Podcasts about nests

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Place of refuge for animals

  • 214PODCASTS
  • 248EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • May 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about nests

Latest podcast episodes about nests

A Moment of Science
The world's largest colony of fish nests

A Moment of Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 2:00


There are many surprises still within the area of the Antarctic, including its unexpected abundance of life. Learn more about the discovery of fish nest colonies in the Weddell Sea with A Moment of Science.

Bigfoot Crossroads
Ep:20 Bigfoot Nests Discovered In Washington

Bigfoot Crossroads

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 93:55


Todd Hale of the Olympic Project joins me to talk about the bigfoot nests they are studying in a remote area of Washington. This might be one of the biggest bigfoot discoveries to date. Todd has some amazing bigfoot stories, all starting with his own encounter he had in Southern California as a teenager.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 627 (5-9-22): A Trio of Songbirds with Tree Nests Near Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:05).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-6-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 9 and May 16, 2022.   This episode from is part of a series this year of episodes related to trees and shrubs. MUSIC – ~14 sec – instrumental. That's part of “New Spring Waltz,” by the late Madeline MacNeil, who was a well-known and highly regarded musician based in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley. Each new spring brings a chance to focus on the life cycles of wildlife.  This mid-spring episode of Water Radio explores some connections among nesting birds, trees, and water.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds to three mystery sounds, and see if you know these three bird species who nest in trees near water, either always or at least sometimes.  And here's a hint: you'll be singing a melodious trill, if you hit this mystery out of the park. SOUNDS  - 29 sec. If you guessed two warblers and an oriole, you're right!  And you get bodacious bird bragging rights if you recognized, first, the Prothonotary Warbler; second, the Northern Parula, also a kind of warbler; and third, the bird for which Baltimore's baseball team is named, the Baltimore Oriole.  All three of these songbirds are found in Virginia in the spring and summer breeding season.  During that period, the Prothonotary Warbler is common in Virginia's central and southern Coastal Plain and can occasionally be found in some other parts of the Commonwealth; the Baltimore Oriole is common outside of the Coastal Plain; and the Northern Parula is common statewide.  The three species show a range of attachment to water-side trees as their nesting habitat.  The Prothonotary Warbler is particularly known for nesting in cavities in trees around water; in fact, the bird is sometimes called the “Swamp Warbler” in the southeastern United States.  The Northern Parula typically nests in trees along rivers and wetlands, especially in areas where it can find the materials it prefers for making its hanging nests: Spanish Moss or a kind of stringy lichen; this bird is also known to make nests out of debris left in trees after floods.  The Baltimore Oriole is the least water-attached of these three species, being found nesting high in trees in many areas outside of deep woods, including parks and yards; however, streamsides are among the species preferred areas for the bird's fibrous, hanging nests. If you're near streams, rivers, or wetlands and you see or hear any of these three birds, look to nearby trees for cavities or hanging materials that may be harboring the birds' next generation. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the bird sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Janita Baker of Blue Lion Dulcimers and Guitars for permission to use Madeline MacNeil's music, and we close with about 25 more seconds of “New Spring Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS “New Spring Waltz” is from Madeline MacNeil's 2002 album “Songs of Earth & Sea”; copyright held by Janita Baker, used with permission.  More information about Madeline MacNeil is available from Ms. Baker's “Blue Lion Dulcimers & Guitars” Web site, online at https://www.bluelioninstruments.com/Maddie.html. The sounds of the Baltimore Oriole, Northern Parula, and Prothonotary Warbler were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Baltimore Oriole at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife's National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, W. Va., August 2015.  Photo by Michelle Smith, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph washttps://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17342/rec/2, as of 5-9-22.Northern Parula at Kennebago Lake in Maine, July 2011.  Photo by Bill Thompson, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12961/rec/1, as of 5-9-22.Prothonotary Warbler bringing food to its nest in South Carolina, March 2012.  Photo by Mark Musselman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; the specific URL for the photograph was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/14152/rec/3, as of 5-9-22. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE BIRDS IN THIS EPISODE The scientific names of the birds in this episode are as follows: Baltimore Oriole – Icterus galbula;Northern Parula – Setophaga Americana (formerly Parula americana);Prothonotary Warbler – Protonotaria citrea. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all.  The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/baltimore_oriole. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Baltimore_Oriole;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Parula/;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Prothonotary_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required). The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/balori/cur/introduction; the Northern Parula entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/norpar/cur/introduction; the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/prowar/cur/introduction. Merriam-Webster, “Warble,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/warble. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Baltimore Oriole entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040348&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Northern Parula entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040312&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117;the Prothonotary Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040303&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19117. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  For More Information about Trees and Shrubs in Virginia and Elsewhere Center for Watershed Protection, “Trees and Stormwater Runoff,” online at https://www.cwp.org/reducing-stormwater-runoff/. Chesapeake Bay Program, “Field Guide: Plants and Trees,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/plants_trees/all. eFloras.org, “Flora of North America,” online at http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1. Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, “Trees and Water,” Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Water Central Newsletter, pages 13-18, online at https://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/49367.   (A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article—“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon, 2018—with some slight differences in the text is available online at https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/pubs_ext_vt_edu/en/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP.html.) Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension, “How Trees Grow,” online at https://agrilife.org/treecarekit/introduction-to-tree-care/how-trees-grow/. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forests of Virginia, 2018, Resource Update FS-264, Asheville, N.C., 2020; available online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/59963. U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Forest Service, “State and Private Forestry Fact Sheet—Virginia 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://apps.fs.usda.gov/nicportal/temppdf/sfs/naweb/VA_std.pdf. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Climate Change Resource Center, “Forest Tree Diseases and Climate Change,” online at https://www.fs.usda.gov/ccrc/topics/forest-disease. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/Northern Research Station (Newtown Square, Penn.), “Forest Disturbance Processes/Invasive Species,” online at https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/disturbance/invasive_species/.” U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Natural Resources Conservation Service, “PLANTS Database,” online at https://plants.usda.gov. Virginia Botanical Associates, “Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora,” online at http://www.vaplantatlas.org/index.php?do=start&search=Search. Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation/Natural Heritage Division, online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/natural-heritage/. Virginia Department of Forestry, “Virginia's Forests,” online at https://dof.virginia.gov/.  Some of the useful pages at that site are the following:“Benefits of Trees,”

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BirdNote
The Perfect Nestbox

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 1:46


Many native cavity-nesters - including this Black-capped Chickadee - will nest in an artificial birdhouse, or nestbox. Look for a nestbox that's plain wood. If the birdhouse comes with a perch, remove it. It just makes it easier for a predator bird to land and go after the eggs or young. Here's the important part: the entrance hole should be 1-1/8 inches. No more, no less, exactly 1-1/8 inches. That size will let native birds in, and keep non-natives out. Now hang the nestbox out of the way of predators. You can buy a nestbox - or build your own! Learn more at BirdNote.org.

Tread Perilously
Tread Perilously -- The Golden Girls: Empty Nests

Tread Perilously

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 97:31


Tread Perilously begins a month of backdoor pilots with The Golden Girls episode "Empty Nests" -- the first attempt to launch Empty Nest. When Renee, the girls' neighbor, begins to lean on them more and more after her daughter moves away to college, Rose suggests she has empty nest syndrome and Dorothy suggests Renee should tell her husband, George, that she's lonely. Back at their house, we discover George is a particularly busy general practitioner and Renee has a brother with Dissociative Identity Disorder. We also learn they have a pesky neighbor named Oliver who is too obnoxious to live. But will it all spell a series we want to watch? Erik and Justin note a certain "first draft" element to the writing. They also agree on the film Go. Justin takes a strong stance on backdoor pilots. Erik offers a hot take on Cowboy Bebop. The pair stump for Cobb Vanth yet again. Rita Moreno continues to be a show all-star while David Leisure proves to be the opposite. Erik's attempt at a Robert Redford impression ends up decidedly Shatnerian. Favorite Golden Girls lines are referenced. Bea Arthur's neutral expression provides some much-needed laughs. Erik tries to recall the actual Empty Nest and blames Odoacer for the disappearance of the pixie cut.

Pinkie The Pig Podcast
0644 Pinkie The Pig Podcast/ Bird Nests

Pinkie The Pig Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 3:29


Pinkie & Mildred discuss different bird nests, Robin, Eagle, Hummingbird, Ducks, 

Outdoors with Rob Zimmer
April 22, 2022 | Fox Valley Plant Fair, Nests Galore, Hummingbirds return

Outdoors with Rob Zimmer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 35:43


XQuadradoY
Epi #98 - The King of Fighters #pt3 - Saga NESTS

XQuadradoY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 98:28


Finalmente chegamos na terceira parte da nossa SAGA KOF. Já falamos do kof 94 como uma introdução ao universo e como foi feito na parte um, passamos pela saga Orochi na parte dois, para, agora, falarmos da saga mais fraca da franquia: A saga NESTS. Compre uma ficha, escolha seu time mais apelão, aperte start e vem com a gente! Redes Sociais:

I am a Health Visitor
BASIS on Sleep Pods and Nests

I am a Health Visitor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 44:17


Amy and Jenny chat to the lovely Alice from the Baby and Infant Sleep Information Source (BASIS) about sleep pods and nests. We cover the evidence base - what can we and can't we say about these products. Are they safe or not? In what circumstances? How do we actually know one way or the other? We talk about what manufacturing standards these products are held to, as well as some of more the hidden risks and implications the use of these items have. We also consider the disproportionate impact on families who live with a low income, who may be tempted to recreate homemade versions and leading to a cluster of co-occurring SIDS risks. Alice tells us about her research from a recent survey with parents about their use of sleep pods and we discuss how to have appropriate conversations with families to help minimise risk while sticking to the evidence base and avoiding scaremongering or judgement. We have quite a few other episodes on sleep now - so do check back through our back catalogue if this is a topic that interests you! Thanks so much for listening everyone - we would love to hear from you with any comments or suggestions to iamahealthvisitor@gmail.com Resources and Further Reading: The BASIS website - check out their resources if you haven't ever used them, they're brilliant: https://www.basisonline.org.uk Professor Helen Ball webinar on "What is Normal Infant Sleep: The View From Anthropology": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5fOogsUpIk Lullaby Trust Resources on Baby Products: https://www.lullabytrust.org.uk/safer-sleep-advice/sleeping-products/ and: https://www.lullabytrust.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/The-Lullaby-Trust-Product-Guide-Web.pdf Specific to sleep positioners: https://www.lullabytrust.org.uk/are-sleep-positioners-safe-for-babies/

Sasquatch Odyssey
SO EP:129 Bigfoot Nests in New York!

Sasquatch Odyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 83:58


My guest tonight is Todd Smith from New York and he is here to share his personal experiences on his hunting lease. He has had several close encounters including a visual sighting of what he believes to be a juvenile Sasquatch. He will also share his discovery of several possible nesting sights! For more on Todd and his Genessee Bigfoot Project check out his Facebook link below. Check out the photos referenced in the episode on our instagram. Support The Showhttps://www.patreon.com/paranormalworldproductionsSasquatch Odyssey Instagram https://www.instagram.com/sasquatchodyssey/Contact Brianbrian@sasquatchodyssey.netGenesse Bigfoot Projecthttps://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100013315262943

The Science of Birds
Nests: Types, Construction, and Challenges

The Science of Birds

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 52:02


This episode—which is Number 49—is all about bird nests. There are tons of fun facts fun facts here, since nests are one of the more impressive aspects of bird behavior and breeding biology.We'll go over the functions of nests, the challenges that nesting birds face, nest site selection, the many types of nests, and nest construction.That's a lot to cover, but I'll try to keep this at more of an overview level. This is sort of Bird Nests 101.~~ Leave me a review using Podchaser ~~Links of InterestWhy a Hawk Is a Hummingbird's Best FriendTime Lapse Video of Blue Tit Building a NestBBC Video of Baya Weaver Nest ConstructionLink to this episode on the Science of Birds websiteSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/scienceofbirds)

Suzie Wilde's Wilde Walks
Suzie's Wilde Walk - Blue Skies and Squirrels Nests

Suzie Wilde's Wilde Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 3:58


Suzie repeats the walk she did at the beginning of the first lockdown and enjoys Blue Skies and Squirrels Nests. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Skyrim Book Club
The Making of Wading-Nests

Skyrim Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 2:36


Shift (NB)
Bird Talk: Nests

Shift (NB)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 10:35


It's about the time of year that birds start setting up nests and preparing for breeding season. Perfect time for the release of a new Peterson Field Guide to North American Birds Nest. Our birder Alain Clavette tracked down one of the authors.

Colorinchaos
Nests & Fog

Colorinchaos

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 29:21


Episode 159 (3/16/22): When the chaos of life feels like a heavy fog…. and the needs within, and the needs around, weigh heavy on you; may we not forget that there is no fog that can completely hide a light. May the ambience produced in the fog capture our attentention in a way that we may have otherwise missed without it. For those who are longing for rest… for home… for peace… this is for you. Music Featured In Today's Episode: CityAlight, “Only a Holy God” (From The Album: Only a Holy God)

Land & Legacy - Sportsmen's Nation
100% of Turkey Nests Destroyed by Predators

Land & Legacy - Sportsmen's Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 53:43


For several years the talk of the town is about wild turkeys and the decline many people are experiencing across the country. The reasons and factors influencing this are long. However, predators seem to be the easy button for a lot of folks! With this, people try to defend their position and end up using old and poorly executed research to make their claims seem more relevant and influential. However, today, we call their bluff. If we care about wild turkeys, we need real information that will create change! At Land & Legacy, we take the practical, impactful, and functional way to solve natural resource-related issues! Let's take the steps moving forward, not ones that just make us feel good. 

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke
Feathers and nests on campus

NatureNotes with Rudy Mancke

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 1:00


Evidence of owls and hawks reported on USC's Columbia campus.

Secrets and Consequences
Tales from the Golden Shield 1.2 - Five nests, four adventurers, and a sea hag

Secrets and Consequences

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 136:40


In part 2 of this special Tales from the Golden Shield adventure, our new group of adventurers continue to explore the mine occupied by a kobold clan. They encounter several clever traps set up by the kobolds, an unexpected friend, and a couple new enemies. What could possibly go wrong? Tune in to find out more!Our players consist of:Vicki - Host & Dungeon MasterJustin - Playing Daezorwyn, a Gith DruidTeri Jo - Playing Erkin, a Dragonborn FighterTaylor - Playing Nox Nocturne, a Dhampir MonkChris - Playing Eckanem, a Dragonborn FighterThanks for listening! If you enjoy our stuff, please consider sharing with your friends, leaving a review and/or rating, and checking us out on social media!https://www.facebook.com/secretsandconsequenceshttps://www.instagram.com/secretsandconsequences/https://twitter.com/secretsandconshttps://www.secretsandconsequences.net/Credits:Adventure Module based off of adventure written by Adventure Bundles:https://www.patreon.com/AdventureBundlesMusic by Will Savino from Music d20:https://www.patreon.com/musicd20Treasure Tables by Nord Games:https://nordgamesllc.com/

Mom & Mind
220: Rage in Motherhood

Mom & Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2022 43:27


Today we are digging into the topic of rage in motherhood, specifically, postpartum rage. We will discuss what it is, why it happens, what it feels like, and what you can do about it. Join us to learn more! Erica Djossa is a registered psychotherapist, sought-after maternal mental health specialist, and Happy As A Mother founder. She has been practicing for over ten years and is a regular media contributor. Erica helps women adjust and manage the load of motherhood with her popular Happy As A Mother podcast, Instagram platform, and online therapy services. She is passionate about supporting moms and helping them embrace their motherhood journey. She is a Toronto-based mother to three rambunctious boys, and she can often be found sharing insights through her Instagram stories. Show Highlights: How rage shows up in the context of motherhood How the “perfect mother” myths stifle a mom's ability to express any anger Examples of what rage might feel like for a mom How we form our inward and outward boundaries for expressing anger based on the “rule book” in the way we were raised How “vulnerability factors” are underlying our anger expression How the narrative we tell ourselves around irritation and anger can either increase or decrease our stress levels Red flag indicators to look out for: intensity and frequency of the anger How to use the acronym NESTS: Nutrition, Exercise, Sleep, Time for self, and Support How continued rage after putting NESTS into place indicates the need to dig deeper Why anger is one of the most commonly overlooked symptoms of depression Erica's personal experience as a mom of three young kids under three years of age How getting the appropriate help can change everything for a mom How mothers experience the depths of shame in feeling anger and rage Steps to take in finding help and support–and taking the first one is the most important! What to expect from Erica's course of five modules How our stress hormones function in our bodies when we feel irritation, anger, and rage Why support, help, and therapy need to feel accessible to everyone Resources: Connect with Erica:  www.happyasamother.co/rage   (Many free resources are available!) Instagram and Facebook Erica is hiring remote perinatal therapists to join the Happy As A Mother team! Certified PMH-Cs from all Canadian provinces are welcome to apply! Click the link for details!

Turn the Page
Birds have nests

Turn the Page

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2022 1:07


Jesus once explained that while “foxes have holes and birds have nests” he didn't have a bed to sleep in. Well foxes still have holes, but human interference means that ... Read More The post Birds have nests appeared first on Turn the Page.

The Chronicles of Salty
"Kicking Wasp Nests"

The Chronicles of Salty

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 7:56


Feb 15, 2022

The Chronicles of Salty
"Kicking Wasp Nests"

The Chronicles of Salty

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 7:56


Feb 15, 2022

New Books in Science
Walter R. Tschinkel, "Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in Science

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 53:44


Walter Tschinkel has spent much of his career investigating the hidden subterranean realm of ant nests. This wonderfully illustrated book takes you inside an unseen world where thousands of ants build intricate homes in the soil beneath our feet. Tschinkel describes the ingenious methods he has devised to study ant nests, showing how he fills a nest with plaster, molten metal, or wax and painstakingly excavates the cast. He guides you through living ant nests chamber by chamber, revealing how nests are created and how colonies function. How does nest architecture vary across species? Do ants have “architectural plans”? How do nests affect our environment? As he delves into these and other questions, Tschinkel provides a one-of-a-kind natural history of the planet's most successful creatures and a compelling firsthand account of a life of scientific discovery. Offering a unique look at how simple methods can lead to pioneering science, Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests (Princeton UP, 2021) addresses the unsolved mysteries of underground ant nests while charting new directions for tomorrow's research, and reflects on the role of beauty in nature and the joys of shoestring science. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science

New Books Network
Walter R. Tschinkel, "Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 53:44


Walter Tschinkel has spent much of his career investigating the hidden subterranean realm of ant nests. This wonderfully illustrated book takes you inside an unseen world where thousands of ants build intricate homes in the soil beneath our feet. Tschinkel describes the ingenious methods he has devised to study ant nests, showing how he fills a nest with plaster, molten metal, or wax and painstakingly excavates the cast. He guides you through living ant nests chamber by chamber, revealing how nests are created and how colonies function. How does nest architecture vary across species? Do ants have “architectural plans”? How do nests affect our environment? As he delves into these and other questions, Tschinkel provides a one-of-a-kind natural history of the planet's most successful creatures and a compelling firsthand account of a life of scientific discovery. Offering a unique look at how simple methods can lead to pioneering science, Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests (Princeton UP, 2021) addresses the unsolved mysteries of underground ant nests while charting new directions for tomorrow's research, and reflects on the role of beauty in nature and the joys of shoestring science. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast
Walter R. Tschinkel, "Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests" (Princeton UP, 2021)

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 53:44


Walter Tschinkel has spent much of his career investigating the hidden subterranean realm of ant nests. This wonderfully illustrated book takes you inside an unseen world where thousands of ants build intricate homes in the soil beneath our feet. Tschinkel describes the ingenious methods he has devised to study ant nests, showing how he fills a nest with plaster, molten metal, or wax and painstakingly excavates the cast. He guides you through living ant nests chamber by chamber, revealing how nests are created and how colonies function. How does nest architecture vary across species? Do ants have “architectural plans”? How do nests affect our environment? As he delves into these and other questions, Tschinkel provides a one-of-a-kind natural history of the planet's most successful creatures and a compelling firsthand account of a life of scientific discovery. Offering a unique look at how simple methods can lead to pioneering science, Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests (Princeton UP, 2021) addresses the unsolved mysteries of underground ant nests while charting new directions for tomorrow's research, and reflects on the role of beauty in nature and the joys of shoestring science. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland.

New Books in Animal Studies
Walter R. Tschinkel, "Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in Animal Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 53:44


Walter Tschinkel has spent much of his career investigating the hidden subterranean realm of ant nests. This wonderfully illustrated book takes you inside an unseen world where thousands of ants build intricate homes in the soil beneath our feet. Tschinkel describes the ingenious methods he has devised to study ant nests, showing how he fills a nest with plaster, molten metal, or wax and painstakingly excavates the cast. He guides you through living ant nests chamber by chamber, revealing how nests are created and how colonies function. How does nest architecture vary across species? Do ants have “architectural plans”? How do nests affect our environment? As he delves into these and other questions, Tschinkel provides a one-of-a-kind natural history of the planet's most successful creatures and a compelling firsthand account of a life of scientific discovery. Offering a unique look at how simple methods can lead to pioneering science, Ant Architecture: The Wonder, Beauty, and Science of Underground Nests (Princeton UP, 2021) addresses the unsolved mysteries of underground ant nests while charting new directions for tomorrow's research, and reflects on the role of beauty in nature and the joys of shoestring science. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/animal-studies

Read Stuff for Friends
Self-Quarantined with Squirrels' Nests

Read Stuff for Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 1:23


by Al Ortolani in Swimming Shelter

Curiously Polar
145 Polar Newsreel (Millions of Nests 🧊🐟)

Curiously Polar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 47:38


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

Chris Marquardt - All Podcasts
145 Polar Newsreel (Millions of Nests

Chris Marquardt - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022


The Arctic and the Antarctic are privileged locations for observers interested in understanding how our world is shaped by the forces of nature and the workings of history. These areas have inspired countless humans to undertake epic expeditions of discov

ThePrint
PureScience: Largest fish colony with 60 million nests discovered under the Antarctic

ThePrint

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 7:17


Researchers operating the German research vessel Polarstern have documented the largest ever fish colony in the world on the Antarctic floor. Images of 60 million icefish nests were captured, making up he largest observation of a previously undocumented ecosystem. ThePrint's Sandhya Ramesh explains. Brought to you by  @Kia India  ----more----Supplementary reading: A vast icefish breeding colony discovered in the Antarctic https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)01698-5#%20

AGRICULTURE
AgriCulture: Warm Bedfellows and Other Sources of Heat

AGRICULTURE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 6:33


Do you “spoon” when you sleep with a spouse or bed partner? Outside, the shutters may be banging against the house in the stiff western wind; the windows encased in white frost; the wind chill at minus 20. But inside, with another body close against yours under the covers, a warmth builds quickly. It's as if the heat of the body is amplified by being bounced back and forth, the way mirrors can refract light and back and forth to intensify heat and light fires. And the benefits of spooning go beyond heat, to feelings of intimacy and protection. You might even feel secure enough to surrender that axe you keep next to your bed to dispatch intruders. Spooning involves adjustments and compromises. If you're the big spoon, does your bottom arm comfortably fit under your partner's head or torso? If you're the little spoon, is the hand of the top arm resting where you like having it? If one of you tosses, does the other turn, and how do you negotiate the frequency? You are surrendering considerable individual autonomy to sleep as a unit with another, so much so that I wonder whether the inclination to spoon correlates with political orientation. How much freedom are you willing to give up to gain those feelings of warmth and protection? As many of you know from your pets, who will sleep with you given half the chance, animals too seek the warmth of other bodies at night. The last cat I shared a bed with remained draped over my feet, but when Lillie the dog is in my bed she seems to work her way up through the night until her head is resting on the pillow and she can herself be properly spooned. Nor is the practice of group sleeping confined to animals that, sharing our homes, have human behavior as an example. I don't know if evolutionary biologists have studied group sleeping as a cross-species phenomenon, but it's pretty clear to me that the instinct to sleep à deux or en masse is shared across innumerable species and may be deeply engrained in our animal DNA. Most of my chickens line up on their roosting bars right next to one another, though there's ample room to spread out. Lambs will sleep with their mothers for months after they're born and even weaned. If I were to arrive early enough in the morning, before the sheep rouse themselves, I'd see Sophie's lamb, Chloe, nestled in alongside her mother, between the front and back legs, not far from Lale's ram lamb with his mother, and so on, each little family unit in their own cluster. Pigs go the sheep one better. Back when we had 30 or 35 pigs, we'd find groups of a dozen or more young ones sleeping piled up against one another, and not necessarily from the same mother or litter. On the coldest days, like the ones we're experiencing right now, you could literally see steam arising from the heap. I'm sure there's a social structure of sorts to these pile ups, such that one's position in the heap correlates to some sort of dominance in the group. But it was always hard for me to tell whether it would be preferable to be under three other pigs or the one on the top. The top one might be exposed to cold air, but the steam from everyone below might provide sufficient warmth and it might be far easier to breathe up top. Of course, not everyone has another creature to rub up against. Luckily, we humans have central heat, space heaters, hot water bottles, blankets, duvets, down comforters, and flannel pajamas, all doing their part to keep us cozy. The animals, too, take an “all of the above” approach, enabling them to thrive in unheated shelters. They shield themselves from the wind by sleeping on the leeside of whatever structure they can take advantage of. The sheep will sometimes even sleep outside the barn, so long as the barn wall is protecting them from the wind, in order to catch the heat of the earliest sunrays in the morning from the southeast. And animals build nests. Nests, made of l

Science Friday
Omicron And Kids, Ivermectin Origins, Icefish Nests. Jan 14, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 47:15


A Replacement Heart, From A Pig This week, doctors reported that they had successfully transplanted a heart taken from a pig into a human being, a type of procedure known as xenotransplantation. The pig had been genetically modified to lack a certain protein thought to be responsible for organ rejection in previous transplant attempts. The patient, a 57 year-old man, will be monitored for any sign of rejection or infection with a porcine virus—but doctors are hopeful that the work will lead to further transplants and a new source of replacement organs for people. Science journalist Roxxane Kamsi joins Ira to talk about that and other stories from the week in science, including research into how antivirals work in people infected with HIV, the role of clothes dryers on microplastics pollution, a push to make the U.S. electric grid greener, and more.   Omicron Sparks Surge In Pediatric Hospitalizations Omicron's rapid spread has many parents and caregivers of young children on edge. The most recent CDC data shows 5.3 cases per 100,000 children under four are hospitalized with COVID-19 in the United States, the highest number since the pandemic started. And kids under five still aren't eligible to be vaccinated. When word went out that we were going to answer questions about COVID and kids, we were flooded with questions from our listeners. To help answer some of those questions, and better understand how to keep our kids safe, Ira spoke with Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, pediatrician, and professor of global health and infectious diseases at Stanford University, and Dr. Rick Malley, infectious diseases specialist at Boston Children's Hospital and professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.   Ivermectin's False Reputation Exemplifies How Misinformation Spread Not a single scientific or health authority in the U.S. recommends the use of the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin to treat or prevent COVID-19. Still, some Americans see the unproven drug as a way out of the pandemic. Ivermectin is mostly used in large animals and is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating human conditions, including head lice and stomach worms. But across the country, demand for the drug has surged in recent months — leading to a spike in hospitalizations for human exposures to ivermectin. The drug is among the latest politically divisive public health issues unfolding across the country. The situation has fast-tracked conversations about the risks and benefits of publicizing research findings that have not yet been vetted by the scientific community. That's because much of the misinformation on ivermectin draws on insufficient data — some coming from low-quality studies, including ones that were retracted after further examination revealed problems and even potential fraud. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com. A Massive New Find Of Icefish Found Near Antarctic The frigid waters near Antarctica are home to an unusual family of fishes collectively known as the icefish. They have translucent blood, white hearts, and have adapted to live without red blood cells or hemoglobin, relying instead on copper compounds that function better at low temperatures. Now, researchers mapping the floor of the Weddell Sea report in the journal Current Biology that they have spotted a massive colony of the unusual sea creatures—containing over 60 million icefish nests. “A few dozen nests have been observed elsewhere in the Antarctic, but this find is orders of magnitude larger,” said Autun Purser, of the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, Germany. Purser and his colleagues were mapping the seafloor of the Filchner ice shelf region, in an area of thermal upwelling, where there are slightly warmer temperatures. They found masses of icefish nests clumped close together as far as the eye can see, somewhat like a land-based colony of nesting penguins. Purser joins Ira to talk about the discovery, and what's known about the ultra-cold ecosystems of Antarctic seas.    

BirdNote
Filming Rare Storks in Their Nests

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 1:46


Photographer Gerrit Vyn traveled to northeastern India to document the daily life of the Greater Adjutant stork. These endangered birds nest high in trees on privately owned land in the state of Assam, where they're known as Hargila. Conservation biologist Purnima Devi Barman helped Gerrit get a stork's-eye view by building a bamboo tower near the canopy of a Hargila nesting tree. Learn more in the documentary Hargila from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Unschooling with Kai
Ants - Part V - Weaver Ants

Unschooling with Kai

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 73:06


We talk about Kai's favorite ants: the Weaver Ants and get into some specifics of Nests and Queens, Battle and Defenses, and Food and Drink. Enjoy! Also, here is the must-see video on how ants stick to surfaces: https://youtu.be/hd5upt3IrWM --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/unschoolingwithkai/message

Granite State Gardening
Supporting Birds In Your Yard and Garden, plus Bareroot Trees and Common Hackberry

Granite State Gardening

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 76:40


Supporting birds on your property goes well beyond putting up bird feeders, although they can be helpful and enjoyable. In this episode on supporting birds in your yard and garden, Matt Tarr, Emma Erler and Nate Bernitz talk about why birds need our help, how to assess your property and the needs of birds, and how to meet the needs of wild birds through landscaping choices and other strategies. ·         Featured Question: Which landscape plants are best for hummingbirds?·         Featured Plant: Common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis)·         Closing Tip: Purchasing Bare Root Trees Promotions ·         Listener Survey·         NH Farm, Forest and Garden Expo·         Webinar: Hydroponics at Home·         Webinar: Extending the Gardening Season Resources ·         All About Nest Boxes·         Winter Bird Feeding·         UNH Extension's Wildlife Program Website·         Cornell Lab of Ornithology·         How to make your yard more bird friendly (Audubon) Subscribe to the monthly Granite State Gardening newsletter. Email us questions, suggestions and feedback at gsg.pod@unh.edu Transcript by Otter.ai 

The Daily Poem
Edward Thomas' "Bird's Nests"

The Daily Poem

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 4:01


Philip Edward Thomas (3 March 1878 – 9 April 1917) was a British poet, essayist, and novelist. He is considered a war poet, although few of his poems deal directly with his war experiences, and his career in poetry only came after he had already been a successful writer and literary critic. In 1915, he enlisted in the British Army to fight in the First World War and was killed in action during the Battle of Arras in 1917, soon after he arrived in France.Bio via Wikipedia See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Treffpunkt
Der Rotmilan – eine Erfolgsgeschichte per Zufall

Treffpunkt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 57:05


Er ist ein wahrer Überflieger. Einst fast ausgestorben, leben heute bis zu 3'500 Rotmilan-Paare in der Schweiz. Jeder 10. Rotmilan auf der Welt lebt in unserem Land. Und das obwohl man gar keinen bewussten Effort zum Schutz des Vogels unternommen hat.  Er ist ein Kulturfolger, der Rotmilan. Und das ist sein Glück – denn wir Menschen machen es anderen Lebewesen nicht immer leicht, mit uns zusammen zu leben. Der Rotmilan ist ein Pragmatiker und passt sich uns an. Kein Spezialist, sondern ein Generalist Die Rotmilan-Population steigt in der Schweiz stetig, unter anderem dank seiner Anpassungsfähigkeit. Ein Paar Beispiele gefällig? Wir lassen Abfall überall rumliegen. Der Rotmilan braucht sie für den Bau und zur Dekoration seines Nests. Wir bewirtschaften unsere Felder intensiv. Der Rotmilan holt sich dort seine Beute. Wegen dem Klimawandel werden die Winter nicht mehr so kalt. Der Rotmilan zieht nicht mehr Richtung Süden, sondern residiert im Alter gleich hier.  Rund 500 Rotmilane mit GPS Patrick Scherler von der Vogelwarte Sempach forscht seit 2015 über die Rotmilane, hat rund 500 der Vögel mit einem GPS ausgestattet und beobachtet sie bei ihren Flügen, aber auch beim Nisten. Wie das genau funktioniert und was die Erkenntnisse bisher sind, hat er im Buch «Der Rotmilan – ein Greifvogel im Aufwind» festgehalten und erzählt er in dieser Treffpunkt-Folge.

Counterpoint - ABC RN
Positive and negative

Counterpoint - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 54:05


Can positive discrimination do more harm than good? Mandatory vaccinations have been around for centuries so just how effective are they? Do humans perceive time differently to nature and why are birds egg coloured?

Counterpoint
Positive and negative

Counterpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 54:05


Can positive discrimination do more harm than good? Mandatory vaccinations have been around for centuries so just how effective are they? Do humans perceive time differently to nature and why are birds egg coloured?

Cafeteria Christian
#149 Nests, Depression, and Grace for us all

Cafeteria Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:06


Emmy and Natalia talk about how life is hard and how our brains handle it differently and what our faith has to say about all of it.  Support the show at http://patreon.com/cafeteriachristian 

Sasquatch Odyssey
SO EP:78 Bigfoot Nests and the Olympic Project with Shane Corson!

Sasquatch Odyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 77:23


My guest tonight is Shane Corson from the Olympic Project. Shane is a long time Bigfoot researcher and is a key member of the Olympic Project. Shane and the other members of the group have been investigating the famed "Nest Site" since 2016, and he is here to share some of their finds as well as his personal encounters he has had along his Odyssey of discovering answers to the mystery of these elusive creatures we call Bigfoot or Sasquatch. For More on Shane and the Olympic Project visit their website https://www.olympicproject.com. To become a Patreon Crew Member and support the show please visit https://www.patreon.com/sasquatchodysseyTo visit the website, share your encounter or visit the Sasquatch Odyssey Merchandise Store, learn more about Brian or anything else show related please click on our LinkTree https://linktr.ee/SasquatchOdyssey

Woman's Hour
Musician & singer, Abi Sampa; Celibacy; Chinaza Onyechi; Femicide

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 57:23


Over the last few years, the figures around celibacy have generally been on the rise - particular amongst young women. What's to be gained from making this life choice? And what should one know before deciding to become celibate? Anita speaks to sex therapist Danielle Bennett, and two women who have experience with celibacy. Laura Kennedy is in her 30's and was celibate for six years. Shirley Yanez is in her 60s and became celibate as part of a conscious change in lifestyle. Chinaza Onyechi has always dreamed of becoming a film maker but she says like other children from a Nigerian background she was encouraged to take up a more traditional career like law, medicine or engineering. But she is now one step closer to that film-making dream, after being awarded the MetFilm School's first Black Student of Talent scholarship. The scholarship covers full tuition fees for a year and could be worth around £50,000 depending on the course. Susan Ogilvy rediscovered learning in her seventies. As a botanical artist from Somerset, she started a journey into painting nests she serendipitously found. This was the start of an ornithological education, specifically into birds nests. Ogilvy has since painted more than fifty bird nests from life, each time marvelling at its ingenious construction. They have been collated in her new book, Nests. The first in a genre that has been dominated by male authors with very little focus on birds nests. Do gender-neutral terms, such as "homicide" and "murder," systematically ignore targeted violence against women? Should femicide be seen as a separate category? If women are being killed specifically because they're women, does that matter? Do motives matter? Anita is joined by Karen Ingala Smith, co-founder of Femicide Census and Chief Exec of Nia, a charity that runs services for women and girls who have been subjected to sexual and domestic violence and abuse. Abi Sampa describes herself as a "weird warbling electric Veena player". She trained as a dentist and then appeared on The Voice in 2013, where she wowed the judges with her unique style of as a fusion of western pop and Indian classical music. She joins Anita to explain how she plays the electric Veena and to describe her performances with the orchestral Qawwalli Project, reviving old Sufi poems and putting their own spin on them musically with a western orchestral style. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Interviewed Guest: Danielle Bennett Interviewed Guest: Laura Kennedy Interviewed Guest: Shirley Yanez Interviewed Guest: Chinaza Onyechi Interviewed Guest: Susan Ogilvy Interviewed Guest: Karen Ingala Smith Interviewed Guest: Abi Sampa

Interviews by Brainard Carey

Nathan Hoks's most recent book, Nests in Air, was published in 2021 by Black Ocean Press. Previous books include Reveilles (winner of Salt Publishing's Crashaw Prize), The Narrow Circle (winner of the National Poetry Series), and the chapbook Moony Days of Being (winner of the Tomaž Šalamun Prize). He has also published translations of work by Vicente Huidobro, Christian Dotremont, and Henri Michaux. In 2018 Hoks was a poet-in-residence at the Tomaž Šalamun Poetry Center in Ljubljana, and he has also held residencies at the Vermont Studio Center and the Millay Colony for the Arts. Hoks occasionally works as an editor and letterpress printer for Convulsive Editions, and teaches creative writing at the University of Chicago and in the MFA in Writing program at the School of the Art Institute. Books mentioned in the interview:  Wuthering Heights and Will Alexander's Across the Vapor Gulf.

Squatchdetective News

Tonight we go to Squatch-D University and learn about primate nests among others and discuss the relevance to Bigfoot/Sasquatch research. Join veteran Bigfoot researcher's Steve Kulls (as seen on History, NatGeo, Destination America & TRVL) and Chris Bennett bring you the latest news and grounded information from around North American and beyond. Sundays 9 PM Eastern. #bigfoot #sasquatch #stopthewoonacy --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/squatchdtv/support

to know the land
Ep. 168 : Peterson Field Guide to North American Bird Nests with Casey McFarland

to know the land

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 54:24


In 1975, Hal H. Harrison wrote the Peterson Field Guide to Eastern Birds' Nests. In 1979 he wrote the Western guide. I have my copy of Eastern Birds' Nests on the primary bird shelf (there are two shelves) beside Bird Feathers by S. David Scott and Casey McFarland. Now, Casey McFarland, Matthew Monjello & David Moskowitz have come together to revamp the Peterson Field Guide to Bird Nests. In one (kinda thick) package they managed to fit descriptions of over 650 bird species along with beautiful high quality photos of many examples of the varied avian architectures discussed. This one has a small name change too: Peterson Field Guide to North American Bird Nests Casey McFarland joined me for a great conversation on what it took to make the book happen. We discuss the legacy Hal H. Harrisons work and how his book inspired a lot of what Casey, Matt, and David wrote, but also they were determined to find new practices that weren't as invasive in their search for beautiful shots of nests and eggs. We spoke about varied bird ecologies and place-based, habitat considerations birds participate within to best protect and rear their young. From bird nests, to the Cyber tracker evaluation process', to an encounter with a Bobcat while searching out nests on the Rio Grande, Casey shares his passion for tracking the wild, and deepening his understanding of the world around him. all the while sharing that enthusiasm and curiosity with others through his work along the way. Shout outs to Matt Monjello and David Moskowitz who could not be apart of the interview. I hope, someday in the near future, our paths will cross and I can ask them all about their projects, their joys and experiences in writing this great new book. Additional information: Peterson Field Guide to North American Bird Nests Casey McFarland.net David Moskowitz.net An experimental demonstration that house finches add cigarette butts in response to ectoparasites

Stuttzcast
Yard Sales and new nests

Stuttzcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 32:18


Rooney and John watch ospreys build new nests and review who attended their yard sale as they near the date when they too will be moving to their new nest, in a shorter than usual episode.

Can We Just Talk?
A Green Puppy, FAST Cars, Spooky Season Rules, and Toilet Paper Stamps... Ep. 4

Can We Just Talk?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2020 51:33


This week we catch you up on the biggest stories you missed including a green dog, an incredibly fast car setting world records, Airbnb's approach to Halloween, Disney's "Racism Warning", Murder Hornet's Nests, and a brand new type of postal stamp that has 2020 written all over it.

Kingdom Awakening Ministries
Raising Up Eagle's Nests - Jesse Shamp

Kingdom Awakening Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2020 70:59


"You're not known by your title, you're known by your anointing" - Dr. Ed Dufresne

The Offshore Explorer
Episode 4: White Seabass Special. Tankers, Slobs and Squid Nests.

The Offshore Explorer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2020 70:07


How can you know how old a white sea bass is? What can the sounds that white sea bass make when they're spawning tell you? How does the sea bass population in a given area relate to squid nests in the area? Today's episode focuses on White Seabass. Today's guests are Chugey Sepulveda and Scott Albers of PIER, the Pfleger Institute of Environmental Research, who has appeared on this podcast previously. Listen in to hear today's guest discuss commercial and recreational fishing of white sea bass, and hear what they have to say about studying recordings of white sea bass sounds, where white sea bass go when they're not spawning, and why fishing for sea bass in Mexico is different from fishing for sea bass anywhere else.Topics Discussed in This Episode● Studying white sea bass spawning patterns by recording the sounds that they make● What the frequency and intensity of sound a sea bass makes can tell you● How the recordings are recovered● The purpose of listening for sounds that indicate spawning● Where white sea bass go when they're not spawning● Why sea bass are often found near squid nests● Why the really big sea bass found along the coast aren't usually found by the Channel Islands● How the squid's population relates to the white sea bass population● Why sea bass may be following sardines● The methods of commercial sea bass fishing● How commercial gill net operations work● How much commercial fishers catch as opposed to recreational fishers● Bluefin fishing● Whether the squid spawning coincides with the sea bass spawning● What is known about how sea bass age● The difference in size and maturity for male and female white sea bass● How length growth slows as sea bass get older● What the otolith can tell about sea bass● How fishing for sea bass in Mexico differs from other methods of sea bass fishing● Plans for sea bass fishing this year● What kind of year this will be for sea bass fishing