, the links below will include directions to the blog post for the updated episodes.) Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring arrival episode – Episode 569, 3-22-21.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 212, 5-5-14.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring signals for fish – Episode 311, 4-11-16.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.Warblers and spring bird migration – Episode 157, 4-15-13. Following are links to some other episodes on chorus frogs.Brimley’s Chorus Frog – Episode 563, 2-8-21.Chorus frogs group in Virginia – Episode 464, 3-18-19.

new york canada bay university agency metamorphosis guide photo natural state audio living game college vhs sound accent animals dark tech water web index rain united states pond research ocean government education behavior plants native spring fish chesapeake snow penn eggs environment organisms images richmond va adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu females normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens reptiles predators environmental frogs dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading biology signals chapel hill choral colorful chorus signature bio reproduction scales carolinas individuals warblers watershed toads transcript males mating robert powell brimley virginia tech ls aquatic virginia beach atlantic ocean celsius natural resources chriss grades k populations name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries dorsal zoology blacksburg amphibians taxonomy spring peepers wood frog msohyperlink north carolina press john d wildlife resources houghton mifflin harcourt hobson relyonvml bay journal mechanicsburg sections attribution noncommercial life sciences reay stormwater lang elliott policymakers bmp heritage park new standard acknowledgment virginia department peepers michigan museum cripple creek cumberland gap inaturalist sols tmdl fourth edition inland fisheries specimens glycerol peterson field guide living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
KNCT - Simply Beautiful 91.3 FM
Centex Planeteers - Inland Fisheries

KNCT - Simply Beautiful 91.3 FM

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2021 3:30


As our host Jennifer Hetzel continues her spotlight on the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, this episodes focuses on their Inland Fisheries division. The Inland Fisheries Division is responsible for managing the state's diverse freshwater fisheries resources. The goal of this management is to provide the best possible angling while protecting and enhancing freshwater aquatic resources. The resources include approximately 1,100 public impoundments covering 1.7 million acres and 191,000 miles of rivers and streams. These resources are used by about 1.21 million anglers 16 years of age and older whose fishing activities provide great benefit to the Texas economy through an estimated $960 million per year in direct angler spending on food, lodging, transportation and equipment. Centex Planeteers airs live each Monday at 6:15pm on public radio, KNCT. You can listen by visiting our website at KNCT.org or downloading our free app, available on iTunes and GooglePlay. The Centex Planeteers hosts a monthly "Virtual Science and Sangria" event on Facebook and their next topic is Groundwater in Central Texas. To view past events, visit Facebook.com/centexplaneteers.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 565 (2-22-21): Winter Birds of the Chesapeake Bay

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:14) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 22, 2021.  This episode is a revised version of an episode from February 2013. MUSIC – ~15 sec – instrumental That’s part of “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” composed for Virginia Water Radio by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at Lamont School of Music in Denver.  It sets the stage for a series of Bay-related mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds, and see if you can guess what kind of animals these six creatures are, and a seasonal thing they have in common.  And here’s a hint: if you think cold, you’re warm!SOUNDS - ~ 32 secIf you guessed all birds, you’re right!  The sounds, in order, were the Horned Grebe, Dunlin, American Coot, Hooded Merganser, Tundra Swan, and Snow Goose.  The seasonal thing they share is that they are winterresidents around Chesapeake Bay area waters.  According to Life in the Chesapeake Bay, by Alice and Robert Lippson, some 22 bird species are commonly found in winter around the Bay but are uncommon or not present at all during summer.  And a similar number of Bay-area bird species are just the opposite—rare in winter but common in warmer months.  So as spring arrives, the first of two yearly feathered comings-and-goings will start to fill the skies over Virginia’s coastal waters. Thanks to the Lang Elliott and NatureSound Studio for permission to use the grebe, dunlin, coot, and merganser sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Birds Songs; and thanks to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the Tundra Swan and Snow Goose sounds.  Thanks also to Torrin Hallett for this week’s music, and we close the final 35 seconds of “Chesapeake Bay Ballad.” MUSIC – ~34 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds of Horned Grebe, Dunlin, American Coot, and Hooded Merganser were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The sounds of Tundra Swan and Snow Goose were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife (FWS) “Sounds Clips” Web page, online at Sound Clips” Web site at http://www.fws.gov/video/sound.htm.  For more FWS audio and video recordings, see the National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  This music was used previous by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio, and a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York.  As of 2020-21, he is a performance certificate candidate at the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previous by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year’s Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 489, 9-9-19, on storm surge and Hurricane Dorian. “Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Horned Grebe with young at Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska.  Photo by Donna Dewhurst, made available in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/.  Specific URL for the photo is https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/478/rec/3, as of 2/23/21.  Drawing of a Dunlin.  Drawing by Tom Kelley, made available in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/.  Specific URL for the image is https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/5023/rec/1, as of 2/23/21.American Coot.  Photo from the Chesapeake Bay Program’s “Birds” Web site, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all, accessed 2/23/21.Hooded Merganser.  Photo from the Chesapeake Bay Program’s “Birds” Web site, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all, accessed 2/23/21.Tundra Swan.  Photo by Donna Dewhurst, made available in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/.  Specific URL for the photo is https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/3403/rec/5, as of 2/23/21.Snow Goose over Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.  Photo by Steve Hillebrand, made available in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/.  Specific URL for the photo is https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/15275/rec/5, as of 2/23/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, 3rd Edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006.  See pages 307-308 for the seasonal occurrence of bird species around the Bay. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (DWR; formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Native and Naturalized Fauna of Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/.Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor.  Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna of Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.   RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on some of the birds mentioned in this week’s episode. American Coot – Episode 391, 10-23-17.Grebes – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Sandpipers (Dunlins are a type of sandpiper) – Episode 315, 5-9-16.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1-13-20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20 . FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and ProcessesK.7 – Plants and animals have basic needs and life processes.1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly

new york society bay university agency music photo natural halloween earth state audio living game college world change drawing accent animals cd dark tech water xeno web index land rain alaska pond research ocean weather government education birds plants chesapeake bay native baltimore ohio fish chesapeake snow environment organisms images oberlin college cambridge adaptations msonormal new year commonwealth stream normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology conservatory grade oberlin colorful md signature bio wild turkey manhattan school watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes zoology minn national audubon society cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds sections life sciences ben cosgrove tom kelley stormwater lang elliott policymakers msobodytext bmp acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols tmdl virginia society fws torrin inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes hurricane dorian
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 563 (2-8-21): Spring Beckons When Brimley's Chorus Frogs Start Calling

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2021


 Click to listen to episode (3:30)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImageExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-5-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 8, 2021. SOUNDS  - ~3 sec This week, we feature a late-winter or early-spring mystery sound heard in marshes, swamps, and woodlands of southeastern Virginia.  Have a listen for about 10 more seconds, and see if you can guess this amphibian advertising for a mate.  And here’s a hint: If you hop to it and get this right, your fans may be brimmingover with a chorus of cheers. SOUNDS  - ~8 sec If you guessed a frog, you’re right!  If you guessed a chorus frog, you’re a frog wizard.  And if you guessed Brimley’s Chorus Frog, you’re a Virginia chorus frog phenom!  You heard a Brimley’s Chorus Frog recording by Lang Elliott’s NatureSound Studio on the 2008 CD, “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads,” from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, which, in 2020, became the Department of Wildlife Resources.  Amphibians are an integral part of Virginia’s common wealth of wildlife, and Brimley’s Chorus Frogs give us one of the year’s first reminders of amphibians, as the males of that species may begin their breeding calls as early as February, depending on temperature.  Brimley’s is found in wetlands and in hardwood forests near rivers and streams in the Coastal Plain of Virginia and states farther south.  There, this one-to-one-and-a-quarter-inch-long frog feeds on small insects and in turn can be prey for some kinds of snakes and probably other animals, although not much information is available on its predators. Brimley’s is one of seven native chorus frog species in Virginia, all of which are in the scientific genus Pseudacris, derived from Greek words meaning “false locust,” presumably because their repetitive trilling recalls insect sounds.  The Brimley’s part of the name honors Clement Samuel Brimley, a native of England who became a highly regarded zoologist in North Carolina in the first half of the 20th Century. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for permission to use this week’s sounds, and we let Brimley’s Chorus Frog have the last call. SOUNDS  - ~4 sec SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Brimley’s Chorus Frog sounds were from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of February 5, 2021, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/. Lang Elliott’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Brimley’s Chorus Frog sound was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 464, 3-18-19, on chorus frogs generally. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE Brimley’s Chorus Frog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, February 28, 2019.  Photo by iNaturalist user jkleopfer, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20834796(as of 2-8-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT BRIMLEY’S CHORUS FROG The scientific name of Brimley’s Chorus Frog is Pseudacris brimleyi. The following information on Brimley’s Chorus Frog is taken from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor.  The Brimley’s Chorus Frog entry is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020003&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18663. Physical Description “This species ranges in length from 25 to 32 mm (1 to 1-1/4 inches).  The coloring is highly variable but typically this species is tan with 3 dorsal [back] brown stripes.  A dark brown or black stripe runs down each side from the nostril through the eye to the groin.  The ventrum [underside[ is typically yellow with brown spots on the chest.  The legs of this species are marked with dark longitudinal stripes.” Reproduction “This species breeds in winter and early spring (February to April) in marshes, shallow ponds, and ditches.  The males’ mating call is a short guttural or rasping trill.  The female deposits small loose clusters of eggs on stems or other objects in ditches or shallow ponds.  The tadpoles transform in 40-60 days.” Behavior, Habitat, and Distribution “Its primary prey items are small insects.  This species is primarily found in bottomland hardwood forests near rivers. …It has been suggested that this species requires low, riverine wetlands. …This species is found in lowland areas of open wet hardwood forests, marshes, swamps, ditches of the Coastal Plain.  Its distribution does not extend into northeastern Virginia.  It is mostly restricted to the Coastal Plain south of the Northern Neck, and it is the only chorus frog found in and east of the Dismal Swamp.” SOURCES Used for Audio AmphibiaWeb, online at https://amphibiaweb.org/index.html.  The Brimley’s Chorus Frog entry is online at https://amphibiaweb.org/cgi/amphib_query?where-genus=Pseudacris&where-species=brimleyi. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Richmond, 2011. Bernard S. Martof et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. State Library of North Carolina et al., “NCPedia/Brimley, Clement Samuel,” online at https://www.ncpedia.org/biography/brimley-clement-samuel.  (Based on an article in Dictionary of North Carolina Biography [Six Volumes], William S. Powell, ed., University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1979-1996.)Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now Department of Wildlife Resources), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor.  The Brimley’s Chorus Frog entry is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020003&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18663.  Entries for Virginia’s seven chorus frog species (in the genus Pseudacris) are at this link.  Entries for amphibians in Virginia are at this link.  Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Frog Friday/Brimley’s Chorus Frog,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/blog/frog-friday-brimleys-chorus-frog/. Virginia Herpetological Society (VHS), “Frogs and Toads of Virginia,” online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm.  The Brimley’s Chorus Frog entry is online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/brimleys-chorus-frog/brimleys_chorus_frog.php.  The VHS supports the scientific study of amphibians (frogs, toads, and salamanders) and reptiles (lizards, snakes, and turtles).Virginia Legislative Information System, “Virginia General Assembly 2020 Session/Senate Bill 616,” online at https://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?ses=201&typ=bil&val=sb616.  This is the bill that renamed the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries as the Department of Wildlife Resources. For More Information about Amphibians in Virginia and Elsewhere J.C. Mitchell and K.K. Reay, Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles in Virginia, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries/Richmond (1999); available online (as a PDF) at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/atlases/mitchell-atlas.pdf, courtesy of the Virginia Herpetological Society. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna of Virginia, as of April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “Wildlife Information,” online at https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). Following are links to some other episodes on chorus frogs. Episode 105, 4-2-12 – on Spring Peeper.Episode 206, 3-24-14 – medley of spring animal calls, including Spring Peeper.Episode 408, 2-19-18 – medleys of frog and toad calls, including Mountain Chorus Frog and Spring Peeper.Episode 464, 3-18-19 – on the chorus frogs group in Virginia (Brimley's Chorus Frog, Little Grass Frog, Mountain Chorus Frog, New Jersey Chorus Frog, Southern Chorus Frog, Spring Peeper, Upland Chorus Frog), with focus on a research study on Mountain Chorus Frog.Episode 509, 1-27-20 – on Little Grass Frog (along with Wood Frog).Episode 516, 3-16-20 – medley of spring animal calls, including Upland Chorus Frog.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth Resources4.8. – Virginia has important natural resources. Life ScienceLS.6     – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism’s survival in an ecosystem. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals,

dictionary bay university agency guide music photo natural state audio living game college vhs england accent animals greek cd dark tech water web index rain pond research ocean government education behavior plants north carolina native spring fish chesapeake snow habitat environment organisms richmond va adaptations msonormal stream menu normal worddocument zoom citizens reptiles environmental frogs dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology powell distribution chapel hill colorful chorus signature bio reproduction carolinas watershed toads transcript brimley virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources chriss northern neck grades k virginia general assembly populations name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries state library zoology amphibians taxonomy cosgrove wood frog msohyperlink north carolina press john d vml wildlife resources hobson sections attribution noncommercial life sciences ben cosgrove reay stormwater lang elliott policymakers bmp acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum cumberland gap inaturalist sols tmdl henrico inland fisheries living systems virginia standards water center audio notes dismal swamp
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 561 (1-25-21): The Northern Harrier's a Hawk on the Marsh

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:04)Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 1-22-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 25, 2021. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental That’s part of “Midwinter Etude,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va.  It opens an episode about a kind of hawk that’s commonly found around eastern Virginia marshlands in wintertime.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to the following mystery sound, and see if you know this bird of prey. [Clarification, not in audio: “raptor” is a more precise term for hawks and related birds than is “bird of prey.”]  And here’s a hint: what might you call a cross-country runner located far north of Virginia? SOUNDS  - ~11 sec If you guessed a Northern Harrier, you’re right!  Besides being a name for cross-country runners, harrier refers to a group of birds within the family that includes hawks, eagles, and kites.  The Northern Harrier is the only harrier species found in North America.  Occurring widely across the continent, this species sometimes is a summer breeder in southeastern coastal Virginia, but it’s more typically found in the Commonwealth during winter.It was formerly called the Marsh Hawk because it’s frequently found around marshes, as well as in meadows, grasslands, and other open, vegetated areas.  In these areas, it flies low over the ground in search of its usual prey of small mammals, other birds, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.  Northern Harriers are also capable of taking larger prey like rabbits and ducks, and    they’ve been reported to overcome some of these larger animals by drowning them.  The Northern Harrier’s face looks somewhat like that of an owl, and, according to the National Audubon Society, the bird also resembles owls in using sharp hearing to help locate its prey.  As Alice and Robert Lippson put it in their book, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, quote, “Northern Harriers have an owl-like facial disc that apparently concentrates the sound of its prey; couple this with its keen eyesight, and mice and voles are in constant jeopardy of becoming lunch.” Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Northern Harrier sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use part of “Midwinter Etude.”  We close with a little more music, in honor of all wild creatures, including harriers and other hawks.  Here’s about 10 seconds of “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va.  MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Midwinter Etude,” from the 1996 album “Incarnation,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  The Northern Harrier sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was previously used by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 524, 5-11-20. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Painting of Marsh Hawk (former common name for Northern Harrier), originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 356).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image was https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/marsh-hawk, as of 1-22-21.  Northern Harrier in flight at Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge in Massachusetts, July 2011.  Photo by Amanda Boyd, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/13235/rec/1, as of 1-22-21. Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 1-25-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE NORTHERN HARRIER The scientific name of the Northern Harrier is Circus hudsonius. The following information is excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Tundra Swan,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040094&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18649. Physical Description “Adult female [is] brown above and on tail bands; lighter brown below with heavy brown streaking.  [Adult] male [is] ashy gray above and on tail bands; white with cinnamon spots below; wing tips black.  [B]oth sexes have long banded tail with prominent white rump patch.  [F]lies a few feet above ground; tilting from side to side and holding its long narrow wings upwards at slight angle.” Reproduction and Behavior “[R]itualized courtship, calls, skydancing, performed by male to advertise territory; males arrive at breeding grounds ahead of females; male provides food during incubation and early nestling period by passing food items to female in flight; rarely visits nest himself….  [N]ests built on ground often in marshy areas and surrounded by low shrubs or tall grasses rather than open.  [N]est is small structure of reeds and sticks on dry ground….  Forage by slowly flying over marshes and fields, usually below 10 feet (3 meters); they generally take small mammals but also use birds, [reptiles and amphibians], and insects. Status of Population“Harriers occur in relatively low numbers as breeders in Virginia, where they may be found using both open marshes and open upland grassland habitat.  Their numbers swell during the winter with the influx of migrants, and it is this winter population that should be the focus of conservation efforts.  Like other grassland species, Harriers rely on relatively large tracts, such that preserving and restoring blocks of native grasslands is a high priority conservation action for this species.  Wintering harriers will likewise use emergent wetlands; identification, protection, and management (for example, Phragmites control) of suitable marshes will be necessary to ensure continued habitat availability for this species…” SOURCES Used for Audio Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Sounds Wild/Northern Harrier,” 1 min./31 sec. podcast, online at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=soundswild.episode&title=Northern%20Harrier. John James Audubon, Birds of America, online by The National Audubon Society at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america.  The entry for the Marsh Hawk (the former common name for the Northern Harrier) is online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/marsh-hawk. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide/Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Northern Harrier entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/northern_harrier; “Raptors” is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/raptors); and “Marshes and Wetlands” is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/marshes_wetlands/all/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Northern Harrier entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Harrier. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Bird of prey,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/bird-of-prey; and “Harrier,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/harrier-bird. Goddess of Never Broken blog site, “The Harrier Incident,” April 9, 2013, online at https://maibey.wordpress.com/tag/northern-harrier-drowning-prey/.  This blot post has a series of photos showing a Northern Harrier drowning an American Coot. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rd Edition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006, page 234. National Audubon Society, “Guide to North American Birds/Northern Harrier,” online at https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/northern-harrier. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Missouri Raptor Rehabilitation Project, “Raptor Facts,” online at http://raptorrehab.cvm.missouri.edu/raptor-facts/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Northern Harrier,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040094&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18649. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna of Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. The Northern Harrier was one of the birds included in Episode 430, 7-23-18, on birds associated with marshes.  (Other birds featured in that episode are the Great Blue Heron, Wood Duck, Least Bittern, Common Moorhen, and Marsh Wren). Following are links to other episodes on raptors (often also referred to as “birds of prey”). Bald Eagle – Episode 375, 7-3-17.Barred Owl – Episode 382 – 8-21-17.Eastern Screech-Owl – Episode 227, 8-18-14.Osprey – Episode 116, 6-25-12; Episode 175, 8-19-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining

new york society bay university agency america guide music photo natural state audio living game college north america circus world painting accent animals cd dark tech water xeno web status index rain pond press research ocean government education birds behavior plants massachusetts chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment adult organisms images harrier va cambridge adaptations northern msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom citizens hawk williamsburg arial environmental dynamic goddess times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading raptors marsh population shenandoah biology colorful md signature bio wetlands incarnation reproduction marshes watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources clarification wildlife service grades k populations forage name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes fredericksburg wintering seaman zoology minn national audubon society taxonomy cosgrove barred owl great blue heron msohyperlink wildlife resources lang elliot audubon society bald eagles all about birds osprey sections encyclopedia britannica attribution noncommercial life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater john james audubon lang elliott policymakers msobodytext never broken bmp be free acknowledgment virginia department alaska department michigan museum occurring robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap wood duck inaturalist sols harriers tmdl virginia society inland fisheries ebird biotic phragmites living systems virginia standards water center audio notes
Virginia Water Radio
Episode 558 (1-4-21): January 13 is Opening Day for the 2021 Virginia General Assembly

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:41) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-31-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 4, 2021. This week is our annual preview of the Virginia General Assembly, which convenes this year on January 13.  We start with some music and a short General Assembly quiz.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds to part of “The Lass of Gowrie,” a traditional tune from the British Isles, which might have entertained General Assembly members in centuries past; it’s performed here by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, Virginia.  While you listen, consider this question: what do the numbers 1619, 100, 40, 60, 30, and 46 have to do with the General Assembly? MUSIC – ~18 sec – instrumental. Here are the quiz answers: The first meeting of the Virginia legislature was held in Jamestown in 1619. The current General Assembly consists of 100 members of the House of Delegates and 40 members of the Senate. And the Assembly convenes for a scheduled 60-day “long session” in even-numbered years and a scheduled 30-day “short session” in odd-numbered years.  In practice, the 30-day sessions are usually expanded to 46 days. In each session, thousands of bills and resolutions are proposed.  Usually about 100 to 200 bills relate to water resources, either directly through impacts on aquatic life, water supply, or other water uses; or indirectly through land uses that affect water.  The state budget also affects water, particularly through funding of water-related departments, such as Conservation and Recreation, Environmental Quality, Game and Inland Fisheries, and the Marine Resources Commission.  A new biennial budget is proposed in each even-numbered year session for the upcoming two fiscal years, while amendments to the current budget may be considered every year.Action on measures in the General Assembly involves sub-committees, full committees, and floor debate.  Passed bills go to the governor for approval, veto, or proposed changes.  All along the way, citizens, interest groups, and other stakeholders vie to have a say through information and opinions.  You can join in by following the Assembly’s work and by communicating with your local delegate or senator about issues of concern.  Tools to help you do so are available online at virginiageneralassembly.gov. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use part of “The Lass of Gowrie.”  We close with some more music, this time by the Harrisonburg- and Rockingham County, Virginia-based band, “The Steel Wheels,” with a song whose title reminds us of what the 140 General Assembly members are called to do every January.  Here’s about 25 seconds of “Get to Work.” MUSIC – ~27 sec – Lyrics: “Wake up in the morning and get work; wake up in the morning and get to work.  Got a lot of work to do; gonna go do it; gotta get to it.” SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The version of “The Lass of Gowrie” heard in this episode, from the 1998 album “Celebration of Centuries: Acoustic Instrumental Music for Williamsburg, Jamestown, & Yorktown, Virginia,” is copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 402, 1-8-18 (General Assembly preview episode for 2018). “Get to Work,” from the 2019 album “Over the Trees,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/home; at https://www.facebook.com/thesteelwheels/; and in a July 2015 interview with Cory Kuklick for the WHURK Newsletter, online at http://whurk.org/29/the-steel-wheels.  Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at https://www.newstandardbluegrass.com/. IMAGES Painting of the first meeting of the Virginia House of Burgesses in Jamestown in 1619.  Image from the Virginia General Assembly, “About the General Assembly,” online at this link.Old Virginia House of Delegates chamber in the State Capitol in Richmond, January 31, 2018.Virginia House of Delegates floor session at the State Capitol in Richmond, January 31, 2018.Virginia Senate floor session at the State Capitol in Richmond, January 31, 2018.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA GENERAL ASSEMBLYThe General Assembly’s main Web page, http://virginiageneralassembly.gov/index.php, offers several useful features, including member lists, session calendars, live video of floor sessions, and information on legislative processes.  The Legislative Information System (LIS) Web site, http://lis.virginia.gov/lis.htm, provides lists and summaries of all bills, searchable by topic, member, committee, etc.  Streaming of floor sessions is available at https://virginiageneralassembly.gov/house/chamber/chamberstream.phpfor the House and http://virginia-senate.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3for the Senate. Committees are key parts of the General Assembly process.  Legislation about water or about activities that can affect water may be assigned to any of several standing committees, most of which meet weekly during the General Assembly session.  Streaming of House committee meetings is available online at https://virginiageneralassembly.gov/house/committees/commstream.html; streaming of Senate committee meetings is available online at http://virginia-senate.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=3.  Two committees that receive many (but not all) of the water-related bills are the House Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources Committee and the Senate Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources Committee.  Information about all standing committees as of the 2021 session—including membership, meeting times, and legislation being considered—is available online at https://lis.virginia.gov/211/com/COM.HTM. To express an opinion on legislation, citizens are requested to contact their respective delegate of senator.  If you do not know your representatives or their contact information, you can use the online “Who’s My Legislator” service, available at http://whosmy.virginiageneralassembly.gov/. You can find members’ contact information at these links:House of Delegates, at http://virginiageneralassembly.gov/house/members/members.php;State Senate, at https://apps.senate.virginia.gov/Senator/. The Lobbyist-In-A-Box subscriber service also offers free tracking for up to five bills, and it offers tracking of more than five bills for a fee; visit http://lis.virginia.gov/h015.htm.  For assistance, phone Legislative Automated Systems at (804) 786-9631. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION Andrew Kuntz and Valerio Pelliccioni, “The Traditional Tune Archive,” online at https://tunearch.org/wiki/TTA.  “The Lass of Gowrie” entry is online at https://tunearch.org/wiki/Lass_o%27_Gowrie_(1). Virginia Division of Legislative Services, “Commissions, Committees, and Councils,” online at http://dls.virginia.gov/commissions.html. Virginia House of Delegates Appropriations Committee, “Legislative Budget Process,” online at http://hac.virginia.gov/legislative.htm. Virginia General Assembly main Web site, online at https://virginiageneralassembly.gov/index.php.  See particularly the following specific pages (all hyperlinked): About the General Assembly;Citizen Involvement;Legislative Terms. Virginia Legislative Information System, online at https://lis.virginia.gov/.  For committee information, see https://lis.virginia.gov/211/com/COM.HTM. Virginia Water Resources Research Center, “Virginia Water Legislation,” online at https://www.vwrrc.vt.edu/virginia-water-legislation/.  This site provides access to inventories of water-related bills in the Virginia General Assembly from 1998 through 2019. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Community/Organizations” subject category. Following are links to previous episodes on the Virginia General Assembly. Episode 143, 1-7-13 – annual General Assembly preview. Episode 147, 2-4-13 – on General Assembly committees. Episode 196, 1-13-14 – annual General Assembly preview. Episode 247, 1-5-15 – annual General Assembly preview, with special focus on the state budget. Episode 252, 2-9-15 – annual “voting on water” episode. Episode 297, 1-4-16 – annual General Assembly preview. Episode 302, 2-8-16 – annual “voting on water” episode. Episode 350, 1-9-17 – annual General Assembly preview. Episode 353, 1-30-17 – annual “voting on water” episode. Episode 359, 3-13-17 – on General Assembly subcommittees. Episode 402, 1-8-18 – annual General Assembly preview. Episode 405, 1-29-18 – annual “voting on water” episode. Episode 410, 3-5-18 – on 2018 session legislation on electricity regulation. Episode 454, 1-7-19 – annual General Assembly preview. Episode 460, 2-18-19 – annual “voting on water” episode.Episode 506, 1-6-20 – annual General Assembly preview.Episode 510, 2-3-20 – annual “voting on water” episode.Episode 522, 4-2-/20 – on 2020 session legislation on electricity generation, carbon emissions, and recurrent flooding. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-5 – Earth Resources3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8. – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment.Life Science Course LS.9     – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity.Earth Science Course ES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations, including effects of human actions.ES.11 – The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic system subject to long-and short-term variations, including effects of human actions. Biology CourseBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, and  natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Virginia Studies Course VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. Civics and Economics Course CE.1 – Social studies skills that responsible citizenship requires. CE.7 – Government at the state level. CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography Course WG.18 - Cooperation among political jurisdictions to solve problems and settle disputes. Government Course GOVT.1 – Social studies skills that responsible citizenship requires. GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers. GOVT.9 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights.Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12thgrade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8thgrade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rdand 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia’s water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food
A Remedy for Everything: Getting People Outside with Judy Camuso — WildFed Podcast #057

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2020 95:08


Judy Camuso is Commissioner of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife and is the first woman ever to lead MDIFW. A wildlife biologist, avid birder, hunter and outdoor enthusiast, Judy's world is rooted in the outdoors, and she's ardent about preserving access to hunting and fishing for all. It was great fun getting to ask Judy some of our most pressing questions regarding state management of wildlife and wild places. We also chat about getting women involved in hunting, Maine's unique access laws, and so much more! View full show notes, including links to resources from this episode here: https://www.wild-fed.com/podcast/057

Guides Gone Wild
Protect What You Love: Judy Camuso (GGW020)

Guides Gone Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 49:13


I am going straight to the top!My guest today is none other than Judy Camuso, the Commissioner of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. If you’re a guide, hiker, bird watcher, kayaker, hunter, game warden, fisherperson, whatever else in Maine, Judy has an impact on your experience in the outdoors.Wildlife-related recreation brings more money into Maine's economy than downhill skiing and snowmobiling combined…. to the tune of $1.4 billion. That’s Billion, with a B.Judy manages a division with a $32 million budget and over 300 staff. She’s the first female Commissioner of IFW, appointed by Maine’s first female governor, Janet Mills. And yet, about 5 minutes into my conversation with her, I got over being intimidated and was wishing I lived closer to Augusta, so we could get together for a socially distanced beer at some backyard campfire to extend the conversation.Judy and I talk about owl banding, conservation, and the crazy balancing act that’s often required to stay atop the tippy, three-legged stool that is wildlife management decision-making (bonus points if you listen to the whole episode and figure out where I got that whole metaphor thing from!)I hope you’ll all check out Judy’s Instagram, and also the array of offerings from Maine Inland Fisheries & Wildlife - you can find them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and You Tube. Finally, if trying new things outdoors in a safe, supportive environment is your jam, I personally recommend you look into the Becoming an Outdoors Woman programs in Maine or your home state - the one-day program I took my mom to on a Mother’s Day whim several years ago was what re-ignited the little spark inside of me that eventually became this podcast. (And yes, my mom is THAT cool - she shot skeet and had a blast, pun intended!)More useful links:Maine Inland Fisheries & Wildlife - keep checking the website for “Next Steps” and other new programs Judy and the IFW team will be adding in the coming months!Maine AudubonBOW - Becoming an Outdoors Woman in New HampshireFish + Game Changers PodcastMaine Fishing Laws Online Angling ToolMaine Hunter Safety online courseInstitute for Bird Populations - course on bird bandingManomet Center for Conservation SciencesLooking for 'that thing' I talked about in a previous show? Make sure to visit the Guides Gone Wild website for more goodness from every episode!

Tasmania Talks with Brian Carlton
Chris Wisniewski, Inland Fisheries Section Manager

Tasmania Talks with Brian Carlton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2020 6:11


Aaron Stevens speaks with Chris Wisniewski, Inland Fisheries Section Manager.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 540 (8-31-20): A Water-related Mammals Quiz

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2020


Click to listen to episode (4:18) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImages SourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-28-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 31, 2020. SOUND – ~5 sec This week, that sound of a Humpback Whale’s song opens an episode about water-related mammals. In scientific classification, or taxonomy, mammals are one class of vertebrates, that is, the animals with internal backbones. Other vertebrate classes are fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds.  While many mammals—including humans—live primarily on land, some other species are aquatic, meaning they actually live in water, while others are semi-aquatic, meaning they spend time both in water and on land.  As of August 2020, the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources’ Fish and Wildlife Information Service listed 149 mammal species and subspecies known to occur in the Commonwealth, including 30 marine mammal species. To give you a chance to see what you know about various aquatic or semi-aquatic mammals that are found in Virginia or in ocean water off Virginia’s coast, here's a short quiz of five questions.  After each question, I’ll play a ticking timer for about three seconds to give you time to think before I give the answer. 1. What semi-aquatic mammal with a long tail like a rudder can remain submerged for as long as 15 minutes?  TIMER SOUND - ~3 seconds  - That’s the muskrat. 2. What weasel-like, semi-aquatic mammal makes distinctive slides through mud or snow?  TIMER SOUND - ~3 seconds - That’s the river otter. 3. What small semi-aquatic mammal, whose name rhymes with shoe, is found near fast-flowing rocky streams, feeds on aquatic insects and small fish, and is in turn eaten by larger fish such as trout and bass?  TIMER SOUND - ~3 seconds – That’s the water shrew. 4. What long-eared semi-aquatic mammal swims well and is found only in marshes and swamps?  TIMER SOUND - 3 seconds - That’s the marsh rabbit. 5. What aquatic mammal, listed on the federal endangered species list, is the largest living species of mammal?  TIMER SOUND - 3 seconds – That’s the Blue Whale. From gigantic whales to small shrews, aquatic and semi-aquatic mammals exhibit a wide range of sizes, shapes, adaptations to water, behaviors, and ecological functions. Thanks to the National Park Service for the Humpback Whale sound.  We close by letting three water-related mammals have the last calls.  Here are about 15 seconds of sounds of a beaver tail splat, an otter at a wildlife center, and an underwater recording of Atlantic Spotted Dolphins. Thanks to Freesound.org contributors for the otter and dolphin sounds. SOUNDS - 15 sec SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Humpback Whale sounds were taken from a National Park Service recording (“Humpback Whales Song 2”) made available for public use on the “Community Audio” page of the Internet Archive Web site, at http://www.archive.org/details/HumpbackWhalesSongsSoundsVocalizations. The otter sounds were recorded by user Motion_S (dated March 5, 2014) and made available for public use by Freesound.org, at online at https://freesound.org/people/Motion_S/sounds/221761/, under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.  For more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Attribution License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. The Atlantic Spotted Dolphin sounds were recorded by user geraldfiebig (dated March 25, 2017) and made available for public use by Freesound.org, at online at https://freesound.org/people/geraldfiebig/sounds/385796/, under the Creative Commons Universal/Public Domain 1.0 License.  For more information on Creative Commons licenses, please see https://creativecommons.org/licenses/; information on the Public Domain License specifically is online at https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Humpback Whale at Moss Landing in California; date not identified. Photo by Wade Tregaskis, made available for use under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 License (information about this Creative Commons License is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/).  Image accessed from the Chesapeake Bay Program, “Discover the Chesapeake/Humpback Whale,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/humpback_whale, 8-31-20.Marsh Rabbit, location and date not identified. Photo by Perry Everett/iNaturalist, made available for use under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (information about this Creative Commons License is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.  Image accessed from the Chesapeake Bay Program, “Discover the Chesapeake/Marsh Rabbit,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/marsh_rabbit, 8-31-20.River Otter, location and date not identified. Photo by Tom Koerner/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, made available for use under Creative Commons Attibution 2.0 Generic License (CC BY 2.0; information about this Creative Commons License is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en_GB).  Image accessed from the Chesapeake Bay Program, “Discover the Chesapeake/River Otter,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/river_otter, 8-31-20. SOURCES Used for Audio Biology Online, “Aquatic,” online at https://www.biologyonline.com/dictionary/aquatic. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Mammals,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/mammals/all.Aquatic mammals specifically are online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/mammals/aquatic.Semi-aquatic mammals specifically are online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/mammals/semi-aquatic. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Mammal,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/mammal/Classification; and “Vertebrate,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/vertebrate. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web/Vertebrates,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Vertebrata/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized fauna of Virginia,” as of April 2018, online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/. Mammals are online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Report+BOVA&lastMenu=Home.Species+Information&tn=.1&geoArea=&sppName=&geoType=None&geoVal=no+selection&sppTax=05&status. Marine mammals are online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Report+BOVA&lastMenu=Home.Species+Information&tn=.1&geoArea=&sppName=&geoType=None&geoVal=no+selection&sppTax=12&status. WorldAtlas, “Examples of Semi-aquatic Animals,” online at https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/examples-of-semiaquatic-animals.html. For More Information about Mammals in Virginia and Elsewhere Richard A. Blaylock, The Marine Mammals of Virginia, Virginia Sea Grant Publication VSG-85-05, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, 1985, online (as a PDF) at https://www.vims.edu/GreyLit/VIMS/EdSeries35.pdf. iNaturalist, “Mammals of Virginia, Maryland, and the Carolinas,” online at https://www.inaturalist.org/guides/8061. D.W. Linzey, The Mammals of Virginia, McDonald and Woodward Publishing Company, Blacksburg, Va., 1998. National Park Service, “Shenandoah National Park/Mammals,” online at https://www.nps.gov/shen/learn/nature/mammals.htm. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS), “Chesapeake Bay Mammals,” online at https://www.vims.edu/test/dlm/critters/mammals/index.php. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the Mammals subject category. For episodes on other animals, see the following subject categories: Amphibians; Birds; Fish; Insects; Invertebrates Other Than Insects; and Reptiles. Following are links to some other episodes on animals’ behavioral and physiological adaptations. Animals’ ways of getting water – Episode 531, 6-29-20. Sounds of animals – Episode 524, 5-11-20. Temperature in animals – Episode 309, 3-28-16. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. 6.9 – public policy decisions related to the environment. Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme K.7 – basic needs and processes of plants and animals. 1.5 – animals’ basic needs and distinguishing characteristics. 3.4 – behavioral and physiological adaptations. Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 2.5 – living things as part of a system, including habitats. 3.5 – food webs. 3.6 – ecosystems, communities, populations, shared resources. 4.5 – ecosystem interactions and human influences on ecosystems. 6.7 – natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Virginia watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; health and safety issues; and water monitoring. Life Science Course LS.4 – organisms’ classification based on features. LS.8 – community and population interactions, including food webs, niches, symbiotic relationships. LS.9 – adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments. LS.11 – relationships between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Biology Course BIO.8 – dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia’s water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

Our Numinous Nature
LIONS & SKUNKS & WEASELS, OH MY! | Furbearer Biologist | Michael Fies

Our Numinous Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2020 113:27


Michael Fies is a wildlife biologist & the furbearer project leader at Virginia's Department of Wildlife Resources [formerly known as Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries]. Furbearers are defined as animals with commercial fur value ranging from the tiny least weasel, the mighty beaver, and mischievous raccoon, to the elusive bobcat and trickster coyote. Mike shares how his grandfather's love of the outdoors & their rabbit beagle led to his 37-year career in wildlife. This is an educational episode where we discuss a wide range of topics: the little known squirrel-sized spotted skunk; fox-sized weasels [fishers] making their way from West Virginia; restoring river otter populations; scat IDing; skunk essence; a gruesome tree full of coyote corpses; and even eastern mountain lions. Mike clears up misconceptions about trapping; how it is not only humane when following Best Management Practices, but can be beneficial to wildlife management, followed by his thoughts on how Native Americans may have used naturally made traps. Mike tells two fun stories from his career: one about a backyard skunk and the other about dealing with a mountain lion call. And before this educational interview, we read a potent and timely Cherokee legend about the ghostly flower [Indian pipe] that grows where friends and family quarrel. Check out Mike's work on the spotted skunk and the department's nature-loving Instagram. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com

Simon Barnett & Phil Gifford Afternoons
Chipmunks are driving people nuts in New England

Simon Barnett & Phil Gifford Afternoons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2020 1:28


There were plenty of acorns this spring, and now the chipmunks are driving people nuts.Their frenetic activities can be entertaining. But this summer in New England the varmints are making a nuisance of themselves, darting to and fro, digging holes in gardens, and tunneling under lawns.Plentiful acorns last fall meant there was still plenty of food on the ground when the chipmunks emerged from winter and got busy breeding this spring, said Shevenell Webb, a small mammal biologist with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.The result is a bumper crop of the critters."They're cute. They're fun to watch in the forest as they duck in and out of the holes and play peekaboo," Webb said. When their cheeks aren't bulging with nuts, chipmunks make a distinctive "chip" sound, she said.But they're also destructive. They can destroy lawns and gardens with their burrowing, and can even get into homes, Webb said."We can't grow a tulip without them digging it up," Steven Parren, wildlife program diversity manager for the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife, said of the chipmunks in his yard. "They don't even pause."There were so many acorns in one of the areas that he monitors that the rodents that rely on them couldn't stash them all away for the winter. Plenty remained on the ground this spring. In addition to chipmunks, he said, he's seeing more squirrels, rabbits and a variety of different kinds of mice.People needn't get too alarmed over an overpopulation. Small mammal populations tend to explode, then crash and burn.Such is life near the bottom of the food chain, where food supply ebbs and flows and chipmunks are easy prey for owls, hawks, snakes, foxes and raccoons. Even if their lives aren't cut short, individual chipmunks tend to live only for three years, Webb said.Many New Englanders recall a similar spike in squirrel populations in 2018 in New England. The boom-and-bust cycle was punctuated by a memorable number of road kills."We've never seen anything like that. That was a once in a lifetime event," Webb said.

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food
The Black Ghost, 37 Years With Black Bears with Randy Cross — WildFed Podcast #038

WildFed Podcast — Hunt Fish Forage Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2020 119:58


We had the serendipitous opportunity to sit down with local Maine legend and State Bear Biologist Randy Cross just as he was ending an illustrious 37-year career leading the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife black bear management and monitoring program. A guide and mentor at heart, Randy shares his profound wisdom and insights into black bear history, behavior, ecology, and his forecast for bear-human coexistence into the future. A must-listen for anyone interested in bear ecology and the conservation of all wild species, especially this incredible omnivore. View full show notes, including links to resources from this episode here: https://www.wild-fed.com/podcast/038

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 531 (6-29-20): Animal Ways of Getting Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2020


Click to listen to episode (4:31) Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-26-20. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 29, 2020.  This episode’s information is intended especially for Virginia elementary students learning about how where water is and how it's used. MUSIC – ~ 5 sec – Instrumental That excerpt of “Driving Rain,” by the Nelson County, Va., band Chamomile and Whiskey, opens an episode about something rain affects: that is, animals getting water.  Many animals, of course, get water simply by drinking from rivers, lakes, puddles, and other water sources.  But animals have several other ways to get water.  In this episode, I’ll play five kinds of animal mystery sounds, each for a few seconds.  After each sound, I’ll identify the animals and tell you something about how they get water. SOUND - ~ 6 sec - Whale That was the sound of a whale spouting water as it surfaced.  Whales and other sea mammals get most of their water from their food, including the water produced when food is digested, which is known as metabolic water.  All animals get some of their water through that process. SOUND - ~ 5 sec – Rattlesnake That was a rattlesnake rattle.  Snakes drink water, including water that collects on their skin, and rattlesnakes in desert areas have special skin structures that allow them to capture rainwater. SOUND - ~ 7 sec – Gray Catbird That was a [Gray] Catbird with a series of calls mimicking other birds.  Birds get water from food, including metabolic water, and from drinking in various ways, including pelicans opening their beaks to capture rainwater and small birds drinking from dew drops.  Some birds are able to use salt water as a water source. SOUND - ~ 6 sec – Frogs and toad (Spring Peeper, American Toad, Gray Tree Frog) Those were the calls of three kinds of frog or toad.  Frogs, toads, and other amphibians can absorb water through their skin. SOUND - ~ 7 sec –Crickets and katydids Those were the evening sounds of two kinds of insects, crickets and katydids.  Like many insects, these two kinds get water from plants they eat.  Insects can also get water by drinking from various sources, from bodily fluids of prey, and, for some insects, by taking water from the air. Other animals, especially animals that live in dry environments, have other fascinating adaptations for getting and conserving water.  Getting water is one example of how the natural world offers plenty of surprises for inquiring explorers. Thanks to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the whale and rattlesnake sounds.  Thanks also to Chamomile and Whiskey for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Driving Rain.” MUSIC - ~ 20 sec – Instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The whale and rattlesnake sounds were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific URL for the whale sound was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/7/rec/1, and for the rattlesnake sound was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/61/rec/6, as of 6/29/20. The Gray Catbird was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on June 26, 2020. The Spring Peeper, Gray Tree Frog, and American Toad sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on April 29, 2012. The crickets and katydids were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on July 25, 2017, about 9:30 p.m. “Driving Rain,” from the 2012 album “The Barn Sessions,” is copyright by Chamomile and Whiskey and by County Wide Records, used with permission.  More information about Chamomile and Whiskey is available online at http://www.chamomileandwhiskey.com/, and information about Charlottesville-based County Wide records is available online at http://countywidemusic.worldsecuresystems.com/.  This music was most recently used by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 500, 11-25-19. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Tail of a Humpback Whale, April 2017, location not identified.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/25236/rec/3, as of 6/29/20. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, April 2008, location not identified.  Photo by Gary Stolz, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/2496/rec/3, as of 6/29/20.Gray Catbird, photographed in Virginia Beach, Va., June 14, 2016.  Photo by Robert Suppa, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/31149441, as of 6/29/20, for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. Seasonal pond habitat used by Spring Peepers and other amphibians, Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., May 28, 2020. SOURCES Used for Audio Animalfoodplant, “What Do Crickets Eat?” online at https://www.animalfoodplanet.com/what-do-crickets-eat/. Joe Ballenger, “How much water can ants drink?” Ask an Entomologist Web site, 9/29/16, online at https://askentomologists.com/2016/09/29/how-much-water-can-ants-drink/. Biology Online, “Metabolic Water,” online at https://www.biologyonline.com/dictionary/metabolic-water. CBC Radio, Rattlesnakes have skin that's sticky for raindrops so they can sip from their scales, 1/20/20. Don Glass, “How Insects Drink,” Indiana Public Media “Moment of Science” Web site, 3/16/04, online at https://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/how-insects-drink.php. Richard W. Hill, Comparative Physiology of Animals: An Environmental Approach, Harper & Row Publishers, New York, 1976; see particularly pages 122 and 145-154. Robert Kenney [University of Rhode Island marine biologist], “How can sea mammals drink saltwater?” Scientific American, 4/30/01, online at https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-can-sea-mammals-drink/. Liz Langley, Meet the Beetles that Harvest Fog in the Desert, National Geographic, 4/7/18.  This article has information on how several kinds of animals get water. Mara Katharine Lawniczak, “Eastern Grey Squirrel,” University of Michigan “Biokids” Web site, online at http://www.biokids.umich.edu/critters/Sciurus_carolinensis/. J. Machin, “Water Vapor Absorption in Insects,” American Journal of Physiology, Vol 244, No. 2, February 1983, accessed online at https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6824103/. Catherine Myers, “How Desert Rattlesnakes Harvest Rainwater,” Inside Science (American Institute of Physics), 1/13/20, online at https://www.insidescience.org/news/how-desert-rattlesnakes-harvest-rainwater. St. Louis Zoo, “Amphibians,” undated, online at https://www.stlzoo.org/animals/abouttheanimals/amphibians. University of Michigan “Biokids” Web site, “Katydids/Tettigoniidae,” undated, online at http://www.biokids.umich.edu/critters/Tettigoniidae/. University of Washington/Burke Museum, “Facts About Frogs,” undated, online at https://www.burkemuseum.org/collections-and-research/biology/herpetology/all-about-amphibians/all-about-frogs. Sonia Villabon, “Do Whales Drink Salt Water?” Whales Online, 9/19/17, online at https://baleinesendirect.org/en/do-whales-drink-salt-water/. Joel C. Welty, The Life of Birds, 2nd Edition, W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1975; see particularly pages 98-100. For More Information about Animals’ Biology and Habitats Audubon Guide to North American Birds, online at https://www.audubon.org/bird-guide. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor. Virginia Herpetological Society, online at https://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/.  Herpetology is the study amphibians and reptiles. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at https://www.virginiabirds.org/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the subject categories for different animal groups (Birds, Fish, Insects, Reptiles, and Mammals), the “Overall Importance of Water” subject category, and the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes exploring water sources for animals. Episode 313, 4-25-16, on honeybees. Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey and other birds. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION This episode was intended to support primarily the following two Virginia Science Standards of Learning (SOLs): 3.9 – Water cycle, including sources of water, energy driving water cycle, water essential for living things, and water limitations and conservation; and 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. Following are some other SOLs that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript or by other information included in this post. 2013 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme K.7 – basic needs and processes of plants and animals. 1.5 – animals’ basic needs and distinguishing characteristics. 3.4 – behavioral and physiological adaptations. Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 2.5 – living things as part of a system, including habitats. 6.7 – natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Virginia watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; health and safety issues; and water monitoring. Grades K-6 Matter Theme 6.5 – properties and characteristics of water and its roles in the human and natural environment. Life Science Course LS.6 – ecosystem interactions, including the water cycle, other cycles, and energy flow. LS.9 – adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments. Biology Course BIO.4 – life functions (including metabolism and homeostasis) in different organism groups, including human health, anatomy, and body systems. BIO.8 – dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to other Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 530 (6-22-20): Virginia Rails in Sound and Music

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2020


Click to listen to episode (4:16) Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-19-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 22, 2020. This is a revised version of an episode from June 2013. MUSIC – ~7 sec – instrumental This week, that music opens an episode about wetland-inhabiting birds known for thinness, secrecy, and silent running among marshy vegetation.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to this week’s mystery sounds, and see if you know this kind of bird.  And here’s a hint: this creature shares its name with a type of fence and with the track of an iron horse.  After the sounds, you’ll hear about 25 seconds more of the music, done by a Virginia composer in honor of the sound-maker. SOUNDS AND MUSIC - ~36 sec - ~10 sec sound, then ~26 sec music (instrumental) If you guessed rails, you’re right!  You heard a Virginia Rail, in a recording by Lang Elliott from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and the music was “Virginia Rail Reel,” by Timothy Seaman of Williamsburg, on the 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.”  The Virginia Rail is one of nine species in Virginia in the bird family of rails, gallinules, and coots.  From the Clapper Rail to the Purple Gallinule to the Common Moorhen, rails have descriptive names, distinctive calls, and adaptations well-suited to marshy habitats.  It’s questionable whether the expression “thin as a rail” refers to this family of birds, rather than to pieces of a fence.  But there’s no question that rails’ thin bodies allow them to run, swim, feed, and nest within the dense grasses and other plants of saltwater and freshwater marshes. Of the Virginia Rail, here’s some of what 19th-Century naturalist John James Audubon wrote: quote, “Excepting our Little Partridge, I know no small bird so swift of foot as the Virginian Rail. …[A]among the thick herbage to which they usually resort, …they run to a short distance, then tack about, and again scud away in a lateral direction, so as to elude the best dog, or if likely to be overtaken, rise on wing, fly with dangling legs eight or ten yards, drop among the weeds, and run off as swiftly as before.” Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Virginia Rail sounds.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with a few more seconds of “Virginia Rail Reel.” MUSIC - ~11 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 165, 6-10-13. The Virginia Rail sounds were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Virginia Rail Reel” (part of the medley “Virginia Rail Reel/Ducks on the Pond/Old Blue”), from the 2004 CD “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  Mr. Seaman’s Web site is http://www.timothyseaman.com/.  The “Virginia Wildlife” CD was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Virginia Rail in 2010, location not identified. Photo by Dave Menke, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12858/rec/1, as of 6-22-20. Virginian Rail (now Virginia Rail) painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate CCV [205]), as reprinted in 1985 by Abbeville Press, New York.  Image made available for public use by the Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/virginia-rail, as of 6-19-20. Map of the occurrence in Virginia of the Virginia Rail. Map accessed at the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Occurrence&bova=040107&version=18432. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE VIRGINIA RAIL The Virginia Rail’s scientific name is Rallus limicola. The following information on the Virginia Rail is from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040107&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18432. Physical Description“[S]mall; 9-11 inches…; long, reddish bill, rusty underparts, gray cheeks.” Reproduction and Nesting“[B]reeding season in VA [is] May to June; incubation period unknown, but not less than 15 days; eggs 5-12…; breeding behavior secretive and highly territorial, solitary nesters… Nesting is solitary, nests almost always in freshwater marsh or near fresh water though also known to nest in brackish marshes. Nesting materials: coarse grass and cattails; shallow saucer woven into surrounding marsh vegetation….” Behavior“Territoriality and home range very strong. Territoriality peaks in May and decreases to eventual winter core areas…. Forages by probing mud and extracting worms and insects. Feeds on a range of prey items including small fish, worms, larval insects, snails, slugs, caterpillars, beetles, and occasionally seeds of grasses, etc.; plant material is infrequently used; they forage in shallow water or mud by gleaning or probing. Probable predators include gulls, raccoons, fish crows, snakes, owls, and hawks.” Aquatic/Terrestial Associations[F]reshwater and brackish marshes in winter, may visit salt marshes; prefers dense habitats; commonly found in cattails.” SOURCES Used for Audio John James Audubon, “Virginia Rail,” in Birds of America, Plate 207, accessed from the Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/virginia-rail. The quote in the audio was taken from this source. . Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Virginia_Rail/.  Information on the family of rails, gallinules, and coots (scientific name Rallidae), is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/browse/taxonomy/Rallidae. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006; see particularly pages 232-233. Patricia T. O’Conner and Stewart Kellerman, “Rail Birds,” published on Grammarphobia, 9/30/07, online at https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2007/09/rail-birds.html. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2001. Bryan Stevens, ‘Thin as a rail’ applies to elusive marsh bird, even if the origins of phrase remain obscure, Bristol Herald-Courier, 9/9/19. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ “Fish and Wildlife Information Service” Web page at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor.  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040107&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18432.  Information on all five species in Virginia called “rail” (Clapper Rail, Eastern Black Rail, King Rail, Virginia Rail, and Yellow Rail) is online at this link; information on the Sora, also considered a rail, is online at this link. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/virginia_rail. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists’ Union, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).  The Virginia Rail entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/virrai/cur/introduction. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following is the link to an episode on the American Coot, another bird in the family that includes rails. Episode 391, 10-23-17. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript or by other information included in this post. 2013 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme K.7 – basic needs and processes of plants and animals. 1.5 – animals’ basic needs and distinguishing characteristics. 3.4 – behavioral and physiological adaptations. Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 2.5 – living things as part of a system, including habitats. 3.5 – food webs. 3.6 – ecosystems, communities, populations, shared resources. 5.5 – cell structures and functions, organism classification, and organism traits. 6.7 – natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Virginia watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; health and safety issues; and water monitoring. Life Science Course LS.4 – organisms’ classification based on features. LS.8 – community and population interactions, including food webs, niches, symbiotic relationships. LS.9 – adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments. Biology Course BIO.8 – dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 528 (6-8-20): The Distinction of Gray Treefrogs, Plus a Cicada Closing

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020


Click to listen to episode (3:58)Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.)Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 6-5-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 8, 2020. SOUND – ~5 sec – Gray Treefrog This week, we have a trilling episode.  That is, we feature the different trilling calls of two frog species that are indistinguishable to the naked eye.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds to the two species’ male breeding calls, and see if you know these two kinds of frogs.  And here’s a hint: think of tall woody plants and then the color of a rainy sky. SOUNDS - ~19 sec If you guessed treefrogs, you’re on the right track.  And if knew that the first call was the Gray Treefrog and the second was Cope’s Gray Treefrog, you’re a frog-call phenom!  The two frog species look identical, but they don’t interbreed and they differ in the number of chromosomes in their cells.  In Virginia they have somewhat different ranges, with the Gray Treefrog typically found in about the middle half of the Commonwealth and Cope’s Gray Treefrog primarily found in the Coastal Plain and the far southwest.  Those male breeding calls you heard are the usual way of distinguishing the two species.As their name implies, these amphibians live mostly in trees or shrubs, except during their spring and summer breeding season when they move to shallow, standing waters to mate.  Both species are relatively small, from about one to three inches long; both feed on various insects and other invertebrates; and both are colored gray, green, brown, or white, except for orange or yellow marks on their hind legs. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and to Lang Elliott’s NatureSound Studio for permission to use the Cope’s Gray Treefrog sounds, from the 2008 CD, “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads.” We close this week with an extra sound, one that doesn’t have anything to do with frogs or even particularly with water, but results from a natural event occurring in southwestern Virginia this late spring that’s too unusual not to mention, and too loud not to notice.  That’s the 2020 emergence of Brood IX of the 17-year periodical cicada, bringing with it a chorus of mating calls by the male insects.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to that sound, recorded on a mountain trail near Blacksburg on June 4. SOUND - ~11 sec SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Cope’s Gray Treefrog sounds in this episode were from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) and Lang Elliott/NatureSound Studio, used with permission.  For more information on this CD, contact VDGIF online at https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/; by mail to P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; by phone to (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); or by e-mail to dgifweb@dgif.virginia.gov. Lang Elliott’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Gray Treefrog sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at a seasonal pond in Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., on July 8, 2016, about 9 p.m.  The sounds in the background are the “peep” of Spring Peepers and the “thunk” of Green Frogs. The periodical cicada sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio on Brush Mountain just north of Blacksburg, Virginia, on June 4, 2020, about 12 noon.Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Gray Treefrog in a pond at a residence in Blacksburg, Va., April 30, 2007.Cope’s Gray Treefrog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, July 8, 2019.  Photo by David Weisenbeck, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/28498566 (as of 6-8-20) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.Virginia range maps for the Gray Treefrog (upper) and Cope’s Gray Treefrog (lower). Maps taken from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor.  The Gray Treefrog map is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Occurrence&bova=020007&version=18418; the Cope’s Gray Treefrog map is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Occurrence&bova=020006&version=18418.Periodical cicada, photographed in Patrick County, Va., June 7, 2020.  Photo by Kathy Richardson, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/48868419 (as of 6-8-20) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GRAY TREEFROG AND COPE’S GRAY TREEFROG The scientific name of Gray Treefrog is Hyla versicolor. The scientific name of Cope’s Gray Treefrog in Hyla chrysoscelis. The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18418 for the Gray Treefrog and at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020006&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18418 for Cope’s Gray Treefrog. Gray Treefrog Physical Appearance “Usually gray but coloration ranges from gray to whitish to brown to green, dependent upon environment and activities.  There is a whitish mark beneath the eyes and a bright orange or yellow on the concealed surfaces of the hind legs.  This species ranges in length from 32 to 62 mm (1.25-2.5 in).” Reproduction “Males call between March and August.  The call of this species is a slower trill than that of Cope’s Gray Treefrog, 25 trills per second.  Breeding generally occurs from March to June.  The female lays clumps of 10 to 40 eggs per group on the surface of shallow ditches, puddles, and ponds.   Females may lay more than one clutch in a season…. Eggs typically hatch in 4 to 5 days, and metamorphosis occurs in 45 to 64 days.” Behavior “This species is not often seen on the ground or near the water's edge except during the breeding season.  It tends to forage while in small trees or shrubs near to or in standing water.  This species is an opportunistic feeder focusing primarily on larval Lepicoptera [butteflies and moths], Coleoptera [beetles], and other arthropods.” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations “This species is typically associated with the following forest types: black willow, sweet gum-willow oak, white oak-red oak-black oak and mixed pine-hardwood.  They are frequently found in recently disturbed areas with shrub and herbaceous cover.” Cope’s Gray Treefrog Physical Appearance “This species is identical to [Gray Treefrog] in appearance but they do not interbreed.  The two gray treefrog species can be distinguished genetically and by breeding call…. The male mating call of Cope’s Gray Treefrog is shorter, harsher and more forceful than [Gray Treefrog].  It is a faster call averaging 45 trills/second.  This species is generally slightly smaller than [Gray Treefrog]. Reproduction “This species breeds between May and August and is usually not found outside of this period. ..Females lay scattered clumps of 10 to 40 eggs on the surfaces of shallow ditches and small ponds.  These eggs hatch in 4 or 5 days.  Metamorphosis occurs in 45 to 64 days…. This species may have two clutches per season.” Behavior “This species is more arboreal and is more tolerant of low humidity than [Gray Treefrog.].  Its diet consists of insects which are foraged from trees, shrubs, and off the ground preferably near water.  This species is an opportunistic feeder.  Typical prey items include larval Lepidoptera [butterflies and moths], Coleoptera [beetles], and other arthropods.” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations “This species is typically associated with small ponds, ditches, beaver ponds, or other standing water.  It is frequently found in areas that have been recently disturbed but contain shrubs, herbaceous vegetation, and/or vines.” SOURCES Used for Audio Eric Day et al., “Periodical Cicada,” Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication 444-276 (ENTO-105NP), February 25, 2015, online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/444/444-276/444-276.html. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Richmond, 2011.  [This is the source used for the description included in the audio/transcript of the two frog species' ranges.] Lang Elliott, The Calls of Frogs and Toads, Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg, Penn., 2004.Bernard S. Martof et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. Dan Mozgai, “Cicada Mania,” online at https://www.cicadamania.com/.  Information on periodical cicada Brood IX and its emergence in 2020 is online at https://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/category/broods/brood-ix/. James Mason, “What’s that noise? The 17-year cicadas are back,” Virginia Tech Daily, May 2020, online at https://vtnews.vt.edu/articles/2020/05/CALS-periodical_cicada_2020.html. Robert Powell et al., Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston and New York, 2016. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor.The Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18418.The Cope’s Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://vafwis.dgif.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020006&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18418. Virginia Herpetological Society, online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/index.html.  Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles.The Gray Treefrog entry is online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/gray-treefrog/gray_treefrog.php.The Cope’s Gray Treefrog entry is online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/copes-gray-treefrog/copes_gray_treefrog.php.Information on all frogs and toads in Virginia is online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/frogs_and_toads_of_virginia.htm.The “Frog Calling Schedule” is online (as a PDF) at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/amphibians/frogsandtoads/_phenology/va-frog-and-toad-phenology.pdf. For More Information about Frogs and Other Amphibians AmphibiaWeb, “Order Anura—Frogs and Toads Species List,” online at https://amphibiaweb.org/lists/alpha/A-Ate-Anura.shtml.FrogWatch USA, online at https://www.aza.org/frogwatch.  According to this Web site, this is the American Zoological Association (AZA)'s citizen science program and “encourages volunteers to collect and contribute information about the breeding calls of frogs and toads to a national dataset that is publicly available online.”Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “Virginia is for Frogs” Web site, online at http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/.For More Information about Periodical Cicadas Ralph Berrier (text) and Stephanie Klein-Davis (photos), Watch Now: The 17-year cicadas emerge across Southwest Virginia, Roanoke Times, 6/8/20. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Amphibians” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on featuring sounds of the Gray Treefrog. Episode 371, 6-5-17 – Herp Blitz by Virginia Herpetological Society (sounds of Bullfrog, Gray Treefrog, Northern Cricket Frog, Fowler's Toad, and Green Frog). Episode 408, 2-19-18 – Frog and Toad Medley (sounds of American Toad, Bullfrog, Carpenter Frog, Gray Treefrog, Green Frog, Mountain Chorus Frog, Northern Cricket Frog, Pickerel Frog, Spring Peeper, and Wood Frog). Episode 427, 7-2-18 – a July 4th “debate.” Episode 431, 7-30-18 – on the Tazewell County, Va., community of Frog Level (sounds of Gray Treefrog, Green Frog, and Spring Peeper). Episode 524, 5-11-20 – a sampler of animal sounds. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources of information, or other materials in the Show Notes. 2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme K.7 – basic needs and processes of plants and animals. 1.5 – animals’ basic needs and distinguishing characteristics. 2.4 – life cycles. 3.4 – behavioral and physiological adaptations. Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 2.5 – living things as part of a system, including habitats. 3.5 – food webs. 3.6 – ecosystems, communities, populations, shared resources. 5.5 – cell structures and functions, organism classification, and organism traits. Life Science Course LS.4 – organisms’ classification based on features. LS.8 – community and population interactions, including food webs, niches, symbiotic relationships. LS.9 – adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments. Biology Course BIO.1 – current applications to reinforce science concepts. BIO.6 – bases for modern classification systems, including structures, biochemistry, and developmental stages. BIO.8 – dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.

Today in Henrico
Today in Henrico – Alex McCrickard, Va. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries

Today in Henrico

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2020 10:44


Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries Aquatic Education Coordinator Alex McCrickard joins the Citizen to discuss this weekend's no-fishing-license-required opportunity in Virginia.

Henrico News Minute
Henrico News Minute – June 4, 2020

Henrico News Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2020 5:32


A Henrico supervisor proposes renaming the Confederate Hills Recreation Center, establishing a citizen review board for public safety agencies; Henrico's first organized protest doesn't go quite as planned; a shooting in Lakeside; COVID-19 positive tests in Henrico slow; a conversation with a Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries official about this weekend's "free" fishing opportunities in Virginia.(Today's Henrico News Minute is brought to you by Nathan's Roof Repairs.)Support the show (http://www.henricocitizen.com/contribute)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 525 (5-18-20): Introducing the Water Beetles

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2020


Click to listen to episode (4:39)Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-15-20. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIOFrom the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 18, 2020. MUSIC – ~4 sec – instrumental This week, we drop in on a musically-enhanced, water-insect competition.  The participants have been challenged to figure out the most species-rich group of insects on the planet, and then come up with the distinguishing words for seven aquatic versions of that group.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds to this entomological exercise, and see if you know the name for that overall group of insects.  And here’s a hint: the name sounds like a revolutionary, four-member rock band. VOICES and MUSIC - ~15 sec – “Crawling. Long-toed. Predaceous diving. Riffle. Water penny. Water scavenger. Whirligig.” If you guessed beetles, you’re right!  You heard part of “Beetle Ballet,” by Torrin Hallett, underlying the descriptive names of seven water beetle families.  Scientists categorize beetles into a taxonomic group called an order, and beetles are the most diverse order of animals, with a current estimate of about 390,000 species worldwide.  Perhaps as many as 20,000 of those species are water beetles.  The seven kinds of water beetles you heard, out of about 20 North American families, are among the most commonly found on this continent, with the predaceous diving beetle family and the water scavenger beetle family having the largest number of species.As a group, water beetles occupy all kinds and sizes of aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats, such as ponds, lakes, and other still waters; streams and rivers; various kinds of wetlands; temporary habitats like puddles; and a variety of moist areas on coastal shorelines.  Beetles that inhabit water typically do so both as adults and in their immature, larval stage; but some, like Water Pennies, are terrestrial as adults, and Long-toed Water Beetles have terrestrial larvae.  All beetle adults have two pairs of wings, with the forewings forming a hardened sheath of the membranous hind wings, and many water beetles are able to hold under those forewings a bubble of air that allows them to breathe while submerged.  Feeding habits among the thousands of water beetle species vary widely, both in what they eat and in how they acquire their food. Water beetles have many remarkable adaptations and biological variations.  Here’s one example: Whirligig beetles, which can be seen swimming in circles on the surface of ponds, lakes, and still water on stream margins, have eyes divided into an upper and lower half; the upper half can see above the water surface, while the lower half can see below. Thanks to several Blacksburg, Va., friends for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Torrin Hallett for composing this week’s music especially for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with the last 20 seconds of “Beetle Ballet.” MUSIC - ~ 22 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.   For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “Beetle Ballet” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; as of 2020, he is a graduate student in Horn Performance at Manhattan School of Music in New York.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio. To hear the complete piece (39 seconds), please click here. The water beetle family names call-outs were recorded by several Blacksburg, Va., residents in May 2020. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode. More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Whirligig beetles in the New River in Giles County, Va., May 17, 2020.A species of predaceous diving beetle, Virginia Beach, Va., April 10, 2019.  Photo by Laura Bankey, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/22308991 (as of 5-18-20) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribtution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT WATER BEETLE FAMILIES As noted in the audio, scientists classify beetles scientific classification level called an order.  The scientific names for the beetles order is Coleoptera.  Other orders of familiar insects include Diptera, the order of “true flies”; Hymenoptera, the order of ants, bees, and wasps; and Lepidoptera, the order of butterflies and moths.  (For one list of all insect orders, see Iowa State University’s BugGuide, online at https://bugguide.net/node/view/222292.) Families are groups within orders.  Following is some information on the beetles families that include water beetles, that is, beetles that live in or closely associated with aquatic habitats. J. Reese Voshell, in A Guide to Common Freshwater Invertebrates of North America (McDonald and Woodward, Blacksburg, Va., 2002; (pages 359-368), lists the following seven beetle families as “common in freshwater habitats” in North America.  The families are listed in alphabetical order by common name, with the scientific names for the family in parenthesis. Crawling Water Beetle (Haplidae) Long-toed Water Beetles (Dryopidae) Predaceous Diving Beetles (Dytiscidae) Riffle Beetles (Elmidae) Water Pennies (Psephenidae) Water Scavenger Beetles (Hydrophilidae) Whirligig Beetles (Gyrinidae) R. W. Merritt and K. W. Cummins, in An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America, 2nd Edition (Kendall/Hunt, Dubuque, Ia., 1984; (pages 427-437), list the following 21 beetle families as having aquatic or semi-aquatic species in North America (connected either to fresh waters, estuaries, or marine waters).  The families are listed in alphabetical order by scientific name, followed by the family’s common name. Amphizoidae – Trout-stream Beetles Carabidae – Predaceous Ground Beetles Chrysomelidae – Leaf Beetles Curculionidae – Weevils Dryopidae – Long-toed Water Beetles Dytiscidae – Predaceous Diving Beetles Elmidae – Riffle Beetles Gyrinidae – Whirligig Beetles Haliplidae – Crawling Water Beetles Hydraenidae – Minute Moss beetles Hydrophilidae – Water Scavenger Beetles Hydroscaphidae – Skiff Beetles Limnichidae – Marsh-loving Beetles Melyridae – Soft-winged Flower Beetles Noteridae – Burrowing Water Beetles Psephenidae – Water Pennies Ptilodactylidae – Toed-winged Beetles Salpingidae (= Eurystethidae) – Narrow-waisted Bark Beetles Scirtidae (= Helodidae) – Marsh Beetles Sphaeriidae – Minute Bog Beetles Staphylinidae – Rove Beetles SOURCES Used for Audio Iowa State University Department of Entomology, “Bug Guide/Order Coleoptera - Beetles,” online at https://bugguide.net/node/view/60.  This is the source used for the total number of beetle species worldwide. R. W. Merritt and K. W. Cummins, An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America, Second Edition, Kendall/Hunt, Dubuque, Ia., 1984. George K. Reid, Pond Life, Golden Press, New York, N.Y., 1967. Andrew Edward Z. Short, “Systematics of aquatic beetles (Coleoptera): current state and future directions,” Systematic Entomology, Vol. 43/No. 1, January 2018, accessed online at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/syen.12270.  This is the source used for the total number of water beetle species worldwide. J. Reese Voshell, A Guide to Common Freshwater Invertebrates of North America, McDonald and Woodward, Blacksburg, Va., 2002. For More Information about Beetles and Other Insects in Virginia and Elsewhere University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Beetle species are listed at https://animaldiversity.org/search/?q=beetle&feature=INFORMATION. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor. Entries for beetles are available at this link.Many field guides to insects are available from book stores or other supplies.RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Insects” subject category. Following are links to other episodes with information related to beetles. Episode 81, 9-26-11, and Episode 363, 4-10-17 – on stream assessment using aquatic insects and other macroinvertebrates. Episode P336, 10-3-16 – on streamside insects. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with links to episodes featuring the music. “Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. “Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year’s Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 455, 1-14-19, on record Virginia precipitation in 2019. “Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders. “Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 489, 9-9-19, on storm surge. “Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources of information, or other materials in the Show Notes. 2013 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme 1.5 – animals’ basic needs and distinguishing characteristics. 2.4 – life cycles. 3.4 – behavioral and physiological adaptations. Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 2.5 – living things as part of a system, including habitats. 3.5 – food webs. 3.6 – ecosystems, communities, populations, shared resources. 5.5 – cell structures and functions, organism classification, and organism traits. Life Science Course LS.4 – organisms’ classification based on features. LS.8 – community and population interactions, including food webs, niches, symbiotic relationships. LS.9 – adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments. Biology Course BIO.6 – bases for modern classification systems, including structures, biochemistry, and developmental stages. BIO.8 – dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 524 (5-11-20): A Tour Around Sounds by Water-connected Creatures

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2020


Click to listen to episode (5:20) Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImageSources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-8-20.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of May 11, 2020. MUSIC – ~8 sec – instrumental This week, that opening of “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann of Fredericksburg, Va., sets the stage for an episode filled with mystery sounds of creatures related to water and found in Virginia.  This episode is designed especially for Virginia K-12 students whose science curriculum includes learning about the Commonwealth’s living creatures, also called organisms.  I’ll play a few seconds of sounds of 12 animals, ranging from tiny to tremendously large.  After each one, I’ll tell what the animal is and a little bit about its occurrence or habitat in Virginia. I hope you know ‘em all!  Here goes. One.  SOUND - ~ 4 sec.  Several species of mosquitoes are common in Virginia and breed in a variety of still-water habitats. Two.  SOUND - ~4 sec.  Deer flies, which annoy and bite during their flying adult stage, inhabit wetlands, ponds, marshes, or streams in their immature stages. Three.  SOUND - ~5 sec.  The Atlantic Croaker, one of many fish species known to make sounds, occurs along Virginia’s coastline and in the Chesapeake Bay in warm weather. Four.  SOUND - ~ 4 sec.  Gray Tree Frogs are a common and sometimes loud amphibian found throughout Virginia. Five.  SOUND - ~ 5 sec.  American Toad breeding in Virginia starts between March and April in temporary pools or ponds, where males advertise to females with long trills. Six.  SOUND - ~7 sec.  The American Bullfrog is Virginia’s largest frog, found all over the Commonwealth in ponds, lakes, and still-water sections of streams. Seven.  SOUND - ~3 sec.  Belted Kingfishers are fish-catching birds found around streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, and estuaries. Eight.  SOUND - ~6 sec.  The Laughing Gull is one of 16 gull species whose occurrence has been documented in Virginia, out of 20 gull species known in North America. Nine.  SOUND - ~4 sec.  The Red-winged Blackbird is often seen, and distinctively heard, around ponds, marshes, streams, and other wet areas. Ten.  SOUND - ~6 sec.  Populations of the Bald Eagle have recovered dramatically in recent decades and our national symbol can now often be spotted along Virginia’s rivers. Eleven.  SOUND - ~3 sec.  American Beavers, now found across Virginia after reintroduction starting in the 1930s, smack their paddle-like tail on the water as a defensive behavior to protect a colony’s territory. And twelve.  SOUND - ~8 sec.  The Humpback Whale, which can be seen during migrations along Virginia’s coastline in winter, uses it song for breeding or other communication. Thanks to Freesound.org for the mosquito sound; to Rodney Rountree for the Atlantic Croaker sound; to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and to Lang Elliott for the bullfrog sound; to Lang Elliott again for the Laughing Gull and Bald Eagle sounds; and to the National Park Service for the whale sound.  Thanks also to Bob Gramann for permission to use his music.And thanks finally to all Virginia students for their efforts to keep learning through an unusually challenging spring 2020. SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used by Virginia Water Radio previously in Episode 465, 3-25-19. The mosquito sound was recorded by user Zywx and made available for public use on Freesound.org, online at https://www.freesound.org/people/Zywx/sounds/188708/, under Creative Commons License 1.0 (public domain).  More information on this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/. The deer fly sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio deer fly in Blacksburg, Va., on July 3, 2014. The Atlantic Croaker sound was from Rodney Rountree’s “Fish and Other Underwater Sounds” Web site at http://www.fishecology.org/soniferous/justsounds.htm; used with permission. The Gray Tree Frog sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on June 10, 2011. The American Toad sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on April 3, 2017. The American Bullfrog sound was from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.  Lang Elliott’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Belted Kingfisher sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on January 19, 2018. The Laughing Gull and Bald Eagle sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliott’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Red-winged Blackbird sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on April 9, 2017. The American Beaver sound was from a video recording by Virginia Water Radio at Toms Creek in Heritage Park in Blacksburg, Va., on June 2, 2012.  A 23-second segment of that video is available on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mulEJhKGhl0. The Humpback Whale sound was taken from a National Park Service recording (“Humpback Whales Song 2”) made available for public use on the “Community Audio” page of the Internet Archive Web site, at http://www.archive.org/details/HumpbackWhalesSongsSoundsVocalizations. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE White-headed Eagle (a name formerly used for the Bald Eagle) painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America, Plate XXXI (31), as reprinted in 1985 by Abbeville Press, New York.  The painting includes what Audubon called a Yellow Catfish caught by the bird.  Photo taken June 29, 2017, from the reprint copy (no. 6 of 350 copies printed in 1985) owned by Special Collections of Virginia Tech Libraries.  Virginia Water Radio thanks Special Collections for permission to photograph their copy and for their assistance.  Information about Birds of America is available from the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america. SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION AmphibiaWeb, online at https://amphibiaweb.org/. Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, “Atlantic Croaker,” online at http://www.asmfc.org/species/atlantic-croaker. Robert A. Blaylock, The Marine Mammals of Virginia (with notes on identification and natural history), Virginia Institute of Marine Science, 1985; online (as a PDF) at https://www.vims.edu/GreyLit/VIMS/EdSeries35.pdf. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Atlantic Croaker,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/S=0/fieldguide/critter/atlantic_croaker. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists’ Union, “Birds of North America Online,” at http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna (subscription required). Eric Day et al., “Mosquitoes and Their Control,” Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication ENTO 202NP, 2016, online (as a PDF) at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/dam/pubs_ext_vt_edu/ENTO/ENTO-202/ENTO-202-PDF.pdf. Nonny De La Pena, What’s Making that Awful Racket? Surprisingly, It May Be Fish, New York Times, 4/8/08. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toad of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Richmond, 2011. Bernard S. Martof et al., Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, 1980. National Aquarium, “A Blue View: Fish That Make Sound,” 2/16/16, online at https://www.aqua.org/blog/2016/February/Fish-That-Make-Sound. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2001). Rodney Rountree, “Soniferous Fishes,” online at http://www.fishecology.org/soniferous/soniferous.htm. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor. Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF), “Virginia is for Frogs,” online at https://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/virginia-is-for-frogs/. Virginia Department of Health, “Frequently Asked Questions about Mosquitoes,” online at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/environmental-epidemiology/frequently-asked-questions-about-mosquitoes/. Virginia Herpetological Society, online at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/index.html.  Herpetology is the study of amphibians and reptiles. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. J. Reese Voshell, Jr., Guide to Common Freshwater Invertebrates of North America, McDonald & Woodward Publishing, Blacksburg, Va., 2002. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the following subject categories: Amphibians, Birds, Fish, Insects, and Mammals. Following are links to other episodes about the creatures featured in this episode. Mosquitoes – Episode 78, 9-5-11. Deer flies (and other true flies) – Episode 484, 8-5-19. Atlantic Croaker (and other sound-making fish) – Episode 77, 8-29-11. American Toad – Episode 413, 3-26-18. American Bullfrog – Episode 74, 8-8-11. Belted Kingfisher – Episode 224, 7-28-14. Laughing Gull (and other gulls) – Episode 518, 3-30-20. Red-winged Blackbird – Episode 364, 4-17-16. Bald Eagle – Episode 375, 7-3-17. American Beaver – Episode 477, 6-17-19. Whales – Episode 399, 12-18-17. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources of information, or other materials in the Show Notes. 2013 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2010 Science SOLs Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme 2.5 – living things as part of a system, including habitats. 6.7 – natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Virginia watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; health and safety issues; and water monitoring. Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme 4.9 – Virginia natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms. Life Science Course LS.8 – community and population interactions, including food webs, niches, symbiotic relationships. LS.9 – adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments. Biology Course BIO.8 – dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems. Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to other Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.

The Articulate Fly
S2, Ep 19: Jason Hallacher of the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries

The Articulate Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2020 29:22


In this episode, I catch up with Jason Hallacher, Assistant Fisheries Biologist with the Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries. In addition to sharing his passion for the outdoors, Jason shares the Commonwealth's numerous opportunities for anglers including the new Trout Slam Challenge. Helpful Links Learn More About the Trout Slam Challenge Support Conservation in Virginia by Joining Restore the Wild Subscribe to Notes From the Field For More Information About Stockings, Where to Fish, Free Fishing Days and Everything Else Fishy in Virginia Follow VDGIF on Social Media Keep up with everything new and noteworthy at VDGIF on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube. Subscribe to the Podcast or, Even Better, Download Our App Download our mobile app for free from the Apple App Store, the Google Play Store or the Amazon Android Store. Subscribe to the podcast in the podcatcher of your choice.

RTÉ - Seascapes
Seascapes podcast

RTÉ - Seascapes

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2020 24:14


The MV Alta was abandoned by her crew 1,600 kilometres SE of Bermuda in September 2018 land on rocks on the south coast last weekend. Lt Balcombe found her in September 2019 while on a voyage to Antartica. We hear from Inland Fisheries on courses to get more women involved in angling. And we visit the Ireland Angling Expo & meet angling skippers.

RTÉ - Seascapes
Seascapes podcast

RTÉ - Seascapes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2019 25:09


In March of 1945, German submarine U-260 was scuttled by it's crew, three nautical miles south of Glandore harbour. We have another extract from the book, At The Water's Edge, Two Boats, Around Ireland by Kayak. Plus we hear from Dr Willie Roche, of Inland Fisheries about the Gov's Nat Planning Framework.

The Turkey Hunter Podcast with Andy Gagliano | Turkey Hunting Tips, Strategies, and Stories
249P - An Interview with a New Turkey Hunter with Judy Camuso

The Turkey Hunter Podcast with Andy Gagliano | Turkey Hunting Tips, Strategies, and Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2019 53:16


An Interview with a New Turkey Hunter with Judy Camuso This week, I have an awesome interview with Judy Camuso who is the Commissioner of the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife for the state of Maine.  Judy is actually new to the sport of hunting, and her reason for participating in the sport came from her want to include more organic sources of animal protein in her diet. I speak with her about her first successful turkey hunt, her entry into the sport of hunting, her previous vegetarian lifestyle, and of course her work. Listen in to this week's interview with Judy to learn a few more talking points that can help us convince those who may be curious about hunting to venture out into the woods with us this coming fall, winter, and spring.

The Turkey Hunter Podcast with Andy Gagliano | Turkey Hunting Tips, Strategies, and Stories
249F - An Interview with a New Turkey Hunter with Judy Camuso

The Turkey Hunter Podcast with Andy Gagliano | Turkey Hunting Tips, Strategies, and Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2019 32:36


An Interview with a New Turkey Hunter with Judy Camuso This week, I have an awesome interview with Judy Camuso who is the Commissioner of the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife for the state of Maine.  Judy is actually new to the sport of hunting, and her reason for participating in the sport came from her want to include more organic sources of animal protein in her diet. I speak with her about her first successful turkey hunt, her entry into the sport of hunting, her previous vegetarian lifestyle, and of course her work. Listen in to this week's interview with Judy to learn a few more talking points that can help us convince those who may be curious about hunting to venture out into the woods with us this coming fall, winter, and spring.

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Land & Legacy - Old Dominion ONE SHOT HUNT

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2019 55:59


During this podcast, you will be exposed to a unique opportunity we have the privilege of being apart. The 5th annual One Shot Hunt in Virginia hosted by the Virginia Wildlife Foundation. This event that is open to the public has many purposes, two of the biggest include fundraising as well as hunter recruitment. The event brings the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, landowners, turkey hunting guides, and sponsored hunters all together for a weekend of networking and turkey hunting. We speak with the Executive Director of the Virginia Wildlife Foundation, Jenny West to get her perspective on the event as well as the future of our hunting heritage. Jenny is enthusiastic and encouraged by recent events and the direction of the hunting culture, especially in Virginia. We also catch up with Ashton Dye, who was a volunteer guide for the event. His role over the past 5 years has been to help facilitate new hunters with outdoor experiences. Lastly, we chat with Caroline Hollandsworth, a new hunter! This event was the first time she took to the woods after any game species. She shares her story and how being a new hunter can be intimidating as well as exciting. Be sure to catch these stories! We hope you find this podcast engaging and encouraging knowing state agencies are working to promote hunting and joining landowners with new hunters. Enjoy.Learn.Share! #ForLoveoftheLand

Land & Legacy - Sportsmen's Nation
Old Dominion ONE SHOT HUNT

Land & Legacy - Sportsmen's Nation

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2019 55:59


During this podcast, you will be exposed to a unique opportunity we have the privilege of being apart. The 5th annual One Shot Hunt in Virginia hosted by the Virginia Wildlife Foundation. This event that is open to the public has many purposes, two of the biggest include fundraising as well as hunter recruitment. The event brings the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, landowners, turkey hunting guides, and sponsored hunters all together for a weekend of networking and turkey hunting. We speak with the Executive Director of the Virginia Wildlife Foundation, Jenny West to get her perspective on the event as well as the future of our hunting heritage. Jenny is enthusiastic and encouraged by recent events and the direction of the hunting culture, especially in Virginia. We also catch up with Ashton Dye, who was a volunteer guide for the event. His role over the past 5 years has been to help facilitate new hunters with outdoor experiences. Lastly, we chat with Caroline Hollandsworth, a new hunter! This event was the first time she took to the woods after any game species. She shares her story and how being a new hunter can be intimidating as well as exciting. Be sure to catch these stories! We hope you find this podcast engaging and encouraging knowing state agencies are working to promote hunting and joining landowners with new hunters. Enjoy.Learn.Share! #ForLoveoftheLand

The Fisheries Podcast
022-Ohio is for lovers...of fish. Inland fisheries research and more with Dr. Jeremy Pritt

The Fisheries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2019 33:01


Hey there...In this episode of The Fisheries Podcast I chat with Dr. Jeremy Pritt of the Ohio DNR's Inland Fisheries Research Center. We discuss some of the work he is doing tracking movements of Blue and Flathead Catfish in the Ohio River, evaluating length limits of river Sauger and reservoir Crappie, and evaluating and developing standard sampling methods in Ohio. We also preview the upcoming Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference taking place January 27-30,2019 in Cleveland, Ohio. Enjoy! More information about the conference can be found here: www.midwestfw.org Main Point:There is value in learning from others and sharing data

Interviews With ME
07 - Chandler Woodcock, Educator, Outdoorsman. Commissioner of Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

Interviews With ME

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2019 47:49


This week we interview Chandler Woodcock, talk about his military family, and how he grew up near the family of Governor Mills.   Listen via YouTube!

Love Maine Radio with Dr. Lisa Belisle
Judy Camuso, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife

Love Maine Radio with Dr. Lisa Belisle

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2018


Judy Camuso has been the director of wildlife for Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife since 2013 and has been with the department since 2007. As director, Camuso oversees the management, protection, and enhancement of the over 500 birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians that call Maine home, and perhaps more challenging, a staff of 50 biologists. She oversees the development and implementation of policy decisions, legislative proposals, and rules related to the wildlife division, and she coordinates a budget of $ 12 million to manage Maine’s wildlife. She is the department’s voice on all matters regarding Maine’s wildlife. Prior to becoming director, she worked as special projects coordinator for the department and was a regional wildlife biologist. She has extensive experience with endangered species management and recovery as well as long-range species planning. She started her career at Maine Audubon as the environmental center director, where she oversaw wildlife education programs and conducted several bird banding projects. https://www.themainemag.com/radio/radio-guests/judy-camuso-maine-department-inland-fisheries-wildlife/

Fairfax County Health and Safety Podcast
Fairfax County Health and Safety Podcast

Fairfax County Health and Safety Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2017


Bears, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Virginia Wildlife Conflict Helpline, ReadyNOVA.org, Fairfax County Health Department, School Immunization, Flood Insurance, National Flood Insurance Program.

Waterways
Brian Vincent: Appomattox River Company #21

Waterways

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2017


Brian Vincent is the marketing and creative director at Appomattox River Company. Enjoy our conversation as we navigate batteau stories, his new role as a board member with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, introducing kids to the river, star gazing (shout out to Chris Baker), service to veterans and much more. Check out … More Brian Vincent: Appomattox River Company #21

Search Dog Podcast NSDA
EPISODE 44 Agencies Having Jurisdiction with Deborah Palman

Search Dog Podcast NSDA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2016 39:53


This month’s podcast features an interview with Deborah Palman , discussing how to work with agencies having jurisdiction Deborah Palman  retired in 2008 after 30 years service as a game warden with the Maine Warden Service, the law enforcement division of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. Twenty-eight of those years were as a K-9 handler and over 25 were as the K-9 administrator and trainer for the Warden Service K-9 Unit. Deborah is a certified Master Trainer with the International Police Work Dog Association (IPWDA) and can offer certifications though IPWDA for cadaver detection, wilderness air scent search, evidence or article search, tracking, trailing, and water search. She is a Level II certified trainer with the United States Police Canine Association. Deborah is also a Maine Criminal Justice Academy (MCJA) certified K-9 trainer and can offer credentialing through the MCJA if the dog handler is a MCJA certified law enforcement officer.

Strange New England
The Billdad – Maine’s Own Marsupial?

Strange New England

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2016 8:34


Boundary Pond is a small, unassuming body of water in the northeastern corner of Maine. It is almost touching Quebec, earning the pond it's name sake. It has an outlet called "Boundary Brook" that meanders from the pond and into Maine, where it fades off into land. It is ideal for "cold-water fish" according to The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Department, whose website displays a map of this and many more lakes and ponds carved out from ice-age glaciers. According to the Department's website, "Spawning and nursery habit is limited, but a few brook trout survive to maintain a fishery. Growth is good with no other competing fish species present. The pond is not stocked." Many Maine lakes and rivers now rely on  fish stocking operations, where fish raised in hatcheries are airlifted over lakes and rivers and dropped into the water.  This is said to contribute millions of dollars into Maine's economy through sustaining fishing pursuits. It also helps sustain Maine's ecosystem, which has been influenced by Man despite it's size and condition. Boundary Pond is not one such body of water. But anyone who goes fishing in this hard to reach  spot may not be fishing alone. A lucky fishermen may, according to the legends, hear the splashing of a rare and elusive animal whose fishing technique is as unusual as it's appearance. It is an animal called the Billdad. It is described as being as large as a beaver and even wields a beaver's tail. It is also covered with brown fur similar to a beaver's pelt. It has long hind feet ideal for jumping like a kangaroo, but also are webbed for swimming. They have very short forelegs tucked in like a T-Rex's arms and the bill and face of a hawk. Sometimes, they are even depicted as having pointed ears. According to accounts, these creatures are predators that feed on insects and fish. They are ambush predators that use both their hind legs and tail in a strange method of hunting. When they see a fish swim up to catch an insect on the surface of the water, the billdad will leap into the air. As they pass over the fish, they swing down their beaver-like tail and smack the fish hard on it's head, stunning it. The billdad goes off with this catch, eats it and continues the pursuit like so. It is implied that this is a nocturnal animal that will usually go fishing at night, and hide during the day Some accounts describe these animals as fierce, but others state this as being too far from the truth. If humans approach, the billdad either leaps for safety or hides. They may do this not only because they know humans are larger and stronger than them, but because legend has it that lumberjacks considered these strange little creatures as a deep woods delicacy. They were said to be far more common back in the days of lumber camps, but their meat was not considered particularly palatable, so they were abandoned as a delicacy, but too late. They are considered to be very rare, like many animals eaten to endangered status. One account, however, states that billdad meat has a dangeorus effect on humans, making it unfit for consumption for more than just bad taste. Accoring to a story from page 43 of "Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods, 100th edition", one billdad was somehow caught and eaten at a lumber camp owned by The Great Northern Paper Company. The meat was used to make a dish called Slumgullion (otherwise known as American Chop Suey).  The only man to eat this dish was a tote-road swamper, who cleared the unpaved roads of debris for the lumberjacks. After the first and only bite, he grabbed the edge of the dinner table, went rigid, a strange look formed in his eyes and he bolted out of the dining room towards the lake outside the camp. He was said to have jumped 50 feet over the lake, just like a billdad leaping for it's dinner. But unlike a water-savvy billdad, the man drowned. After that strange and disturbing incident, billdad meat was never on lumber camp menus again, lest they too be driven to think they are a billdad and drown themselves. This animal is often compared to Australia's platypus by some accounts, with the idea that of all of New England's cryptids, this one is mostly likely to be real. In fact, some accounts even state that the billdad is related to The Duck-Billed Platypus. Its appearance and choice of habitat would lend a small spark of plausibility to this theory. When the platypus was first discovered in 1798, most people who saw it thought it was a hoax: a chimera made by a talented taxidermist. Only a drawing and a pelt was brought back to England by Captain John Hunter. But subsequent expeditions to Australia proved that this animal was very real. Today, this animal is alive and well in Australia, being 'of least conservation concern' in Eastern Australia. Cryptozoologists still think that because of the many similarities that the billdad has with the platypus, we may someday find that the billdad is a real marsupial, making it the second marsupial native to North America. Currently, the only native marsupial to North America is the opossum, which is also found in Maine. So far, however, no billdad living or dead, has ever been found. Visitors who come to Boundary Pond to catch a glimpse of this cryptid leave empty-handed. Some accounts say that even in their heyday, these were shy and hard to hunt. The only testimony that we have that these animals existed is from the tall tales of logging camps where many fantastic yarns were spun by men seeking entertainment in the quiet heart of nature. It is most likely that lumberjacks made up this story to pass the time or mess with the minds of people who lived in towns and cities. After learning about the platypus, they may have thought about the possibility that Maine could have it's own platypus and let their imagination do the rest from there. So for now, Boundary Pond is just a quiet, out of the way part of Maine where the sounds of axes and trees falling no longer echo. Silent nature prevails as does great fishing that has not needed man's intervention to thrive. But, if the stories of the lumberjacks have any credence at all, there may be a chance that any fisherman who comes here for the brook trout may have a strange, furry little companion who keeps itself hidden, save only for when it makes a splashing sound with it's tail. Is it someone with a canoe or kayak paddle? Or is it the elusive billdad? Fearsome Creatures of The Lumberwoods: 100th Edition, Page 43-The Billdad Cryptids and Monsters: The Billdad Cryptid Wiki-The Billdad Bruce Van Patter-Mythical American Animals Allrecipes.com-Slumgillion Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife-Franklin County Video: Maine Forest Service Fish Drops  Wikipedia: Platypus

The Hunt Fish Journal
HFJ No. 92 V. Paul Reynolds editor of the North Woods Sporting Journal

The Hunt Fish Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2015 60:45


This week we welcome V. Paul Reynolds editor of the North Woods Sporting Journal to the Hunt Fish Journal. Paul also writes a self-syndicated weekly outdoor column for a number of Maine newspapers and co-hosts a Sunday night radio program called "The Main Outdoor".  Paul is a member of the Outdoor Writers Association of America and serves on the Board of Directors New England Outdoor Writers Association.  Paul is an active outdoorsman who loves Maine's Great Outdoors.  From 1994 to 1998 he was Director of Information & Education for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.  We brought Paul Reynolds on the show to talk about the Great Outdoors of Maine, from fly fishing to moose hunting to its' well kept secret, the wild trout ponds and popular land locked salmon.  If you ever wanted to know more about Maine and its' rich hunting and fishing heritage, this show will give you a glimpse of what's available in Maine.               Thank you V. Paul Reynolds for the time to do this show                                           Remember      Hemisphere Coffee Roasters in Mechanicsburg, Ohio contact          Paul or Grace at 937-834-3230  You'll be glad you did!                                "you just can't get a better tasting cup of coffee" 

Northeast Hunting - New England's Premier Hunting & Firearms Blog
Press Releases Maine, N.H., VT., Conn., NY, Pa., NJ.

Northeast Hunting - New England's Premier Hunting & Firearms Blog

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2012


Maine Road Signs to Help Maine’s Endangered Turtles Augusta, Maine – Late May through early July in southern Maine is a critical period when female turtles undertake risky overland forays to reach nesting areas. During this time, turtles often cross roads, sometimes with fatal consequences. In response, the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife [...]Click here to play

Northeast Hunting - New England's Premier Hunting & Firearms Blog

Maine 2011 Brook Trout Pond Survey an Overwhelming Success! Project to continue and expand in 2012 Falmouth, Maine – Two conservation groups and the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife are seeking volunteer anglers to survey remote ponds for brook trout this fishing season. This will be the second year anglers can help Maine [...]Click here to play

Tierärztliche Fakultät - Digitale Hochschulschriften der LMU - Teil 01/07
Untersuchungen zur Wirkung von östrogenwirksamen Stoffen auf die Gonadenentwicklung bei Fröschen (Rana temporaria und Xenopus laevis) sowie ultrastrukturelle und immunhistochemische Untersuchungen an Froschgonaden (Rana temporaria)

Tierärztliche Fakultät - Digitale Hochschulschriften der LMU - Teil 01/07

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2003


The influence of estrogen-like substances on the gonadal development in frogs (Rana temporaria and Xenopus laevis). Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical investiga-tions on the gonads of frogs (Rana temporaria). The aim of the present thesis was the investigation and assessment of the estrogen pollu-tion of a river in South-Germany above and below a sewage plant outlet and its possible effects on the gonadal development in amphibians. In an exposure experiment with differ-ent sewage dilutions the effect on the indigenous gras frog (Rana temporaria) were com-pared with the effects on the African claw frog (Xenopus laevis). Because of the lack of relevant data in current literature it was necessary to first collect some basic data on light microscopy, ultrastructure and immunohistochemistry with reference to frogs. Furthermore the sexual differentiation of two populations of different origin were compared histologically. Characterisation of the gonads The ovaries of Xenopus laevis displayed a garland-like structure in contrast to the compact ovaries of Rana temporaria. The ovaries of both frog species were surrounded by an epi-thelium and filled with germ cells which enclosed an ovarian cavity. The oogonies were mainly found in the peripheral parts of the organ. The oocytes were characterised by a big and irregularly shaped cell nucleolus with peripherally located nucleoli. They were sur-rounded by a thin one-layered follicular epithelium. Electron microscopical examination of the ovaries of Rana temporaria showed elongated tubular mitochondria in the cytoplasm which were found exclusively in oocytes. Some of the mitochondria from subadult frogs contained yolk crystals. Additionally an accumulation of electron-tight Granule was found just below the plasma membrane, which could be a preliminary stage of the cortical granule. The testis of the frogs were enveloped by an epithelium and a tunica albuginea which al-ready showed a tubular structure. The testis from Rana temporaria and the Xenopus laevis differed in their developmental stages. The testis of juvenile Rana temporaria contained only germ cells whereas the testis of some Xenopus laevis already contained spermato-cytes and spermatozoa. The spermatocysts, characteristic of frog testis, could be seen in conjunction with the appearance of spermatocytes only. By using light microscopy two different types of germ cells in both frog species could be distinguished which probably were primary and secondary germ cells. By electron microscopical investigation of the testis of Rana temporaria the somatic cells could, on the basis of location and morphology, be differentiated in two types. The somatic cells of the first type were located inside the Tubuli seminiferi and have probably the same function as the Sertoli cells of mammals. The cells of the second type, the Leydig cells or interstitial cells, were located outside the Tubuli and were characterized by granular vesicle in the cytoplasm. With view to the sexual differentiation of Rana temporaria a comparative histological inves-tigation of the gonads of juvenile and subadult frogs of a native midland population and a high alpine population was performed. The midland population proved to be a sexually semi-differentiated species since apart from clearly male or female animals it also com-prises intersex individuals in different stages of the transformation process. The genotypi-cally male animals developed female gonads in the first place which secondly converted into testis during a hermaphrodite stage. The transformation process from female into male gonads was, on the basis of morphological criteria, classified into three stages. The highal-pin population on the other hand proved to be a sexually differentiated race. By using the Avidin-Biotin-Complex-Technique five different antibodies were tested on the gonadal tissue of juvenile and subadult Rana temporaria. The test for Laminin, a non-collagen glycoprotein, which is part of the basal membrane in mammals, resulted in a posi-tive reaction. It seems therefore that similar to Laminin in mammals a glycoprotein plays an important part in the basal membrane of frogs. α-Actin, a fibrous protein of the smooth muscles, which was detected in the Theca externa of the layer of follicle cells in different species, could be established in the blood vessel wall only and not in the layer of follicle cells. Furthermore the occurrence of a Zona pellucida by using antibodies against the por-cine glycoprotein ZP3 was investigated. The ovum including the surrounding layer of follicle cells showed a negative reaction which however did not implicitly exclude the occurrence of a glycoprotein layer with a different antigenicity. Until now the existence of a glycoprotein layer in anurans, in connection with microscopical anatomy of ovaries in Rana temporaria or other species of frogs has not been mentioned in references. The examination of the go-nadal tissue as to the occurrence of ACE (Angiotensin Converting Enzymes) turned out negative as well. Example of application With the exception of a temporarily higher concentration of alkylphenol in the beginning of the exposure, the chemical analyses revealed a relatively low degree of pollution with alcyl-phenols and steroids. The results were comparable to other results of German rivers and stayed well below other European comparative data. According to the results of this study the current level of pollution of the experimental water with estrogens does not endanger the amphibian population. The examination did not reveal any influence of the sewage on the embryonal and larval development. Furthermore, the histological investigation of the gonads in exposed and unexposed frogs with reference to the gonadal sexual differentia-tion as well as the sex ratios did not reveal significant changes. There was no correlation as to the frequency of the occurrence of intersex in the groups of exposed and unexposed frogs, neither of Xenopus laevis nor of Rana temporaria. Only the transformation process from ovaries to testis of the sexually semi-differentiated species of Rana temporaria was slowed down in the group of exposed animals in contrast to unexposed animals. The rea-son for this phenomenon could be the inhibitive influence of the low-level but more continu-ous estrogen pollution in sewage than in river water. Conversely, a link between the accel-eration of the transformation process within the group of unexposed animals and the tem-porarily higher alkylphenol level in the beginning of the exposure cannot completely be ruled out. According to references alkylphenol can cause an increase of testosterone. The semiquantitative RT-PCR detecting Vitellogenin-mRNA carried out by the Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries in Berlin showed a minor increase in females of Xenopus laevis which were exposed to sewage in the ration of a 2:1 dilution in contrast to the unexposed animals. Taking into account the synergistic effects of estrogens, the in-crease could be attributed to the higher estrogen pollution of the sewage. The histopa-thological analysis for the detection of toxical effects of the sewage as well as other poten-tial influential factors provided no hints as to a possibly toxical influence of the sewage.