Podcasts about Zoology

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The study of the animal kingdom

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  • Jan 21, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Zoology

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Latest podcast episodes about Zoology

Beyond Blathers
Coelacanth with Charles Nye

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 61:34


This week we're joined by marine biologist Charles Nye to talk about the coelacanth! We had a great time chatting with Charles about this fascinating creature, his research on eDNA metabarcoding and cetaceans, and palaeoart! Make sure to follow Charles on Twitter and check out their palaeoart on Instagram and Twitter. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game. 

The TrainingBeta Podcast: Climbing Training Podcast
TBP 190 :: Meal Timing for Climbing Performance and Recovery

The TrainingBeta Podcast: Climbing Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 28:49


In this episode, I talk all about how to time your meals and snacks to help your climbing performance, energy levels every day, overall mental well-being, and body composition. You might think that when you eat food isn't really that important – or maybe you haven't given it much thought. But the truth is that it can be almost as important as what you eat when it comes to performance, recovery, and overall well-being.  I'll go over some sample meal/snack time schedules and tell you about the mistakes I see many people making with it. I'll also go over the truth about recovery meals/snacks. Is it super important to eat right after working out? And if so, what should you eat? This is a recording taken from a 5-day nutrition challenge I did last year in front of a live zoom audience. I talked for about 15 minutes on the topic and then took a bunch of questions from the audience (very common questions, so they're quite relevant). A Little about Me After completing my Bachelor's degree in Psychology and Zoology at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, I did a 4-year nutrition certificate program at Seven Bowls School of Nutrition, Nourishment, and Healing. I graduated in 2007 as a Certified Integrative Clinical Nutrition Therapist. During those 4 years, I learned about not only nutrition, but herbs, homeopathy, and other alternative practices. I've been seeing clients since 2007 and I've worked exclusively with climbers since 2013. Nutrition Coaching with Me If you're looking for help with your own nutrition and you feel like you need personalized coaching, I'm taking new clients right now. I also have a program that is self-paced with 4+ hours of video from me, PDF's, and meal plans laid out for you. LEARN MORE ABOUT NUTRITION COACHING Show Links Work with me one-on-one or do my self-paced program   Please Review The Podcast on iTunes Please give the podcast an honest review on iTunes here to help the show reach more curious climbers around the world.

Beyond Blathers
Mussels

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 28:48


This week we're talking all about mussels! Listen to learn more about their beards, impressive glue, and the conservation issues facing freshwater mussels. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Beyond Blathers
Dimetrodon

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 30:40


This week we're full on de-bunking Blathers and talking all about the dimetrodon! Spoiler alert: these prehistoric friends weren't dinosaurs, but they weren't actually reptiles either! Listen to learn more. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Just the Zoo of Us
126: Carnation Corals w/ Rosie Steinberg!

Just the Zoo of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 53:06


Join Ellen & marine biologist Rosie Steinberg for a review of some beautiful animals that you might not have even known were animals: carnation corals! We talk about the living Ship of Theseus, what a coral smells like, intense turf wars being fought in super slow motion, and life as a hivemind of squishy clones.Follow Rosie on Twitter!Follow Just the Zoo of Us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!Cover photo: johnandersonphoto via Getty Images 

Snake Talk
Snakes of China with Dr. Kevin Messenger

Snake Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 77:55


Dr. Jenkins sits down with Dr. Kevin Messenger to talk about snake diversity in China.  A unique opportunity first brought Dr. Messenger from his home state of North Carolina to a remote region of China.   Listen as we learn about China's ecosystems and climate and how similar they are to the United States, as well as the widely variable diversity of snakes in the country - ranging from no species in the high western deserts to over a hundred species in the tropics.  Finally, discover more about the natural history and ecology of Rat Snakes, Mang Vipers, and Fea's Vipers.Connect with Kevin on Facebook or Instagram.Connect with Chris on Facebook, Instagram or at The Orianne Society.Shop Snake Talk merch.

Beyond Blathers
Evening Cicada with Ferf Brownoff

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 34:14


This week we're talking about the evening cicada with hardcore cicada-lover Ferf Brownoff. Join us for a celebration of these amazing insects and lots of fun cicada stories!  If you haven't listened to our first episode on the cicada, make sure to give it a listen here for lots more information and fun facts! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Dialogue Journal Podcast
Dialogue Gospel Study #57 w/Nathan Kitchen

Dialogue Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 92:52


Nathan Kitchen will be giving our December 26th lesson now due to Darren Parry neeing to be rescheduled later. He will speaking on How Silently the Wondrous Gift is Giv'n: The Gentleness of Love in our Daily Discipleship. Kitchen served his mission in Alabama, graduated with a B.S. in Zoology from BYU, earned his DoctorRead More » The post Dialogue Gospel Study #57 w/Nathan Kitchen first appeared on The Dialogue Journal.

The Science Hour
Omicron – mild or monster?

The Science Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 60:49


Studies from South Africa and the UK suggest Omicron may be a mild infection for the majority of people. Hospital admissions are down when compared with other variants. However, the virus is replicating at a much faster rate than earlier variants and is able to overcome vaccines to some extent. Cases studies so far have mainly been in young people. There is concern over what will now happen as Omicron spreads across Europe and the US where there are older unvaccinated populations. Anne von Gottberg from South Africa's National Institute for Communicable Diseases tells us what early results from studies there show and discusses the implications. Typhoon Rai in the Philippines led to the loss of many lives and even destroyed buildings designed to resist such extreme weather events. Could more have been done either to predict the ferocity of the typhoon or to prepare for its impact? Liz Stephens, Associate Professor in Climate Risks and Resilience from the University of Reading discusses these issues. Beavers are making a comeback – in the Arctic. Their activity in engineering the landscape, building dams, and changing water courses is so widespread it can be picked out by satellites. However, this is not entirely welcome says Helen Wheeler Senior Lecturer in Zoology at Anglia Ruskin University. who has been working with local people concerned about the beavers impact on their livelihoods. And the James Webb telescope is finally launching. Heidi Hammel, who has been involved in the project for over 20 years tells us what it's all about. Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens – CrowdScience has covered a lot this year. And what better way to see out 2021 than to look back at a few of our (and your!) favourite things? Great questions are right at the top of the team's list – especially with the way that for every one we answer, five more appear in our inbox! So for a festive treat, Marnie asks the crew to answer three of them. What's the sun's role in our sense of direction? Why are we so uncomfortable with other people's sadness? And why does listening to the radio make us sleepy? (Or is it just too much eggnog…?) From our favourite listener advice on how to keep your Christmas lights untangled to why cold swimming could activate your Vagus nerve, tune in for new questions and more CrowdScience favourites to light up your holiday season! Presented by Marnie Chesterton and many members the CrowdScience Team – Melanie Brown, Marijke Peters, Caroline Steel, Hannah Fisher, Samara Linton and Anand Jagatia. Produced by Sam Baker for BBC World Service. Featuring: • Haneul Jang, post-doctoral researcher, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology • Juliet Rosenfeld, psychotherapist and author of The State of Disbelief: A Story of Death, Love and Forgetting • Mathias Basner, professor of psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania (Image: Getty Images)

EcoJustice Radio
Dangers of Palm Oil with Dr. Gary Shapiro

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 58:35


The is an encore presentation of an interview we did with Dr. Gary Shapiro from 2020. Palm Oil is touted as a “miracle ingredient,” found in more than 50% of all packaged products consumed in the US. It renders makeup smooth, keeps ice cream from melting, and moisturizes our hair and skin. It is a hot commodity; giving rise to plantations in Asia, Africa and Latin America. At 66 million tons annually and 10% of permanent global cropland, palm oil is a prevalent, economically appealing crop. Although popular, the cultivation and expansion of this supposed cash crop can come at the expense of the Indigenous peoples, critical habitat, endangered species, and the climate. Almost 90% of the world's oil palm is grown on a few islands in Malaysia and Indonesia, home to the most bio-diverse tropical forests found on Earth. Can palm oil can be produced in a responsible, sustainable, and regenerative manner that protects the environment, bio-diverse species, and communities where it is cultivated? On this episode, we discuss what is happening in Indonesia and elsewhere around Palm Oil extraction, expansion, and exploitation. Dr. Gary Shapiro has been involved with orangutans for 46 years and has been working to secure and protect the orangutan populations through creating more regenerative and equitable solutions around Palm Oil production. We welcome Dr. Gary Shapiro, President of Orang Utan Republik Foundation & The Orangutan Project-USA. https://www.orangutanrepublik.org/ https://www.theorangutanproject.org/ https://www.facebook.com/OrangUtanRepublik/ http://twitter.com/OURF Gary L. Shapiro, Ph.D. has dedicated most of his life to understanding and supporting the well-being of individual and populations of critically endangered orangutans through research, conservation, advocacy and education. He was the first person (1973-1975) to teach a symbolic communication system to an orangutan and the first person to have taught sign language to orangutans in their natural environment, the forests of Tanjung Puting National Park, Indonesian Borneo (1978-1980; 1981). Shapiro further assisted in the rehabilitation efforts of dozens of orangutans confiscated from the illegal pet trade and monitored the phenology of local rain forest ecosystem. Shapiro received his doctorate in Zoology in 1985 from the University of Oklahoma then returned to Indonesian Borneo (1986) to conduct post-doctoral freshwater ecology studies in Tanjung Puting National Park. He spent 28 years as a government scientist and retired in 2014. Shapiro was the co-founder and vice president of the first orangutan support organization, the Orangutan Foundation International, from 1986-2004 where he administered and oversaw the activities supporting research and conservation in and around Tanjung Puting National Park. In late 2004, Dr. Shapiro and his Indonesian wife, Inggriani, were inspired to create the Orang Utan Republik Education Initiative (OUREI), a nonprofit project, in response to the education needs underscoring the Critically Endangered status facing orangutans today, particularly in Sumatra. In 2007, the Orang Utan Republik Foundation (OURF) was established as a legal organization to support the programs of OUREI in Indonesia. In 2015, OURF partnered with The Orangutan Project (TOP) to serve as their US chapter. Shapiro also serves on the board of TOP and administers the funds collected and distributed to dozens of organizations conserving orangutans. Hosted by Jessica Aldridge Engineer: Blake Lampkin Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Show Created by Mark and JP Morris Music: Javier Kadry Episode 50 Phot Credit: Dammer Saragih

Science in Action
Omicron – mild or monster?

Science in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 28:21


Studies from South Africa and the UK suggest Omicron may be a mild infection for the majority of people. Hospital admissions are down when compared with other variants. However, the virus is replicating at a much faster rate than earlier variants and is able to overcome vaccines to some extent. Cases studies so far have mainly been in young people. There is concern over what will now happen as Omicron spreads across Europe and the US where there are older unvaccinated populations. Anne von Gottberg from South Africa's National Institute for Communicable Diseases tells us what early results from studies there show and discusses the implications. Typhoon Rai in the Philippines led to the loss of many lives and even destroyed buildings designed to resist such extreme weather events. Could more have been done either to predict the ferocity of the typhoon or to prepare for its impact? Liz Stephens, Associate Professor in Climate Risks and Resilience from the University of Reading discusses these issues. Beavers are making a comeback – in the Arctic. Their activity in engineering the landscape, building dams, and changing water courses is so widespread it can be picked out by satellites. However, this is not entirely welcome says Helen Wheeler Senior Lecturer in Zoology at Anglia Ruskin University. who has been working with local people concerned about the beavers impact on their livelihoods. And the James Webb telescope is finally launching. Heidi Hammel, who has been involved in the project for over 20 years tells us what it's all about. (Image: Getty Images) Presenter: Roland Pease Producer: Julian Siddle

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Let’s Talk Animals 12/23/21: Citizen Science Programs

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:14


Producer/Host: Dr. John Hunt Citizen Science Programs -What they are, how they work -Bird Atlas Program -River Bird, Turkey, Reptile programs Guest: Dr Nathan Webb, Wildlife Division Director for the Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife About the host: Dr. Hunt is a retired veterinarian that practiced small animal medicine and surgery for 32 years. For twenty six of those years he owned and operated the Bucksport Veterinary Hospital. He graduated from Michigan State University Vet School in 1982, earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resource Conservation from the University of Connecticut in 1974, and a Masters in Zoology at Michigan State in 1976. Although he took special interest in pet behavior problems his primary interest was helping pet owners care for their pets by not only helping them when they were sick but educating, counseling and supporting the family to achieve good pet care. Dr. Hunt was also a track coach at Bucksport High School for 20+ years, raised his 3 children and loved being part of the Bucksport community. His has written 2 books and currently teaches at the Veterinary Technician program at York County Community College. The post Let's Talk Animals 12/23/21: Citizen Science Programs first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Herpetological Highlights
098 Kingsnake Squeeze

Herpetological Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 47:15


Renowned for their habit of eating other snakes, just how do colourful kingsnakes manage to tackle prey almost their own size? We delve into this mystery, and find out just how much these snakes can eat. To top it off, there is a serpentine Species of the Bi-Week.  Become a Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/herphighlights FULL REFERENCE LIST AVAILABLE AT: herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Penning DA, Moon BR. (2017). The king of snakes: performance and morphology of intraguild predators (Lampropeltis) and their prey (Pantherophis). Journal of Experimental Biology 220:1154–1161. DOI: 10.1242/jeb.147082. Penning DA. 2017. The gluttonous king: the effects of prey size and repeated feeding on predatory performance in kingsnakes. Journal of Zoology 302:119–125. DOI: 10.1111/jzo.12437. Species of the Bi-Week: Entiauspe-Neto, O. M., Abegg, A. D., Koch, C., Nuñez, L. P., Azevedo, W. D. S., Moraes, L. J., Tiutenko, A., Bialves, T. S., & Loebmann, D. (2021). A new species of Erythrolamprus (Serpentes: Dipsadidae: Xenodontini) from the savannas of northern South America. Salamandra, 57(2), 196-218. Music: Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Species Bi-week theme – Mike Mooney Other Music – The Passion HiFi, www.thepassionhifi.com

Wealth and Law
What's Happening to the Build Back Better Act?

Wealth and Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 40:21


Over the weekend, the Build Back Better Act was dealt a devastating blow when Senator Manchin announced that he would not vote on the Act before the Christmas deadline. So what's the fate of the Build Back Better Act and will we still see tax changes in the near future? On this week's episode of the Wealth & Law Podcast, Brent and Rachel chat with John Strohmeyer to discuss the future of the Build Back Better Act and what clients should be doing while the proposed changes are in limbo. John Strohmeyer is the owner of Strohmeyer Law PLLC, in Houston, Texas. After earning his B.S. in Zoology from the University of Texas at Austin, John spent four years working for the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin, primarily as the Night Manager, before beginning his legal education. He earned my J.D. from the University of Texas School of Law in 2009, then earned a Masters of Law (also known as an “LL.M.”) in Taxation in 2010 from the New York University School of Law. While John's time at NYU was the end of his formal education (at least for now), he has gone on to become Board Certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in both Tax Law and Estate Planning & Probate Law. John has been recognized by his peers as a Fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, named a Texas Super Lawyer by Texas Super Lawyers by Thompson Reuters in 2019, 2020, and 2021, a Rising Star by Texas Super Lawyers by Thompson Reuters in 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019; “Rookie of the Year” in 2016 and Outstanding Substantive Committee Chair in 2017 by the State Bar of Texas Tax Section; a 2015-2017 Fellow of the Section of Real Property, Trust and Estate Law of the American Bar Association; and a Young Leader of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. John can be reached at john@strohmeyerlaw.com, (713) 714-1249. His show is available on You Tube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDaKULB-A6Ru4tKfpZl8ozg and on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/strohmeyerlaw.

Beyond Blathers
Seagull with Suzy Buttress

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 55:19


This week we're joined by Suzy Buttress of the amazing Casual Birder podcast to talk all about Gulliver, gulls, and birding in general! Tune in to learn lots and get inspired, and for lots of fun facts and birding tips and tricks. Make sure to check out Suzy's podcast, The Casual Birder and follow her on Twitter and Instagram for lots more birding content! You can find the episode Suzy recorded in a garden in Mexico here. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Thanks again to everyone who supported our shop during our holiday sale — we really appreciate it! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 607 (12-13-21): A Winter Holidays History of Counting Birds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-10-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 13, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2015 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUNDS – 7 secThis week, the sound of Mallard ducks on a December day in Blacksburg, Va., is the call to explore the annual Christmas Bird Count, organized by the National Audubon Society.Since 1900, the Society has helped organize volunteers to hold local daylong bird counts between December 14 and January 5.  On any single day within that period, volunteer counters follow specific routes within a 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear.  The count provides a snapshot both of the species encountered and of the numbers of individuals within each species.  According to the Society, this effort is the “longest running community science bird project” in the United States, and it actually takes place now in over 20 countries in the Western Hemisphere.  The results of such a long-term inventory help show the status of bird populations and the impacts of changes in habitat, climate, and other environmental conditions. Of course, birds living around water and wetlands are part of the annual count; in fact, the Audubon Society's founding in the late 1800s was due largely to concerns over commercial use of plumes from egrets and other wading birds.  [Additional note, not in audio: This refers to the founding in 1896 of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, the first state-level affiliate of the National Audubon Society, founded in 1905.  For more information on this history, see the Extra Information section below.] So what kinds of water-related birds might Virginia Christmas bird counters find?  Have a listen for about 20 seconds to this sample of four possible species.SOUNDS - 23 secThe Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs are among the many water-related birds that inhabit parts of Virginia during winter, including shorebirds, ducks, herons, and lots of others.  Keeping track of these and other feathered Virginia winter residents is a holiday tradition for many Commonwealth citizens with patience, binoculars, and attentive eyes and ears.Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the eagle, kingfisher, gull, and yellowlegs sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs. Here's hoping that Virginia's Christmas bird counters find good variety and high numbers this year.  We close with a U.S. Fish and Wildfire Service recording of another Virginia water-related winter resident, the Common Loon, a species that some diligent coastalVirginia counter might spot or hear on a winter day or night. SOUNDS - ~6 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 294, 12-14-15. The Mallard sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Virginia Tech Duck Pond in Blacksburg on December 10, 2015. The sounds of the Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern RegionCD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Common Loon sounds were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific URL for the loons recording was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/57/rec/1, as of 12-13-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Mallards (several males, plus one female on right) on Virginia Tech Duck Pond, Blacksburg, December 10, 2015.Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 16, 2021.Canada Geese beside a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 11, 2021. EXTRA INFORMATION On Bird Counts Another nationwide count is the Great Backyard Bird Count, held each February and organized by Audubon, the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, and Birds Canada.  This count calls on volunteers to watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over four days (February 18-21 in 2022), and record the species and numbers of all the birds seen or heard.  Its results also contribute to large-scale and long-term understanding of bird species distribution and health.  For more information, visit http://gbbc.birdcount.org/.On Audubon Society History and Waterbirds “Outrage over the slaughter of millions of waterbirds, particularly egrets and other waders, for the millinery trade led to the foundation, by Harriet Hemenway and Mina Hall, of the Massachusetts Audubon Society in 1896.  By 1898, state-level Audubon Societies had been established in Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, Illinois, Maine, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Minnesota, Texas, and California. ...In 1901, state-level Audubon groups joined together in a loose national organization....  In 1905, the National Audubon Society was founded, with the protection of gulls, terns, egrets, herons, and other waterbirds high on its conservation priority list.” – National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation, online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation.On Loon Calls in Winter“Generally loons are silent on the wintering grounds, but occasionally on a quiet winter night one will hear their primeval, tremulous yodel.” – Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay (Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006), p. 285.“All calls can be heard in migration and winter, but compared to the breeding season, they are uncommon.” – Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists' Union, “Birds of North America Online/Common Loon/Sounds,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/comloo/cur/sounds (subscription required for access to this Web site). SOURCES Used in Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required for this site). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Audubon Society, online at http://www.audubon.org/. National Audubon Society, “Christmas Bird Count,” online at http://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count. Kathy Reshetiloff, “Listen for the haunting call of loons on Bay's frigid winter waters,” Bay Journal, 12/8/14, updated 3/31/20. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Bald Eagle entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040093&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Belted Kingfisher entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040220&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Ring-billed Gull entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040170&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Common Loon entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040001&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online athttps://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird.  Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes for Winter American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.&l

new york science society bay humans university agency california guide music ice broad indiana christmas natural relationships state audio game college history north america frost world change surviving modern illinois accent texas animals cd dark tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain united states pond press research ocean tennessee government education birds plants foundation maine pennsylvania ring chesapeake bay native rhode island connecticut baltimore new jersey ohio fish chesapeake snow wisconsin environment images green new hampshire va cambridge minnesota columbia outrage msonormal commonwealth generally stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens hawk environmental counting dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology union scientific teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript demonstrate ornithology mallard virginia tech ls aquatic atlantic ocean natural resources grades k populations name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes gull western hemisphere audubon zoology blacksburg minn national audubon society taxonomy cosgrove great blue heron msohyperlink wildlife resources bay journal audubon society bald eagles all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback bird conservation lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp acknowledgment virginia department christmas bird count michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press mallards cumberland gap winter holidays tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems canada geese virginia standards water center audio notes
American Birding Podcast
05-50: Discovering the Inti Tanager with Ryan Terrill

American Birding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 39:24


It is one of the great dreams of many birders, to be part of the discovery and description of a bird species that is brand new to science. But it is a process that can be long and involved. Ryan Terrill, an ornithologist at the Moore Lab of Zoology at Occidental College, was in the middle of it with the recent formal recognition of the Inti Tanager, a stunning South American bird known for years as the "Kill Bill" Tanager. Ryan's work surveying the bird's breeding territory in western Bolivia was a big part of that work, and he joins us to talk about the process, and why Inti Tanager is certainly not the last new species to come from this part of the world.  Join us this weekend for the 2022 Bird of the Year reveal party! Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts, and please leave a rating or a review if you are so inclined! We appreciate it!

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Shell Survey: Moving forward

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 9:22


Guest: Mia Wege, Marine Predator Ecologist and lecturer in Zoology at University of Pretoria See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Creative + Cultural
Dr. Richelle Tanner

Creative + Cultural

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 26:07


Dr. Richelle Tanner is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Science and Policy Program, jointly appointed to the Schmid and Wilkinson Colleges. She is broadly interested in how climate change affects both ecological and human communities, and our mechanisms of resilience. She uses tools from ecology, physiology, genomics, and the social sciences to ask questions about how coastal ecosystems can rapidly adapt to warming temperatures and more unpredictable extreme weather events.Her current research projects include: 1) sea hare physiology and population dynamics for increasing eelgrass restoration efficacy under climate extremes, 2) socio-ecological best practices for collective action in Phragmites australis invasive species management, and 3) values-based communication strategies for science-informed policy across stakeholder groups in the California Delta.Dr. Tanner is also the Science Director at the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (www.nnocci.org) and the Reviews Editor at the Journal of Zoology. She received her PhD in Integrative Biology from UC Berkeley and two undergraduate degrees in Environmental Studies and Jazz Studies from the University of Southern California, and completed two postdoctoral positions at UC Davis and Washington State University. Her work has been supported by agencies including the National Science Foundation and the California Sea Grant, and she has published in journals including Marine Ecology Progress Series and Nature Ecology & Evolution.Engaging the World: Leading the Conversation on Environmental Justice is a series of informed, sustained, and enriching dialogues looking at how environmental toxicity and risk disproportionately impact populations based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and social standing. Environmental Justice brings awareness to these disparities, fighting to ensure that every voice is heard, every challenge is addressed, and every community has a seat at the table for a greener future.Guest: Dr. Richelle TannerHost: Jon-Barrett IngelsProduced by Public Podcasting in partnership with Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Chapman University.

Beyond Blathers
Goldfish

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 26:33


This week we're talking about a very familiar animal — the goldfish! Do you know the history of how goldfish came to be pets? And did you know that they have THROAT TEETH?! Listen to learn more! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. We're having a holiday sale where you can get 30% off everything in our store until December 15, so make sure to take a look! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

U2FP CureCast
Episode 56: Barry Komisaruk, PhD

U2FP CureCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 75:11


Jason and Matthew interview Dr. Barry Komisaruk, Neurophysiologist from the Psychology Department at Rutgers University. Barry has been researching sexuality for over 50 years and is maybe best known for the seminal work: The Science of Orgasm. We talk about the history of his research and discoveries, the historical challenges around sexual function research and ideas for how to further this area of research to benefit folks with SCI. Pay particular attention to the latter half of the podcast if you're interested in participating in a study idea that we landed on collectively. If it piques your interest, send us a message at curecast@u2fp.org and we'll connect you. --- Barry R. Komisaruk received a B.S. in biology at The City University of New York and Ph.D. in psychobiology from Rutgers University. He was a National Institute of Mental Health postdoctoral fellow in neuroendocrinology at the Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles. Joining the Rutgers-Newark faculty in 1966, Komisaruk was a professor in the Institute of Animal Behavior and Department of Zoology. He is now Distinguished Professor in the Psychology Department, director of the Minority Biomedical Research Support Program, and former associate dean of the Graduate School. With a penchant for finding new research avenues to explore, Komisaruk received a Board of Trustees of Rutgers University Excellence in Research award and the Hugo G. Beigel Research Award of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality. His major research interests include: functional neuroimaging of genital sensory response; neurophysiology, neuropharmacology and neuroendocrinology of reproductive behavior; and neural control of autonomic genital function. He is senior author of The Science of Orgasm, a comprehensive look at the biology and neuroscience of orgasm, published by The Johns Hopkins University Press, as well as The Orgasm Answer Guide, a general readership book from the same publisher. He has published more than 155 academic journal articles and chapters.

ZSL Wild Science Podcast
ZSL #036 What lies beneath: investigating the amazing world of wildlife pathology

ZSL Wild Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 53:06


Pathology is the science of diagnosing diseases by observing physical changes in animal cells and tissues, either in living, or more commonly dead animals. In this episode, our host Ellie Darbey will explore the unseen…or rather, unheard world of wildlife pathology with the help of ZSL's experienced pathologists, veterinarians, and scientists. Through post mortems on black widow spiders, to giant stranded humpback whales, these four pathology professionals will show the value of this diagnostic work to the conservation and welfare of animals in zoos and in the wild. What are the practicalities of examining large animals like elephants and rhinos? How can pathology be used to solve wildlife crimes? And what do pathology and The Supreme Court have in common? Guests Dr Simon Spiro, Wildlife Health Services, Zoological Society of London Dr Becki Lawson, Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London Rob Deaville, Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London Dr Tammy Shadbolt, Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London Overview 01:22 – Ellie Darbey introduces the first guest, Dr Simon Spiro, to discuss what it's like to be a veterinarian pathologist, and how pathology can be used for animal welfare and conservation 14:06 – Ellie is joined by Dr Becki Lawson to explore the Garden Wildlife Health Project and the detective work used to discover a snake fungal pathogen in Europe. 27:15 – Rob Deaville joins to explain what happened to “Hessy” the humpback whale, and how the Cetacean Strandings programme works. 40:10 – Ellie welcomes the final guest Dr Tammy Shadbolt to discuss the Disease Risk Analysis and Health Surveillance Project and how pathology can help solve wildlife crimes. 49:44 – The speakers give their advice for pursuing a career involving wildlife pathology from their varied backgrounds and perspectives. Resources Previous ZSL Event “Revealing the unseen: the amazing world of wildlife pathology”: https://www.zsl.org/science/whats-on/revealing-the-unseen-the-amazing-world-of-wildlife-pathology Blog: Grass in the Snake - Zoo Pathology in Practice: https://www.zsl.org/blogs/science/grass-in-the-snake-zoo-pathology-in-practice Royal College of Pathologists: Careers in Pathology: https://www.rcpath.org/discover-pathology/careers-in-pathology.html Royal College of Pathologists: Become a Veterinary Pathologist: https://www.rcpath.org/discover-pathology/careers-in-pathology/become-a-veterinary-pathologist.html Garden Wildlife Health Project: gardenwildlifehealth.org UK Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme (CSIP): https://www.zsl.org/science/research/uk-cetacean-strandings-investigation-programme-csip “Hessy” the humpback whale in the media: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/oct/09/humpback-whale-found-dead-thames-hit-by-ship Collaborative UK Marine Mammals Strandings Project: summary of contaminant data for the period 1993-2001: https://www.cefas.co.uk/publications/techrep/tech131.pdf Disease Risk Analysis and Health Surveillance (DRAHS) Project: https://www.zsl.org/science/wildlife-health/disease-risk-analysis-and-health-surveillance Hazel dormouse 1000th reintroduction: https://www.zsl.org/blogs/science/dormouse-reintroductions--a-landmark-day Study and Research Opportunities at ZSL: https://www.zsl.org/science/postgraduate-study

UNTOLD RADIO AM
Untold Radio AM Richard Freeman – Monster Hunter, Author, Cryptozoologist Discusses Strange Creature Sightings

UNTOLD RADIO AM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 120:10


Richard Freeman is a working cryptozoologist. He searches for and writes about unknown animals. The melodramatic may call him a monster hunter. He has hunted for creatures such as the yeti, the Mongolian death worm, the giant anaconda, the Almasty, Orang-Pendek the gul, the Naga, the Ninki-Nanka, and the Tasmanian wolf. He is the Zoological Director at the Centre for Fortean Zoology. This is the world's only full-time mystery animal research organization. It is based in North Devon, England. A former zookeeper, Richard has worked with over 400 species, from spiders to elephants but lists crocodiles as his favorite. He has lectured at the Natural History Museum in London, the Grant Museum of Zoology, and the Last Tuesday Society at Viktor Wynd's Little Shop of Horrors. Richard is also a regular contributor to the magazine Fortean Times. He has written books about cryptozoology, folklore, and monsters, including Dragons: More Than a Myth? , Explore Dragons, The Great Yokai Encyclopaedia: An A to Z of Japanese Monsters, and Orang-Pendek: Sumatra's Forgotten Ape. However, he has recently branched out into horror and weird fantasy with Green Unpleasant Land: 18 Tales of British Horror and Hyakumonagatari: Tales of Japanese Horror Book One. His latest work is an overview of cryptozoology and a chronicle of his own expeditions entitled Adventures in Cryptozoology volumes one and two. He is currently working on a book of high strangeness Fortean cases called The Highest Strangeness. See links belowRichard Freeman's Books and Links:Adventures in Cryptozoology: Hunting for Yetis, Mongolian Deathworms and Other Not-So-Mythical Monsters (Almanac of Mythological Creatures, Cryptozoology Book, Cryptid, Big FootIn Search of Real Monsters: Adventures in Cryptozoology Volume 2ORANG PENDEK: Sumatra's Forgotten ApeDragons: More than a MythThe Great Yokai EncyclopaediaExplore DragonsGreen Unpleasant LandHyakumonogatariThe Centre For Fortean Zoology

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener
A study done by researchers from the University of Pretoria finds that SA hand sanitisers are often substandard.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 6:03


Dr Yusuf Abdullahi Ahmed, Senior lecturer in Entomology in UP's Department of Zoology and Entomology  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond Blathers
Sea Pineapple

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 20:15


This week we're talking about the sea pineapple! Although it may look like a rotting fruit, it's actually a very fascinating animal that's more closely related to humans than you might think. Listen to learn more! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. We're having a holiday sale where you can get 30% off everything in our store until December 15, so make sure to take a look! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

The Guiding Voice
Career options in social work | Kavya Narayanan | TGV 170

The Guiding Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 22:12


Career options in social work Know the Speaker  Kavya Narayanan (Program officer, South India AIDS Action Program)  Genre: Social Work, Career Options & Emerging Fields  Social work is a rewarding career for those who are interested in working with people and wish to address social and community issues.  Many people think that social work simply involves working with NGOs as a part-time job/activity.  But in reality, social workers work with individuals, communities, and families and deal with social issues such as unemployment, education, and poverty.  Social workers contribute to the society by working for the upliftment of poor people, by working with children with special needs and promoting women empowerment. In this episode you will listen to :- Huge transition she had in her career . ( 3.55 ) Why the humanitarian sector as a career ? ( 6.18) Career options in Humanitarian sector ( 6.56) Common myths about social work ( 8.26)  How social work helps people with special needs (9.40) Solution by identifying the root cause ( 11.03) Development of newer fields in Social sector (13.30) Mental health and helps ( 14.32) Interesting rapid fire questions (17.08) Hidden talent no one knows about kavya (18.16) Advice for people who want to flourish their career (19.44) Tune in for more!  About the Speaker (Kavya Narayanan): Kavya Narayanan, a program officer at South India AIDS Action Program is  currently working on a project that focuses on the mental health of adolescents in low income communities in Chennai .  She did her Research Master in Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience from Maastricht University. She also did her Bachelor's in  Biotechnology , Chemistry and Zoology from Christ University , Bengaluru. She has dedicated herself to exploring and researching intersectional mental health of marginalized communities .  Social work as a career is very prominent these days and the number of  people choosing social work as a career increases day by day .  This episode talks about the social service path Kavya chose and  the career options in social work . She also gives amazing advice for her younger version that can help the coming generation . Follow her on Linked in :-https://www.linkedin.com/in/kavya-narayanan-1b38a811b Connect with the hosts: Naveen Samala: https://www.linkedin.com/mwlite/in/naveensamala Sudhakar Nagandla: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nvsudhakar  #socialwork, #careeroptions, #mentalhealth, #humanitariansector, #socialsector. #tgv, #theguidingvoice, #careerguidance, #careergrowth

Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive
Memories of Trinity College Community 1930s-1950s

Irish Life & Lore - Voices from the Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:03


This podcast provides a unique opportunity to hear a selected number of sound clips taken from the Trinity College Dublin Oral History Collection we compiled in 2011.The voices you will hear include those of:Barbara Wright, Emeritus Prof. French LiteratureBrian McMurry, Emeritus Prof. Organic ChemistryGeraldine Watts, graduate and widow of former Provost Bill WattsIan Howie, Emeritus Associate Prof. Zoology.  Former Vice ProvostJanet Moody, graduate and daughter of T.W.MoodyJennifer Lyons, widow of former Provost F.S.L. LyonsJoseph Haughton, Emeritus Prof. GeographyLeslie Greer, graduateLouden Ryan, Emeritus Prof. Political EconomyPeter Boyle, Emeritus Senior Lecturer Organic ChemistryPeter Gatenby, Emeritus RegiusProf. PhysicSusan Parks, Emeritus Senior Lecturer EducationWilliam Vincent Denard, Emeritus Senior Lecturer Mental and Moral Science

ChiroHustle Podcasts
PI Care and Getting Better Cases in Chiropractic with Dr Mark Slater DC – Chiro Hustle Podcast 304

ChiroHustle Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 36:24


Mark Slater, BS, DC is a healthcare entrepreneur from Atlanta, Georgia who practiced for over 20 years in Personal Injury marketing and patient treatment. Mark grew up in Birmingham, AL, and attended the University of Florida where he received a BS in Zoology and Health Science Education. After graduation, he moved to Atlanta in 1994 […] The post PI Care and Getting Better Cases in Chiropractic with Dr Mark Slater DC – Chiro Hustle Podcast 304 appeared first on Chiro Hustle.

Beyond Blathers
Goliath Beetle

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 20:47


This week we're going to talk about the huge (and not-so-terrifying) goliath beetle! Tune in to learn more about where they live, what they eat, and why it's so hard to figure out the real weight of insects! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. We're having a holiday sale where you can get 30% off everything in our store until December 15, so make sure to take a look! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 604 (11-22-21): Canvasbacks Come Back to the Chesapeake as Winter Approaches

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-19-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 22, 2021.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~5 sec That's the landing sound of a large, distinctive duck that can be found in winter on Virginia's coastal waters.  Have a listen for about 10 seconds to some more of this species' sounds, and see if you know this bird.  And here's a hint: the bird's name, and the male's beautiful color, may remind you of a painting.SOUND – ~12 secIf you guessed a Canvasback, you're right!  Canvasbacks breed on water bodies in the prairies of Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in large sections of the U.S. and Mexico, with one concentration in the Chesapeake Bay area.  According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, at one time almost half of North America's Canvasbacks wintered around the Chesapeake, but that number has decreased to about 20 percent because of reductions in Bay submerged aquatic vegetation, or Bay grasses, a valuable winter food for this species.  Canvasbacks are diving ducks, meaning they typically go completely underwater to obtain food and avoid predators.  In winter, Canvasbacks feed largely on plant roots and buds, while in summer they'll add to their plant diet a variety of aquatic insects and other animals.  Predators on adult and young Canvasbacks include mink, coyotes, foxes, owls and other birds, some reptiles and fish, and human hunters, while Canvasback eggs are eaten by various mammals and birds. The Canvasback is considered one of the most distinctive North American ducks.  The following quote from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site describes how the bird stands out.  Quote: “This exclusively North American species is considered the ‘aristocrat of ducks.'  The male's striking appearance—rich chestnut-red head and neck, black chest, white back, and long, sloping, blackish bill—along with its large size distinguish it in the field.”  Unquote. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 50 seconds of music appropriate for the Canvasback's Chesapeake Bay connection.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 197, 1-20-14, and the sounds segment of Episode 50, 1-24-11. Emily Whitesell helped write this original script for this episode during a Virginia Tech English Department internship in Spring 2011 with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. The Canvasback sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used most recently in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESMale Canvasback (location and date not identified).  Photo by Lee Karney, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/1645/rec/2), as of 11/22/21.Female Canvasback in Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska in May 2005.  Photo by Donna A. Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for this photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14/rec/9), as of 11/22/21.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT CANVASBACK DUCKS The scientific name of the Canvasback is Aythya valisineria. Here are some points about Canvasbacks, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Canvasback,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949.Physical Description “The adult male has a head that is rusty red, shading to almost black near the bill.  The breast is grayish-black and the sides and back are light gray to white.  The wings and speculum are gray, and the eye is red.  The bill is long and sloping, black, with decidedly long sloping profile that clearly distinguishes it from the redhead. …The adult female head is light brown.  The sides and breast are olive-brown to gray-brown, and the underparts are light gray. The back is gray, finely barred with darker gray, and the wings are grayish brown.  …They have short wings, and a rapid wingbeat.  This species has difficulty leaving the water.  It is one of the fastest flying ducks.  …It is one of the largest ducks.”Breeding “The breeding season is from May to June… This species breeds in Alaska, western Canada, northwest United States, western North America from the prairie provinces of Canada, south into the central and western states and occasionally as far east as Hudson Bay with a few as far north as Alaska.  Spring and early summer they are found in marshes with shallow waters [and in] flooded farmland.  In mid-summer they frequent large marshes and lakes, sloughs, and swampy areas.” Migration and Winter Habitat and Behavior “During migration, they fly in large ‘V' shaped flocks at high altitudes. … They are also associated with larger bodies of water.  …Late migration is in the fall, and early migration in the spring.  This species migrates cross country from the northwestern United States to the Atlantic Coast, principally the Chesapeake Bay.  The migration corridors shift annually, and they have a strong tendency to return to the same breeding ground.  … The heaviest flight is from the Canada pothole country to the Chesapeake Bay. … They arrive at Chesapeake Bay later than most other ducks.  The Chesapeake Bay fall migration is from October 15 to December 15, with a peak from November 15 to December 15.  The spring migration is from February 20 to May 1, with the peak from March 1 to March 30.  They occupy specific and traditional rivers, lakes, and marshes on migratory areas.  … This species winters to Mexico [and to the] Atlantic and Gulf Coast.  ...Virginia is one of best areas for canvasbacks.  …  They are found in lakes, salt bays and estuaries, brackish and alkaline waters near the coast, estuaries and shallow bays, [and] rarely on the open sea. … The optimum in Chesapeake Bay areas is in fresh and brackish estuarine bays with extensive beds of submerged plants or abundant invertebrates, primarily in brackish rather than salt or freshwater areas. … There has been a 53% decline in wintering populations in the United States.  There has also been a decrease in the Atlantic flyway.”  [Population decreases have been caused by several factors, including drainage of breeding marshland, food supplies being depleted by carp and swan, pollution of wintering areas, disappearance of submerged aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay, droughts on breeding grounds, oil spills, and illegal hunting and trapping.] Diet “This species dives and obtains food from the bottoms of ponds, lakes, large rivers, open marshes, and muddy bottoms.  Plants are uprooted and the roots are eaten.  This species dives to 20-30 feet. … Important foods include…aquatic plants…, molluscs, insects, caddisfly and midge larvae, dragonflies, [and] small fish.  Chesapeake Bay foods include wild celery, widgeon grass, eelgrass, pondweed, clams and mud crabs.  Juvenile foods include caddisfly larvae, midge larvae, and mayfly nymphs.” SOURCES Used for Audio Mike Burke, “The big, beautiful canvasback: What's not to love?”  Bay Journal, November 2021, available online at https://www.bayjournal.com/eedition/page-43/page_136f4325-b978-5e55-bcec-907f0a04b1fc.html. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all; the Canvasback entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/canvasback. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/.  The Canvasback entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription may be required).  The Canvasback entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/canvas/cur/introduction. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Canvasback entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040064&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18949. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disas

new york canada society bay university agency mexico guide music ice photo natural halloween earth state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving sound accent animals cd dark north american tech water xeno web index fall land rain alaska united states pond press research ocean weather government education diet birds behavior plants foundation chesapeake bay native baltimore spring ohio fish chesapeake snow environment images green oberlin college cambridge dewhurst migration adaptations msonormal new year commonwealth atlantic important stream menu robbins normal allowpng worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens arial predators environmental dynamic times new roman trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading population biology gulf coast conservatory teal comeback grade special olympics oberlin colorful md brant yale school signature bio breeding wild turkey manhattan school scales freezing watershed transcript ornithology approaches virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes zoology minn taxonomy msohyperlink juveniles wildlife resources relyonvml bay journal lang elliot runoff audubon society all about birds sections life sciences birdsongs stormwater canvasback hudson bay lang elliott loons policymakers bmp new standard acknowledgment atlantic coast virginia department michigan museum cornell lab robert l cripple creek johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols unquote tmdl virginia society polar plunge torrin inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley
Managing complexity with Holistic Management

Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 92:54


Allan Savory is my guest on Episode 143 of Inside Ideas with Marc Buckley. Allan Savory, born in Zimbabwe and educated in South Africa (University of Natal, BS in Zoology and Botany) pursued an early career as a research biologist and game ranger in the British Colonial Service of what was then Northern Rhodesia (today Zambia) and later as a farmer and game rancher in Zimbabwe. In the 1960s he made a significant breakthrough in understanding what was causing the degradation and desertification of the world's grassland ecosystems and, as a resource management consultant, worked with numerous managers on four continents to develop sustainable solutions. He served as a Member of Parliament in the latter days of Zimbabwe's civil war and became the leader of the opposition to the ruling party headed by Ian Smith. Exiled in 1979 as a result of his opposition, he immigrated to the United States, where he continued to work with land managers through his consulting business. The growth of that business, a desire to assist many more people and the need for furthering his work led him to continue its development in the nonprofit world. In 1992 Savory and his wife, Jody Butterfield, formed a non-profit organization in Zimbabwe, the Africa Centre for Holistic Management, donating a ranch that would serve as a learning site for people all over Africa. In 2009 Savory, Butterfield, and a group of colleagues co-founded the Savory Institute in Boulder, Colorado to serve the world through an international network of entrepreneurial innovators and leaders committed to serving their regions with the highest standards of Holistic Management training and implementation support. The Africa Centre became the first of the Savory Institute's locally led and managed “hubs.” Savory's book, Holistic Management: A New Framework for Decision-Making (Island Press, 1999), describes his effort to find workable solutions ordinary people could implement to overcome many of the problems besetting communities and businesses today. In 2003, Allan Savory received Australia's International Banksia Award “for the person or organization doing the most for the environment on a global scale,” and in 2010 Savory (and the Africa Centre) received the Buckminster Fuller Institute's Challenge award for work that has “significant potential to solve humanity's most pressing problems.” A TED talk Savory gave in 2013 has received over 3.4 million views and in 2014 was voted one of the 50 most intriguing TED talks of all time. The Savory Institute is one of 11 finalists in the Virgin Earth Challenge, a $25 million initiative for the successful commercialization of ways of taking greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere and keeping them out with no countervailing impacts. https://savory.global

The Uncensored Unprofessor
233 The Book of Job (2) His 3 Friends, Behemoth, & Leviathan

The Uncensored Unprofessor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:29


Why do we suffer? Is God punishing us? Did we deserve it? Does the book of Job teach us the law of karma? In this show I look at Job in its historic context to see what it is teaching us about suffering, life, and God himself. Why does God teach Job about the monsters Behemoth and Leviathan? I also discuss why my show is subversive in Christ. Come laugh and think with me!

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 603 (11-15-21): Last Bird Out

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 11-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 15, 2021.  This revised episode from October 2013 is the first in a series this year of winter-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 21 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's gone, the days were long; now the moonlight froze the dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” That's part of “Winter is Coming,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels.  It sets the stage for exploring a characteristic feathered feature of the transition from fall to winter.  To start, we drop in on a chattering crowd of eager flyers, who then hear their long-distance flights being announced but no planes are taking off.  If this sounds like a huge airport headache instead of a water event, well, just have a listen for about 35 seconds.SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec – Voice call-outs: “Sora.  Snowy Egret.  Green Heron.  Osprey.  Least Tern.  Piping Plover.  Broad-winged Hawk.”You've been listening to the names and sounds of seven kinds of birds that are known to spend summer in Virginia and then typically migrate out of the Commonwealth for winter.  Fall's arrival means the departure from the Commonwealth of many species of birds—including the first six you just heard—who may nest in spring and summer around Virginia's aquatic areas.  Fall also brings seasonal migrations of land-based birds—including the seventh species you heard, the forest-dwelling Broad-winged Hawk—that travel over watery areas of Virginia, particularly the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula.  In fact, the concentration of hawks and other migrants along Virginia's Eastern Shore makes it an important and popular location for monitoring bird migration, and the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory maintains a migrant-counting platform in Kiptopeke State Park in Northampton County.  Among various programs at the Observatory, Kiptopeke Hawkwatch has been conducted at that location since 1977.  In fall 2021, over 17,000 migrating hawks and other raptors had been recorded as of late October. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the other bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and to several Virginia Tech colleagues for calling out the bird names.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Winter is Coming.” MUSIC – ~23 sec – Lyrics: “Summer's gone, we're movin' on, can't regret that frozen dawn.  Summer's over, winter's coming.  Summer's over, winter's coming.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 183, 10-14-13. “Winter is Coming,” from the 2015 album “We've Got a Fire,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 292, 11-30-15. The sounds of Sora, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Osprey, Least Tern, Piping Plover, and Broad-winged Hawk were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/.Thanks to Eli Heilker, Sarah Karpanty, Kevin McGuire, and Tony Timpano for recording bird names.  Thanks to Dr. Karpanty also for her help in developing the idea for this episode. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES An observation station for the Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory in Kiptopeke State Park, Northampton County, Virginia, October 7, 2007.  The chart listed the birds of prey that had been counted to date during that year's fall migration on Virginia's Eastern Shore. North American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 11/16/21. SOURCES Used for Audio Coastal Virginia Wildlife Observatory, online at http://www.cvwo.org/. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rdEdition, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required).U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Eastern Shore of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge, online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/eastern_shore_of_virginia/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Entries for the species mentioned in this episode are located online as follows:Broad-winged Hawk: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040089&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Green Heron: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040028&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Least Tern: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040186&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Osprey: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Piping Plover: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040120&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Snowy Egret: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040033&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943.Sora: https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040108&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18943. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth.Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 403, 1-15-18 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Surviving freezing (by animals) – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter preparedness – Episode 553, 11-30-20.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes Audubon Christmas Bird Count – Episode 294, 12-14-15.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 197, 1-20-14.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive.2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles.2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and resp

new york society bay university agency guide music ice broad natural earth fire state audio living game college north america frost world change surviving map accent animals cd dark north american steel wheels tech water xeno web index fall sora land rain pond press research ocean weather government education birds plants foundation voice chesapeake bay native baltimore fish chesapeake snow environment images green va cambridge adaptations msonormal commonwealth stream menu robbins normal worddocument zoom donotshowrevisions citizens voices hawk environmental dynamic times new roman calibri trackmoves trackformatting punctuationkerning saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent compatibility breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit latentstyles deflockedstate latentstylecount latentstyles style definitions msonormaltable table normal donotpromoteqf lidthemeother lidthemeasian x none snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules mathpr mathfont cambria math brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin rmargin defjc centergroup wrapindent intlim subsup narylim undovr defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked priority semihidden unhidewhenused qformat name normal name title name default paragraph font name subtitle name strong name emphasis name table grid name placeholder text name no spacing name light shading name light list name light grid name medium shading name medium list name medium grid name dark list name colorful shading name colorful list name colorful grid name light shading accent name light list accent name light grid accent name revision name list paragraph name quote name intense quote name dark list accent name colorful shading accent name colorful list accent name colorful grid accent name subtle emphasis name intense emphasis name subtle reference name intense reference name book title name bibliography name toc heading shenandoah biology teal grade special olympics colorful md brant signature bio freezing watershed transcript ornithology virginia tech ls atlantic ocean natural resources wildlife service grades k observatory name normal indent name list name list bullet name list number name closing name signature name body text name body text indent name list continue name message header name salutation name date name body text first indent name note heading name block text name document map name plain text name e name normal web name normal table name no list name outline list name table simple name table classic name table colorful name table columns name table list name table 3d name table contemporary name table elegant name table professional name table subtle name table web name balloon text name table theme name plain table name grid table light name grid table light accent dark accent colorful accent name list table processes entries harrisonburg ar sa eastern shore zoology minn taxonomy cosgrove msohyperlink wildlife resources audubon society all about birds osprey sections life sciences ben cosgrove birdsongs stormwater canvasback delmarva peninsula lang elliott loons policymakers msobodytext bmp rockingham county acknowledgment virginia department michigan museum robert l johns hopkins university press cumberland gap sols kevin mcguire northampton county tmdl virginia society polar plunge inland fisheries ebird living systems virginia standards water center space systems audio notes
Beyond Blathers
At the Beaty Biodiversity Museum

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 24:02


Come along with us as we explore the Beaty Biodiversity Museum at the University of British Columbia! We're on the hunt for the insects, fish, and fossils you can find at Blathers' museum. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Olivia is also open for commissions for adorable pet portraits, pins, and custom illustrations — take a look at the highlight on our Instagram! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Philosophy Audiobooks
History of Animals Book 10 by Aristotle

Philosophy Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 37:04


History of Animals Book 10 by Aristotle & Translated by Richard Cresswell

Nature's Archive
#33: Dr. Andrew Farnsworth - Predicting Bird Migrations with BirdCast

Nature's Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 62:25


My guest in this episode is Dr. Andrew Farnsworth. Andrew is a Senior Research Associate in the Center for Avian Population Studies at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and has a BS in Natural Resources from Cornell University, MS in Zoology from Clemson University, and PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Cornell.Andrew started birding at age 5 and quickly developed a fascination with bird migration, which continues to this day. His research advances the use and application of multiple technologies to study bird movements on continental scales. This includes the use of weather surveillance radar, audio and video recording and monitoring tools, citizen science datasets, and machine learning techniques.Today we discuss one of his primary projects, BirdCast. BirdCast presents near real time bird migration status, provides migration forecasts up to three days out, and provides local migration alerts to inform conservation action.Creating BirdCast has required decades of research and a combination of many disciplines.  Andrew discusses how ground-truth observations, acoustics, and radar data are correlated to weather data to produce a predictive model that accurately forecasts migration days in advance. Andrew discusses how advances in computing technology and machine learning have dramatically advanced model accuracy and accelerated progress.We get into the details of the model, including why temperature is the most important factor in bird migration prediction, how tropical storms impact migration, and why migration and monitoring in the western USA is different from the eastern USA.We also discuss how birders can use BirdCast for their interests, and the many ways that migration prediction helps with conservation efforts, such as Lights Out Texas.You can see the forecasts and a lot of research and technical data at birdcast.info, or follow the team @DrBirdCast, on twitter.Full Show NotesLinks to People and Topics DiscussedThe Academy of Natural SciencesAdriaan Doktor, Benjamin Van Doren and Kyle Horton from the birdcast teamDr. Sidney Gauthreaux - Dr. Farnsworth's advisor at Clemson University, and a pioneer in the field.How radar detects birds (from birdcast.info) Lights Out Texas from Texan By NatureWSR 88D (aka NexRAD) - the US National Weather Service overview of the technologyLinks to Related EpisodesBrian Sullivan - Brian is a former project lead for eBird, also from the Cornell Lab. This episode discusses that, as well are many technological opportunities to better understand birdsProject Terra - learn more about bird telemetry, nocturnal flight calls, and associated tracking technologies 

Beyond Blathers
Queen Alexandra's Birdwing

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 35:34


This week we're talking about the huge and beautiful Queen Alexandra's Birdwing Butterfly! Join us as we talk about this butterfly's biology, and go off on tangents into conservation and the fascinating Wikipedia page of Walter Rothschild.  If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Olivia is also open for commissions for adorable pet portraits, pins, and custom illustrations — take a look at the highlight on our Instagram! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Wild Thing
S2 Bonus Episode #12: Aliens and Zoology—An Interview With Arik Kershenbaum

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 38:11


If we find them, aliens would be, well, alien, right? Maybe not as alien as we think. In his book, zoologist Arik Kershenbaum makes the case for why what we know about animals on Earth could reveal what aliens might be like, too. *Season 2 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lipinski Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks.

Travel Utah Podcast
Travel Utah Podcast Episode 16- Natural History Museum of Utah

Travel Utah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 46:50


Established in 1969, The Natural History Museum of Utah has become the Crown Jewel of the many historic and scientific institutions located in the State of Utah. In this episode of the Travel Utah Podcast, I talk with Tim Lee (Director of Exhibits), Randy Irmis (Chief Curator/Curator of Paleontology), and Jason Cryan (Museum Director), about the history of the NHMU, what makes it so special, and what we can expect in the future for this one of a kind destination. 

The TrainingBeta Podcast: Climbing Training Podcast
TBP 184 :: Carbs for Climbers - How Much, What Kind, Timing, and Why

The TrainingBeta Podcast: Climbing Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 31:06


TBP 184 :: Carbs for Climbers – How Much, What Kinds, Timing, and Why In this episode, I talk all about carbohydrates and how to use them properly in your diet to help your climbing performance, energy levels every day, overall mental well-being, and body composition. Carbs are a tricky topic because we've been taught to fear and hate them, even though in reality they're what fuel strength and power activities. They're also paramount to keeping your blood sugar and mood stable all day every day, as well as helping you to fall asleep and stay asleep. If you're eating the wrong kinds of carbs in the wrong amounts at the wrong times of day, in conjunction with the wrong amount of protein and fat, you're going to have issues. But if you know some basic guidelines around carbs, including what kinds to eat, how much of them, and when, it can make a world of difference in your life and your climbing. These changes can literally happen overnight, so listen carefully to this episode and try to make some tweaks to your diet for some potentially big changes. This is a recording taken from a 5-day nutrition challenge I did last year in front of a live zoom audience. I talked for about 15 minutes on the topic and then took a bunch of questions from the audience (very common questions, so they're quite relevant). A Little about Me After completing my Bachelor's degree in Psychology and Zoology at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, I did a 4-year nutrition certificate program at Seven Bowls School of Nutrition, Nourishment, and Healing. I graduated in 2007 as a Certified Integrative Clinical Nutrition Therapist. During those 4 years, I learned about not only nutrition, but herbs, homeopathy, and other alternative practices. I've been seeing clients since 2007 and I've worked exclusively with climbers since 2013. Nutrition Coaching with Me If you're looking for help with your own nutrition and you feel like you need personalized coaching, I'm taking new clients right now. I also have a program that is self-paced with 4+ hours of video from me, PDF's, and meal plans laid out for you. You can find more information about my services and the program at www.trainingbeta.com/nutrition. You're welcome to email me at neely@trainingbeta.com if you have any questions at all.   Episode Details Common symptoms of low and high carbs in my clients.  The right kinds of carbs help stabilize blood sugar, which keeps your energy levels up for longer.  What about vegetables? Sugar consumption guidelines Sample meals afternoon fatigue Low energy for workouts Poor recovery the next day (especially after big day outside) Sugar cravings Food obsession Always hungry Snacking a lot at night Poor sleep Things I see happen when people don't eat enough carbs or too many, especially in the morning   Show Links Work with me one-on-one or do my self-paced program

Cryptopedia - A Paranormal Podcast
Cryptopedia 102 - HOW?! | Cursed Zoology | Where Do Eels Come From?

Cryptopedia - A Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 61:39


I literally don't even know where to begin on this one. We joke about The Mighty Boosh a lot, but this one broke your hosts.   At the time of uploading, we're awaiting news of the newest cryptid of the Cryptopedia family.   Discord: https://discord.me/cryptopediacast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=14015340 --- Spontaneous Generation in Antiquity — TAPA 51:101‑115 (1920) Where Do Eels Come From? Why Nobody Knows How Eels Reproduce Nature Notes: The Journey of the Eel As American as ... the American Eel - Yesterdays Island, Todays Nantucket Japan researchers collect wild eel eggs for first time

2 Million Blossoms - The Podcast
Taxonomist & Ecologist Michael Orr (016)

2 Million Blossoms - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 44:04


Have you ever wondered about the bee biodiversity in other countries? In this episode, meet Dr. Michael Orr, Assistant Professor at the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, where he has worked for the last three years. Michael is a taxonomist and ecologist, who has studied the aggregations of the sandstone excavating bee, the tiny Anthophora pueblo. Listen as Kirsten talks with Michael and learn why these bees spend so much time and energy to create nest holes in the pueblo walls. He just recently published an important paper on global bee distribution and on the show, we discuss how our collection strategies both historically and currently contain inherent biases. Many species sit in drawers waiting to be fully described as type species. Listen today and learn how bee taxonomists and digitization of collections is moving our understanding of bee diversity forward. _____________________ Learn more about the 2 Million Blossoms and about protecting our pollinators at: https://www.2millionblossoms.com/ _____________________ We welcome Betterbee as sponsor of today's episode. BetterBee's mission is to support every beekeeper with excellent customer service, continued education and quality equipment. From their colorful and informative catalog to their support of beekeeper educational activities, including this podcast series, BetterBee truly is Beekeepers Serving Beekeepers. See for yourself at www.betterbee.com ______________________ Music: Original 2 Million Blossoms Theme, by Oscar Morante / Mooi Studios. Guitar music by Jeffrey Ott 2 Million Blossoms - The Podcast is a joint audio production of Protect Our Pollinators, LLC and Growing Planet Media, LLC

Beyond Blathers
Moray Eel

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:08


This spooky Halloween weekend, we're bringing you an episode on the slithery, slimy moray eel! What is up with their jaws and teeth? Are they as fierce predators as they seem? Listen to find out! If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Olivia is also open for commissions for adorable pet portraits, pins, and custom illustrations — take a look at the highlight on our Instagram! Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Two Bees in a Podcast
Balanced Diet in Bees & Bottling Honey

Two Bees in a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 52:53


In this episode Two bees in a Podcast, released on October 27th, 2021, we are joined by Christian Pirk, a Professor in the Department of Zoology and Entomology at the University of Pretoria to discuss the behavior of Cape/African Honey Bees. In the 5 Minute Management segment, Jamie and Amy discuss bottling honey. This episode is ended with a Q&A segment.

The Podcast on the Prairie with Jeremiah Hall and Brayden Willis
Episode 10: Kenneth Murray, Kansas, and Zoology 101

The Podcast on the Prairie with Jeremiah Hall and Brayden Willis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 50:47


DOUBLE DIGITS. We've made it to Episode 10 and on this week's pod the guys talk being 8-0, Caleb Williams' fourth down conversion, and how Boomer and Sooner would fare in a Big 12 mascot melee. Sooner legend Kenneth Murray then stops by to chop it up with 9 and 27.Support for this episode is from MANSCAPED. Head over to MANSCAPED.com and enter code "Prairie" to get 20% off your order AND free shipping.  

Beyond Blathers
Acanthostega

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 22:16


This week we're talking about an interesting fossil — the acanthostega! Were they an evolutionary stepping stone to get from water to land? The answer is a bit more complicated than that! Listen to find out more. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

Better Than Human
Mermaids: Imprinted in Human Psyche, But Evolutionarily Impossible

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 59:24


A Mermaid is a mythical aquatic creature with the upper body of a female human and the tail of a fish.  Legends of these creatures have been reported since the beginning of humanity. There is no evidence that mermaids live anywhere on earth. However, there are a lot of scientific reasons why they physically cannot exist. Seriously, fish and human's last common ancestor was over 170 million years ago. If you're going to say mermaids are mammals, they'd have to breathe air, which means going to the surface often. (So lots of chances for humans to spot them).  AND even then, a human/water mammal would not have had time to evolve. Whales returned to the ocean 50 million years ago, and humans evolved 300,000 years ago…. So there is just not enough time for evolution to take place.But, there is a lot of interesting folklore surrounding these creatures. (A lot more interesting than the bigfoot ‘folklore') Tails of merfolks go back to ancient times: from the 2500BC Mesopotamia to the first know tale of an Assyrian queen who turned into a mermaid in 1000BC to current culture.  So, to say mermaids have been in the human psyche forever, would not be in error. Listen now to learn why mermaids cannot happen in real life, but are interesting anyways. For more information on us, visit our website at betterthanhumanpodcast.comFollow us on Twitter @betterthanhuma1on Facebook @betterthanhumanpodcaston Instagram @betterthanhumanpodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@betterthanhumanpodcastor Email us at betterthanhumanpodcast@gmail.comWe look forward to hearing from you, and we look forward to you joining our cult of weirdness!#betterthanhuman #cultofweirdnes

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
627: Sorting Out the Science of Fruit Fly Flight and Behavior - Dr. Michael Dickinson

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 44:45


Dr. Michael Dickinson is the Esther M. and Abe M. Zarem Professor of Bioengineering  at the California Institute of Technology. His work focuses on the biomechanics and the biophysics of life with a particular focus on how animals fly. He looks at these questions through a neuroscientific lens, trying to understand behavior and flight control. In addition to being an excellent scientist, Michael is quite the enthusiastic musician. He played guitar for many years, and has been strumming on the ukulele for about 10 years as well. Much of his free time is spent gardening native plants and enjoying the company of his family. He received his PhD in Zoology from the University of Washington and afterwards worked briefly at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany. Michael has received numerous awards and honors during his career, including the Larry Sandler Award from the Genetics Society of America, the Bartholemew Award for Comparative Physiology from the American Society of Zoologists, a Packard Foundation Fellowship in Science and Engineering, a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and the Quantrell award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching from the University of Chicago. He is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Michael shares more about his journey through life and science in this interview.

Beyond Blathers
Mantis Shrimp

Beyond Blathers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 33:43


This week we're talking about the Mantis Shrimp, a crustacean that's gained a lot of popularity recently, and for good reason! But with fame comes gossip, and we're here to unpack all the flim flam, from their deadly punch to their renowned eyesight. If you'd like to support the show, please check out our merch store over on Etsy where we sell stickers, postcards, keychains, and hand-made needle-felted ornaments. Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a rating and review. To stay up to date and see our weekly episode illustrations, make sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Beyond Blathers is hosted and produced by Olivia deBourcier and Sofia Osborne, with art by Olivia deBourcier and music by Max Hoosier. This podcast is not associated with Animal Crossing or Nintendo, we just love this game.

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
626: Digging into the Fossil Record to Understand our Planet's Past and Aid Present Conservation Efforts - Dr. Michael Archer

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 63:01


Dr. Michael Archer is a Professor of Paleobiology in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of New South Wales in Australia. Mike is a paleontologist who is fascinated with understanding the continuity of life over billions of years. He spends his free time watching Sci-Fi movies, including classics like Jurassic Park (one of his all-time favorites). Mike received his undergraduate education from Princeton University in Geology and Biology. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study in Australia and remained there to earn his PhD in Zoology from the University of Western Australia. Mike has since worked at the Western Australian, Queensland, and Australian Museums, and he joined the faculty at the University of New South Wales in 1978. Mike has received many awards and honors, including being named one of the Top 100 Most Influential People in Sydney in 2008, receipt of the Riversleigh Society Medal, the TH Huxley Award from the Australian Museum, and the Australian Centennial Medal from the Federal Government of Australia. He is a Member of the Australia Institute of Biology, as well as a Fellow of the Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, the World Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Australian College of Educators, The Australian Academy of Science, the Royal Society of New South Wales, and Australia 21. In this interview, Mike tells us more about his journey through life and science.