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  • 101PODCASTS
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  • Apr 12, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about New River

Latest podcast episodes about New River

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 624 (4-11-22): Sycamores are Sizable and Scenic at Streamsides

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:57).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-8-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 11, 2022.  This revised episode from August 2013 is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~12 sec – instrumental. This week, we feature a musical selection inspired in part by one of Virginia's largest and most distinctive riverside plants.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~ 34 sec – instrumental.You've been listening to part of “Sycamore Rapids,” by Timothy Seaman, of Williamsburg, Va., on a 2002 album also called “Sycamore Rapids.”  The album was inspired by the trees of Virginia's state parks and forests, and the “Sycamore Rapids' tune honors particularly James River and Shenandoah River state parks.  According to the composer, the tune's progressions are meant to signify changes a paddler might experience from small riffles to larger rapids to smooth water. At any of those water features throughout the eastern United States, part of a paddler's scenery is often the American Sycamore tree.  Of the three sycamore species native to North America, the American Sycamore is the most familiar and by far the most widespread, ranging from New England to the Midwest and down to Texas, including all of Virginia.  Common in floodplain areas along rivers and streams, the sycamore's distinctive features are large, often hollow trunks; peeling, patterned bark; crooked limbs; large root masses visible along stream banks; and spherical fruits persisting on leafless twigs long into winter. Virginia riversides are of course commonly home to other tree species, too, such as Black Willow, Silver Maple, and Eastern Cottonwood.  But with its large size and distinctive bark, the American Sycamore is perhaps the Commonwealth's most noticeable waterway marker. Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Sycamore Rapids.” MUSIC – ~ 16 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 176, 8-26-13. “Sycamore Rapids,” from the 2002 album of the same name, is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://www.timothyseaman.com/.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Fruit on an American Sycamore beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va. (Montgomery County), March 19, 2022.American Sycamore beside Sinking Creek in Newport, Va., (Giles County), April 10, 2022.American Sycamore roots along the James River near Wingina, Va., along the Nelson-Buckingham county line, July 12, 2009.Hollow trunk of American Sycamore beside the New River in Radford, Va., October 4, 2009.American Sycamores beside Toms Creek in Blacksburg, Va., November 5, 2016.SOURCES Used for Audio eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1.  The American Sycamore entry is online at http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200010589. William C. Grimm, The Book of Trees, Hawthorn Books, New York, N.Y., 1962. Oscar W. Gupton and Fred C. Swope, Trees and Shrubs of Virginia, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 1981. University of Texas at Austin/Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, ‘Plant Database: Platanus occidentalis,” online at https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ploc. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home.  The American Sycamore entry is online at https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=PLOC. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia State Parks,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/.  The James River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/james-river; the Shenandoah River State Park entry is online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/state-parks/shenandoah-river. Virginia Department of Forestry, Common Native Trees of Virginia, Charlottesville, 2016. A.S. Weakley, J.C. Ludwig, and J.F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Bland Crowder, ed.  Copyright by the Foundation of the Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond.  Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Fort Worth, 2012.  (The Flora of Virginia Project is online at https://floraofvirginia.org/.) Herbert S. Zim and Alexander C. Martin, as revised by Jonathan P. Latimer et al., Trees—A Guide to Familiar American Trees, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Viriginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/. Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program, Virginia Cooperative Extension and Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment, online at https://forestupdate.frec.vt.edu/. Virginia Forest Products Association, online at https://www.vfpa.net/. Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/. Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, “Virginia Tech Dendrology” online at https://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/vtree.htm.  At this site, one can search for trees by common or scientific name. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Plants” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on trees and shrubs. Introduction to trees and water – Episode 621, 3-21-22.American Witch Hazel – Episode 238, 10-31-14.Ash trees – Episode 376, 7-10-17.Early spring wildflowers in woodlands – Episode 573, 4-19-21.Forest lands and work in Virginia – Episode 623, 4-4-22.Maple trees – Episode 503, 12-16-19.Photosynthesis – Episode 602, 11-8-21.Poison Ivy and related plants, including the shrub Poison Sumac – Episode 535, 7-27-20.Rhododendrons – Episode 574, 4-26-21.Tree buds – Episode 622, 3-28-22. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 1.4 – Plants have basic life needs (including water) and functional parts that allow them to survive; including that plants can be classified based on a variety of characteristics.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth Resources2.8 – Plants are important natural resources.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems. Life ScienceLS.5 – Biotic and abiotic factors affect an ecosystem.LS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.Episode 407, 2-12-18

united states music new york university texas education college water state zoom land living tech research government foundation search north america environment dark press normal web natural tree va rain ocean fruit snow new england midwest citizens trees agency stream priority richmond plants biology environmental bay images ash dynamic grade bio conservation copyright recreation charlottesville index commonwealth processes pond signature fort worth ludwig virginia tech hollow asheville newport scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences townsend forests maple natural resources adaptations williamsburg msonormal compatibility colorful forestry times new roman populations ls sections aquatic poison ivy watershed organisms montgomery county chesapeake radford policymakers scenic forest service photosynthesis shrubs new standard blacksburg acknowledgment cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting msonormaltable lidthemeother stormwater snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin intlim narylim virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat latentstyles semihidden unhidewhenused table normal sols james river bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list new river cripple creek virginia press living systems sizable grades k name e biotic light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name plain text name date rhododendrons name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional cumberland gap name document map name table subtle sycamores name mention name hashtag forest resources name unresolved mention giles county audio notes tmdl 20image platanus water center virginia standards
CAST11 - Be curious.
I-17 Lane Restrictions New River to Flagstaff

CAST11 - Be curious.

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 4:20


As work continues on Interstate 17 north of Phoenix for fiber-optic cable installation and the Interstate 17 Improvement Project between Anthem Way and Sunset Point, motorists should expect several intermittent lane closures in the week ahead, beginning Sunday, March 20. The Arizona Department of Transportation urges motorists to slow down, be prepared to merge into the open lane and use caution around construction personnel and equipment while the following restrictions are in place: New River to Black Canyon City The following nightly left lane closures are scheduled from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. beginning Sunday, March 20, and continuing until... For the written story, read here >> https://www.signalsaz.com/articles/i-17-lane-restrictions-new-river-to-flagstaff/

London Walks
Russell’s Overview of London’s Watery History – the Friday Special

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 10:31


David Jackson Productions
Mind Your Business - Ed Miller - App State New River Light & Power

David Jackson Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 25:25


Energy is on everyone's mind these days, whether its the gas in your gar or the heat in your house. How communities and their utilities source energy that is efficient and sustainably focused is as important as ever.On this week's Mind Your Business, Ed Miller of App State's New River Light and Power updates us on the utility's plans for future infrastructure investment. He also discusses how people can maximize energy efficiency in their homes and businesses, and how the Green Power Program is setting the community up for future energy stability.Mind Your Business is produced weekly thanks to a partnership between Appalachian Commercial Real Estate and High Country Radio. Support the show (https://www.boonechamber.com/membership-information)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 617 (2-21-22): Ice on the River

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:37).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-18-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 21, 2022.  This revised episode from February 2018 is part of a series this year of winter-relatedepisodes. MUSIC – ~15 sec - Lyrics: “Mama, oh mama, it was out by the water's edge.”This week, that excerpt of “Waters Edge,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, sets the stage for going to a water body's edge to explore freezing water.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds to the following mystery sounds, and see if you can guess what cold-water experience was taking place.   And here's a hint: the speaker and the water were both running. SOUNDS - ~15 sec If you guessed, wading into an icy river, you're right!  You heard me at the edge of the New River in Giles County, Va., on January 1, 2018, wading—very quickly!—into the partially iced-over river.  After nighttime temperatures in the teens or lower for several days, about half of the river's surface in some locations on that New Year's morning was covered in ice.Rivers throughout Virginia will freeze during notably cold winter spells, but it's not a routine occurrence.  River freeze-ups are really noteworthy in the tidal sections of the James, Rappahannock, and other Commonwealth rivers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed; in those sections, the water is somewhat salty, called brackish, so it has a lower freezing point. When rivers do freeze, ice typically forms first at the river edges, where in slow currents surface water can lose heat to colder air while not being mixed with warmer water.  This border ice can also form in slower currents around rocks or other obstacles well away from shore.  In stronger currents that keep the water mixed, if the whole water column drops just below the freezing point, ice can form around tiny particles; this type of ice is called frazil.  Sometimes frazil gets transported to the river bottom and attaches there, forming what's known as anchor ice.   If the water keeps losing heat to colder air, these and other kinds of ice can accumulate horizontally and vertically, eventually covering the river and perhaps filling much of its depth.Ice may also be carried along by the current, particularly after warming temperatures break up a solid ice cover.   If these ice floes get blocked by natural or human-made structures, ice jams can occur.  Ice jams can block a river's flow, leading possibly to upstream flooding.  And when an ice jam eventually breaks, it can suddenly release large amounts of water and ice, causing possible hazards downstream. Thanks to Blacksburg friends for recording the New Year's Day New River wade-in.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Waters Edge.” MUSIC - ~16 sec – Lyrics: “Mama, oh mama, it was out by the water's edge.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 406, 2-5-18. “Waters Edge,” from the 2013 album “No More Rain,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission. More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 529, 6-15-20. The New River wade-in sounds were taken from a video recording on January 1, 2018, below McCoy Falls in Giles County, Va.  Thanks to Virginia Water Radio friends Sarah, John, and Alan for making the recording possible. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGESVirginia Water Radio host Alan Raflo in the New River in Giles County, Va., January 1, 2018.  Photo courtesy of John Imbur.Ice on the New River at McCoy Falls in Montgomery County, Va., January 1, 2018.Ice on Goose Creek in Loudoun County, Va., January 20, 2018.Ice jam in the Potomac River near Washington, D.C., February 1918.  Photo from the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, accessed online at https://www.loc.gov/item/npc2008011359/, as of 2-22-22.  For more historic Potomac River ice photos in the Library of Congress, see https://www.loc.gov/photos/?q=Potomac+River+Ice. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT ICE IN FLOWING WATERThe seriousness of the threats river ice can pose is highlighted in the following information from the National Weather Service, Chicago Forecast Office, “Volunteer River Ice Spotter Network,” online at https://www.weather.gov/lot/river_ice_spotter_network, accessed 2/17/22: “The National Weather Service (NWS) Chicago/Rockford, IL, office uses information from volunteer spotters along area rivers to monitor the development of river ice which may lead to flooding.  Ice jams are often localized and may occur away from river gauges.  River ice spotters share important information such as extent of ice cover, ice cover trends, and location of ice jams which is very important for issuing timely warnings. “River ice can be a serious problem during some winters.  Chronic ice jam locations on the Rock, Fox, and Kankakee Rivers have up to a 1-in-2 chance of experiencing an ice jam in any given year, and almost a 1-in-3 chance of experiencing ice jam flooding in a given year.” The Chicago office is one of several NWS offices that seek river ice spotters in winter.SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION  Kevin Ambrose, The Potomac River has a history of disastrous ice floes during a rapid thaw, Washington Post, January 10, 2018. Spyros Beltaos, ed., River Ice Jams, Water Resources Publications LLC, Highlands Ranch, Colo., 1995. Spyros Beltaos, ed., River Ice Breakup, Water Resources Publications LLC, Highlands Ranch, Colo., 2008. Tamara Dietrich, Arctic blast not enough to freeze James, York rivers, [Newport News, Va.] Daily Press, February 19, 2015. Don M. Gray and Terry D. Prowse, “Snow and Floating Ice,” Chapter 7 of Handbook of Hydrology, David R. Maidment, ed., McGraw-Hill, Inc., New York, N.Y., 1993. Erica Leayman, Frozen Potomac River, Lakes Show Just How Cold It Is; From boats stuck on the ice to people skating on reflecting pools, here's a visual reminder of the bitter cold around the DC area, Old Town Alexandria [Va.] Patch, January 3, 2018. National Weather Service, Blacksurg, Va., Forecast Office, “Observed Weather Reports/Preliminary Monthly Climate Data for Blacksburg,” online at https://www.weather.gov/wrh/climate?wfo=rnk. National Weather Service, Chicago, Illinois, “River Ice Guide,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.weather.gov/media/lot/hydro/outreach/NWS_River_Ice_Guide_2020.pdf. University of Minnesota-Duluth/Minnesota Sea Grant, “Lake and River Ice: Formation and Classification,” by John A. Downing, February 25, 2021, online at https://seagrant.umn.edu/news-information/directors-column/lake-river-ice-formation-classification.  RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes (listed separately) on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18(especially for grades 4-8).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 613, 1-24-22.Snow terms – Episode 612, 1-17-22.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 610, 1-3-22. Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – Episode 607, 12-13-21.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 615, 2-7-22.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2-15-16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration – Episode 603, 11-15-21.Northern Harrier – Episode 561, 1-25-21.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1-13-20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.

music new york university new year chicago earth rock education washington work college water state fall zoom energy tech research government green dc illinois environment dark normal surviving web natural va force rain ocean snow washington post ps ice weather citizens lake agency stream priority motion physics environmental bay images chemistry rivers grade chronic arctic index frost commonwealth patch handbook pond arial signature virginia tech phases accent library of congress atlantic ocean natural resources freezing special olympics msonormal compatibility classification colorful times new roman brant colo sections teal watershed montgomery county wg freshwater chesapeake mcgraw hill national weather service policymakers chesapeake bay earth sciences shenandoah blacksburg acknowledgment loudoun county cosgrove newport news loons cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves physical sciences trackformatting msonormaltable lidthemeother stormwater snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount harrisonburg mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin intlim narylim virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority potomac river lsdexception locked qformat latentstyles semihidden unhidewhenused table normal sols hydrology polar plunge nws bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name toc heading name light list accent name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list new river highlands ranch water's edge daily press grades k name e msohyperlink space systems light accent dark accent colorful accent name list steel wheels name plain text name date name normal indent name table web name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme goose creek name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table cumberland gap name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle rockingham county rappahannock name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention ben cosgrove canvasback photographs division giles county audio notes tmdl water center virginia standards
South Carolina from A to Z
“S” is for St. Peter's Parish

South Carolina from A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 0:52


“S” is for St. Peter's Parish. In 1747 the Commons House of Assembly established St. Peter's Parish, bounded on the west by the Savanna River and on the east by the New River.

Doug Rowse
Who are we New River Church?

Doug Rowse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022


Virginia Water Radio
Episode 610 (1-3-22): Wading into the New Year, the New River, and Water Thermodynamics

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:20).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-31-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 3, 2022.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. For this first week of 2022, we listen in on one Virginian's annual New Year's challenge to the laws of physics and chemistry—water-temperature physics and chemistry, that is.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds. SOUNDS AND VOICE - ~35 sec – “It's the New Year, on the shore of the New River. It's 22 degrees and perfect time for a swim. Happy New Year, everyone! Happy New Year! [Series of exclamations about the cold.] Ah, welcome to Antarctica.” You've been listening to Blacksburg resident Alan Moore during the 2014 version of his annual New Year's Day wade into the New River.  The watery welcome to that January 1st—unaided by a wet-suit—lasted only a few seconds, not as much because of the 22-degree air temperature as because of the 39-degree water temperature.  Water that cold can cause exhaustion or unconsciousness within 15 to 30 minutes, and even water at 60 or 70 degrees can be dangerously chilling over one to two hours, depending on a person's body size and other factors. Water's capacity to chill a human body is much greater than that of air at the same temperature, for two reasons.  First, liquids generally conduct heat more rapidly than gases, because liquids are denser (that is, the molecules are closer together).  And second, liquid water has chemical attractions between molecules that can absorb high amounts of energy, such as heat energy coming from a person's body.  These and other interactions among water, heat, and temperature are part of water's thermodynamics, and they exert a big influence on weather, aquatic environments, biology, and taking a plunge on New Year's or any other day. Thanks to Alan Moore for lending his voice and wade-in sounds to this episode.  We close this first episode of the New Year with about 45 seconds of music to give a hydrological hello to 2022. Here's “New Year's Water,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~46 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 195, 1-6-14. Thanks to Alan Moore for allowing Virginia Water Radio to record sounds during his annual New River wade-in on January 1, 2014.“New Year's Water” is copyright 2016 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 349, 1-2-17.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two photos of the New River near the county line between Giles and Montgomery counties in Virginia, looking upstream: At dawn on January 1, 2014 (upper photo) and at 8:40 a.m. on January 1, 2022 (lower photo). EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT COLD WATER SAFETY The following is quoted from the National Weather Service, “Cold Water Hazards and Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. “Warm air doesn't always mean warm water in lakes, streams or oceans.  Fifty-five degree water may not sound very cold, but it can be deadly.  Plunging into cold water of any temperature becomes dangerous if you aren't prepared for what the sudden exposure can do to your body and brain.  Warm air temperatures can create a false sense of security for boaters and beach goers, so if you are planning to be on or near the water, arrive knowing the conditions and how to protect yourself.  Cold water drains body heat up to 4 times faster than cold air.  When your body hits cold water, “cold shock” can cause dramatic changes in breathing, heart rate and blood pressure.  The sudden gasp and rapid breathing alone creates a greater risk of drowning even for confident swimmers in calm waters. In rougher open water this danger increases.  Unplanned immersion in cold water can be life-threatening for anyone without protection from the temperatures or a lifejacket to help you stay afloat.  When Cold Shock and Hypothermia begin to impact your ability to think and act, life jackets and flotation can create extra time for help to arrive or for you to get out of danger.   Even the most experienced cold water surfers, swimmers or boaters know to prepare for the conditions.” SOURCES Used for Audio Encyclopedia Britannica, “Thermodynamics,” online at https://www.britannica.com/science/thermodynamics. J. J. Hidore and J. E. Oliver, Climatology—An Atmospheric Science, MacMillian, New York, 1993, pages 55-58. Linus Pauling, General Chemistry, Dover, New York, 1970, pages 343-350. On survival in cold water: National Weather Service, “Cold Water Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. University of Minnesota Sea Grant, “Hypothermia Prevention: Survival in Cold Water,” at http://www.seagrant.umn.edu/coastal_communities/hypothermia; see the site's “How Long Have I Got?” section for information on how long one can survive being immersed in cold water. For More Information about Cold Weather Safety, Hypothermia, and Frostbite National Weather Service, “Cold Weather Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/cold. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Prevent Hypothermia & Frostbite,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/staysafe/hypothermia.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Newsroom/Winter Weather Preparedness,” at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/news/public-relations-contacts/winter-weather-preparedness/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to other episodes that focus on an incoming New Year. Episode 296, 12-28-15 – Setting a Course for 2016 with ‘On a Ship' by Kat Mills.Episode 349, 1-2-17 – Water for a World of New Years, Featuring “New Year's Water” by Torrin Hallett.Episode 401, 1-1-18 – Diving into 2018 with “Driving Rain” by Chamomile and Whiskey.Episode 453, 12-31-18 – Water and the New Year of 2019.Episode 505, 12-30-19 – Eyes on the Water as the 2020s Arise. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge® for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades). Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – Episode 607, 12-13-21.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19. Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration – Episode 603, 11-15-21.Northern Harrier – Episode 561, 1-25-21.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20. Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20. Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy 5.2 – Energy can take many forms. Grades K-3 plus 5: Matter 5.7 – Matter has properties and interactions. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.4 – There are basic sources of energy and energy can be transformed. 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Physical Science PS.5 – Energy is conserved and transformed. Chemistry CH.7 – Thermodynamics explains the relationship between matter and energy. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels (* indicates episode listed above in the “Related Water Radio Episodes” section). Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.*Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.*Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.*Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.*Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

Eastern Current Fishing
EP 134: WintertimeTrout Fishing The New River & Pamlico Sound

Eastern Current Fishing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 38:27


In this episode of the Eastern Current Saltwater Inshore Fishing Podcast we chat with Capt. Ozzy about wintertime trout fishing in the Coastal Rivers of North Carolina from the New River all the way up to the Pamlico Sound! Wintertime is a great time to target big Gator Speckled Trout her in the inshore waters of Coastal North Carolina! Hope y'all enjoy this podcast episode! Eric's Realty info: https://www.nestrealty.com/wilmington/agents/eric_williams.html Eric's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/EricWilliamsFishing Do you love Eastern Current and want to help support us as well as gain access to tons of extra content that has never been released to the public? Donate through our PATREON Account! https://www.patreon.com/user?u=31609753&fan_landing=true Be Sure to checkout Eastern Current on Youtube, Facebook and Instagram as well as anywhere that you can listen to podcasts. Check out Eastern Current's website! https://etcurrent.com/ Book a Fishing Trip -Jud Brock - https://www.easternangling.com/ Book a Hunt -Jud Brock- https://www.easternwaterfowl.com/ inshore fishing , saltwater fishing , speckled trout fishing , North Carolina fishing , fishing North Carolina , light tackle fishing , backwater fishing , speckled trout, gator trout , gator speckled trout 

The Lone Angler Podcast
#165: New Year, New River

The Lone Angler Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 29:09


Happy New Year! Starting out the new year with a short one because I'm just coming off vacation. In this episode I cover: new Lone Angler goals, new Lone Angler places, funneling my social media's to minimize the strain on the brain, a Christmas recap, my first ice fishing session and more!  Support the show by donating a beverage for consumption or 5$ to The Lone Angler Podcast! If you do I will send you some cool stuff! Stickers, buttons and a small piece of art drawn by me! Hit the link below https://buymeacoffee.com/loneangler Or Cash App: $mnchomp Venmo:@Patrick-Olson-50   Thank you to P3 Plastics from Panfish Pursuers! If you are looking for that “edge” in your panfish plastics game this winter then, look no further than https://p3-plastics.com/  OGSPUGG15   Thank you to Ridge Top Outdoors! Located at the intersection of US 71 South and Highway 2, Bemidji, Mn. A great locally owned outdoor sporting good store for all your outdoor needs!   https://www.ridgetopoutdoors.com   Thank you to Della Bay Rods! Two dudes, in a basement, in Minnesota, creating excellently crafted fishing rods! Want free shipping? Enter LAPFREE I thank you and so does Della Bay!   https://www.dellabay.com     Find us here: Instagram: @lone_anglermn Email: theloneanglerpodcast@gmail.com l

Que Pasa Calexico
Episode 149 - Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia

Que Pasa Calexico

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 60:28


Today I had the pleasure of talking to returning guest, Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia. He stopped by to give us a review of some of the things he was able to accomplish in 2022 representing the 56th assembly district which include communities in eastern Riverside County and Imperial county. Some of the topics we touched were the redistricting, Salton Sea and New River updates and historic 2021 budget allocations for education, broadband and housing. Follow Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia on Instagram for any updates!! https://www.instagram.com/asmegarcia/ Follow Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia on Facebook for any updates!! https://www.facebook.com/AsmEGarciaAD56 Visit Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia's website for updates!! https://a56.asmdc.org/ Thank You to my Anchor Sponsors! Camilo Garcia, Jake, Johnny Cabrera, Edward Velasquez and Norma Sierra Galindo! Sergio's Tacos and Hotdogs! Follow Sergio's Tacos and Hotdogs https://www.facebook.com/Sergios-Tacos-and-Hotdogs-814183015393170 Follow Eddie Lopez and Roots Creative on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/cultivatingideas/ Eric Reyes - Amigos de la Comunidad https://www.facebook.com/El-Amigo-De-La-Comunidad-1010952642326840/ David Gastelum! https://www.facebook.com/whybuyorsell Follow us on Facebook! http://bit.ly/2AljpUQ Follow us on Instagram! http://bit.ly/31l34ve Follow us on Twitter! http://bit.ly/2ZTMdlL Visit our new and improved website https://quepasacalexico.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/quepasacalexico/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/quepasacalexico/support

#StartDisrupting
Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center Receives GO Virginia Grant to Expand Lab - special podcast

#StartDisrupting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 27:44


Guests:Craig Meadows: Montgomery County AdministratorErin Burcham:  President, Verge and  Executive Director, Roanoke Blacksburg Technology CouncilMatthew Hull, Ph.D. : Research Scientist / President & Founder, Nanosafe, Inc.John Newby:  Chief Executive Officer,  Virginia Biotechnology Association Visit website |  Download flyerNew collaboration with Johnson & Johnson Innovation announced with the aim to accelerate life science sector growth in the New River and Roanoke Valleys by providing access to expert mentors, programming, and commercialization resources for startup companies  BLACKSBURG, Va. (Dec. 15, 2021) — The GO Virginia Coalition today approved a grant award to the Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center (VTCRC) to fund the expansion of laboratory space and facilities aimed at supporting the region's growing life science industry. In addition to the construction of shared lab space by the VTCRC, this project will support the creation of 125 new biotech jobs over the next five years.  “Through collaborations, we aim to fill the demand from biotechnology companies and provide full access needed to support research to commercialization aspirations,” said Brett Malone, President & CEO of the Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center. “Our sophisticated infrastructure makes us a research destination across industries and for everyone from startups to enterprise companies.”Read full press release

Larry Richert and John Shumway
Allegheny Health Network opens new RIvER Clinic to treat formerly incarcerated

Larry Richert and John Shumway

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 5:27


Dr. Divya Venkat, Allegheny Health Network Physician, details the new clinic that is the only one of its kind in the greater Pittsburgh region.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Great Battlefield
Democratic Data with Benjy Messner of New River Strategies

The Great Battlefield

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 53:17


Benjy Messner joins The Great Battlefield podcast to talk about his career in politics, working on the Beto for America campaign and founding New River Strategies, where they help campaigns through data and analytics.

Air Line Baptist Church
Worship Service with Karen Peck & New River - 11/28/2021

Air Line Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 105:33


Worship Service with Karen Peck & New River

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Billy Sims, Owner of "The Glossy Heifer"

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 5:41


Barry Markson in for Broomhead talks to New River restaurant owner, Billy Sims of "The Glossy Heifer", about the struggles he is facing with staffing, inflation and COVID restrictions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Oral Arguments for the Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

New River Electrical Corp. v. OSHC

Overflow Podcast
Sacrifice & The Spirit of God

Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 57:41


To learn more about New River, visit us online at NewRiver.church

David Jackson Productions
Mind Your Business - New River Light & Power - Green Power Program

David Jackson Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 30:10


Clean energy alternatives are a hot topic, especially in an area of the country where residents and businesses are as environmentally conscious as they are in the High Country. On this week's installment of the Mind Your Business podcast, we will hear about a new Green Power Program, offered by New River Light and Power (NRLP), the supplier for energy for residents and businesses inside the Town of Boone. We'll hear from Ed Miller, General Manager of NRLP, about how customers can purchase blocks of power from clean and renewable energy sources that can help offset their monthly consumption. We'll hear about the environmental impacts of such a project from Watauga Riverkeeper Andy Hill. George Santucci, Sustainability Coordinator for the Town of Boone will share how the largest users of power in the area feel this project will advance their own clean energy objectives.Mind Your Business is produced weekly thanks to a partnership between High Country Radio and Appalachian Commercial Real Estate.Support the show (https://www.boonechamber.com/membership-information)

The Brainjo Jam
New River Train (3 finger banjo)

The Brainjo Jam

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 2:27


Tab and tutorial now available in the Breakthrough Banjo course for fingerstyle banjo: https://fingerstylebanjo.com/coursetour

Stories-A History of Appalachia, One Story at a Time
The Batts And Fallam Expedition

Stories-A History of Appalachia, One Story at a Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 11:43


In 1671 Thomas Batts and Richard Fallam set out from Appomatox Town (near present day Petersburg), Virginia, on a mission of exploration into Appalachia.  Along the way they discovered the New River and many other places in the western part of the colony. Today we tell their story. You can subscribe to the Stories podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Spotify, IHeart Radio, Deezer and many other podcast apps. Thanks for listening!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 589 (8-9-21): A Musical Tour of Rivers and Watersheds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (5:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image and Extra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 9, 2021.  This revised episode from February 2015 is the last in a series of eight episodes this summer related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 sec – Lyrics: “Take me down to the riverside.” This week, that excerpt of “Riverside,” by the Rockingham County- and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, opens an episode giving musical tour of some of Virginia's major river watersheds.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds to parts of six other songs, and see if you can guess the six Virginia watersheds being represented.  Three may be obvious, but the other three may challenge your musical and hydrological knowledge. MUSIC – ~ 94 sec “Shenandoah” by Timothy Seaman – ~18 sec – instrumental. “Sandy Boys” by Sara Grey – ~11 sec – Lyrics: “Do come along, Sandy boys, waitin' for the bug-eye-boo.” “Banks of New River” by Whitetop Mt. Band – ~13 sec – Lyrics: “I'm sitting here on the banks of New River.” “Clinch Mountain Quickstep” by Timothy Seaman – ~14 sec – instrumental. “Rappahannock Running Free” by Bob Gramann – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “I love the Rappahannock and its waters running free; the rapids of this river, that's where I want to be.” “James River Blues” by Old Crow Medicine Show – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “James River blues.” “All Quiet on the Potomac” – ~18 sec – instrumental. You heard parts of “Shenandoah,” performed by Timothy Seaman; “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, referring to the Big Sandy River; “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band; “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” also by Timothy Seaman, selected here for its connection to the Clinch River; “Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann; “James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show; and “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales. The watersheds of these rivers are part of 14 major watersheds in Virginia, as identified by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.  Wherever you are in the Commonwealth, you're in one of the those watersheds, as well as being—in turn—in one of the larger watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico.  They all deserve to have songs written about them, because they're part of Virginia's varied, complex, and historic system of waterways and landscapes.Thanks to all of the artists mentioned for permission to use this week's music. We close this episode, and Water Radio's summer 2021 series on watersheds and rivers, with about 30 more seconds of The Steel Wheels' “Riverside.” MUSIC – ~29 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 251, 2-2-15. “Riverside,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 10, 2014, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Productions; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. More information about Goose Creek Productions is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 295, 12-21-15.The “Shenandoah” version in this episode's musical tour is by Timothy Seaman and Paulette Murphy, from the start of “Shenandoah/Hazel River” on the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 447, 11-19-18. “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, is from the 2009 album “Sandy Boys,” copyright by Sara Grey and Fellside Records, used with permission.  More information about Sara Grey is available online at http://www.saragrey.net/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 436, 9-3-18. “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band, is from the 2008 album, “Bull Plus 10%,” copyright Whitetop Mountain Band and Arhoolie Records, used with permission.  More information about Whitetop Mountain Band is available online at http://whitetopmountainband.tripod.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 546, 10-12-20. “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” from the 2002 album “Sycamore Rapids,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 435, 8-27-18.“Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann, is from the 2008 album, “Mostly Live,” copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at http://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 304, 2-22-16.“James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show, is from the 2006 album “Big Iron World,” copyright Nettwork Records, used with permission.  More information about Old Crow Medicine Show is available online at http://www.crowmedicine.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 373, 6-19-17. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard here was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 318, 5-30-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE AND EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT VIRGINIA'S MAJOR WATERSHEDS Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Four large watersheds containing, collectively, all of Virginia's lands are the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico.  The watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Sound are also contained within the Atlantic Ocean watershed.The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds.  (This table was also included in the show notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21.)  WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River

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