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Best podcasts about Sierra Nevada

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Latest podcast episodes about Sierra Nevada

KQED's The California Report
Abortion Access Limited for Many Living in Rural California

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 11:52


The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Wednesday in a case that could overturn Roe v. Wade, which guarantees a woman's right to an abortion. Here in California, abortion laws are among the most progressive in the country. But that doesn't mean it's always easy to get an abortion here, especially if you live in a rural area.  Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED California's Sierra Nevada region has been known for being a winter wonderland in the coldest months. But a new study shows the Sierra snowpack could all but disappear in just 25 years. Reporter: Tara Atrian, KCRW

Dog Cancer Answers
Bladder Cancer in Dogs: Is It a Death Sentence? | Dr. Nancy Reese, DVM, PhD Deep Dive

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 19:47


Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common bladder cancer in dogs. While there is no cure, Dr. Nancy Reese does consider this cancer to be treatable and you can dramatically improve your dog's comfort and quality of life with medications. TCC can also be diagnosed with a special urine test, which is much easier to do and less stressful for your dog than a surgical biopsy (not to mention less expensive!). As the cancer progresses, it can become uncomfortable and may even obstruct the bladder and prevent the dog from urinating. About 50% of cases will eventually spread to other parts of the body as well. But treatment will usually keep your dog comfortable for 6 months to a year. Listen in to learn where this cancer can occur, how it is diagnosed, and options for treatment. Links Mentioned in Today's Show: CADET® BRAF and CADET® BRAF-PLUS Urine Tests for Bladder Cancer Related Links: Transitional Cell Carcinoma – What You Need to Know About Your Dog's Cancer Podcast Episode Chemotherapy for Dogs Demystified | Dr. Sue Ettinger Deep Dive Podcast Episode Metronomic Chemotherapy for Dogs with Cancer Article by Oncologist Dr. Susan Ettinger About Today's Guest, Dr. Nancy Reese: Dr. Nancy Reese is a small animal veterinarian with over 30 years of clinical experience taking care of cats and dogs and other critters in the Sierra Nevada foothills. She is also a perpetual student and researcher, as evidenced by her many degrees. In addition to her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of California, Davis, she earned a Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis and then a Ph.D. in Epidemiology at UC Davis. If you string all her letters out after her name it looks like this: Nancy Reese, DVM, MPVM, PhD. In her spare time, she volunteers to help evacuate and shelter animals caught up in disasters, and she's currently training to help in human search and rescue efforts. Dr. Reese lives in a log cabin with her husband, her 13-year-old golden retriever, and her two 13-year-old cats. Her hobbies include boosting the quality of life and longevity for all animals in her care, hiking, travelling, and cross-country skiing. Oh, and lots of dog walking.  degree from the University of California at Davis before earning his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Cornell University. Other Links: To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/  Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers. If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceransers.com. Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com

The CRUX: True Survival Stories
41) Jean Muenchrath: Escape from Mt Whitney

The CRUX: True Survival Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 45:08


Today we have a special guest, Jean Muenhcrath. She is going to tell her amazing survival story that starts when she and her boyfriend Ken set out to ski the John Muir trail in 1982 on skinny nordic skis. The John Muir trail is over 200 mile long trail in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California, a world famous trail, connecting the Yosemite Valley to Mount Whitney, the highest point in the United States, with a total elevation gain of 47,000 feet. All was going well on this journey until the duo encountered a storm on Mount Whitney that would forever change Jean's life. Check out Jean's book: If I Live Until Morning: A True Story of Adventure, Tragedy and Transformation, available on Amazon. Also take a look at Jean's website at www.jeanmuenchrath.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kaycee-mcintosh/support

The Unfiltered Gentlemen
Batch279: Is There Anything Worse Than Eggnog?

The Unfiltered Gentlemen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 42:12


Grab your turkey and your festive beers; it's time to prepare for the holidays! Coley hangs out with Flex and Greg as they discuss the best boozy holiday beverage, stocking up on drinks for the holidays, and Thanksgiving fun facts!To kick off Thanksgiving, we're drinking beers that make us think of turkey day. First is Sierra Nevada's Celebration fresh hop IPA. Then, for dessert, we're stepping outside the box with Main & Mill Brewing Company's HoliDaze Halloween stout. One of these beers is great!Holiday beverages are essential, and we're talking about the best (and worst) holiday beverages and what beers really bring in the winter. A line is drawn when it comes to eggnog. What's America's Thanksgiving drink of choice? How about the drunkest states on turkey day? We've got your Thanksgiving Fun Facts.Delaware is providing this week's Ludicrous Libation Law; make sure you stock up on beer ahead of time!Who brews it best? We have Beer and Brewing's Best Beer of 2021. Maui Brewing is moving its operations to the mainland. And two drunk men are arrested for bringing a knife to a gunfight, or was it a gun to a knife fight?Coley: www.instagram.com/ice_cole_beer_ Boozecast Flex: www.instagram.com/flex_me_a_beer Craft Beer Republic: www.CraftBeerRepublic.com www.instagram.com/CraftBeerRepublic www.facebook.com/CraftBeerRepublicPod www.twitter.com/CraftBeerRepub (805) 538-2337 Use promo code UNFILTERED on Tavour.

Oxygenaddict Triathlon Podcast, with Coach Rob Wilby and Helen Murray - Triathlon coaching by oxygenaddict.com
361 Kristian Blummenfelt: Ironman World Record breaker and Olympic Gold Medalist

Oxygenaddict Triathlon Podcast, with Coach Rob Wilby and Helen Murray - Triathlon coaching by oxygenaddict.com

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 1:16


Kristian Blummenfelt has just destroyed the World Record for Ironman, with his incredible 7.21 at Cozumel. He joins us the day after the race to tell us all about the race, the Olympic Gold medal, training at altitude in the solitude of the Sierra Nevada mountains. We also hear about his plans to be the first human to break the 7 hour barrier for Ironman, and how he plans to win both St George and Kona in 2022! Sponsorshttps://www.precisionhydration.com/ - Multi-strength electrolytes that match how you sweat, and Precision Fuel 30 Gel and Drink mix to ensure enough carbohydrate to perform at your best. Get 15% off your first order With the code OXYGENADDICT15· Take the Quick Carb Calculator· Take the Free online Sweat Test· Book a free 20-minute hydration and fueling strategy video consultationLike what you heard in this interview? Join hundreds of other age group triathletes making the most of their limited training time, training with Team OxygenAddict! http://team.oxygenaddict.com - The most comprehensive triathlon coaching program for busy age groupers. To find out more, You can book a zoom, phone or skype call with Rob or the Team here Join the Oxygenaddict Triathlon Community page on facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/666558563716897/Listen on Spotify: http://bit.ly/OATriPodSpotifyListen on iTunes: http://bit.ly/OATriPodiTunes

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia
403: Las Señoritas: Liberated missionaries in Colombia's Sierra Nevada

Colombia Calling - The English Voice in Colombia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:14


One of the goals of the Colombia Calling podcast is to reveal lesser or unknown stories from Colombia and this week on Episode 403, I feel we've really hit this one out of the park! We get to talk to Daniela Rocha and Daniel Velasquez, part of a team of filmmakers currently putting together a documentary entitled: Las Señoritas. This is a special story as it highlights the work of a religious organization called USEMI (la Unión Seglar de Misioneras). This is a missionary group with a difference, it's revolutionary, it's staffed by single women and it was not designed to "drag the poor indigenous people from poverty and ignorance," but to understand local and original cultures, finding god within their beliefs. We talk to Daniela and Daniel about the experiences of filming in the Sierra Nevada with the Arhuaco and Kogui people, hearing of the USEMI project which took place between the 1960s and 1980s before leaving the Sierra. It's unusual to hear about "revolutionary catholicism," and this makes for phenomenal listening. The filmmakers are seeking contributions in this post-production phase, take a look here: https://vaki.co/en/vaki/lassenoritas#summary

I Like Beer The Podcast
Thanksgiving 2021 with Fresh Hop Beers

I Like Beer The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 36:11


As 2021 starts to wind down, the ILB would like to give thanks to all of our family, friends and listeners for supporting our little podcast.  The team shares some travel tips with more silly state laws while tasting some fantastic Fresh Hop beers from Fremont Brewing and Sierra Nevada.  Happy Thanksgiving Everyone. 

Drinking Socially - The Official Untappd Podcast
Drinking Socially S4 Ep. 44: Winter Wonderland

Drinking Socially - The Official Untappd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 54:00


You can earn this badge by checking-in any beer with a winter theme. Look for beers with "winter" in the title or style! As the hosts sip on Sierra Nevada's Celebration Fresh Hop IPA, they also highlight Mills River Brewing as the Verified Venue of the Week. Shout out to Neshaminy Creek Brewing and Casita Brewing for the best beers we had this week. 

Dog Cancer Answers
How to Stop Dog Bleeding | Dr. Nancy Reese Deep Dive

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 18:15


Bleeding can be a minor inconvenience or a medical emergency. Dr. Nancy Reese recommends methods to stop minor bleeding at home as well as how to bandage a more serious wound to control bleeding on your way to the veterinary hospital. Most bleeding in dogs is due to trauma, from cutting a paw on a rock to being hit by a car. The easiest way to stop bleeding is to prevent it from happening in the first place! Keep your dog on a leash when outside near roads or in the woods, and limit interactions with wildlife and unfamiliar dogs. If hiking with your dog, bring a first aid kit and consider protective booties when traveling over rough terrain. Some types of cancer and other health conditions can cause bleeding as well. Superficial tumors might get damaged when your dog is playing, and nasal tumors often cause nosebleeds. Hemangiosarcoma, cancer of the blood vessels, is famous for causing bleeding. External bleeding can often be controlled with first aid care, while internal bleeding will require veterinary care. Learn about basic first aid, products to stop bleeding, and the herb Yunnan baiyao. Links Mentioned in Today's Show: Herbal Treatment for Bleeding Tumors in Dogs podcast episode on Yunnan baiyao HemaBlock Related Links: Hemangiosarcoma- What You Need to Know About Your Dog's Cancer Nasal Tumors – What You Need to Know About Your Dog's Cancer About Today's Guest, Dr. Nancy Reese: Dr. Nancy Reese is a small animal veterinarian with over 30 years of clinical experience taking care of cats and dogs and other critters in the Sierra Nevada foothills. She is also a perpetual student and researcher, as evidenced by her many degrees. In addition to her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of California, Davis, she earned a Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis and then a Ph.D. in Epidemiology at UC Davis. If you string all her letters out after her name it looks like this: Nancy Reese, DVM, MPVM, PhD. In her spare time, she volunteers to help evacuate and shelter animals caught up in disasters, and she's currently training to help in human search and rescue efforts. Dr. Reese lives in a log cabin with her husband, her 13-year-old golden retriever, and her two 13-year-old cats. Her hobbies include boosting the quality of life and longevity for all animals in her care, hiking, travelling, and cross-country skiing. Oh, and lots of dog walking.  degree from the University of California at Davis before earning his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Cornell University. Other Links: To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/  Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers. If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceransers.com. Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com

Science Friday
Mammoth Pool Fire, Fun Squirrel Facts, Soil Importance. Nov 12 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 52:39


As Wildfire Intensity Rises, So Does The Human Toll Of Blazes It was Labor Day 2020, and Mammoth Pool Reservoir, in California's Sierra Nevada, was buzzing with campers. Karla Carcamo and her parents, siblings, cousins, and countless others, mostly from the Los Angeles area, have been coming here every Labor Day for 17 years. “Most of it is my family, and family that's invited family, and those family friends have invited friends of theirs,” she says. “I'm telling you, we have over 200 people.” Alex Tettamanti and her husband Raul Reyes are also Labor Day regulars. Every year, they drive in from Las Vegas to meet up with an off-roading club made up of a few dozen families from across the West. They fill their weekend with jet-skiing, ATVing and hiking. “It's beautiful,” says Tettamanti. “The smell of all the pine trees and stuff, and the trees are so big, it's really cool. The campground and reservoir are nestled at an elevation of about 3,000 feet in the Central California foothills a few hours northeast of Fresno. The attraction is unfiltered Sierra Nevada: Sparkling blue water surrounded by a thick forest of stately ponderosa pines and black oaks. Plus, it's isolated. There's only one road in and out, which dead ends at the lake. “Being there, let me tell you, it's like a little piece of paradise,” says Carcamo. That Friday passed like any other. Groups split up to go hiking, swimming and grilling, and Carcamo's family prepared for their annual pupusa night later in the weekend. By Saturday morning, however, the atmosphere had changed. “When I woke up, I did notice it was kind of cloudy,” says Reyes. “The sky was orange and there was ash, like big pieces of ash falling,” says Reyes' friend Vicky Castro. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   Squirrel-Nut Economics And Other Agility Tricks In many parts of the country, the lead-up to winter is a busy time for squirrels, furiously collecting and hiding acorns and nuts for the cold months ahead. But how can squirrels recall where it has stashed all its stores? And what can studying squirrels tell researchers about memory, learning, and economic decision-making in other species? Ira talks with Lucia Jacobs, a professor in the department of psychology and the Institute of Neuroscience at UC Berkeley, about her studies of the campus squirrels—from learning about their cognition, learning, and memory to recording the acrobatic movements of a squirrel on the ground and in the treetops. Jacobs co-leads a "squirrel school," observing rescued and orphaned juvenile squirrels as they learn normal squirrel behavior, and is contributing to a project seeking to develop robots using agility tricks learned from the rodents.   What Will We Reap Without Topsoil? You may have missed the research when it came out this February: a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science reporting on satellite studies of farmland topsoil in the nation's corn belt, states like Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois. And the news was not good. The team estimated that more than one-third of the topsoil in this region is gone, eroded mostly from hilltops and ridgelines, thanks to the plowing and tilling processes used to perform industrial agriculture. That topsoil, some of the richest in the world, is carbon-rich and crucial to our food supply. And yet it's continuing to wash away, a hundred years after scientists like Aldo Leopold first called out the threat of erosion. This erosion, as well as other degradation of soil's complex structure and microbiome, continues at a fast clip around the globe, hurting food production and ecosystems health. In addition, soil could be helping us contain more than 100 billion additional tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere—if we let it. But the good news, according to University of Wisconsin soil scientist Jo Handelsman, is that the solutions like cover crops and no-till farming are simple, well-understood, and easy to implement—as long as we give farmers incentives to make the leap. She talks to Ira about her forthcoming book, A World Without Soil: The Past, Present, and Precarious Future of the Earth Beneath Our Feet.

Plane Talking UK's Podcast
Episode 390 - Remember Remember the 5th of November

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 120:38


Join Carlos, Matt and Armando for this week's programme. In this week's show One airline goes all plastic, one airport introduces some lovely charges & someone finds an engine for Trumps B757 In the military, Wily Coyote hits the streets (he's armed this time); we have Thunderbolts and Elephants; and lots and lots of airplanes protect the G20 World Leader summit. We also catch up with Nev when he attended APG's meet up at Fairoaks a few weeks ago. Don't forget you can get in touch with us all at : WhatsApp +44 757 22 491 66 Email podcast@planetalkinguk.com or comment in our chatroom on YouTube. Here are the links to the stories we featured this week : COMMERCIAL Alaska Airlines is getting rid of plastic bottles and cups for water https://www.washingtonpost.com/travel/2021/11/03/alaska-airlines-plastic-water-bottles/ https://www.iata.org/en/programs/environment/cabin-waste/ Ryanair introduces digital travel assistant and self-service hub https://www.futuretravelexperience.com/2021/11/ryanair-introduces-digital-travel-assistant-and-self-service-hub/ King Air C90 stall during parachute drop captured by jumpers on camera https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nZHZFo29k4&ab_channel=MibFC American Airlines reduces flight cancellations but staffing challenges continue to disrupt travel https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/01/american-airlines-flight-cancellations-and-staffing-challenges-continue.html What is the new drop-off charge at the airport and how to avoid it https://www.mylondon.news/lifestyle/travel/heathrow-what-new-drop-charge-22041459 FAA To Take Regulatory Action Over 5G Altimeter Interference https://www.avweb.com/aviation-news/faa-to-take-regulatory-action-over-5g-interference/ Collins Aerospace wins deal to upgrade BA's B777 Club World https://www.aircraftinteriorsinternational.com/news/airline-news/collins-aerospace-wins-deal-to-upgrade-bas-b777-club-world.html Emirates starts dismantling A380s with specialist recruited for recycling https://www.flightglobal.com/airlines/emirates-starts-dismantling-a380s-with-specialist-recruited-for-recycling/146184.article Boeing's 747 Jumbo Jet Era to Close Next October, Buyer Says https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-11-03/boeing-s-747-jumbo-jet-era-to-close-next-october-buyer-says Engine Found: Trump's Boeing 757 Returns To The Skies After 2 Years https://simpleflying.com/trump-boeing-757-flies-again/ MILITARY PZL Mielec and Sierra Nevada showcase initial MC-145B prototype https://www.flightglobal.com/defence/pzl-mielec-and-sierra-nevada-showcase-initial-mc-145b-prototype/146109.article Typhoons, Predators, P-72A And HH-139s Part Of A Huge Security Operation For G20 Summit In Rome https://theaviationist.com/2021/10/31/g20-security-operation/ Every A-10 Thunderbolt II Of The Maryland Air National Guard Took Part In An ‘Elephant Walk' At Warfield Air National Guard Base https://theaviationist.com/2021/11/03/md-ang-a10-elephant-walk/

Queens of the Mines
Lola Montez - Part 2 of 2

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 34:50


Lola's mother had found out about new life in Europe, and she went into mourning as if her daughter was dead, sending out customary funeral letters on stationary edged in black. Lola could have easily been the richest woman to ever live, had she preferred her own advantage over political freedom. Lola's identity had been revealed at Her Majesty's Theatre, it led to an arrest on a charge of bigamy. Lola's wealthy new husband George Trafford Heald bailed her out of jail and they ran to Spain. The feisty and sometimes violent Montez and Heald were not getting along and the couple eventually decided to split while in Portugal. When George Heald suddenly and mysteriously drowned there in Portugal, Lola gained Heald's large inheritance. Lola, with her new fortune, was ready to find a new start. It was 1850, and she left for the land the whole world had been rushing to, The United States of America.   On the stages up and down the east coast of the New World, Lola Montez debuted a southern Italian folk dance, her own gussied up version of a lively tarantella. She wore tights in the color of her flesh, and layers and layers of petticoats in every color that bounced with her quick, flirtatious steps.  In her act, she was playing the part of a maiden in the country, who had spiders in her clothes. The spiders hung from her gloves and gown and hid under the layers of her petticoat. As she shook off and stomped away the toy spiders that riddled her costume and the stage, she exposed her shapely legs and as she lifted her skirt, the men cheered for her to find each and every spider. Lola lifted her petticoat so high that the men in the audience went crazy, for they could see, onstage, Lola wore no underclothing at all. Lola Montez was a smash. Although not everyone impressed, and some believed her performance was unprofessional, and talentless.    Lola stirred up excitement on that side of the new world for two years. After one particular show at an East Coast theatre, the manager openly criticized her spider act. Backstage, the sassy star retaliated with the bull whip she used onstage, busting the manager's face open. Denying the assault later, Lola said instead “there is one comfort in the falsehood, which is, that this man very likely would have deserved the whipping.” It was soon decided that she may be a better match with the lawless west. Without telling anyone, Lola caught a ride via a Pacific Mail paddle-wheel steamer in New Orleans, headed for California.   After the passage along the isthmus of Panama, and finally on the last ship of the voyage, Lola stood on the deck with a male distinguished fellow passenger looking out over the water. He asked her about her life. “My father was Irish, she told Brannan. “Irish! Well, then where did you get the name Montez?” Lola Montez stared out into the still ocean, “I took it”. She said. Just like I have taken everything I ever wanted.”    He chuckled, approvingly. This man was Sam Brannan. California's first millionaire. Brannan was on his way home after doing business in Boston and New York, he had a wife and 4 children at home in California yet he was paying much attention to his glamorous shipmate. The 29 year old Lola was by now an epic tabloid sensation in The United States. Her political schemes, erotic expolits and violent temper had made the top headlines through out the world. Yet no one would be at the long wharf to greet her when she stepped off the ship into San Francisco in 1853. She was arriving unannounced.   On the northeast corner of Sansome and Halleck streets, stood the American Theater. The American Theatre was the first brick large building built on the newly made soil along Sansome Street on land reclaimed from Yerba Buena Cove. During its opening night two years earlier in 1851, The American Theatre was so crowded that the walls sunk a couple of inches from the weight.    The irish satirist Richard Brinsley Sheridan's comedy "School for Scandal” was playing, and Lola Montez was playing Lady Teazle. The theater was able to charge $5 for the best seats. An outrageous price.  The reason being, the men in the audience truly desired to see her famous risque Spider Dance they had read about in the East Coast papers, and with that it was more than a dance they wanted to see. If you know what I mean. Lola obliged on the second night, to the delight of the mostly male audience her body exposed by her contortions.  She won the people over through naked charisma and pure force of personality. The act was reasonably well received by some, and it outraged others who felt they were obliged to look for the spiders in improper places.    Lola Montez was an eccentric woman who fascinated the masses entirely. She wore trousers and she carried a bull whip. She had an uncommon for ladies' fondness for hand-rolled cigarettes, and smoked openly! She became the first woman to ever be photographed while smoking. She straddled highbrow and lowbrow classes, rejecting the restrictive social codes associated with Victorian notions of “true womanhood.” Lola had the appearance of a Duchess.  As she spoke the royal illusion evaporated. Her vial mouth would have been considered to be unacceptable even in the wee hours of the city's most provocative men's smoking clubs.  Although they watched her every move, and even sometimes copied her style,  San Francisco's respectable classes never truly embraced Lola Montez, and she really felt it.   Lola was being courted by the married Sam Brannan. He was spoiling her in finer style than her Bavarian King Ludwig had ever provided her. Quite an impressive feat. Sam Brannan had an income of one thousand dollars a day, which is over 30,000 in 2020. He owned one hundred and seventy thousand acres, over 250 square miles where present day Los Angeles County lies. He lived well and lavishly, drinking and womanizing freely. Ann Eliza Brannan, his wife eventually divorced Sam, and when she did, she took half of everything he had. Lola moved on.  In San Francisco's early years, attending the theatre was a mostly male centered activity for they were the majority of the population. By 1853 it had become a highbrow sophisticated activity for audiences of both genders. Giving a place that countered the degrading, debilitating atmosphere of the times. The American Theatre had a rival theatre that was aptly named The San Francisco. One of the first original plays staged in the city was put on at the theatre San Francisco. "Who's Got the Countess?", a satire that profited off of Lola's deflating balloon. For two weeks, the burlesque packed the house. Some audience members accused the play of going too far. A writer for the Herald said the show was "an exceeding coarse and vulgar attack upon one who, whatever her faults and foibles may have been, has proved herself a noble-hearted and generous woman."   Lola Montez was performing onstage one evening in Sacramento, when someone laughed during the Spider Dance. Lola berated the audience and then stormed offstage. In the papers, it read that it was believed Montez had papered the house with her supporters. A letter challenging the editor to a duel soon surfaced, assertedly from Lola that read "You may choose between my dueling pistols or take your choice of a pill out of a pill box. One shall be poison and one shall not."   When Lola first sailed to San Francisco, on the same trip she met Brannan, she also met Patrick Purdy Hull. He was an irish reporter and the owner of the newspaper The San Francisco Whig. Lola said Patrick Hull could tell a story better than any other man she had known, and that was why she fell in love with him. On 1 July 1853 at the Mission Dolores, in a catholic ceremony, Lola Montez and Patrick Hull were married. Making Lola a US citizen. Lola did not want to live among the ridicule in the city, and instead bought a mine in a swelteringly hot ravine. The property was close to two of the richest mines in Nevada Country, California, Empire Mine and North Star Mine. She left San Francisco for the unincorporated town of Grass Valley.   Three years prior to her move to Grass Valley, the town held its first election under a large oak tree and one year later a building was constructed on the site. It was first used as the office for Gilmor Meredith's Gold Hill Mining Company, and then as a schoolhouse. Lola Montez purchased the building at 248 Mill St in Grass Valley and made it the home where her parrot, pet monkey, herself and Hull would live.     The town's disdain for the woman was proven by Grass Valley's Reverend when he spoke in a sermon denouncing Montez, warning the locals of the newest evil in town, calling the woman a hussy. Word passes to Lola, who was outraged at the statement and decided she would prove the quality of her act to the man herself. That night, she stormed into the Reverend's house where he was sitting to eat dinner with his wife. Lola Montez demanded the couple watch her full performance. She stomped and clapped and shook around his living room until he finally agreed she was in fact, a professional.  Montez ended up hated her life with her newest husband, and rather spent her days in Grass Valley with the young girl next door. Patrick Hull was tired of the parties and extremely spiteful of his wife's popularity. When a baron who was visiting from Europe attended one of Lola's social gatherings, he gifted her a grizzly bear to add to her exotic collection of pets. She named him Major. Patrick Hull was insanely jealous, and this final straw yanked a tear in the relationship that could not be mended. Hull sued Montez for divorce, naming a german doctor as the co-respondent. A few days later, the doctor was found in near-by hills, shot dead.   The neighbors, who ran a boarding house, had a daughter who was fascinated with the clearly unique Lola Montez and her private menagerie. It was not long before Lola was equally fascinated by the little girl, who was genuinely talented. She taught her to sing and dance and live wildly and allowed her to play in her extravagant costumes. Lola taught the young irish girl to sing ballads and perform ballet steps, fandangos, jig reels and Irish Highland flings from Lola's own childhood. The little blonde child's sense of rhythm surpassed Lola's, and she impressed the theatrical elite, strolling players and entertainers who came to the lavish parties Montez hosted. The unlikely pair rode bareback together, on a horse and pony. Despite the townspeople's opinion, the mother of the girl liked Lola and appreciated the time she spent with her daughter.  In the two years that Lola lived in Grass Valley, the California Gold Rush was ending, yet there was another gold mining rush in full swing. She hired Augustus Noel Folland, a married American actor as her new manager, hired a company of actors, and within two weeks, they were all sailing to Sydney Australia, aboard the Fanny Major. By the time they arrived, two months later, she had taken her new manager on as a lover. The following week, Lola's show opened at the Royal Victoria Theatre in a show titled 'Lola Montez in Bavaria'. That night, Montez fired some of the company, and they quickly sued her for damages.    As Lola and Folland were waiting to depart Sydney for Melbourne on board the Waratah, A sheriff's officer boarded the ship with a warrant of arrest, demanding she paid the sacked actors. Lola ran to her cabin, where she undressed. She sent out a note inviting the officer in to arrest her and drag her out. He left empty handed.     Audiences began to diminish at the Theatre Royal in Melbourne as Montez performed in her Bavarian role. Monttez made the decision to bring out her 'Spider Dance'. It was an instant hit for the men in the audience, again, Montez raising her skirts so high that the audience could see she wore no underclothing at all. The papers roared that her performance was 'utterly subversive to all ideas of public morality'. The theatre began to show heavy losses when respectable families ceased to attend the theatre. One even summoned the mayor of Melbourne to issue a warrant for her arrest for public indecency, but he refused the application. Months later in Ballarat, packed houses miners were showering gold nuggets at her feet yet again, the papers attacked her notoriety. Lola by now had a motto, “Courage---and shuffle the cards".  When Lola ran into the Ballarat Timeseditor Henry Seekamp at the United States Hotel, she retaliated by publicly horsewhipping him. Resulting in the rest of her tour being canceled. Folland and Montez quarreled excessively as they left for San Francisco on May 22 1856. On the journey near Fiji on the night of July 8th, Folland mysteriously fell overboard and drowned. Some believed he committed suicide after there fight, other believe he was pushed. No official investigation followed.    When Lola arrived back in the United States in 1856, she was different, subdued. Whatever happened on that ship, changed Lola Montez.Her previous lover from the past Alexandre Dumas once said 'She is fatal to any man who dares to love her'. Uncharacteristically, she sold her jewelry and gave the proceeds to Folland's children. She began using the remains of her bank account to give homeless and less fortunate women food, water and money. She decided to spread knowledge rather than performance, and began lecturing on her life, fashion, beauty, and famous women.  "I have known all the world has to give -- ALL!"  She began to write her book titled The Arts of Beauty, Or, Secrets of a Lady's Toilet: With Hints to Gentlemen on the Art of Fascinating.    Dance with all the might of your body, and all the fire of your soul, in order that you may shake all melancholy out of your liver; and you need not restrain yourself with the apprehension that any lady will have the least fear that the violence of your movements will ever shake anything out of your brains. I never claimed to be famous. Notorious I have always been.    She moved to New York, and reinvented herself once more. Embracing christianity, and with the Reverend Charles Chauncy Burr she arranged to deliver a series of moral lectures in Britain and America written by him. She returned to Ireland and did her final lecture in Dublin, “America and its people”, speaking in Limerick and Cork. Then returned to America in 1859. Later that year, the Philadelphia Press wrote Lola was iving very quietly up town, and doesn't have much to do with the world's people. Some of her old friends, the Bohemians, now and then drop in to have a little chat with her, and though she talks beautifully of her present feelings and way of life, she generally, by way of parenthesis, takes out her little tobacco pouch and makes a cigarette or two for self and friend, and then falls back upon old times with decided gusto and effect. But she doesn't tell anybody what she's going to do.   Within two years, Lola Montex began showing the tertiary effects of syphilis, the last contribution to the marriage from Patrick Hurdy Hull, and her body began to waste away. Lola, 39 years old, suffered a massive stroke and died alone in poverty on January 7th 1861. She is buried in the Greenwood cemetery, in Brooklyn. The marker simply reads “Mrs. Eliza Gilbert / Died 7 January 1861.”   You can read Lola's own writing, The Arts of Beauty, Secrets of a Lady's Toilet: With Hints to Gentlemen on the Art of Fascinating, Lectures of Lola Montez, Anecdotes of love, and Timeless Beauty: Advice to Ladies & Gentlemen. Lola's restored house  at 248 Mill St in Grass Valley is now a registered California Historical Landmark. Mount Lola, Nevada County and the Sierra Nevada's north of interstate 80 highest point at 9,148 feet, is named in her honour as well as two lakes you can find in the Tahoe National Forest. Named the Upper and Lower Lola Montez Lakes.   Now, let's talk about song lyrics, you many have heard this famous lyric.  "Whatever Lola Wants, Lola Gets".  "Whatever Lola Wants” was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross for the 1955 musical play Damn Yankees. The saying was inspired by Lola Montez. Or what about “Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl, With yellow feathers in her hair and a dress cut down to there", even Copacabana by Barry Manilow was inspired by our girl Lola.   In light of the BLM movement and the incredible change we are seeing, I would like to mention a quote said by Marian Anderson. "No matter how big a nation is, it is no stronger than its weakest people, and as long as you keep a person down, some part of you has to be down there to hold him down, so it means you cannot soar as you might otherwise."   Until recently, historians and the public have dismissed "conflict history," and important elements that are absolutely necessary for understanding American history have sometimes been downplayed or virtually forgotten. Lola constructed an identity as a “Spanish dancer” when Anglo Americans in California swayed between appreciating aspects of non-white cultures and rejecting them. If we do not incorporate racial and ethnic conflict in the presentation of the American experience, we will never understand how far we have come and how far we have to go. No matter how painful, we can only move forward by accepting the truth.  I am Andrea Anderson, thank you for taking the time to listen today,  let's meet again when we meet Lola's neighbor, the little irish girl in Grass Valley, next time, on “Queens of the Mines.    Queens of the Mines was written, produced and narrated by me, Andrea Anderson.  The theme song, In San Francisco Bay is by DBUK, You can find the links to their music, tour dates and merchandise, as well as links to all our social media and research links at queensofthemines.com  

Something Cryptid This Way Comes
Darkness into Light

Something Cryptid This Way Comes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 77:34


Michael has helped lives. He has given validation and honor back to those that have suffered trauma due to a sighting. And... he's created an outlet that is unique and supportive for countless individuals.This episode is also available on YouTube, where you'll see Michael and I analyze some of his drawings and the process he uses. It is highly suggested that you view this show to see what he is doing to create amazing drawings. You can also visit his YouTube channel The Drawings of Bigfoot as well as purchase some of his drawings online.Follow SOMETHING CRYPTID THIS WAY COMES on Instagram and Facebook. Subscribe to YouTube to be immersed in visuals and watch live interviews, and visit us online.EARLY RELEASES: Join OMM+  For as little as $3/month, with extra benefits for higher tiers, members will have access to extended episodes, behind-the-scenes interviews with guests, free merchandise, and many other exciting materials that will only be available through a membership. https://www.ommstories.com If you have a potential story to share, one you'd like to hear set to a story-telling format, or would even like to discuss sponsorship, send an email to Russ@ommstories.com  We've got some GREAT swag and gear that you can find on Redbubble  and Tee Public too. Stickers, t-shirts, mugs and more… you name it, we've got it! 

Beer and Conversation with Pigweed and Crowhill
173: The disaster that is public education

Beer and Conversation with Pigweed and Crowhill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 39:19


P&C drink and review Sierra Nevada's Amber Marzen, then discuss the catastrophe that public education has become, highlighting some recent developments. The education establishment believes parents have no say in what their children are being taught. Parents are punching back, which provoked a school board association to collude with the Biden administration to call these parents "domestic terrorists." In Loudon county, school are covering up sexual assault to protect their stupid bathroom policies. In Fairfax county, teachers are lying about critical race theory. The boys say it's time to start paying attention to school board elections.

Better on Draft  | A Craft Beer Podcast
Better on Draft News (10/22/21) - Spaten & Sierra Nevada

Better on Draft | A Craft Beer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 41:52


CRAFT BEER PODCAST NEWS EPISODE!  A bit of a delay but we finally get the episode out to you and it's a doozy.  Ken tries to keep quorum discussing the news but gets easily sidetracked like a cat who just found a squirrel.  Listen as we go over some of the pressing news about Sierra Nevada, ABI selling their German beers, and what we think are the must watches currently on streaming services.    Sponsors: North Center Brewing - https://northcenterbrewing.com/ Zetouna Liquor - https://www.facebook.com/Zetouna-Liquor-Fine-Wine-Cigars-146021445420374/ PCI BrandCraft - https://www.instagram.com/pcibrandcraft/ Baffin Brewing - https://www.baffinbrewing.com/ Join The Michigan Beer Discord - https://discord.gg/vEEDyzwdjT Download the MI Beer Map - http://www.mibeermap.com Subscribe to Better on Draft - https://plnk.to/BOD Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6AlzP1BH0iykayF856bGRc?si=xXZzdd3CTPqgUq_KYTnBKg iTunes - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/better-on-draft-a-craft-beer-podcast/id1091124740 Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/betterondraft Untappd - https://www.untappd.com/bodpodcast YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/betterondraft Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/betterondraft Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/betterondraft

Three B Zine Podcast! Presents: Beer Night in San Diego!
Episode 327: Episode 327 - FEAR Night in San Diego

Three B Zine Podcast! Presents: Beer Night in San Diego!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 145:03


Buckle up, as this week the BNISD Crew break out the tricks and treats for their annual Halloween spectacular - FEAR Night in San Diego! Oozing with frights, laughs and all kinds of holiday fun. This week the crew focuses in on Halloween themed beers including of course the dreaded pumpkin beer! Also, don't miss out as the crew discusses which horror villain they could outrun or beat, what spells they want to cast and their favorite and least favorite halloween candies. And to make things extra weird and wild, they bring back a fan favorite game - Muppet or Serial Killer. All this plus much more including finally finding Celebration from Sierra Nevada, being sick of weird stuff in beer, Costco trips, pairing beer and candy live on the show, specialty Reese's, slurpee beers, who ate the nutella, next level smores and tons more. Don't miss this extra large, trick AND treat filled Halloween episode from your friends at BNISD. And always party safe.

Brew Ha Ha Podcast
Falling Rock Tap House Closing

Brew Ha Ha Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:04


Falling Rock Tap House in Denver is closing its doors and going out of business. Chris Black, owner of Falling Rock Tap House in Denver is our first guest today on Brew Ha Ha, today with Herlinda Heras, with Harry Duke sitting in for Steve Jaxon. Sadly for the beer world Chris Black is on a farewell tour. Falling Rock Tap House has been the most popular tap house in the country for many years. Now he has a set of several four-foot-by-six-foot signs that depict the logos of beers they sold. A former bartender who worked for him painted them. Now, he is visiting the breweries to give them their signs. He just visited Lost Abbey in San Diego and now he is up in Northern Caifornia to deliver some others at Anchor, Lagunitas, Sierra Nevada and Deschutes. Jeremy Cohen is on the phone from Schmaltz Brewing. Jeremy Cohen is wrapping up 25 years of brewing. He started at age 26 in 1996 in San Francisco. He grew the brand and sold beer all over the country. Now instead of trying to sell a regional brand, he is focussing on a new brand to serve just the New York City area with an exclusive wholesaler. He also has a new taproom in Troy, upstate New York. He is also doing consulting in the beer industry. He says he never thought it would get a far as it did. Brew Ha Ha "Brews News with Herlinda" is sponsored by Russian River Brewing Co. and by The Beverage People / Fermenter's Warehouse.   Herlinda describes how Falling Rock was located near the Colorado Rockies stadium. During the World Beer Cup in Denver, Falling Rock was the place to go. He still has a beer truck with 22 taps that can go to events. Bob Brewer is the legendary sales guy for Lagunitas. He met Chris Black a long time before Falling Rock. They met in Houston when Chris was a rep for a German brewery and Bob worked for Lagunitas. There was a tap house in Houston called The Ginger Man. Later he found that Chris had a taproom. Bob Brewer's role at Lagunitas included troubleshooting taps, sales and marketing. He always had a table at Beerfest and would go to Falling Rock in the off hours. Once there was an All-Star game at Coors Field and the rep from a large American brand put their signature product in every single bar, except for Falling Rock. They festooned the town with their logo, but only gave a case of beer to Chris, who proceeded to smash it with a large hammer, and then turned it into a sign outside the store saying something like “no crap on tap.”

KVMR News
Molly Fisk - Everyone Has an Inner Golden Retriever

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 4:09


Molly Fisk writes, coaches, and teaches writing in California's Sierra Nevada foothills.

Pushing The Limits
Ultramarathoning: How to Do the Impossible with Dean Karnazes

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 64:16


When was the last time you got up and ran? Simply jogging around the neighbourhood during the weekends to keep fit may be daunting for some. Now, imagine the sheer amount of dedication, endurance, and resilience ultramarathoning requires. This type of long-distance running is an activity that tests the limits of human endurance. You might think running a thousand miles is impossible, but today's guest continues to prove others wrong. He's on a mission to exceed his limits and inspire others to do the same. Dean Karnazes joins us in this episode to get up close and personal about his experiences in ultramarathoning. He candidly shares the highs and lows, the triumphs and defeats. We also find out the importance of failure and finding magic in misery.  If you're interested in discovering how you can build your character, embrace pain and failure, and get inspired to push your limits, then this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Discover how to cope with the ups and downs of ultramarathoning. Learn about the importance of pain and failure. Get inspired by Dean's valuable takeaways from his career.   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health program all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/. You can also join their free live webinar on epigenetics.   Online Coaching for Runners Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching. You can also join our free live webinar on runners' warm-up to learn how a structured and specific warm-up can make a massive difference in how you run.   Consult with Me If you would like to work with me one to one on anything from your mindset, to head injuries,  to biohacking your health, to optimal performance or executive coaching, please book a consultation here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/consultations   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: http://relentlessbook.lisatamati.com/ For my other two best-selling books, Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   My Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Harness the power of NAD and NMN for anti-aging and longevity with NMN Bio.  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness!  Listen to my other Pushing the Limits episodes:  #8: Dean Karnazes - The Road to Sparta #183: Sirtuins and NAD Supplements for Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity with Dr Elena Seranova Connect with Dean: Website Books by Dean Karnazes:  Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner A Runner's High: My Life in Motion Dean's other books   Episode Highlights [05:21] Dean's Lockdown Experience in Australia Dean was supposed to go on a 1000-mile run across New South Wales.  After boarding a jet to Australia, he found that the pandemic situation was getting worse.  And so, Dean and Pat Farmer will be doing their run in a military base instead. Although he's quarantined inside a hotel room, Dean always stays moving and does bodyweight exercises to remain active. It was challenging to go from California, where 80% have been vaccinated, to Australia, which is still in lockdown. [11:18] Chronological and Biological Age Chronologically, Dean is closer to 60 than 50 years old. There are various ways to test your biological age, like C-reactive proteins and inflammation. Tune in to the full episode to learn more about what else goes into calculating your biological age. [14:17] Dean's Greek Heritage Dean's mother is from Ikaria, a Blue Zones with the highest concentration of centenarians worldwide. People in Ikaria live long, healthy lives. They don't pay attention to time and live in a strong community. Therefore, they are not prone to stress. Dean doesn't have any back, muscle, or joint pain. [18:50] Know What Your Body is Built For People are built to run at different speeds and distances. Various factors affect what you're optimised to do.  What's important is knowing the things that are optimal for your health. Dean has run over 300 traditional marathons in his career. He has also seen people well past their 70s who are still physically able and active. [22:04] What is A Runner's High About? A Runner's High is about the changes that he, the world, and ultramarathoning has undergone. Ultramarathoning impacts the people closest to you. Dean wanted to write a true and honest story about his reflections over the past three decades.  [24:00] Running the Western States Endurance Run This 100-mile trail race starts in Sierra Nevada, California. Dean first did this race in 1994. To him, this was an unforgettable experience. Going back after 13 times, Dean found that watching his dad and son crew for him and seeing how things changed over time was transformative for him. Dean recounts his experiences in detail in A Runner's High. [25:54] The Surprises of Parenting Kids grow faster than parents can adjust to them growing up.  Dean describes his son Nick as dichotomous, recounting how he would complain about his roommates being slobs while his own room is a mess. Nick volunteered to crew for him. Dean thought Nick would be irresponsible. Nick surprised Dean; he was much more responsible than Dean's dad. It's a parent's burden to accept that their child is now a self-sufficient, capable adult. [29:58] Did Dean's Career and Fame Affect His Family? Ultramarathoning has always been a family affair for Dean.  He would take his family to where his marathons are. Dean's kids had the opportunity to travel to different places from a young age. Fans that come up to him asking for autographs and selfies are decent people. [34:44] Dealing with Pain and Failure When you're in pain, it's difficult to interact with others. Dean admits that it can be tough when his fans come up to chat with him during this time. He commits to setting aside his ego and always gives 100% in everything he does, including ultramarathoning and interacting with fans. [40:44] The Value of Failing Success builds character, but failure more profoundly so. The emotional range that comes with failure makes one a better human. Don't shy away from hitting rock bottom because you'll be missing out on a profound character-building opportunity. In the end, it's a matter of perspective. Most people will applaud the distance that you run, whether you come in first or not. [44:49] Ultramarathoning is Achieving the Impossible Dean initially thought there was trickery involved in ultramarathoning. The moments that stuck to Dean in his career weren't victories or crossing finish lines.  What stuck to him were the moments when he was on the verge of giving up but persisted through difficulty. [48:04] The Importance of Character Ultramarathoning teaches you to be resilient through the tough times. Running doesn't hurt when you're doing it right. Some people try to avoid difficult things and pain, while others embrace them. We've built our world around comfort, but somehow we're still miserable. However, the more struggle you experience, the more strength you build. [53:21] Dean's Biggest Takeaways From Ultramarathoning To Dean, it's the little moments that are the most priceless. Ultramarathoning is a journey, a passion, and a commitment. Staying true to yourself is valuable, simple, and magical. [56:11] Forming Connections Through Books Writing is laborious, but the motivation it brings to people makes it worthwhile. Dean dictates the things he wants to write on his phone while running.  Running clears Dean's thoughts. To him, motion stirs emotion. A singularity of purpose is achieved when focusing on a specific goal or mission.   7 Powerful Quotes from This Episode ‘Some people are built to run far and slow, and other people are built to run quick and short.' ‘In school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test, and then you get the lesson.' ‘What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best.' ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' ‘I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way.' ‘We've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable.' ‘I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that.'   About Dean Dean Karnazes is a renowned ultramarathon runner. Among his many accomplishments, he has run 50 marathons in 50 days on 50 consecutive days, gone across the Sahara Desert in 120-degree temperatures, and ran 350 miles without sleep. He has also raced and competed in all seven continents twice. Dean has carried the Olympic Torch twice. He appeared on the covers of Runner's World, Outside, and Wired, and has been featured in TIME, People, GQ, and Forbes. He was named one of the "Top 100 Most Influential People in the World". Men's Fitness has also labelled him as one of the fittest men in the world. To top it off, Dean is also a New York Times bestselling author and a much sought-after speaker and panellist in running and athletic events worldwide.  If you want to learn more about Dean, his incredible adventures and his achievements, you may visit his website.   Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can find inspiration from Dean's stories on ultramarathoning and the lessons he learned along the way. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You can also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa   Trasncript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com. Lisa Tamati: Good day, everyone. Welcome back to Pushing the Limits, your host Lisa Tamati here. Today, I have one of my longtime friends and a guy who has had a massive influence in my life both as a role model and as someone who has facilitated me with a lot of help with my books and so on. He's a worldwide legend. He is Dean Karnazes. He is the author of four books. And he has a new one out called the Runner's High, which I was excited to give me an excuse to chat to my buddy, and see what he's been up to, and to talk everything, ultramarathon running. We talk a whole lot about getting older in ultramarathon running, and the difficulties, and we talk about life in general and longevity, and the beauty of the sport. He's an incredible ambassador for our sport. He's done so much. He's brought so many people into the sport worldwide and he's an incredible human being. He's actually stuck in lockdown in Australia right at the moment as we were recording this and was about to do a race ride around Australia with my other friend, Pat Farmer. Another incredible human being. These guys are just next level crazy, and bloody COVID has ripped everything so they're now down to doing thousand-mile race around a military base in Australia in New South Wales. But in true ultramarathon form, where there's a will, there's a way. And when there's an obstacle, you find a way around it. Improvise, adapt, and overcome as my friend Craig Harper always says. So that's what these guys have been doing. So I hope you enjoy this episode with Dean Karnazes. Without him, I wouldn't have my books. He is a very generous and caring person as well as being an incredible athlete. Before we head over to the show, just want to remind you, we have our BOOSTCAMP live webinar series coming up starting on the first of September 2021. If you're listening to this later on, we will be doing these on an ongoing basis. And actually, we have planned to set up a mastermind that goes the year long. I don't know how long it's gonna take us to get organised but that is our goal. We're all about helping each other upgrade our lives and be the best versions of ourselves that we can be. This one's called BOOSTCAMP. This eight-week-long webinar series that Neil and I are doing. This is a live series where you hang out with us once a week for an hour and get a lot of great information: the latest science, the latest biohacking, the latest longevity, everything about mental toughness, resilience, everything that's going to basically upgrade your life and help you be a better human. The stuff that we've spent years and decades actually studying, learning, and doing. So I hope you get to enjoy this with us. You can head on over to peakwellness.co.nzboostcamp. That's B-O-O-S-T camp. BOOSTCAMP, not boot camp. We won't be making you run around doing anything. We're just going to be having wonderful chats and education. A lot of lectures and a lot of fun to be had along the way. And, I think, what's most important is you'll be networking with like-minded individuals. They say that you are the sum total of the five people that you hang out with most. And make those five people, in this case, it will be a few more, some top-quality people who are all on a mission the same as you are. So if you want to come and join us, that's BOOSTCAMP. We also have our epigenetics program. If you want to know all about your genetics, and how to upgrade your life through your genes, understanding what your genes do, if you're dealing with a difficult health journey, and you don't know where to go to next, this is a very good place to start. This is our flagship program that we've been running for years now. We've taken hundreds and hundreds of people through this program. And it's really an incredible all-encompassing program that looks at your food, your exercise types, what time of the day to do different things, your mood and behaviour, and lots, lots more. So come and check that out at lisatamati.com and hit the ‘Work with Us' button then you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program there if you're interested in doing that. Right. Now, over to the show with Dean Karnazes who's sitting in lockdown in Australia. Well. Hi, everyone and welcome to the show. Today, I have my very good friend and absolute legend of ultramarathoning, Dean Karnazes, with me. Dean, welcome to the show, again. Repeat offender. Dean Karnazes: Oh, it's so nice to be back on with you. Thank you for having me. We always have such lively conversations. I love it. Lisa: We do, right? I just absolutely enjoy your company. Whenever I've had the chance to spend a little bit of time with you, it's been absolute gold whether it's been on the podcast, or interviewing you, or hanging out with you on the Gold Coast like we did last year. That was absolutely awesome. Dean, you've just brought out another book. Another amazing book called Runner's High, and that's why we had to get you back on, because I want to share about all this book. But before we get into the book, you're sitting in lockdown in Australia. Tell me what is going on there. Dean: It's a long story but it started with a run across Australia with Pat Farmer. So from Western Australia to the East Coast, and that was the original idea; it was 5,000 kilometres. And this was six months ago when the world was going in a better direction, and over the past six months, boy, the world has done just the opposite. And we, like you, are a fighter and we kept saying we're going to persevere the same... Well, the run across Australia got mixed to a run across New South Wales, a thousand-mile run across New South Wales. And we kept thinking, 'This is going to happen. This is going to happen.' I boarded the plane, I flew to Australia with 10 people on the huge jet, yeah. And when I get to Australia, I realise how bad the situation is here. And every day, I turn on the news. It's getting worse, it's getting worse as I'm in quarantine, and then finally Pat called me a couple days ago and said, 'We can't do the thousand-mile run now. We could still the thousand-mile run. It's just going to be contained within a military base because we need to stay in our own bubble.' And I thought 'Oh.' Lisa: He has flown away from America to Australia to run around the military base. It sounds a bit like being tactic stuff. Dean: Oh, yeah. And not only the... To sit in quarantine. To your point, I've been in our hotel room for 12 days now, waiting to get out, yeah. Lisa: For someone like you... You're just like me. Obviously, you're even more extreme than me. It must be torture. I just can't comprehend being in a room. This must be awful for you. Dean: Don't remind me, but yeah. Basically, from the moment I get up, I'm staying active. We both know the importance of movement. So from the moment my head leaves the pillow, I'm not sitting down ever. Even right now, I'm pacing back and forth in this room, and I'm doing bodyweight exercises just constantly, at least throughout the day. Lisa: I used to... If I was travelling and I was stuck in a hotel room somewhere in a dangerous city or whatever, I'd put on something running on TV and run along with them. I was doing the Boston Marathon in Budapest in a hotel room one day. Just run along the spot. Doesn't matter. You got to do something to keep active, so I can imagine it being a bit of a mission for you. So my heart goes out to you and hang in there for two more days. And all my love, please, to Pat Farmer. I love the guy. He's just amazing. We got to hang out when we're in the Big Red Run together, which I failed spectacularly, by the way. I had a back injury that walked me out in the middle of that race. But one of the big advantages of that run was actually getting to meet Pat Farmer because he's an absolute legend of the sport. So you two together would be a really powerful combination. I'm really sad that he's not going to go right around Australia because imagine the people that would have come out and enjoyed meeting you two. Dean: Oh, he pulled all the strings. He's very well connected in political circles and the Australian Army is crazy for us. So we had 13 Army personnel and they're setting up a tent city every night, and they're cooking for us. It was amazing but COVID had other plans. Lisa: Oh, bloody COVID. It's wrecking every damn thing. Hey, but it's ultramarathon runner and Pat Farmer who has run from the North Pole to the South Pole, people. Absolute crazy guy. Obstacle? Find a way around it. Obstacle? Find a way around. And that's what you guys are doing, and you have to be flexible. That's a good lesson for this day and age because we're all having to be very, very flexible right now, and adapt to a hell of a lot of change, and being able to cope in different situations. So I bet you guys would just find a way through it and it will be another incredible story at the end of the day. Dean: I think the world needs it. As controversial as the Olympics were, I think it was an amazing thing, and it's so scaled back, right? But still, people are stuck in their house and now, what are they doing? They're watching the Olympics. They're getting energised, and they're thinking about the future so yeah, thank you. It's been a very emotional journey for me to leave a place... Where I live in California, we're over 80% vaccinated. So to leave a place where there was no masks then come here, it's been eye-opening and challenging. Lisa: You should have Pat go to you and run around California. You got it backwards. I have no doubt that you guys will just find a way through, and you'll make it epic, anyway. Say you get given lemons, you make lemonade. Dean: Yeah well, at least we're staying in military barracks, and we're basically running. Every day, we're staying in the same place so logistically, it'll be easier. Lisa: Yeah. Oh my god, you guys just don't stop. I admire you guys so much, and I was saying to you last year, when we're in the Gold Coast, 'I've hit the wall at about 48 but to be honest, I had a pretty hit on, full-on war with my body and....' But you guys just seem to keep going, and going, and going. I had Mum as well so I did have an excuse, guys. But pretty highly, it was a stressful last five years. But you just seem to... Because how old are you now, Dean, if you don't mind sharing? Dean: Yeah. Well, when anyone would ask my age, I would say, 'Are you talking about my chronological age or my biological age?' Lisa: Well, your chronological because biological, you're probably 20 years younger. Because I definitely am. That's my take on it. Dean: Chronologically I'm closer to 60 than 50. Lisa: Exactly. Have you actually ever had your biological age done? Because that's an interesting thing. Dean: Yeah, I had a couple. There's a lot of good ways you can test it, and I've had it done a couple different times. One, I was about I was in my late 30s. And then on another, I was older than my actual chronological age. Lisa: Which one was that? Dean: It was post ultramarathon. So after racing, we spoke about C-reactive protein earlier and inflammation. And that was one of the biomarkers that they used in calculating your biological age. So when I looked at the results, I said, 'Hold it. How did you arrive at that figure?' And they gave me all the markers they looked at, and I said, 'Well, look. This is wildly elevated because just four days ago, I just ran a hundred miles.' Lisa: Exactly. And C-reactive protein, if you've just had a cold, if you've just hit like we were talking about my dad before and sepsis and his C-reactive protein was just through the roof. So that makes sense that they would be out. There's a whole clock, which is the methylation markers, which is a very good one. I've done just one very basic one that came out at 34. I was pretty pleased with that one. At the end of the day, I think if you can keep all your inflammatory markers like your homocysteine and C-reactive protein generally under control, keep your albumin levels high, they are pretty good markers. Albumin is one that is looking at, it's a protein that your liver makes, and that's a very important one. And if you albumin starts to go too low, that's one sign that things aren't going to good. So keep an eye on all those. I love studying all this longevity stuff because I plan to live to 150 at least, and I don't think that that's unrealistic now as long as I don't get run over by a bus or something. With the stuff that's coming online and the technology that's coming, we're going to be able to turn back the clock on some pretty advanced stuff already. Now, my mum's on more than me because obviously, her needs are a bit greater than mine. I can't afford for us to be on all the top stuff. But yeah, I'm very excited. We don't need to age like our grandparents have aged. We're gonna have... And someone like you, Dean, who's lived a good healthy life, apart from pushing the hell out of your body, and I'll talk about that in a sec, but I think you've got the potential to live to 150, especially because you're Greek. You come from stock. Dean: And my mom is from one of the Blue Zones. An island called Ikaria and I've been there and I've met... Ikaria, the island she's from, has the highest concentration of centenarians anywhere on Earth. Lisa: Oh my gosh. So you're going to live to 200 then. Dean: Well, the beautiful thing about these people is that not only are they over 100, they still have a high quality of life. They're still mobile; they're self-sufficient. Mentally and cognitively, they're sharp as a tack. They're active. The one thing that they have that we don't have the luxury of is the complete absence of stress. They don't pay attention to time. Lisa: That's, I think, a crucial point. Stress is a killer in so, so many ways. Dean: Even the fact that we have mortgages, and we have payments, rent, all those sort of things, I think, contribute to obviously, to stress. And fitting in with new society. It's much more of a sense of community in these villages where everyone is part of it. They all take care of each other, so it's a different lifestyle. Lisa: I think, definitely when you're actually living the old way of being out in the sunshine, from the time you get up to the end of the day, you're working outside and on the ground, in the land, hands in the dirt, all of that sort of stuff really... Because I studied lots about circadian rhythms and how our eyes, for example, you see sunshine early in the morning. That resets your circadian rhythms, sets the clock going for the day. Your adenosine starts to build up over the day. You get tired at about 14 to 16 hours later. All of these things that we've... as modern-day humans, we've taken ourselves out of the old way of living and put ourselves into this artificial comfortable environment. But this is upsetting all our ancient DNA, and that's why that's leading to problems. And then, of course, we've got this crazy life with technology, and the stuff we have to do, and work. Just like stress, what it does to the gut, the actual microbiota in the gut, and how much it affects your gut health. And of course, gut health affects everything. Your brain and your gut talk all the time. All these stuff so I think if we can harness the cool stuff of the technology coming, plus go back and start respecting as much as possible our ancient DNA, and then eating our ancestors did as best we can with these depleted soils, and pesticides, and glyphosates, and God knows what's in the environment, but doing the best we can, then we've got a good chance of actually staying around on this planet and still be running ultramarathons or at least marathons when you're a hundred plus. I don't think that that's unrealistic anymore, and that excites me. So I'm always learning on that front. Dean: But I want to be that guy that's running a marathon when you say a hundred. That's my ambition now. Lisa: I'll keep you up on the latest stuff then. What you need to be aware of. Dean: I don't have any... People say, ‘You must have arthritis, or back pain, or knee pain, or joint pain.' I don't have any of those things. I don't know why but I just... I'm so happy. I get up every morning and feel fresh. Lisa: That's absolutely amazing. I think one of the amazing things with you is that... Because I studied genetics, and I looked at my genes. And actually doing really long bouts of exercise with my combination of genetics and my cardiovascular system, especially I've got a very weak glycocalyx, which is the lining of your endothelial cells. Bear with me people. This means that if I do a lot of oxidative damage, which you do, of course, when you're running, that's pretty damaging to my lining of my blood vessel. So I've got to be a little more careful and take a lot of antioxidant support. But having that inflammation means I can now take steps to mitigate that so that I can still do what I love to do. And that's really key. It's hitting stuff off at the pass and there's so much we can do now and that's really, really exciting. But I've gone completely off topic because we should be talking about your book. Dean: No, I think it's very relevant because I think that some people are built to run far and slow and other people are built to run quick and short. Lisa: Yeah. I do and I agree and it's not just about your fast-twitch fibres. It is also about your methylation and your detox pathways, your hormonal pathways, your cardiovascular genes. All of these things do play a role, and that's why there's no one size fits all. And that's why we don't all have to be Dean Karnazes or Pat Farmer. You know what I mean? Not everybody is built for that or should be doing that, and that's okay as well. And working out what is optimal for your health is the key thing. Having role models like you guys is just mind-blowing because it does lift your perception of what the human body is capable of. That leads the way for others, and to follow, and to test out their personal limits. I think that's important too. Dean: Well, I've run over 300 traditional marathons. And you go to the Boston Marathon, you go to these big marquee marathons, the New York City Marathon, and you see people in their 70s and 80s that, compared to their peers, are off the charts. You say, 'Well, that running is gonna be bad for you.' I don't subscribe to that. Lisa: I've done what, 70-odd thousand K's. Not as much as you have. And I don't have any knee pain. I don't have any back pain because I keep my core strong and that's despite having accidents with my back and having no discs. Because I keep myself fit and healthy. I have had some issues with hormones and kidney function because when we... You would have been rhabdomyolysis, no doubt a few times. Dean: Minor, minor, but I have. Yeah. Every ultra runner has, yeah. Lisa: Yeah, so things that. You've got to just keep an eye on and make sure you don't... You look after your kidneys otherwise and do things to mitigate the damage. Because yeah there are certain things that damage. But life damages you. Like living, breathing is damaging. It's causing oxidative stress. So you've got to weigh up the pros and cons, but having an active physical life outdoors, and having adventures, and being curious and excited, and being involved in the world, that's got to be beneficial for you. So when do you actually start with this big adventure with Pat? Dean: It's on the 14th of August, so in about a week. Yep. They finish on the 24th, yeah. Lisa: Oh, I'd like to get you both back on at the end of it to give me a rundown, have a go. That will be cool. Dean, let's just pivot now and let's talk a little bit about your book. Because you brought out some incredible books over the years. You're world-famous. You're a New York Times bestselling author. You've been named by the Times magazine as one of the most hundred influential people of the world. That's just insane. And now, you're brought out Runner's High. What's different about this story? Dean: Well, my first book was Ultramarathon Man, and that was kind of a coming-of-age book. It was about me learning about this crazy universe of ultramarathon and people doing things that I thought was impossible. And Runner's High is five books later and three decades later. How am I still doing it? And how have I changed? How has the sport of ultramarathoning changed? How has the world changed? And that was the book. And it was also a very personal book and that... You're an ultramarathoner, and you know ultramarathon is an island. If you start running these long distances it impacts everyone in your life including your family. Very much for your family. The book, it is not really about running. It's funny. People read it and they say, 'Wow. It's amazing but it's storytelling.' And you and I are both good storytellers, and that was what I just set out to write a book that was true and honest, and it was enjoyable for the reader. And yeah, it's doing really well in New Zealand, actually. Lisa: It must be doing well around the world. And this one is very... It's really real, and genuine, and raw. No holds barred. No barred... What do you call it? No... How do you say that? It's very much a real and it's a love letter to, basically, like you say, to running. And you're actually revisiting the Western States, a race that you've done how many times? 13 times or something? But coming back in your 50s, late 50s to do this again in 2018. It was a bit of a tough road, shall we say. Can you tell us a little bit about that part of the journey and why Western States are so special to you? Dean: Yeah. The Western States 100 mile endurance run is in the Sierra Nevada, California. And it was the first 100-mile trail race, and I first did it back in 1994. So your first is always your best. It's kind of this amazing experience that you have, and you just never forget it. I can recall literally conversations I had in that race in 1994. I can recall what people were wearing. I can recall where I saw my parent. I recall it. It gets impressed upon your mind. So my synapses just absorbed it. So going back here after 13 goes at it and thinking, 'Wow, is this going to be a stale experience? Or what is it going to be like?' And it ended up being quite magical and quite transformative in my career as well as... I learned a lot about my father and my son, and I wrote a lot about that in the book, and watching them crew for me, and how things have changed over time. It wasn't a good race. I don't want to be a spoiler but I think good races don't make good stories. Good races, you pop the champagne, yeah, it's boring. You high five at the finish, you have some champagne, and all this good. When things go to shit, that's an interesting story. Lisa: Yeah, absolutely. I've got three books full of things turning to shit. And I think it's beautiful that you talk about your dad or what a crazy guy he is, and your son coming and how your son was actually... Like you didn't know whether he was up to crewing for you really because he's a young man. He wasn't going to take this seriously because you need your crew to be on form. How do he actually do when he was out there? Dean: Yeah. There's a saying that in school, you get the lesson and you take the test. In parenting, you take the test and then you get the lesson. You're just like, 'Boy I screwed that one up.' You lose track of your kids, especially when they go off to uni. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do. There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us. Dean: As a parent, your kids grew up quicker than you adjust to them growing up, and I always treat them as a guy that needs his diaper change kind of thing even though he's 20 years old now. Nick was just such a dichotomous individual because he complained to me when he came home from uni that his roommates were such slobs. I said, 'How do you like living with three other guys?' He's like, 'It's great. They're my best friends, but they're such slobs.' Every every time I walked past his room, I'd look in his room, and it was a Tasmanian devil had gone through it. ‘Your room is such a mess.' When he volunteered the crew for me at Western States, claiming he knew how to do it, even though the last time he'd done it, he was nine years old, and he didn't do anything. At this time, he was actually driving a vehicle. He was the most important support I had during this kind of foot race. And I just thought that it was gonna be a horrible experience. That he'd be irresponsible, he wouldn't show up, and this, and that. At least it was just the opposite. He was the most responsible, so much more responsible than my dad. So much more capable. My dad's been doing this for 30 years, and my son who's never done it was so much better than my dad. He showed me a new side of him that I'd never seen. Lisa: That's him growing up, I suppose? Dean: Yeah. I think every parent that's got a kid is kind of nodding their head as they're hearing this because they can relate. Lisa: Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I think kids, sometimes when they can be a kid, they'll be a kid. They'll be the irresponsible... But when you actually put them on the spot and expect something from them, sometimes, they come to the party if you're lucky, and actually step up to the line, and actually do a good job, and obviously, Nicholas did that. Dean: Yeah. I think it's more the burden of the parent to accept and to realise that this little baby is self-sufficient and capable. Let go of the fact that they once were so dependent on you. They're not anymore. They have their own life, and they can navigate their way through the world. Lisa: It must be pretty hard to let go. What do you think it's been like for them having such a famous, crazy, extreme athlete dad? Was it hard for both of them? Because I can imagine you were away a lot. You're doing dangerous, crazy, amazing things. Everybody knows you. You're extremely well known when you go anywhere. How did that affect the family in general? Dean: It's funny. My kids have never known me as anything different. They've always known me as this ultramarathoner, and it's always been a family affair for me. My kids, they've been to Australia, they've been to Europe multiple times, South America, all over North America. I have taken them with me. I once ran 50 marathons in all of the 50 US states in 50 days, and they were along. Yeah. How many kids... My son was nine, my daughter was 11. How many kids ever, how many people ever get to see all of the states of America, let alone when you're that age? So I think that they just accept me for what I am. Sometimes I get the fan thing where people come up to me like at a restaurant. Like, 'Oh, can you sign this or that?' And it's always good people. The people that come up to me in an airport and say, 'Hey, I really admire you. Can we do a selfie?' They're decent people. Like I want to go have a glass of wine with this guy or this lady. It's not like I'm a rock star or movie star where I have all the crazy people chasing around. The people who chase me around are my peers. People I really admire myself. Lisa: Or other runners. You know what? Something I've always admired about you, too, was that you always gave every single person time of day despite... And when we did that speaking gig together last year on the Gold Coast, I was really nervous, to be honest, because I was like, 'I'm on the stage with someone who is a superstar, and I'm little me.' Right? I'm sort of like, 'How the hell am I on stage with you? Because no one's gonna be interested in what the hell I've got to say when you're standing next to...' It's like some superstar, and you're standing on the stage with them, and you've got to do... It was quite difficult in a way because everybody wanted to... The line for your books was just two hours long. The line from mine was two people long. Dean: You carried yourself beautifully. I thought together, we were a great pair. We complemented each other. Lisa: You are a gentleman. You would always straight to me and make sure that I was included, which was fantastic. I saw you. Like you take the time for every single person. You are present with everybody, and that's a really hard thing to do. It's not so hard in a book signing, but it's bloody hard in the middle of a hundred-miler or a hundred K-er or when you were half-dead, dragging yourself into a checkpoint, and somebody wants a signature from you or a selfie, and you're trying to just get your stuff together. I found that difficult on my level of stuff. Because when I enter in New Zealand, I found that really difficult. I'd have people coming out on the road with me all the way through. And in that preparation, I thought that would be cool. In the reality of the day-to-day grind, did you know when you're... Because I was running up to 70K's a day. I was in a world of pain and hurt most of the time, and just struggling to keep going, and very, very breakable, you feel like. And then, you'd have people coming out and now it's been maybe 2, 3, 4 or 5K's with you, and they're full of beans, and they want you to be full of beans and full of energy, and give them the greatest advice in their 5K's when you're half dead. I found that really, really hard because I'm actually, believe it or not, quite introverted and when I'm running, I go in. How do you deal with it? How do you deal with that without being... Because you don't want to be rude. You don't want to be disrespectful to anybody, God forbid. But there were times on that run when I just literally had to say to my crew, 'I can't cope right now. I'm in a world of pain. I need some space.' And they have to sort of politely say, 'Sorry, she's not in a good space.' How do you deal with that? Dean: Well, it's amazing that we're having this conversation because there are not a lot of people that can relate intimately to what you just said. Because most people will never be in that position but what.. I experienced exactly you've experienced. When running 50 marathons in 50 days or running, I ran across America as well. When you're in a world of hurt, you've got this protective shell on, and you don't want to be social, and then I'd have groups of college kids show up with my book. Like 'Oh my god. Karnazes, you're such a great influence, and we love your book.' And 'Let's order a pizza.' I just feel like I just want to crawl into a mummy bag and hide and you just got to turn it on. Lisa: You've got to step up fine. Dean: Yeah, they're so happy to see you, and they want to see you on. They don't want to see you like this groveler just dying. They want to see you strong and engaging, and it's really tough sometimes. Yeah. It's definitely really tough sometimes. Lisa: Yeah, and that's why I admire that you managed to do that most of the time. You turn it on no matter in what shape you were. If I were to pull it out whereas, to be honest, a couple of times, I just couldn't. I'm just like, 'I'm done guys.' Remember on the run through New Zealand that one time? This was not with fans. I was running for CanTeen, the kids with cancer. I was in an immeasurable world of hurt one night after running for, God knows how long I've been out there, 1200 K's or something at the stage. I had a 13-year-old boy was sent into my room to give me a pep talk. He was dying of cancer or had cancer, and he was here to give me a pep talk because I was crying. I wasn't able to get up and run the next day. And he came in and told me how much it meant to him, and to his peers, and what it meant to him that I was undertaking this journey. That was a real lesson. Like, 'Oh, get over yourself. You're not dying, okay? You're not a 13 year old with cancer. You just have to run another 70 K's tomorrow. So what?' That's a good perspective. I did get up the next morning and go again and that was like, 'Here, come on.' Some funny but really touching moments. You are human and it's very easy when you go to a speaking engagement or whatever to be what you meant to be, a professional. But it's bloody hard when the chips are down and you're in the middle of a race to do that. So I really always did admire that about you. What I also admired was that it didn't matter whether you came first or last in a race. With the Western States, it was a struggle. You never shied away from the fact that today might not have been your day, and you're having a bad day, and you weren't embarrassed about that. I've had races with Pat Farmers, a classic one in the middle of the Big Red Run where I was just falling to pieces. I was going through some personal trauma at the time, and my back went out. Yeah, I was just at a bad place. And I was embarrassed because I failed at a race at that stage. I was in that mindset. Now, I look back and go 'Give yourself a break.' How do you cope with that? How do you... Like when you don't do what the fans expect you to do on that day? Dean: To me, it's your ego. Yeah, it is such an ego thing. And let's be honest, when you're a public figure, your failures are public. You don't fail in silence. You just kind of DNF and walk away and live the race another day. You DNF and people are taking pictures of you, and it's on the internet. I always got crowded. But in the end, I just... What can you do other than just do your best? You're human. All of us can only just do our best. So my commitment now is like, ‘When I stand on the starting line, I'm going to give it my all. I'm not going to leave anything on this course. I'm just going to be the best that Dean can be. I'm going to try my hardest and the only way I'm going to fail is if I don't try my hardest and don't give it my all.' And when you go with that mindset, no matter what happens, you're doing yourself a service. Lisa: Yeah, and you're a winner. This is such a powerful message, I think, for young people listening because often, we don't even try because we don't want to risk embarrassing ourselves, and risk failure, and risk looking like an idiot. And what you're saying is just forget your ego, set that to the side, and go, 'I'm going to give it all today, and if it isn't enough, it isn't enough and that's fine. I'll learn something out of it. And it's a journey that I'm on. And I'm going to be the best I can be today.' That's such a powerful story of perspective, and resilience, and leaving the ego at the door. I did struggle with that when I was younger because I had some pretty spectacular failures, and they really hurt. They really hurt where you take a long time to sort of go, 'Do I want to do that again in the public eye?' So to speak. And you've just always just been 'If it was a good day, it was a good day, and on to the next one if it was a bad day.' Dean: Yeah, I think bold failures build character. I have to be honest. Success builds character, but so does failure and in a more profound way. I lean into every emotion that I have. Either success or failure, sorrow or regret. All those things that happen when you have a bad race or a bad day. I want that full emotional range. It just makes you a better human, I think. Not to shy away from those deep lows where you're just crushed. I think that people that try to avoid that are really missing out. Yeah, yeah, it's painful and it hurts but it builds your character in a profound way. Lisa: Wow. That is so deep, actually. Because we're often taught push down your emotions, and keep them in a box, and be a professional, and keep going, and keep calm and carry on type thing. And it has its place as far as when you're in the middle of a race, you've got to keep your shit together, and compartmentalise stuff, and be able to function. But I think it's also very important to experience the pain, the grief, the pain, or whatever you're going through, and the happiness. It's another thing. I would get to the end of a race and it didn't matter how well I'd done, and what I've just achieved, and how difficult it was. I remember doing one in the Himalayas and a friend coming up to me afterwards and it was 220K race, extreme altitude, hell of a journey to get there, all sorts of obstacles. I get to the finish line and he's just like, 'Wow, you're amazing. It's incredible. I can't believe what you just did. If I hadn't seen it, I wouldn't have believed it.' And I just went, 'Oh no. Someone else was faster, and there's a longer race.' You know what I mean? And I didn't integrate it. And he just went, 'Oh, for crying out loud. Can't you just take this one to the bank and actually bank it as being a success and a huge win?' And I really took that to heart. And now, I pat myself on the back when I do even a little thing good because it reinforces that neural pathway in my brain that tells me, 'This was great because I just got a little reward' rather than, 'You're never good enough.' Because that was what I was telling myself before. No matter what I did, it wasn't enough. And now, flip that script around to go, 'Hey, you managed to do your shoelaces and get to the end of the road today. Well, done.' And it's the thought of it. Dean: It is, completely. My son said something to me that was along that same vein during the Western States. I said, ‘Nicholas…' This is maybe a mile 60 or 70 of a hundred-mile run. I said, 'My race is crap. I'm not having a good race.' And he looked at me, said, 'Dad, you're running a hundred miles. To most people, that's enough.' And I put it in perspective. That although I'm with all these super elite athletes, you're not doing that... To most people that hear about anyone running a hundred miles, they don't care if you came in first or last. A hundred miles? They don't care if my time was 15 hours or 50 hours. They're just so inspired. Yeah, blown away by it. Yeah. Lisa: Exactly, And I think that puts it because when we hang out... Because you are the sum total of the people that you hang out with, the top five, as the saying goes. And that can have negative connotations as well as positive. It can be the fact that you think if you're hanging out with the five top guys in the world, then you are going to be not looking too good. But if you're hanging out with just the average person, and you're doing something this long and this incredible, for most people, that's just like, 'Huh? Humans can do that?' I did a speaking engagement yesterday in Auckland and the people were like, 'But that's humanly impossible.' I go, 'It actually isn't, and there's actually thousands of us that do the stuff.' And then, they're like, 'What? I don't get it.' Dean: That was it. That was the same reaction I had when I heard about someone running a hundred mile like that. They're, 'Oh, there's trickery.' I thought there's trickery. I thought there's hotels, or just campgrounds, or something. The guy said, 'The gun goes off and you just run, and you stop when you cross the finish line.' I couldn't wrap my head around it. Lisa: Until you did it. Dean: Until you did it. Exactly, yeah. Lisa: And you built yourself up to it, and this is the thing. It's a combination of so much and it's that journey isn't it? So I think what we're talking about is it being this incredible life journey that you go on within an ultramarathon and within the training of our ultramarathon. It's like living an entire life in short. You're going through the highs, and the lows, and everything in between. And it's long, and it's hard, and it's awesome, and it's amazing, and you meet incredible people. It's everything that you go through in life but just on an intensive timescale, I feel like. And it's just a beautiful experience to go through, especially with the value of hindsight. Sometimes, in the middle of it, mile 70 of a hundred-mile race, it's not looking too flash. Dean: Well, but I mean, to that point, when we reflect back on moments that we remember, at least me, it's not the victories. It's not the crossing the finish line first to me. It's always that time where I thought, 'I'm done. This is it. I can't get out of this chair. I'm trashed.' And somehow getting through that really, really tough moment and carrying on. That's what sticks with you. It's pretty weird, at least with me. Those are the moments that reflect back on my career. It's those horrible moments that I somehow persisted. Lisa: When you look back, you're proud of yourself and you know that when... One of the biggest values, and I've seen this with my story with Mum and, unfortunately, recently with my dad, is that when the shit hits the fan, like it did in those two situations, I knew that I could step up to do everything within my power and that I was a fighter. I knew that I was a fighter, and then I knew that I would fight to the bitter end, whatever the outcome was. And that's a really good thing to know about yourself. Because you need to know that when things are down, what character do you have? Who are you when all the niceties of our world have gone? What are you capable of? And you learn to be able to function when everyone else is gone. And that's a really powerful lesson that ultramarathoning teaches you, I think, in decades of the sort of hard work. And that's why athletes, I think... When you're employing athletes or you going into business with other athletes, you're more likely to have someone who's willing to fight through the tough times than if you just get someone who hasn't ever experienced any sort of discomfort in their life. Then they're not liable to be able to push through and be as resilient. I think that's what I'm trying to say. Dean: I agree with you completely. And I often wonder if people have those character, those values, and that's what draws them to ultra running or if ultrarunning instils those values. I remember coming home from a run one time, and my neighbour was fetching up the morning paper. He saw me running back to my house and I'd, I don't know, I'd run 30 or 40 kilometres, and he said to me, 'Doesn't running hurt?' And I said to him, 'It doesn't if you're doing it right.' And he looked at me, 'I do everything to avoid difficult things.' And I'm like, ‘And I embrace it.' It's just a different mindset. Lisa: And if you have the mindset of wanting to always avoid all sorts of pain in life, then you're not going to experience very much. And when you're in a tough situation, you won't be able to cope because you won't have experienced any sort of pain. So the more that you had to struggle, the more strength you develop from that. The old proverb: 'Strength comes from struggle' is valid in all walks of life. So unfortunately, this is the way the world is set up. If you seek comfort all the time, you're actually going to be in deeper shit somewhere along the way and not able to help yourself because you haven't learned to fight, and you haven't learned to push through and to deal with a certain level of discomfort and a certain level of pain. And I think that's a really, really valuable thing to do. Every day, I try to experience some sort of discomfort or pain: whether it's cold, whether it's pushing myself mentally, intellectually, whether it's pushing myself physically, doing some intense extreme exercise, or whatever the case may be. Every day, I try to do something that it scares the shit out of me or pushes me in some way because then, I know that I haven't gone backwards that day. I've probably learned something, and gone forward, and I've strengthened my body and my mind in some sort of way, shape, or form. Dean: Yeah, but I think you're an exception. I think most people just try to take the path of least resistance and avoid difficult things and avoid pain. I think we've built our world around comfort: having every comfort available and removing as much discomfort and pain as we can. And I think, in a way, we're so comfortable, we're miserable. Lisa: Exactly. That's exactly the problem. Because by actually experiencing a little bit of pain, by doing your push-ups, going for your run, doing your pull-ups, whatever the case is, being outside and digging the garden and doing stuff that is a bit unpleasant, it actually makes your body stronger, and it makes you mentally stronger. If we all sit on the couch and watch Netflix all day every day and eat chips, what's going to happen to us? We're going to destroy our health. We're going to just be so... And this is... I think I'm scared for the younger generation, that they haven't actually... We grew up. We're roughly the same age. You're a couple years older. I grew up in the 70's where we were outside, doing something all day, every day. We came in at night time for a feed and went to bed. That was our childhood, and that was just a beautiful way to grow up. We were cold. We were hungry. We were tired. We were happy. Dean: We were playing, right? We were exercising. I remember riding my bike just everywhere. I never thought of it as exercise. It was playing. Kids don't play that way anymore, unfortunately. Lisa: It's a scary thing for them because we need to teach them. Because again, it goes back to sort of respecting our ancient DNA and that's what I think... That's another thing that ultramarathoning does, or even trekking, or adventuring in any sort of way, shape, or form. It's that we've come from stock that used to have to build their own houses, cut down their own trees, chase animals, whatever the case was, just to survive. And then, we now have it all laid on for us. We're in lovely houses. We've got light all day or night. We've got food every street corner. And our ancient DNA isn't just set up for that. This is where all the problems come. We could go on a complete rant, which I often do on this podcast. But coming back to your story in your Runner's High, what do you think now looking back at this incredibly long and prolific career and this incredible journey that you've been on so far, and I do think that you still got miles and miles to go. What are some of the biggest lessons that you've learned along the way on the thirty-odd year journey that you've been? What are the biggest takeaways from ultramarathon running? Dean: I think that it's the little moments that are the most priceless. It's not the moments where... I write about meeting with First Lady Michelle Obama. Yeah, that was great. It was amazing, and incredible, and everything else, but it's the little moments of having a moment with a crew member or your family that you just you reflect on and laugh about. So it's those things to me that are most priceless. The other thing with ultramarathoning that I've certainly learned is that it's a journey. To me, it's a passion and it's something I've committed my life to. And staying true to the person you are, there's value in that. Even though it's just running, Lisa. It's nothing hugely intellectual. I'm not winning Nobel prizes. I'm just a runner, but that's who I am and I'm staying true to that. I'm going to do that to the grave. And I think in that, there's a simplicity and I think there's some magic in that. Lisa: Oh, absolutely. You know what you're born to do. You say it's only running but actually, you're a teacher; you're an author; you're a person who empowers others. You're doing all of that in the framework of running. So you do a heck of a lot more than just running for me. You've influenced an entire generation worldwide. I hope you know. Without you, ultramarathon running would not be where it is today. So I think you know a little bit more than just running yourself. This is the power of books, and this is the power of storytelling. And it's the power of having such a unique character that is so charismatic and draws people in. And those are all the things that you've managed to take. You could have just been a silent runner who just did his thing and went away again, but you've chosen to share your journey with the world. And that's just gold because that just gives people an insight into what they can do. It's all about... when I read your books, I'm getting something for me. And everybody who's reading those books, that's actually, 'Yes, we talk. We're hearing Dean's story.' But we're actually going, 'Huh. Maybe I could do that. Maybe I could try that. Oh, yeah I've experienced that.' This is the conversation that are going on in people's heads when they read those stories, and that's why they have such an intimate connection with you. And why, even though it's weird when people come up and ask you for an autograph or any of that, they feel like they know you, and they do know you. Dean: I've got a message from a guy. Yeah, I know. Every time I think, 'Wow, this is really laborious, writing these books. And maybe it's my last book.' I got a message from a guy a couple days ago and he said, 'I was planning on reading a couple chapters of your new book before I went to bed.' And he said five hours later, 'I finished the last page.' And then, he said, 'And then I got up. I just had to go running.' Wow. Then the book worked if it motivated him to read the whole thing in one sitting and get up and go running, then it's worthwhile. Lisa: Absolutely. And you know when you read, I read books ferociously, and the list is long. I'm usually reading about 10 books at a time. And when I'm reading, I am distilling the world's top people and their entire experience, I get to absorb within the space of 10, 15 hours of reading their book. That's a good return on investment. If I want to download someone's experience, or knowledge, or whatever the case is, then reading books is just such a powerful way to do it and listening to podcasts as well. Because that's another way that you can do it without having to... You can be out and about, driving, or running, or whatever and absorbing some new information. And I think we're just so lucky to have access to all of this. It's just incredible. Dean: It is and it's a pity if you don't take advantage of that because you're so wise and educated. That conversation we had before the podcast, it's amazing how... It's amazing. Your knowledge base and how you developed your knowledge base. Well, you've absorbed the best of the best and what they're thinking and the research they've done. Lisa: Exactly. All you're doing is you're absorbing it from the best scientists, the best doctors, the best athletes, the best executives, the best business people, and then, you get to share it, teach it. This is the other thing. If I learn something in the morning, I'm teaching it in the afternoon. Usually it's to my poor husband or my mother. I'm teaching it and then, I often build into my programs, or it comes out in my webinars, or whatever. And you're basically just regurgitating stuff that you've learned, but it's powerful when you put it into the perspective of your experience and you change it. You learn it, you teach it. You learn it, you teach it. And that's a such a cool way to share, and get that information out there into the world, and actually help the world on your little corner of the earth and what you're doing. And that's what I love to do and that's the power of what your books are all about. So yeah, I commiserate with you. Getting a book out is a bloody long, hard journey. People don't realise how hard it is to write a book. Give me a bloody hundred miler any day over writing a book. In fact, give me ten hundred milers over any day because it's such a long process, isn't it? Dean: Well, I do a lot of my writing while I'm running actually. So I dictate into my phone now. Because we have some of our clearest thoughts while we're running. Before, I used to think, 'God, why didn't I write that down? How did that go again?' Now, I just dictate as I'm running and then come home, put in an earbud, and just type up my notes. Lisa: I haven't done variations of that. I do end up stopping on my runs and just writing a quick note. I haven't actually dictated. I have to start adapting that because maybe that'll make it easy because you're damn right. When I'm actually at the computer, there's distractions. There's a hundred windows open; there's notifications coming all the time, and I really find it hard to sit down and write. It is sometimes best if you could just dictate into something, so I'll have to give that a crack next time. Dean: I think motion stirs emotion. Lisa: Yeah, it does and it clears the mind. That's one thing I miss now that I'm not doing the ultras, personally, at the moment. It's that singularity of purpose. That cleanness the mind had before of this one goal. And I'm watching my husband's preparing for a hundred miler in November. And just watching everything in his whole day, and he has the luxury of doing this because we haven't got kids and stuff, but everything in his whole day is centred around his training and getting to that hundr

Earth Wise
Wildfires And Giant Sequoias

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 2:00


Two massive California wildfires that erupted during a lightning storm on September 9 have continued to threaten groves of giant sequoia trees in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains.  As of the beginning of October, flames from the KNP Complex fire had burned in or passed through 11 sequoia groves, including the famed Giant Forest in […]

Little Yo Pod
Fire in Yosemite and the Sierra Nevada

Little Yo Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 18:15


In this episode of Little Yo Pod I discuss the fire situation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Find out how we got into this situation and what is being done about it!ResourcesThe Big Burn Documentaryhttps://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/burn/The Big Burn by Timothy Eganhttps://www.timothyeganbooks.com/the-big-burnCal Firehttps://www.fire.ca.govHelp Support Little Yo PodVenmo Account@Laura-Jackson-23Email melittleyopod@gmail.comFacebook and Instagram@littleyopod

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
October 25, 2021: John Rothmann is talking about the weather - what was your weekend like?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 36:30


California braced for winter storms and flash floods on Monday as meteorologists warned of a “bomb cyclone” and an “atmospheric river,” a convergence of storms that unleashed heavy rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. From Marin County to the area just south of Big Sur along the Pacific Coast, flash flood watches were in effect until late Sunday night and, in some areas, early Monday morning, including parts of the San Francisco Peninsula. The system was so vast that it was expected to reach souther BC on Monday, where it was set to bring rain and strong winds.The National Weather Service issued a winter weather warning on Monday with heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada through Tuesday morning. The convergence of storms comes at a challenging time for California, which has been besieged by wildfires and drought, the result of extreme weather brought on by climate change. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
October 25, 2021: John Rothmann is talking about the weather - what was your weekend like?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 36:30


California braced for winter storms and flash floods on Monday as meteorologists warned of a “bomb cyclone” and an “atmospheric river,” a convergence of storms that unleashed heavy rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. From Marin County to the area just south of Big Sur along the Pacific Coast, flash flood watches were in effect until late Sunday night and, in some areas, early Monday morning, including parts of the San Francisco Peninsula. The system was so vast that it was expected to reach souther BC on Monday, where it was set to bring rain and strong winds.The National Weather Service issued a winter weather warning on Monday with heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada through Tuesday morning. The convergence of storms comes at a challenging time for California, which has been besieged by wildfires and drought, the result of extreme weather brought on by climate change. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Something Cryptid This Way Comes
Paranormal Things

Something Cryptid This Way Comes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 66:22


This episode is also available on YouTube, where you'll watch Mallory, Hilary and I look at haunted sites, unusual experiences, and the unknown.Follow SOMETHING CRYPTID THIS WAY COMES on Instagram and Facebook. Subscribe to YouTube to be immersed in visuals and watch live interviews, and visit us online.What is beyond the veil? Why do we think we've discovered everything? Why are so many cryptid topics polarized between beliefs and theories? We dive deep into  the understanding of psychic abilities, how to develop our connections, and how we understand our own gifts.  Follow Hilary and Mallory on Instagram and enjoy their incredible and ongoing journey. They will take you along with them...EARLY RELEASES: Join OMM+  For as little as $3/month, with extra benefits for higher tiers, members will have access to extended episodes, behind-the-scenes interviews with guests, free merchandise, and many other exciting materials that will only be available through a membership. https://www.ommstories.com If you have a potential story to share, one you'd like to hear set to a story-telling format, or would even like to discuss sponsorship, send an email to Russ@ommstories.com  We've got some GREAT swag and gear that you can find on Redbubble  and Tee Public too. Stickers, t-shirts, mugs and more… you name it, we've got it! 

ThePodCraft Beer Show
Okto-beer-fest 2021 With German-style Märzens & Festbiers #oktoberfest | Episode 62

ThePodCraft Beer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 28:57


In Episode 62 Chris, Charlie, and Steve deep dive into four Oktoberfest-style craft beers this week: [1] "Oktoberfest Amber Marzen" from Sierra Nevada Brewing Company (Chico, CA); [2] "Oktoberfest" (Märzen) by Founders Brewing Company (Grand Rapids, MI); [3] "Festbier (2021)" by Enegren Brewing Company (Moorpark, CA); & [4] "Festbier" by Fall Brewing Company (San Diego, CA). Full show notes, links, & photos at: www.thepodcraft.com.

Valley Public Radio
Signs of fire season winding down: weekend storms and closing of fire lookout

Valley Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 1:23


Nestled in the northeast part of Sequoia National Forest 8500 feet up, the Buck Rock Fire Tower sits atop a 250 foot rock face, jutting over an expansive view of the forest and the Sierra Nevada. The tower is situated between Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks, giving it a prime view of smoke columns. A woman who goes by the name Michigan staffs the lookout full-time. “We are a first-line early fire detection resource,” Michigan says. She says the lookout is an important tool during fire season. “I can see it, I can tell if it's really a smoke. I can tell if it's a legitimate smoke.” she says. From the tower, Michigan watched the KNP Complex grow, even as the fire got closer. “I could see flames on that ridge,” she says pointing to a ridge at eye level to the tower. “I had embers falling on the roof and on the stairs from a fire that was still four and a half miles away.” Michigan had to flee the tower on October 4. Since then, the building had been wrapped with the same foil used

Arcanum Obscura
Sirens and Mermaids and a Nice comment, Oh My!

Arcanum Obscura

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 91:54


Hello and welcome back! first thing, we got new mics, and I'm not too sure about them, I was either really out of it or the mic muffles me lol. But in this week's episode, we partly talk about Sirens due to going way way off track more than usual, but we get there... well, Nate does! We also bring up what they believe killed the family in the Sierra Nevada case though we disagree. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/arcanumobscura/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/arcanumobscura/support

KVMR News
Molly Fisk - For The Love Of Mike Ditka

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 3:59


Molly Fisk writes, coaches, and teaches writing in California's Sierra Nevada foothills.

@ Sea With Justin McRoberts
God, Context, and Bad Religion

@ Sea With Justin McRoberts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:10


I ran into a friend recently whom I haven't seen in a while. And at first, I didn't recognize him. Some of that had to do with the time between meetings. But more of it had to do with context. The last time I saw him was in California in the Sierra Nevada foothills.This recent meeting was in a town called Goshen, Virginia. He and I were walking into buildings adjacent to one another and caught each other's eye. Then we did “that thing;” just staring at one another quizzically and awkwardly until he (his name is Mike) said “McRoberts!?” There were hugs and high fives and that “guy” hug with the clasped palms thing in the middle. I'm guessing you've had a similar moment: seeing someone or something you know well enough but in a context that threw off your expectations. Them? Here? No.. that can't be. They belong somewhere else,… right? Part of what has been exposed in my religious training is that this happens to me, in relationship to God, somewhat regularly. An “encounter” or a moment of clarity is cast into substantial doubt because, .. well. God doesn't go “here;” God goes to certain places at certain times (and sometimes in certain ways). This isn't to say that those places and spaces and times and ways are, in and of themselves, problematic; more so, they become problematic when I try to stuff the entirely of my expectant longing for God into them. They can't hold that. They break. What if the spaces and places we call “sacred” were less like consumer packaging and more like training grounds; always pointing beyond themselves and humbly aware of their transience. May it be so that I learn to see The Divine there (goodness, truth, beauty) so that I can recognize Divine love and movement everywhere else… not so that I would know where to go should I desire to find it. So, The 10 am -11 am hour on a Sunday The specific words of specific prayersThe specific chord progressions The specific genre of music or art are all fineBut/And/Also…They are small. So small. Alexander Schmemann, in his book “For The Life of the world” criticized what he called “the religion of this world,” suggesting that too much of it has called this one, small area of life “sacred” and, in doing so the way we've done it, rendered the MAJORITY of the rest of life and the experience of life “plain” or ‘other” or even “bad.” That's terrible religion. And if those of us at the helm of contemporary religious machinery are truly honest with ourselves, we have to admit that this is the case, at least in part (if not in large part) because we've made it this way. If I am a gatekeeper to your spiritual/religious experience or if something I've created is THE place and way you see The Divine, then you need me and you need what I make and I get to keep my job and my power. This takes me all the way back to the poetic, prophetic challenge issued by the writers of Genesis, who, in the third chapter, expose the core, human temptation to “be like God, knowing good and evil.” It is a temptation, in part, to set the parameters of reality and decide where things should go, including The Divine. But God is who, what, and how God is, wherever God is. Just like my friend Mike is Mike, wherever he is. And getting to know him how and where and when I did should mean that, when I discover him on the other side of the country, I recognize him.. as Mike. May it be so for you and I in relationship to each other and may it be so for you and I in relationship to the Divine and may it be so for us who continue to forge pathways for people to encounter God - that we would not be gatekeepers. We would set the stage for folks to come into an encounter with the Divine by which/in which they would learn to see God however God shows up, wherever God shows up.

Radio Toilet ov Hell
Toilet Radio 334 – Ravenous (feat. Rolderathis)

Radio Toilet ov Hell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 90:18


This week we're watching an edgyboi cannibal classic set in the Sierra Nevada mountains amid the Westward expansion of the United States, Ravenous! Three different directors, myriad production catastrophes, and a team of producers hell-bent on late-90s-ing the shit out of this movie could not hold it back. Join us as we watch Guy Pearce struggle with the morality of violence and cannibalism! Enjoy the delightful presence of Jeffrey Jones until we remember his whole deal! Listen to us argue about Christian themes vs Native American themes vs Manifest Destiny vs Robert Carlyle's excellent facial hair! You cannot defeat the wendigo, you can only die. It's a good one! NEXT WEEK: We're watching We Summon The Darkness (2019) with a very special RETURNING guest! Join us next time as the October Spooktacular continues. Music featured on this ‘sode: Arch Enemy – Ravenous from Wages of Sin Call into the show and leave us a message at (803) 712-3773. Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe to Toilet Rad

The Unfiltered Gentlemen
Batch274: We're Kind Of A Big Deal In Finland

The Unfiltered Gentlemen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:48


Get your pizzas, pretzels, and beers; it's time for research! Erica joins Flex and Greg to talk about the return of beer festivals, mac and cheese pizza, the best place to live for drunk people, and why the great people of Finland love us so much! We also get an exclusive performance from Masterdrunk Theatre.Flex is drinking Smashing Yuzu, a cold sour IPA from Eagle Park Brewing. Erica is reviewing Pretzel Bier from Captain Lawrence and Snyder's Pretzels. Finally, Greg is drinking and talking about Czech Rendezvous, his latest homebrew. Greg and Erica were able to get outside and attend a couple of beer festivals; Greg went to Surf n Suds to hang out with the Booze League crew. Erica was slinging pretzels at Capital Beerfest in Sacramento, CA. Flex scored some rare beer at a kid's birthday party. And it turns out, we're really popular over in Finland. Who knew?Listener Jay writes in to talk about his beer-drinking adventures on a road trip across the Midwest. He throws Coley under the bus in the process.Our Ludicrous Libation Law comes to us from those underage drinkers in Arkansas. Uber completes their buyout of Drizly, the alcohol delivery platform. Sierra Nevada to launch and upscale hard tea brand; will it come with crumpets? Which state is the most tolerant of drunk and high employees? Get packing. And a bartender quits his job after his manager tells him not to get drunk on his days off.Erica:www.instagram.com/necknoshwww.necknosh.com Flex:www.instagram.com/flex_me_a_beerCraft Beer Republic:www.CraftBeerRepublic.comwww.instagram.com/CraftBeerRepublicwww.facebook.com/CraftBeerRepublicPodwww.twitter.com/CraftBeerRepub(805) 538-2337

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
October 19th, 2021 6am Alice News Network

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 17:52


The biggest snow storm happened in the Sierra Nevada over the weekend, an update on the standing for the baseball playoffs for the World Series, experts say that Colin Powell's death doesn't contradict efficacy of coronavirus vaccines, men think that they are better at pumpkin carving than women, and cuffing season is here!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Scary Time
Donner Dinner Party (Part 2) by The Q Files

Scary Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:19


Donner Dinner Party (Part 2)Subscribe to The Q Files on Apple - https://apple.co/3pe9niSSubscribe on Spotify - https://spoti.fi/3aNMBWMSubscribe Everywhere else - https://bit.ly/3DPXuUpWelcome back to the Q Files. In the second part of the Donner Dinner Party, we'll continue to tag along on the snowy trail with our unlucky pioneers. We'll share the rarely examined Native American perspective of this epic American tale and finally, conclude our own dinner party with our Donner-inspired main dish and...a little desperation pie.At the end of our last episode, we left the band of our desperate immigrants seeking relief, lost deep in the unrelenting blizzards that had covered the Sierra Nevada mountains in 20 ft. snow drifts. They called themselves, "The Forlorn Hope". They were out of food. They were dying. So... on Christmas Day, after almost nine days without sustenance, they succumbed to only thing that could save them. Cannibalism.The Q Files is a personal, purposeful, paranormal podcast about the highly strange and weirdly unknown. Join us on our queer adventures as we explore the people, places, and phenomena, outside popular consciousness.The Q Files documentary series will feature astonishing stories about the paranormal, the supernatural, occulture, forgotten history, and the strange.Be Weird. Stay Curious. These are The Q Files.Subscribe wherever you enjoy podcasts.Stay in touch: Facebook: The Q Files Podcast, Twitter: TheQFilesPod, Instagram: TheQFilesPodThe music for The Q Files is provided by Sounds Like An Earful.

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast
Hidden Bodies: A You Novel by Caroline Kepnes (YOU Book 2)

The Drunk Guys Book Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 93:40


The Drunk Guys LOVE beer again this week when they discuss Hidden Bodies: A You Novel by Caroline Kepnes. They also get their beer's sucked, including: Staycation by Magnify, Requesting Data by Finback, Wild Little Thing by Sierra Nevada, Gridlock, and Panther Club by Founders. Join the Drunk Guys again

Something Cryptid This Way Comes

Follow SOMETHING CRYPTID THIS WAY COMES on Instagram and Facebook. Subscribe to YouTube to be immersed in visuals and watch live interviews, and visit us online.What the hell have I got myself into?!?  The smoke is filling your lungs, and a constant cough has developed over the last two weeks consisting of 18-hour days fighting the raging flames. Your hands are stiff having dug trenches, chopping down trees, and creating fire lines for the flames to reach… and then die. But the flames are spreading. And then... you see it:A lone shadow walking down the hill, escaping the flames. It's not any animal you've seen before. It looks like a man... but is it? Jump in and join three eye witnesses as they tell their stories of the Sasquatch in the Chelan area.If you have a potential story to share, one you'd like to hear set to a story-telling format, or would even like to discuss sponsorship, send an email to Russ@ommstories.com  We've got some GREAT swag and gear that you can find on Redbubble  and Tee Public too. Stickers, t-shirts, mugs and more… you name it, we've got it! Join OMM+  For as little as $3/month, with extra benefits for higher tiers, members will have access to extended episodes, behind-the-scenes interviews with guests, free merchandise, and many other exciting materials that will only be available through a membership. https://www.ommstories.com 

Dave & Mahoney
Beer For Breakfast Brought To You By Speedee Mart: Sierra Nevada Narwhal

Dave & Mahoney

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 8:39


Mahoney rates this beer a... Socials: @DaveandMahoney Voice Mail: 833-Yo-Dummy https://www.twitch.tv/daveandmahoney Additional Content: daveandmahoney.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Adventures in Luxury Travel
25. Spain | Museums in Madrid, professional soccer, Gaudi in Barcelona, hiking, rooftop bars and pools, world class dining in San Sebastian and exploring the islands

Adventures in Luxury Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:41


Spain is a country near and dear to my heart, as I lived there for a year on our family sabbatical with my teens. Join Nigel and me as we talk about traveling to Spain and share active, culinary, and cultural highlights.   We'll share our favorite hotels, including Puente Romano, Belmond La Residencia, and the new Four Seasons Madrid. And we'll tell you about some of our favorite local experiences like relaxing in El Retiro Park and on Marbella's beaches, tasting tapas on terrazas and cocktails on rooftops, and hiking in the Sierra Nevada. Spain is also known for its world-class art and architecture, which you can see in the museums of Madrid, the Guggenheim in Bilbao, and the famous work of Gaudi in Barcelona. We'll take you to the white Andalucian villages of the south and the impressive Alhambra.   Visit truvaytravel.com/25 for a video of today's show and additional resources.

KVMR News
Molly Fisk - On The Road Again

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 4:18


Molly Fisk writes, coaches, and teaches writing in California's Sierra Nevada foothills.

Brewbound Podcast
We'll All Be Drinking Seltzers From the C-Store

Brewbound Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:09


The Brewbound team reconvenes to discuss all the new hard seltzers coming to the convenience channel, plus new products from Sierra Nevada -- a lifestyle tea brand -- and Firestone Walker -- more 805, more Mind Haze and Cali Squeeze seltzers. The conversation then turns to the closing of Due South, the acquisition of Catawba and a bunch of openings. Dusty the dog also makes a squeaky appearance.

Uncorking a Story
J.M. Thompson

Uncorking a Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:01


When I was presented with the opportunity to interview J.M. Thompson about his memoir, Running is a Kind of Dreaming, I sprinted to say yes for two reasons; I'm an avid runner and wanted to know what inspired the title and it deals with mental health issues, specifically men's mental health issues. A few years ago, my twin brother was suffering from anxiety, depression, and panic attacks. I'm not telling tales out of school here, he chronicled all of that in his own memoir. One of the hardest things I've ever had to do in my life was check him into the psychiatric hospital where he spent a long week of in-patient treatment followed by multiple weeks of outpatient treatment. It pained me to see this strong man, who I shared so many life experiences with, come to the brink of falling apart.  Even in this day and age, men's mental health is still very much a taboo subject given our sex's aversion to vulnerability. I hoped that by interviewing J.M. about his book, I wouldn't just leave with another powerful story but that I'd also help the cause to raise awareness of men's mental health issues in general. But enough about me.  You might be asking yourself who J.M. Thompson is. Well, I have answers. He was born in England and holds a BA in English literature from Oxford University and a doctorate in clinical psychology.  He completed his psychology training at the University of California, San Francisco, where he conducted research on the brain mechanisms of meditation and the physiology of trauma. He is also an ordained Zen practitioner and certified yoga teacher.  Critical to this story is the fact that he has finished over 40 ultramarathons, and multiple solo adventure runs in the Sierra Nevada, the Grand Canyon, and Death Valley. Thompson currently serves as a staff psychologist at the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. His aforementioned memoir, Running is a Kind of Dreaming, became available for sale as of October 5th.  Listen in as we uncover the emotionally charged story that is the genesis behind the book as well as how running helped J.M. turn his life around. This is a powerful story and one that I was honored to uncork. Please share it with anyone who you think could benefit from it. Happy listening!

Unfold
Nature Tells Its Story, Part 2: Caves and Really Old Water

Unfold

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 15:35


California boasts hundreds of caves, many of them hidden in the Sierra Nevada foothills. These caves hold much more than beautiful icicle-like stalactites and stalagmites. Trapped inside the stalagmites are tiny droplets of fossilized precipitation from climates long ago. In “Nature Tells Its Story Part 2” of Unfold, UC Davis researchers discuss how these water droplets provide a “climate archive” that may help us predict future shifts in rain, snow and drought.    In this episode:  ​Isabel Montañez, distinguished professor, UC Davis Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Barbara Wortham, doctoral student, UC Davis Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Dog Cancer Answers
Artemisinin for Dogs with Cancer | Dr. Nancy Reese Deep Dive

Dog Cancer Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 21:58


In this week's episode Dr. Nancy discusses the herb artemisinin: what it is, what it has been able to do in the lab, and how to discuss adding it to your dog's treatment plan with your vet. Artemisinin has shown promise in studies as an adjunctive treatment for a variety of cancers, including bone cancer. It targets several of the hallmarks of cancer, has potential to help destroy cancer cells, and may also make cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. There is still work to be done on dosing, as artemisinin has a short half-life which can make it challenging to deliver the compound to the actual cancer cells, but we are learning more about how to give it to get the best results while minimizing side effects. Artemisinin is not a good fit for dogs who are undergoing radiation therapy or have a seizure disorder, but otherwise it is very safe. Links Mentioned in Today's Show: The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger NIH Clinical Trials Studies on Artemisinin Related Links: Podcast episode on osteosarcoma: https://dogcanceranswers.com/osteosarcoma-what-you-need-to-know-about-your-dogs-bone-cancer/ Apoptosis: https://www.dogcancerblog.com/articles/book-excerpt/apoptosis-for-cancer-cells/ About Today's Guest, Dr. Nancy Reese: Dr. Nancy Reese is a small animal veterinarian with over 30 years of clinical experience taking care of cats and dogs and other critters in the Sierra Nevada foothills. She is also a perpetual student and researcher, as evidenced by her many degrees. In addition to her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of California, Davis, she earned a Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis and then a Ph.D. in Epidemiology at UC Davis. If you string all her letters out after her name it looks like this: Nancy Reese, DVM, MPVM, PhD. In her spare time, she volunteers to help evacuate and shelter animals caught up in disasters, and she's currently training to help in human search and rescue efforts. Dr. Reese lives in a log cabin with her husband, her 13-year-old golden retriever, and her two 13-year-old cats. Her hobbies include boosting the quality of life and longevity for all animals in her care, hiking, travelling, and cross-country skiing. Oh, and lots of dog walking.  degree from the University of California at Davis before earning his Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from Cornell University. Other Links: To join the private Facebook group for readers of Dr. Dressler's book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide,” go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogcancersupport/  Dog Cancer Answers is a Maui Media production in association with Dog Podcast Network This episode is sponsored by the best-selling animal health book The Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity by Dr. Demian Dressler and Dr. Susan Ettinger. Available everywhere fine books are sold. Have a guest you think would be great for our show? Contact our producers at DogCancerAnswers.com Have an inspiring True Tail about your own dog's cancer journey you think would help other dog lovers? Share your true tail with our producers. If you would like to ask a dog cancer related question for one of our expert veterinarians to answer on a future Q&A episode, call our Listener Line at 808-868-3200 www.dogcanceransers.com. Dog Cancer News is a free weekly newsletter that contains useful information designed to help your dog with cancer. To sign up, please visit: www.dogcancernews.com

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #55: China Peak, California CEO Tim Cohee

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 77:20


The Storm Skiing Podcast is sponsored by Mountain Gazette - Listen to the podcast for discount codes on subscriptions and merch.WhoTim Cohee, Managing Partner, CEO, and General Manager of China Peak Mountain Resort, CaliforniaRecorded onSeptember 28, 2021Why I interviewed himBecause China Peak, an independent operation situated on the Southwest side of California’s Sierra Nevada mountains, sits at the bullseye of multiple issues shaping the modern lift-served skiing landscape. Climate change is descending in all seasons: seven winter snow droughts in the past 10 years; wildfire scraping the resort’s edges and damaging buildings in 2020. The mega-resorts with their super-cheap megapasses beckon the local Fresno skiers that are China Peak’s core constituency. And not just California’s many Epic and Ikon gems – Palisades Tahoe, Kirkwood, Heavenly, Northstar – but the resorts dotted all around the West – it takes the same amount of time to fly to Salt Lake City from Fresno as it does to drive to China Peak. But, like most mid-sized ski areas around the country, China Peak is stamping out a model to survive and hopefully thrive in this era of consolidation, cheap travel, and climate catastrophe: banding together with other independent mountains on the Indy Pass and Powder Alliance, and investing in a powerful New England-style snowmaking system capable of burying the place and (hopefully) fending off fires. And if you’re going to initiate such massive and dramatic change, it helps to have a charismatic leader with more than 40 years of experience dealing with every possible circumstance a snowy mountain can churn out. Skiing needs the China Peaks to thrive if skiing itself is to survive long-term, and I wanted to see how Cohee planned to do that.What we talked aboutThe Southern California ski scene in the 1970s; the Cohee family ski diaspora and their potential future at China Peak; the 1970s vacuum in ski-area marketing; the surreal reality of Southern California skiing; when the massive city below doesn’t know about the abundant skiing in the mountains above; what it took to get same-day snow conditions video from the mountain to the local news station 40 years ago; working for Bill Killebrew at Heavenly; the smartest guy in the history of skiing; quadrupling skier visits at Bear Mountain né Goldmine; how “skiing’s dream team” emerged from a 1990s version of Bear Mountain to run some of the largest ski areas in the country; moving east and working under Les Otten in the heyday of the American Skiing Company; reviving a declining Kirkwood; leaving the ski area after 17 years to buy China Peak (known at the time as Sierra Summit); what happens when a ski area ignores the customer; How and why China Peak overhauled its snowmaking system and how that’s going to change the resort; and what happens when your snowmaking manager quits over Christmas break.Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewFor most of its first two years, The Storm Skiing Podcast focused mostly on the Northeast. In order to capture the true breadth and spirit of the region, it was important to me to maintain a balance between monster, conglomerate-owned ski areas and the-owner-drives-the-Snowcat family-owned hills. So episodes featuring Killington, Sunday River, Sugarbush, Sugarloaf, Loon, and Mount Snow lived alongside interviews with the folks running Plattekill, Berkshire East, Bolton Valley, Titus, Whaleback, Mad River Glen, and Lonesome Pine. The ski world is big and messy, and the podcast had to reflect that.As I expand the pod’s focus from the Northeast to the entire country, I will deliberately follow that same template. My first two western interviews – Taos and Aspen – are ski-world A-listers, checkbox items for the Ikon set, places with deep resonance and meaning for generations of locals and tourists. China Peak is something different. Once knowns as Sierra Summit, it’s a local bump that no one’s flying across the country to ski. But that’s exactly why I’m here: what the hell is this place, this mysterious Indy Pass partner wading in a purgatory south of the Sierra badboys? It’s been there for 63 years and no one outside of Fresno has ever heard of it. But like all ski areas, it means a tremendous amount to a lot of people out there, and it’s an important part of this American ski story that I’m trying to tell.Questions I wish I’d askedFor a typical Storm Skiing Podcast interview, I’ll write 25 to 30 questions and manage to get to around 80 percent of them. This time, I got through six. Cohee’s 40-plus-year journey through the ski industry during its decades of explosive change was so compelling that we didn’t even get to China Peak until we were nearly out of time. So all of my normal questions about chairlifts, trail networks, local markets, snowfall, fire danger, the Indy Pass, the Powder Alliance, and the wild world of Covid will just have to wait until next time – and you will want there to be a next time after you hear this.Why you should ski China PeakChina Peak is an interesting place. It’s more or less at the end of the road, on the way to nowhere, close to nothing at all. Mammoth, 30-ish miles away as the crow flies, is a five-hour drive. Because it’s not big enough to merit destination status in a state overloaded with alpha ski resorts, it’s mostly a day tripper’s hill for Fresno, an hour-and-a-half southwest. But there’s no rule that it has to be. An Indy Pass and Powder Alliance member, China Peak is a walk-up proposition for many skiers on their existing passes. The trail map looks fun, especially after a big snow, but the mountain’s new megahose snowmaking system ought to guarantee more stable conditions even when the snow fails to materialize. This would make a nice stop on any California ski tour.Additional reading/videosLift Blog’s China Peak lift inventoryHistoric China Peak/Sierra Summit trailmapsSome Slopefillers love for CoheeSAM($) profiles China Peak’s new snowmaking system Fires approaching China Peak last September:Cohee on video: Get on the email list at www.stormskiing.com

Queens of the Mines
The Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 22:26


This is Queens of the Mines. Today I am going to tell you the story of the Murderous Mail Order Bride of Tuttletown from 1929. The preceding episode may feature foul language and or adult content including violence which may be disturbing some listeners, or secondhand listeners. So, discretion is advised.   On a ranch on blanket creek, near the current Kress Ranch Road, lived  Carroll and his parents Stephen Rablen and Corrine Brown. They were a well known family in Sonora who were pioneers there during the gold rush. Corrine was the daughter of the late C.C. Brown, a prominent lawyer of Sonora.    Carroll had been married twice, first to Martha Copeland and second to Eva Young. Neither marriage lasted. While serving during WW 1 in France, a German shell exploded in Carroll's dugout, causing him to lose his hearing. The thirty-four year old veteran returned to Tuttletown to live with his widower father. The hearing impairment made Carroll too shy to meet a local girl. Yet he was lonely.   So lonely that, in June of 1928, Carroll placed an ad in a San Francisco matrimonial paper in search of a bride. He stated that he was looking for a woman who would enjoy a life with him hiking and enjoying the natural wonders of the Sierra Nevadas. The ad was printed in matrimonial papers across the nation and a thirty-three year old waitress in Texas responded to Rablen's request. They wrote back and forth. She told him she was a heavy boned blond with a twin sister who she called Effie and a son, Albert. About Albert, Eva wrote to Rablan, he has had no father since he was a month old. The father left her. She hasn't seen him and if a man left her she wouldn't want to see them again and she would make sure she didn't.” It was an odd thing to say during courtship. They continued to write back and forth and it was decided that Eva would leave Texas, come to California and the two would be married.    Carroll met Eva at the station in San Francisco, and together they traveled to Nevada where they were married in Reno. Her twin sister Effie and son Albert soon followed her out to California. Stephen Rablen was not keen on the idea of his son's previously divorced “mail order bride”. Steven questioned her motives. The town was curious.    One year after the wedding, the gossiping had died off. Carroll had found a job as a clerk with Standard City Lumber, which was being acquired and would soon be named Pickering Lumber and the couple was living on a chicken ranch in Standard City. The two of them quarreled often and shared a toxic and unhealthy relationship. When Eva transferred herself as the beneficiary on the $3,500 life insurance policy Carroll had purchased for himself, his father Stephen was alarmed.    Stephen Rablen played the fiddle and a local wedding or party seldom went without Stephen and his brother John providing the music. The brothers had been asked to play at a community dance at the Tuttletown school house on the 29th of April in 1929. Carroll and Eva joined them for the party. Well, Eva did.  Carroll's insecurities with his hearing impairment kept him from fully enjoying the festivities and as per usual, Carroll waited out the night in the car while his wife danced the night away with the people from town.  Halfway through the night, Stephen was playing “Turkey in the Straw” on his fiddle when Eva went to the refreshment table to make up a sandwich and a cup of coffee for Carroll. She would bring him a refreshment to the car. With her hands full, Eva made her way across the dance floor towards the front door. Alice Shea, a local woman who was dancing, jostled her arm, and some of the coffee spilled on Alice's pink dress. Oops.    Eva made her way outside with the sandwich and cup of coffee to her husband who was still in the car. “Here dear, here is something to eat.” Carroll thanked his bride, she waved and returned to the dance floor. He had a few bites of his sandwich while he waited for the hot coffee to cool down. He blew into it, and took a sip. He made a strange face. He took another drink and then another. Then, he dropped the cup.   This episode was brought to you by our main Sponsor Columbia Mercantile 1855, Columbia Historic Park's Main street grocery store. Teresa, the owner carries a mix of quality international and local products that replicate diverse provisions of when Columbia was California's second largest city after San Francisco. I love the selection of hard kombucha, my favorite. It is common to hear, "Wow! I didn't expect to find that here in Columbia". The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is located in Columbia State Historic Park at 11245 Jackson Street and is a great place to keep our local economy moving. At a time like this, it is so important to shop local, and The Columbia Mercantile 1855 is friendly, welcoming, fairly priced and accepts EBT. Open Daily! Now, back to Tuttletown-    A few minutes after midnight, Rancher Frank Shell and a group of his friends were smoking in front of the schoolhouse on the night of the dance.  The men stopped mid conversation when they began to hear groans of distress. Frank Shell realized it was coming from a nearby parked car and followed the sound. He found Carroll doubled over and shouted to him. “What's the matter, are you sick?” Carroll mumbled to Shell, “That coffee - bitter - get  - my - father.”    Frank Shell opened the car door, picked the vet up and carried him into the schoolhouse. Shell was yelling as he burst through the door,  “Steve - Steve Rablen- Your boy is sick!” The music in the Tuttletown schoolhouse stopped and everyone heard Carroll cry out in pain. Stephen threw his fiddle down, jumped off the platform and rushed through the crowd towards his son. Eva had rushed out from the kitchen where she had been helping clean up. She stood and watched the action play out around her, seemingly terrified. She finally attempted to hold her husband down as he thrashed around but Frank Shell carried Carrol outside and placed him on the ground.   Carroll reached out for his father's hand and told him one last time, “ Papa, that coffee was awfully bitter.” His words faded as he slipped into an unconscious state. Emergency services arrived 45 minutes later with Tuolumne County Sheriff Jack H. Dambacher, who pronounced Carroll B. Rablen dead at the scene. Eva rode along quietly as the ambulance took her husband's body to Coroner Josie Terzich.    Dr. Bromley also built a two-story hospital called the Bromley Sanitarium, which we talked about in the Open Mic episode, it later became known as Sonora Hospital. It was situated at the current Yosemite Title parking lot.   Dr. Bromley performed an autopsy on Carrol Rablen's body and sent Rablen's stomach contents to the University of California for analysis. Foul play was not obvious, and it was assumed Carroll had died of natural causes but Steven Rablen did not buy it. He stormed Dambacher's headquarters, demanding that the search continued.    Sheriff Dambacher returned to the Tuttletown schoolhouse on May 1, 1929, the day of Carroll Rablen's funeral. After an hour of searching which turned up nothing, he placed his hat on his head and turned to leave the scene, he paused. On the ground in a bush, near where the Rablen's car had been parked, was a small medicinal bottle from Bigelow's drugstore. He picked up the bottle and read the label. STRYCHNINE. The poison used to kill rodents.   We want to welcome this month's featured sponsor, Sonora Florist. SONORA FLORIST has been providing our community with beautiful flower arrangements for whatever the occasion since the early 1950s. You can visit sonoraflorist.com, or search Sonora Florist on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. There is a special website for wedding florals, visit sincerelysonoraflorist.com to see their wedding work, read reviews, or to book a consultation with one of their designers if you are getting married in the area. Thank you Sonora Florist. And if you have not checked out the mural on the side of the shop, on the corner of Washington and Bradford in downtown Sonora, in honor of the local Chinese history, do so! It was a fight to get it up, and it was worth it!   This Episode is brought to you by the Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH. Are you facing criminal charges in California? The most important thing you can do is obtain legal counsel from an aggressive Criminal Defense Lawyer you can trust. The Law Office of Charles B. Smith has effectively handled thousands of cases. The Law Offices of CHARLES B SMITH do not just defend cases, they represent people. Charles is intimately familiar with the investigative techniques the police and prosecutors use and is able to look at your case and see defenses that others can, and do, miss. Visit cbsattorney.com for more information.  Even during the gold rush, no one liked attorneys, and Chrles, you will love.    After finding the empty bottle of strychnine at the scene of the crime, Dambacher headed to Bigelow's Drug Store to question the clerk about the recent purchases of the poison. There had been only one purchase of the substance that week, to a Mrs. Joe Williams, who lived on a chicken ranch near the junction of the Sonora Mono road and the road to Soulsbyville, at about 10 o'clock on the morning of Crroll's death. The purchase was under the pretext of the need for poisoning gophers. When the drugstore clerk described the appearance of Mrs. Joe Williams, it was an exact description of Eva Brandon.    Eva had been staying with Mrs. Jasper Shell after the accident, and Dambacher headed to the Shell's Hale Ranch. Eva came outside, and the Sheriff told her they were going on a ride with Constable Hoskins to the drugstore. The employees that were present when she bought the poison for 50 cents were Walter Ronten and Mrs Warren Sahey. They told the officers that Eva was the woman who bought the bottle. Dambacher made the clerks aware that their certainty would end in a murder charge for Eva, they took a second look but were positive. Eva was immediately accused of murder. She vigorously denied the charges, saying her husband was broken-hearted over his health problems and had surely poisoned himself. She demanded the Sheriff bring her home but Jack Dambacher told Eva she was not going home for a long time.   At the sheriff headquarters, Carrol's father Stephen insisted that he suspected his daughter-in-law had killed his son over a $3,500 insurance policy. For reference, $3500 would be the equivalent of $56k in 2021. Stephen Rablen told the deputies he believed that Eva found her victims through mail-order bride advertisements. He suggested she surely killed her last husband, a mail-order groom named Hubert Brandon. Eva was formally charged with premeditated murder the following day in a complaint signed by Stephen Rablan. Her twin sister Effie had been working night and day to prove someone else bought the poison. Effie insisted that the two were deeply in love and that Eva was miles away when the poison was bought.   Sonora's Dr. Bromley conducted the autopsy and sent Carroll's stomach to western laboratories in Oakland to be tested for poison by the famed scientist Edward O. Heinrich. Local Coroner Jesie Terzzich attended the testing. Heinrich was a famous American criminologist in the 20's known as the Wizard of Berkeley, America's Sherlock Holmes and the Edison of Crime Detection. He was an extraordinarily skilled criminologist who, almost single-handedly, helped to instill a systematic and scientific level of criminal investigation in the 20s and 30s. Heinrich is still held in the highest esteem by those who are familiar with his methodologies.    The Mother Lode was seething with controversy, everyone had their own opinion on whether it was murder, suicide or natural causes. Eva sat calmly in jail for a week proclaiming “why would I kill my husband? I never poisoned him!” The San Joaquin attorney Charles H. Vance, offered to defend Eva, telling her that “No hick sheriff or county prosecutor would ever be able to convict her”. The entire case was heavily covered in extreme detail in the papers as front page news.    The trial for the murder of Crroll Rablan was so largely attended on June 10 1929, the hearing was held outside in an open-air dance pavilion, where there was no shortage of space. Eva arrived on the arm of her attorney and quickly pleaded not guilty. Her defense focused on the mental state of the husband and wife. Carroll, they claimed, was suicidal. His first wife was there to testify that she had heard him make suicidal remarks in the past. The defense stated that Eva was manic depressive with developmental disabilities leaving her with an IQ equal to her eleven year old son.    Then, the opposition took the stage. An insurance agent from Oakdale  was called on as a witness, testifying that he had called on Carroll the day before he died to let him know his insurance would soon expire, and he had refused to renew the policy under Eva's name. Next, a handwriting expert proved the signature on a drugstore's registry with Eva's handwriting and they were a perfect match. It wasn't looking good for Eva.   Now, forensic science was still new, and forensic science using DNA would not be used to solve a crime until 1984, but it was forensics and chemical analysis that cracked this case in 1929. Edward O. Heinrich was called to the stand. Heinrich proved to the judge, and the curious audience, that there was strychnine in Carroll's stomach, on the coffee cup, and on the coffee stain that was left on Alice Shea's dress.    Eva and her team's mood changed when they realized the strong case against her and the crowd was shocked when suddenly, Eva took the stand and changed her plea to guilty.    She told the judge the war had left horrific effects on her husband. He constantly victimised himself and complained about his ailments.    “Quarrels, quarrels, I was sick and tired of them. We talked things over. It was decided we should both commit suicide. But I couldn't bring myself to do it. I was exhausted by my husband's suicidal tendencies, he constantly talked about self-harm and asked me to kill him. Finally I decided to poison him. It was the best way out, I thought. Now they want to hang me? I could only put him out of the way because I felt it was the only way to get my freedom.”     Her confession eliminated the need for the trial and Eva Brandon-Rablen was sentenced to life in prison at San Quentin for Murder, without the possibility of parole. By pleading guilty, Eva evaded the death penalty.  Sheriff Jack Dambacher and his wife escorted Eva to the ferry that would take her to the penitentiary. Eva was all smiles as she told the couple “I feel fine,  not a bit tired. I'm not at all downhearted or discouraged.” Effie was there with Eva's son, eleven year old Albert Lee so he could say farewell to his mother. She held her son in a cold embrace. “I will be alright,” she told him. “I'm going to study Spanish. I've always been crazy to learn Spanish. Then if I get along well with that I can take on other subjects.” Reporters on hand at the ferry dock asked her why she killed Carroll. “I can't tell you why. I can't tell you why I confessed to putting strychnine in my husband's coffee. I told the court all and I want to tell.”  Eva boarded the ferry that would transport her to San Quentin and looked to the distance as the ferry left the shore. She disappeared behind the prison walls to spend the rest of her life; she would never again be free. Well, never say never.    Nine years later, on Jan 27th 1938, against the recommendations of the Tuolumne County Superior Court and officials at prison, she applied for parole.       You see, Eva was one of the original prisoners transferred from San Quentin to the California Institute for Women at Tehachapi. Eva had served longer than most of the other criminals incarcerated there. Parole was granted. The forgotten woman left the prison walls and was whisked away in a car that was waiting for her outside.    I guess we will never know what Eva's true motive was. Was she insane, as her lawyers would have argued? Did Carroll poison himself and she took the blame? Did he ask her to do it? Was it for $3,500, as her father-in-law believed? Or is there a story, still untold? What do you think?   John Henry “Jack” Dambacher, whose tenure as sheriff from 1922 to 1946 is the longest in county history. Dambacher was known by his nickname “The Black Hat”, apparently after his iconic headwear. The new county jail was named the JH Dambacher detention center. He was originally buried in Sonora's Mountain View Catholic Cemetery but he was dis-interred and moved to the Casa Bonita Mausoleum in Stockton. Carroll Burdette Rablen, his mother and his father Stephen are buried in the Sonora City Cemetery. Heinnrich was buried at Chapel of the Chimes Columbarium and Mausoleum at hot - topic on QOTM Mountain View Oakland.   Alright, love you all, be safe, get vaccinated, wear a mask, stay positive and act kind. Thank you for taking the time to listen today, subscribe to the show so we can meet again weekly, on Queens of the Mines. Queens of the Mines is a product of the “Youreka! Podcast Network” and was written, produced and narrated by Andrea Anderson. Go to queensofthemines.com for the book and more.    Primary sources: Oakland Tribune Tue May 14, 1929 The Ogden Standard Examiner Sun Jul 14, 1929 www.murderpedia.org/female.R/images/rablen_eva/eva-rablen.pdf https://oldspirituals.com/2019/06/16/from-the-end-eva-rablen-mail-order-bride/ THE MAIL ORDER BRIDE MURDER- C.A. Asbrey  Object: Matrimony: The Risky Business of Mail-Order Matchmaking on the … By Chris Enss

The California Report Magazine
Escape from Mammoth Pool: A Wildfire Rescue that Saved 242 People (and 16 Dogs)

The California Report Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 29:41


Over Labor Day weekend 2020, the historic, fast-moving Creek Fire tore through remote wilderness in the Sierra Nevada northeast of Fresno, trapping hundreds of campers at a Mammoth Pool Reservoir. A new podcast from KVPR explores what it takes, in the era of climate change, to launch a successful, large-scale rescue from a massive forest fire. "Escape from Mammoth Pool" gives us an intimate look at the people involved in the rescue effort — survivors who helped save strangers, and National Guard members who said this was scarier than war. We're devoting our whole show this week to sharing parts of the podcast and talking with reporter Kerry Klein. She spent a year interviewing survivors and rescuers, listening to 911 tape, and pouring over government documents and data to piece together what happened. 

Life is a Festival Podcast
#110 - A Superhero Team of Indigenous Elders | Vivien Vilela & Rudy Randa (Aniwa Gathering)

Life is a Festival Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 80:07


What started as a festival bringing together elders from around the world has become a platform of superheroes! Aniwa is a movement to amplify the voices of Indigenous leaders and today's guests founders Vivien Vilela & Rudy Randa share what that means in the time of Covid. We start with Vivian and Rudy's initial awakenings, which started like many of ours. at outdoor dance parties. We discuss what is known as the Rainbow Prophecy and how that gave birth to the Aniwa Gathering. We talk about some of the Indigenous leaders they represent like Benki Piyãko, Mona Polacca, and the mysterious Mamos of the Sierra Nevadas. Finally we explore how we might transmit elder knowledge to a Western context and how we could scale Indigenous wisdom in our modern world. The Aniwa Gathering is a non-profit event produced by The Boa Foundation bringing together 40 of the world's most respected indigenous leaders and elders to share their wisdom over 4 days of cultural exchange and sacred ceremonies. Links Aniwa: https://www.aniwa.co/ The Boa Foundation: https://www.theboafoundation.org/ Brazil: Reject Anti-Indigenous Rights Bill: https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/08/24/brazil-reject-anti-indigenous-rights-bill Aniwa on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aniwa.co/?hl=en Boa Foundation on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theboafoundation/?hl=en Timestamps :07 - Vivian and Rudy both first opened up through outdoor parties :18 - The Rainbow Prophecy and the Aniwa Festival of Indigenous wisdom :29 - A superhero team of indigenous elders :47 - Transmitting elder wisdom to a Western context :59 - Scaling access to indigenous wisdom

The Trail Show
The Trail Show #110: The Three Passes High Route

The Trail Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 133:46


Show #110 – #elderberries – On this month's Trail Show we spend an inordinate amount of time discussing the peoples of the PCT that are no longer on the PCT, special guest “Flamingo” joins us to talk about important work, his passion for the Sierra Nevada and California's Three Passes High Route, Speshul drinks six month old […] The post The Trail Show #110: The Three Passes High Route first appeared on The Trail Show.

The Mushroom Hour Podcast
Ep. 97: Mushrooms of the Mountain Ranges & High Meadows of California (feat. Thea Chesney)

The Mushroom Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 86:27


Thea Chesney is a lifelong Sierra Nevada foothill resident and naturalist. She has had an interest in mushrooms (and plants, and the rest of the natural world) since early childhood, which gradually became an obsession. She holds a B.S. in forestry from UC Berkeley, with an emphasis in botany and natural sciences. During her time at Berkeley, she spent plenty of time working and hanging out in the Berkeley mycology labs and continues to return to campus to provide specimens for and aid in teaching their mushroom ID course. She worked on a mushroom survey crew for the U.S. Forest Service around Mt. Shasta for several seasons, which allowed her to become intimately familiar with the fungal inhabitants and ecology of the area. Since then, she has continued with the Forest Service as a botanist for a long-term California-wide meadow monitoring project. She teaches occasional workshops in mushroom and plant identification, both for work and independently. She has also been involved with the California Rare Fungi Working Group since its inception. Her fieldwork and her own studies of plants and fungi are centered in the Sierra Nevada and other mountains of California, and she is currently working on a field guide to mushrooms of these understudied regions with Noah Siegel and Christian Schwarz.   TOPICS COVERED:   Mycology Lineage & Childhood Immersion in Nature  Underexplored Mountain Ranges of California  Diversity of Bioregions in Mountain Ranges  Mycorrhizal Mushrooms & Tree Hosts  Montane Water Cycles, Plant Ecology & Fungal Diversity  High Meadows Ecosystems & Their Mushrooms  California Rare Fungi Working Group  The Future of Documenting Fungal Diversity  Fire-Following Fungi  Morel Habitat & Ecology in California  Tips for Finding Morels  Thea's Lifelong Connection to the Sierras  Klamath Mountains – The Most Biodiverse Pocket of California?!  Future Work with Christian Schwarz & Noah Siegel  EPISODE RESOURCES:   Thea Chesney iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/people/theachesney   Thea's Talk on Fire Fungi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8V9Irj0GtTE   Thea's Talk on Mycorrhizal Fungi: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PISk9C6FAds   Prof. Ralph Emerson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Emerson_(botanist)   Klamath Mountains: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klamath_Mountains   Rare Fungi of CA National Forests: https://www.scribd.com/document/432145073/Rare-Fungi-of-California-National-Forests   William Bridge Cooke: https://www.mykoweb.com/articles/PDF/William%20Bridge%20Cooke,%201908-1991.pdf   Caloscypha fulgens (fungus): https://www.mushroomexpert.com/caloscypha_fulgens.html   Hygrophorus goetzii (fungus): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygrophorus_goetzii

The John Batchelor Show
1655: Quarter of the nation's food supply now short of water. @DevinNunes author, podcaster and CA-22. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 12:22


Photo: No known restrictions on publication.1916 Hill north of Woodlake, Misc. Valleys, San Joaquin Valley and Sierra Nevada. Remarks: Good early valley photos of agriculture. Right panel of three panel panorama from Sand Creek to Blue Ridge. Farmin @Batchelorshow Quarter of the nation's food supply now short of water. @DevinNunes author, podcaster and CA-22.  #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/how-californias-drought-is-stressing-a-water-system-that-delivers-water-to-millions-of-residents https://www.amazon.com/Countdown-Socialism-Devin-Nunes/dp/1641771860