Podcasts about Fast Company

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

American business magazine

  • 3,329PODCASTS
  • 6,421EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 23, 2022LATEST
Fast Company

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Fast Company

Show all podcasts related to fast company

Latest podcast episodes about Fast Company

Hacking Your Leadership
Ep 291: Leading the prematurely promoted.

Hacking Your Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 24:16


Discussing how to make sure new leaders are successful.Link to Fast Company article: https://www.fastcompany.com/90751277/the-next-great-resignation-challenge-managing-the-prematurely-promotedSend us a message on Community! (213) 444-5381#HackingYourLeadership #StarkEngagementConsulting #LifeOfLozo #BeABetterLeaderYouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/HackingYourLeadershipPodcast/featuredPatreon Account: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=22174142#Leadership #HackingYourLeadership #StarkEngagementConsulting #LifeOfLozolozo@lifeoflozo.comchris@starkengagement.comhttps://link.chtbl.com/workcheck?sid=podcast.hackingyourleadership

The Art Of Coaching
E223 | Todd Kashdan: Disagreeing Effectively & Lateral Thinking

The Art Of Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 81:09


We're living in a society more polarized and intolerant than ever before; A society in which it's hard to tell a joke, let alone disagree with someone. But to evolve and for this to change, we need principled insubordination, systematic rule-breaking, and people not afraid to engage with those who share different views.  On today's episode we have the pleasure of talking to Dr. Todd Kashdan, (Ph.D & Professor of Psychology at George Mason University), a leading authority on well-being, psychological flexibility, curiosity, courage, and resilience.  Dr. Kashdan is the author of Curious? and The Upside of Your Dark Side, and his latest book is The Art of Insubordination: How to Dissent and Defy Effectively. His writing has appeared in the Harvard Business Review, National Geographic, Fast Company, among other publications, and his research is featured regularly in media outlets such as The Atlantic, The New York Times, NPR, and Time Magazine. We discuss: How to dissent / disagree effectively Why we should seek & welcome alternative opinions  The importance of comedy in combatting echo chambers The right and WRONG way to change minds and behavior Dr. Kashdan has published over 220 peer-reviewed articles and his work has been cited over 36,000 times. He received the Distinguished Faculty Member of the Year Award from George Mason University and Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contributions from the American Psychological Association.  Connect with Dr. Kashdan: Via his book: The Art of Insubordination  Via his FREE newsletter: https://toddkashdan.substack.com/ Via his website: https://toddkashdan.com/ Via Twitter: @toddkashdan Today's episode is brought to you by Lumen, a first of it's kind portable device and app that measures your metabolism in real time with just a breath! Lumen is like having a dietician in your pocket, something that gives you unprecedented insight into how efficiently your body is optimizing fats and carbs so you can have better control over your health and wellness. Research backed and simple to use, Lumen's technology will give you a personalized meal plans and customized workout data. Get $35 off by using code: AOC at Lumen.me. It's almost half way through 2022 which means it's time to make plans for one of our remaining live events (if you haven't already). Check out artofcoaching.com/events for all of our latest locations and dates! No matter your profession, age or experience, if you're a leader or want to be a leader we have something for you.

Rise Up For You
Episode 412 with Karen Eber on The Magic Of Storytelling As A Leader

Rise Up For You

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 20:01


Karen Eber is an international consultant and keynote speaker. Her talk on TED.com: How your brain responds to stories – and why they're crucial for leaders, has almost 2 million views. As the CEO and Chief Storyteller of Eber Leadership Group, Karen helps companies reimagine and evolve how they build leaders and teams, transform culture and tell stories. Karen works with Fortune 500 companies like General Electric, Facebook, Kraft Heinz, and Kate Spade and guest lectures in universities including Purdue University and London School of Business. She has inspired many through her articles published in Fast Company, CLO Magazine, and Training Industry Magazine. Karen has 20+ years of experience and has been a Head of Culture, Chief Learning Officer, and Head of Leadership Development at General Electric and Deloitte. She is a four-time American Training and Development winner. She is writing a book on storytelling, expected in 2023. SOCIAL MEDIA: Website: http://www.kareneber.com Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kareneber/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kareneber1 Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kareneber1 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/KarenEber ____________________________________________ Thank you again for joining us today! If you know anybody that would benefit from this episode please share it with them and help spread the knowledge and motivation. -- Subscribe and rise up for you to be your best: www.youtube.com/c/riseupforyou -- Enroll in one of our Coaching Programs today to improve your life, deepen your success and increase your potential in work and life: www.riseupforyou.com/coaching -- Check Out our Book, Rise Up For You: Closing the Gap Between You and Your Potential www.nadalena.com/book -- Follow us on Social Media: LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/nadalena/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/RiseUpForYou/ Instagram: www.instagram.com/riseupforyou Sign up for our FREE Master Success Kit: www.riseupforyou.com/successkit Looking for more support? Grab your free coaching call with our team completely FREE! Bring your questions about Confidence, Leadership or Business and we will assign you the best coach to provide customizable support. SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CALL HERE calendly.com/riseupforyou/coaching

EntreArchitect Podcast with Mark R. LePage
EA457: Thomas Gluck – Why Architect-Led Design/Build is Better

EntreArchitect Podcast with Mark R. LePage

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 46:52


Why Architect-Led Design/Build is Better Thomas Gluck is a principal at GLUCK+ in New York City. Named by Fast Company as one of the top 10 most innovative companies in architecture, GLUCK+ has been recognized for their unique approach to Architect Led Design Build: single-source responsibility with architects leading the building process. The practice is […] The post EA457: Thomas Gluck – Why Architect-Led Design/Build is Better appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

Designdrives
#69 | Hussain Almossawi | How CGI is changing design.

Designdrives

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022


"Every project needs to start with inspiration" - Hussain Almsosawi.In this episode, we had the pleasure to chat with Hussain Almsosawi.Hailing from Bahrain, 3D motion designer Hussain Almsosawi has since moved to Brooklyn, New York, and started his own studio – Mossawi Studios.Across his exciting career, which is equally striking as it is satisfying, Hussain has worked for huge brands, including Adidas Football, Adidas Basketball and EA. The strength of Hussain's work lies in its confident simplicity, flourishing in intelligently reserved aesthetics and concept.Aside from some of these projects with the big brands in the industry, a massive part of his self-initiated projects has led him to gain a large following on social media, with followers captivated by his gratifying and eye-catching outcomes.In the episode, we jump into:What are common challenges in CGI projects?At what part of the process to bring in advanced visualization? (Early-phase vs final renderings)How will “designing in real-time rendering” change the design process?How will digital and physical be coming together in the world of design?What will the metaverse and "instant real-time visualization" mean for the future of design?and many more!Thanks a lot for your time and for your learning Hussain!*************The GuestHussain Almossawi is an international designer based in New York City who has worked on various products across different industries worldwide.Hussain began his career designing official websites and logos for NBA players such as Derrick Rose, Allen Iverson and Tracy McGrady. He also designed official websites for Adidas Basketball.Almossawi created Type Fluid, a 3-D typography experiment. He was named one of Fast Company'sCompany's ""10 Inspiring Type Designers From A New Generation"".In 2016 he designed a pair of sneakers based on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles with footwear designer Quintin Williams. That same year, Almossawi created Enfuse, a custom tea maker.A significant part of his work has been working with world-famous companies such as Nike, Adidas, EA Sports, Ogilvy & Mather, and other world-known brands.He currently works out of his Mossawi Studios in New York.Mossawi Studios is a multi-disciplinary studio specialized in creating memorable, iconic, and bold experiences, blurring the lines between CGI, VFX, and Product Design.From 2018 to 2019, Hussain Almossawi was an adjunct professor at The New School. He taught Human factors and ergonomics and now serves as a member of the advisory panel for Pace University'sUniversity's Lubin School of Business in New York, Design Thinking Program.He is a frequent public speaker and has presented workshops and designs at Bike to the Future, Solidworks Conference in Bologna, Saudi Design Week, and -ING Creative Festival in Dubai.He frequently publishes design tutorials and articles in magazines and trade publications. His designs have been featured in publications such as Wired UK, Motor1.com, Mashable, Auto Motor und Sport, Highsnobiety, Fast Company, Yanko Design, SoccerBible, Hypebeast, Gizmodo, and Adobe'sAdobe's Substance 3D Magazine.

Black to Business
96: Using Your Brand Story To Secure Business Grants w/ Paulana Lamonier

Black to Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 54:36


Name: Paulana Lamonier Business Name: Black People Will Swim Current Title: Founder Location: Long Island, NY Educational Background: B.A. in Journalism   About Paulana: Paulana Lamonier is the founder of Black People Will Swim, a purpose-driven organization working to smash the stereotype that Black people don't swim. ​ After learning how to swim with the help of coaches in 2009 at CUNY York College, Paulana nurtured her love for swimming and became inspired to teach others how to conquer their fear of water. For over a decade, she has shared her passion for swimming by working with swim clubs, teams, and gyms to build a community with her students. ​ She's also a multimedia journalist who has made a career out of telling compelling stories. She's written for Fast Company, Forbes, Complex Magazine, and interviewed the likes of Queen Latifah, Loni Love, Venus Williams, and more.   DURING THIS EPISODE YOU'LL LEARN: Why it's important to have a brand story Key elements you should have in your brand story Why it's important to be transparent in business How to use the S.O.A.R method to secure grants  What you should have before applying for grants Mistakes people make when applying for grants Where to find small business grants For complete show notes and resources mentioned for this episode go to: blacktobusiness.com/96 Thank you so much for listening! Please support us by simply rating and reviewing our podcast!

The Balancing Act with Dr. Andrew Temte
”Nobody Wants to Work Anymore,” Part 3 (feat. Jared Lindzon)

The Balancing Act with Dr. Andrew Temte

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 31:09


Future of work thought leader, public speaker, and journalist Jared Lindzon joins us for part 3 of our miniseries entitled "Nobody Wants to Work Anymore," a continuing exploration of new attitudes toward work and the challenges surrounding today's labor markets. Jared's insights have been published in numerous publications including Fast Company, Toronto's The Globe and Mail, Time Magazine, the BBC, the New York Times, and many others.

Harvest Eating Podcast-Plant Based Vegan Recipes
Epi-470-Charleston SC-an Excellent Example Of How Our Food Supply Can Be More Sustainable.

Harvest Eating Podcast-Plant Based Vegan Recipes

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 57:57


Show notes at Keith Snow.com If you have ever visited Charleston SC you quickly realize that among the southern charm and historic buildings there is something else that has visitors flocking to the Holy City. Charleston was founded in 1670 as Charles Town, honoring King Charles 11, and is literally a living history book. Once the heart of the slave trade almost half of all slaves arrived at Charleston, or course this stain on the city's past should never be forgotten. One of the results of this slave trade was that many slaves from Africa brought their Gullah cuisine and cooking methods with them as well as other traditions such as basket weaving, these recipes, methods, and skills have become a treasure to the Charleston area and all who visit. it Many ingredients that are considered basic commodity staples like rice and corn are now heralded in the Charleston area and have become the stuff of obsession. A reading from Fast Company….The Grit Awakening: Why Antebellum-Style Cornmeal Has Risen Again Tim Mills remembers that as a boy growing up on a North Carolina farm, one of his favorite chores was riding with his grandfather to the local mill to get the corn ground. So when “the still voice of God” told the 71-year-old Methodist farmer to build a grist mill on his small farm in Clarke County, Georgia, Mills says he at least had some idea what The Almighty was talking about. God had great timing: Mills' brand of grits, made with 19th-century techniques and a pair of mules, are now a hit in upscale Southern restaurants. Mills' brand, Red Mule, is one of a slew of successful pre-industrial cornmeal companies that are seeing sales surge across the New South and beyond. There are a number of trends that help explain the increasing appeal of Antebellum-style grits. First there's the increasing preferences among consumers for less-processed, locally sourced foods. There's the well-documented Southern instinct to celebrate old ways of doing things. But above all, the success of Red Mule is probably about their taste, which for most Southerners is older than living memory. “I grew up eating those bland grits, and they didn't have any taste, other than the butter, salt, and pepper you'd put on them,” says food historian John T. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance. He's referring to the familiar white stuff pooling beside fried eggs on breakfast plates. Those grits are processed on high-speed roller mills, which heat to a high temperature, damaging the flavor of the corn and smashing the germ to dust. Edge has watched, happily, as grits have been resurrected into an artisanal food. “What's happened to the South isn't some fad but a genuine unearthing of old foods and varieties,” he says. “Grits are a reintegration of a very old food being enjoyed in a very new time.” Now grits or corn are just one staple that is being celebrated and the focus of many Charleston area menu items, also oats, Carolina Gold Rice and other simple staples are making a huge comeback, and rightfully so. Several years ago I had the pleasure of filming an episode of Harvest Eating TV in an old steel building behind the railroad tracks in downtown Columbia SC with Glenn Roberts founder and principal of one of the most important companies in America, Anson Mills. And then there's Anson Mills in Columbia, S.C., which takes the term “heirloom” to a new level. Owner Glenn Roberts produces grits and meal made of corns that were raised as crops in the nineteenth century. But Roberts' mission isn't just to sell grits. He's spent the last 20 years finding, protecting, and cultivating corn and other pre-industrial domesticated plants–called “landraces”–and resurrecting agricultural systems that existed in North America centuries ago. His Carolina Gold Rice, grown in the coastal area of South Carolina, is of the same variety that people were eating at the end of the Revolutionary War. In old journals and diaries Roberts discovered that in the South Carolina of the 1700s, many farmers followed a 17-year-long cycle of rotating specific crops to enhance their flavor, hardiness, and nutritional value without depleting the soil. -Fast Company I literally could go on and on about how important the work Glenn Roberts does at Anson mills but suffice to say we all owe Glenn a debt of gratitude for his dedication to Antebellum grains and preserving southern foodways. Resourced for this episode: https://ansonmills.com/ https://www.coastalconservationleague.org/projects/growfood/ https://huskrestaurant.com/about/suppliers/ https://www.jstor.org/stable/3740433 https://www.fastcompany.com/3035287/the-grit-awakening-why-antebellum-style-cornmeal-has-risen-again https://www.southernfoodways.org/ https://www.southernfoodways.org/gravy/

BookThinkers: Life-Changing Books
82. Vanessa Van Edwards: Author of Cues

BookThinkers: Life-Changing Books

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 43:46


The World's #1 Personal Development Book Podcast! In this episode, I have the pleasure to interview author Vanessa Van Edwards. Vanessa is the national bestselling author of Captivate: The Science of Succeeding With People, which we discussed back in 2020 when I was first starting this podcast. Tens of millions of people watch her on YouTube and in her TEDx London Talk. She founded Science of People and has taught communication science for over a decade. Her unique work has been featured in Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, CNN, CBS, Entrepreneur Magazine and many more. Vanessa also leads corporate workshops for the world's largest companies, such as Amazon, Microsoft, Comcast, Nike and dozens more. She speaks to audiences around the world. Today, she is speaking with us about her brand-new release, Cues: Master the Secret Language of Charismatic Communication. Please enjoy this amazing conversation with Vanessa Van Edwards. Today's episode is sponsored by Audible. Try Audible for free: www.bookthinkers.com/audibletrial. The purpose of this podcast is to connect you, the listener, with new books, new mentors, and new resources that will help you achieve more and live better. Each and every episode will feature one of the world's top authors so that you know each and every time you tune-in, there is something valuable to learn. If you have any recommendations for guests, please DM them to us on Instagram. (www.instagram.com/bookthinkers) If you enjoyed this show, please consider leaving a review. It takes less than 60-seconds of your time, and really makes a difference when I am trying to land new guests. For more BookThinkers content, check out our Instagram or our website. Thank you for your time!

eCommerce Evolution
Episode 193 - Disruptive Marketing and Building Edgy, On-Brand and Fridge-Worthy Ads with Miki Agrawal of Tushy

eCommerce Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 50:07


I've never met anyone quite like Miki Agrawal. She's incredibly creative. No really. She once hosted a “funeral for a tree” at an old cathedral in NYC hosted by comedians and actors. It drew a crowd of thousands, generated millions in free press, and helped shed light on the toilet paper waste that her company TUSHY can help solve.  She understands trends in marketing. She knows how to grab attention. So much so that she was banned by the NY transit authority from running subway ads. Which led to a PR fight that she won…and in the end, got more press and attention than if they hadn't been banned.  She's also warm and kind and FUN.  She's created multiple 9-Figure businesses and has garnered some pretty incredible recognition. She was named "Fast Company's Most Creative People", “Young Global Leader” by the World Economic Forum and INC's “Most Impressive Women Entrepreneurs”. She's also the author of #1 best selling books Do Cool SH*T and Disrupt-HER. In this episode we unpack Miki's wacky, impossible-to-forget and wildly successful marketing strategies and tactics. Here's a look at what we cover: How Miki was banned from advertising on the NYC subway and turned that into a huge PR win for her brand THINX. How to use Accessible + Relatable language.  How to create ads that are both effective and “fridge worthy”. How iteration is perfection. How to start with play to create great ideas.

Voice Is
NICE with Fran Hauser: Building better relationships at work and niceness as a superpower

Voice Is

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 60:00


Julie and Casey chat with author, speaker, and angel investor Fran Hauser (author of Embrace the Work, Love Your Career and Audible's Best Business Book of 2018, The Myth of the Nice Girl) about building relationships, rejecting the idea that being nice makes you weak, how to stand up for yourself, the difference between "nice" and "people pleaser", and why founders need to take care of themselves.   Thank you to our Season 3 sponsor, Armoire! If you're ready to try a new look, Armoire's high-end clothing rental service (full of amazing women-owned brands) will hook you up! For 50% off your first month's rental + a free item, go to http://armoire.style/voiceis and use VOICEIS in the referral box!   TOP TAKEAWAYS: Being successful in business is all about relationships You don't have to choose between being nice and being strong. If you're a founder/entrepreneur, are you jumping ahead to business model, marketing, partnerships, etc. before making sure you have an awesome product that consumers are delighted by?  You're skipping the most important step. Taking a breath, taking the time and energy to care for yourself and others makes the WORK better.  Compassion for ourselves and for other people makes us more productive, not less, and we need to bring more of it into our professional lives. You don't need to be the smartest kid in fifth grade (i.e. have all the answers all by yourself).  Build out your community and your network. Nice is a superpower - its "evil twin" is people-pleasing. Know the difference, and know when to stand up for yourself. Mini-Lesson: How to embrace your "toos". Articles referenced: On the culture of over-work, and how it holds both women and men back - https://hbr.org/2020/03/whats-really-holding-women-back Gender bias in performance reviews - https://hbr.org/2017/04/how-gender-bias-corrupts-performance-reviews-and-what-to-do-about-it Vague vs specific feedback - https://hbr.org/2016/04/research-vague-feedback-is-holding-women-back   Fran Hauser is an author, keynote speaker and startup investor at the intersection of women's empowerment, career fulfillment, and collective wellbeing. As a long-time media executive, Fran has always championed the power of content in shaping culture, educating the public, and driving awareness of important issues.  She is the best-selling author of The Myth of the Nice Girl: Achieving a Career You Love Without Becoming a Person You Hate which has been translated into six languages and was named “Best Business Book of the Year, 2018” by Audible. Fran's new book, Embrace the Work, Love Your Career, is quickly becoming the go-to for women seeking more joy and fulfillment in their career. Fran regularly speaks at conferences and organizations to help women build careers they love while staying true to themselves Fran has invested in over 30 female-founded companies across CPG, media & publishing, and wellness. She also serves as an LP in the Female Founders Fund. Her writing, speaking and investing is informed by 15 years spent in media, from startups where she played an integral role in the $525mm sale of Moviefone to AOL, to ultimately rising the ranks at Time Inc. to President of Digital where she led innovation, acquisitions and digital expansion for powerhouse media brands People, InStyle, Entertainment Weekly, Essence, and People en Espanol. Fran has been the recipient of the Fairy Godmother Award from Girl Be Heard, the W Award from the YWCA of the City of New York and has been included in lists from Business Insider's "30 Women In VC to Watch" to Refinery29's “Six Most Powerful Women in New York City's Tech Scene”. She has been featured on TODAY, CNBC, Fortune, TIME, Fast Company, Forbes, Vogue.com, Ad Age, Oprah.com and more.  In 2020 Fran channeled her lifelong love of books into an Instagram platform @FransBookshelf focused on the joy of reading -- both the escapism and the celebration of diverse ideas that can change the world.  Fran serves on the board of directors of the Foundation for Bedford Central Schools and is an advisor to Helpusadopt.org and LiveGirl. Fran is a summa cum laude graduate of Pace University. She resides just outside of NYC with her husband and two sons.

Leadership and Loyalty™
2/2 Totally Reimagining the Engagement Model: Carson Tate

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 34:42


Think about it, we're all here at the moment in time that has rattled our work-life reality. As employees and employers, we are in the middle of what's become known as The Great Resignation. However, is resigning the answer, or could there be other opportunities you never even considered?  In many of my articles, I've spoken about how the Great Resignation is in fact, The Great Pause. We've all been given an extraordinary moment to examine what matters most to us. But does that always mean walking away from the job you are in? Or might there be an opportunity to co-create your dream job? You might be amazed. Our guest for the next two episodes is Carson Tate. Carson serves as a consultant and coach to executives at Fortune 500 companies including Deloitte, FedEx, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Heinz, Synchrony, Wells Fargo, and many others. Her work has been featured in top-tier business media including Bloomberg, Businessweek, Business Insider, CBS Money Watch, Fast Company, Forbes, Harvard Business Review Blog, The New York Times, USA Today, Working Mother, and more.  Carson Tate knows that when employees thrive, business thrives. She is the author of two books, Work Simply, and Own It. Love It. Make it Work. How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job. Carson's practical, tactical, science-backed strategies and methodologies have enabled Fortune 500 companies to amplify team performance, engage their employees, and increase workforce productivity. Website  http://www.workingsimply.com Social media  https://www.linkedin.com/in/carsontate Part 2) Totally Reimagining the Engagement Model What's wrong with the Multi-billion-dollar Engagement model  Are You Building an Empire on Sand? Culture - Connection - Collaboration - with Courage Are you a "to me," "for me," or "With me"? The Future of Work: Reciprocal Relationship Sunk Cost Bias and Committing to What No Longer Works Curious to discover how tapping into the Anatomy of Meaning can #actualize your #business, #culture, #Leadership and #tribe DovBaron.com "Those Who Control Meaning for The Tribe, Also Control The Movement of That Tribe" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Life (UN)Closeted: LGBTQ & Heterosexual Coming Out Stories & Advice for coming out of life's closets!
518: Design Your Own Rules For Limitless Opportunities – Meg He

Life (UN)Closeted: LGBTQ & Heterosexual Coming Out Stories & Advice for coming out of life's closets!

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 57:48


We all want to experience freedom, joy, confidence. Many of us also want to keep it simple. When you bring all those desires together, along with burning desire to carve your own path, you meet a woman named Meg He - a clothing brand innovator, a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu athlete and a queer, British-Chinese digital nomad. She's here keeping it real simple about living her life uncloseted. About Meg Meg He is the co-founder and co-CEO of Aday, a sustainable capsule clothing brand designed for outfit repeating, so you can do more with less. Aday sources innovative super fabrics and partners only with factories who put people + planet first. Aday has been named one of the Fast Company's World's Most Innovative Companies and Meg has been named one of Goldman Sachs' 100 Most Intriguing Entrepreneurs, Forbes 30 under 30 and Gaingels 100. She's also a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu athlete and World medallist. Connect With Meg https://www.meghe.com/ (Website) https://www.facebook.com/thisisaday/ (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/meg.he/?hl=en (Instagram) https://twitter.com/meghe (Twitter) https://www.linkedin.com/in/meghe (LinkedIn) You can also listen to the podcast on… https://apple.co/2RBmUxZ ()https://bit.ly/2UxP9zN ()   https://spoti.fi/2JpvCfg ()https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/rick-clemons/the-coming-out-lounge ()   http://tun.in/pjtKR ()https://bit.ly/30kT4kL ()   https://bit.ly/2FVH55j ()  

HR Leaders
You Can Change Other People: Four Steps to help the People Around you make Positive Change

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 39:52


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest, Howie Jacobson, Executive Coach, Author, ultimate Frisbee Player, Behaviour Nerd and host of the Plant Yourself Podcast.Howie is co-author, with Peter Bregman, of You Can Change Other People, and the author of Google AdWords For Dummies. Also, with Peter Bregman, he is co-author of the Coaching for Performance chapter in the AMA's Certified Professional in Management Body of Knowledge series. His writings have also appeared in Fast Company, Harvard Business Review, CNN, and Market Watch. We discuss: Body Language Secrets To Win More NegotiationsThis episode of the HR Leaders Podcast is brought to you by AceUpIf there's a lesson in everything, what did the pandemic teach us about work, leadership, and the role coaching can play in our future? Download the report to access a collection of highlights to help you shape a post-pandemic workplace that works for everyone: https://bit.ly/381qQF5

Lochhead on Marketing
148 Who Are You Going To Be When The Sh*t Hits The Fan

Lochhead on Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 35:17


On this episode of Lochhead on Marketing, let's talk about a critical question: Who are you going to be when the shit hits the fan? As we have talked about in previous episodes, it is starting to look like the business environment could get very hard here. Some people in Silicon Valley are even saying that it could be like back in 2008. Sequoia Capital wrote their seminal “RIP, Good Times” presentation, and its final slide says, “Get real, or go home”. No matter what's going to happen next in the economy, or frankly, the world, it's probably time for all of us to get real or go home. So on this episode, let's dig into why some people step up, and others melt down in times of crisis. Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind. The Signs When I was in my late 20s, and into my early 30s, I was the founding CMO of a company called Scient. We were a leader in the we called E-business Innovation Space, we were one of the very first consulting firms to focus on building E-businesses or Digital Businesses. We did incredibly well, as a matter of fact, the company was founded, I believe, in 98, maybe late 97. By 2000, we had grown to almost 3000 people, which is incredible for a consulting startup, essentially. We were public and had a market cap of about $9 billion. Now, if you were around back then, you've done your homework, and you know the.com bust happened. Like all bad things, they happen over time. It built starting by about February, March, we could feel things starting to get bad. Shortly thereafter, we could feel the rumblings our pipeline wasn't starting to look very good. There was weird shit happening with our customers. And there was a slow takedown that happened from about March, slowly, slowly, slowly, building over the summer, and by the fall, we were in a freefall. Sh*t Hits the Fan Due to all that, we had to do the first ever layoff in the history of the company. It was insanely painful. So when we announced the miss in the projected stocks, we do the layoff. The people we laid off are amazing. They were cheering the company on saying please go forward and be successful sign had an incredible culture. So as painful as it was, the exiting people were, were incredible warriors and supporters. And the people who stayed really wanted to make a go of it. However, people at management seemed to be focusing on the wrong things, rather than discussing how to move forward, given the resources we still had at the moment. This continued until I left the company, and from there the company continued on its freefall rather than picking itself up and starting anew. How People React to Disruption So why do I share that with you? It's a great example of the shit hitting the fan for a company. In my opinion, an executive team unwilling to deal with the reality of the situation, and unwilling to deal with it with any kind of speed is a bad way to go at it. That's why I got so mad and took off, and that's why the CEO of the company fired me. After that, the company vaporized. To hear more how legendary people react when disruption happens in the market, download and listen to this episode. Bio Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger. He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur. Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist. In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion. He also co-founded the marketing consulting firm LOCHHEAD; the founding CMO of Internet consulting fi...

Leaders in Cleantech
Janelle Wang, Acton – 95

Leaders in Cleantech

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 36:57


What's it all about? eScooters, eBikes, last mile solutions and all things Micro-mobility. Great to see how design thinking and innovation applies not just to technology, but to company cultures and business models. This week I talk about the challenges and opportunities for micro-mobility and mobility as a service across cities in various parts of the world, and how building an innovative company culture has helped Acton grow rapidly and globally. About Janelle Wang:  Co-Founder and CEO of Acton, Janelle is a Designer turned Entrepreneur with 15 years of Strategic Planning, New Category Creation & Design Thinking for Fortune 500s to Start Ups, bringing breakthrough Innovation and Sustainability to reality. She is leading the charge to help shape a new, more efficient, vibrant and livable urban environment. She holds 50+ patents in micromobility and sustainability solutions. Janelle has an M.S. in Industrial Design from Purdue University. Janelle was selected as one of “19 Influential Women In Mobility” in 2019, she was awarded Female CEO of the Year in 2016, and has been featured in WSJ, FastCompany, CNN, VOGUE, BBC, and more.. About Acton: ACTON, headquartered in Silicon Valley, offers Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) solution packages from multimodal vehicles to advanced IoT to move people and goods efficiently & intelligently. ACTON partners with automakers, cities, ride-share operators, and private property owners. Together, we make our cities better places to live. ACTON is unique in its range of mobility solutions on offer. ACTON has won numerous awards and has been featured in various media, internationally. ACTON creates excellence in riding dynamics, safety, serviceability, ease of use, design aesthetics, and sustainability. With over 100 patents, more than 100 cities globally, tens of millions of rides, ACTON is leading the way. Social links:  Janelle Wang on LinkedIn: (61) Janelle Wang | LinkedIn Acton website: ACTON | Supercharging City 3.0 | California Acton on LinkedIn: (61) ACTON: Overview | LinkedIn Acton on Instagram: ACTON (@actonallday) • Instagram photos and videos About Hyperion Cleantech Group: Hyperion Cleantech Group is the holding company for businesses focused exclusively in cleantech talent acquisition, retention, leadership development. working with some of the most innovative cleantech companies in the world, helping to find extraordinary talent to enable their growth and success. Partnering with leading cleantech VCs, as well as directly with founders and entrepreneurs in the sector. With our clients we are transforming business and growing a strong and prosperous cleantech economy. We work across EMEA and NORAM, with teams based in the UK, Germany and the US. EPISODE LINKS Acton's latest acquisition hints at the future of docked micromobility Acton's latest acquisition hints at the future of docked micromobility – TechCrunch Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die: Chip Heath, Dan Heath: 8601410083830: Books: Amazon.com Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't Amazon.com: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't (Audible Audio Edition): Jim Collins, Jim Collins, HarperAudio: Audible Books & Originals Follow us online, write a review (please) or subscribe I'm very keen to hear feedback on the podcast and my guests, and to hear your suggestions for future guests or topics. Contact via the website, or Twitter. If you do enjoy the podcast, please write a review on iTunes, or your usual podcast platform, and tell your cleantech friends about us. That would be much appreciated. Twitter https://twitter.com/Cleantechleader Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DavidHuntCleantechGuide Instagram https://www.instagram.com/davidhuntcleantech/

Badass Basic Bitch
The Power of Mindset with Tracy Litt

Badass Basic Bitch

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 45:38


Tracy Litt is a sought-after success mentor for visionary women leaders that are navigating huge paradigm shifts and elevating to the next level themselves,  so they can seamlessly generate the next level of their impact, wealth, and holistic success.  Tracy is a certified mindset coach, spiritual advisor, rapid transformational hypnotherapist, best-selling author, and TEDx speaker.  She is the Founder of The Litt Factor, and creator of Mind Magic ®, a proven methodology that marries metacognition and spirituality, neuroscience, and quantum law to expand and elevate more quickly.  Her work has served thousands of women across the globe and has been featured in Entrepreneur, FastCompany, Thrive Global, and Inc.com. Her book  Worthy Human is a #1 best seller in Spiritual Growth and Mindset. Tracy is a powerhouse of energy. Her impact is undeniable and her belief in human potential is palpable. 

The Savvy Scribe
Episode 162: 3 Things to Do Every Day to Explode Your Business With Martha Krejci

The Savvy Scribe

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 42:13


Martha Krejci joins us today to share some great resources to use and  3 things you can do every day to explode your business.About MarthaMartha Krejci is a high-vibin' mama, wife, life coach, business-growth strategist, and social media marketing powerhouse who has taken the internet by storm. Featured in Oprah Magazine, Fast Company, Cosmopolitan, Shape, and Huffington Post among other places, Martha's intuitive marketing expertise has helped her make her first million in less than a year using a strategy she teaches openly through courses, group coaching, and other tried-and-true resources.From finding your passion to building a business that works, she teaches it all — and it's all ready and waiting for you. Her new book marthasbook.com is published by the same publisher as the Secret and she'll be on a reality tv show in 2022!Key points we've discussed:Why she teaches families to create multiple income streams from home utilizing stuff they already knowHow to explode your business in 20 mins a day without ads3 things she does every day to take the momentum in her businessHow she figured these three things outBusiness is a common nation with many mini-systems.3 Things to Do Every Day to Explode Your Business1. Message 5 people a dayHow CRM can help you with this processKinds of messaging to useShe shares her secret cheat code!How algorithm works2. Take advantage of the algorithmAt least 3x times a week, we need to be able to post about business-related – something that we're excited aboutLead group – a group where you invite people to know more about what you do while allowing them to interact; it is where the nurturing of lead happensBe a good human, and run a business as a good human.3. Make sure that you have a connector or a bridge to your lead group.Check out these resources she shared!Grab her free Ultimate Scaling Tool! It's the perfect tool to make sure you're scaling your business on YOUR DATA instead of other people's. Nothing else works, period. You need to know YOUR numbers, and then GROW based on them. The tool makes it easy.Join Heart-Centered + CRUSHING Business and connect with home-based business owners who are scaling too. It's my new Facebook community where smart home-based business owners learn how to build a sustainable income from home so they can quit their jobs.Martha recommends using CRM where you can create lead pages – you can try it for a dollar for 45 days – attractwell.com/marthaTop Systems She Used Every Day In Her Business:AttractWell for automation, email, and SMS marketingHer team – people that do all sorts of different pieces in her business such as PR, writing emails, and contentSupport the show

Remarkable Retail
The Power of Regret: An Interview With Best-Selling Author Dan Pink

Remarkable Retail

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 25:24


Welcome to a special cross-over episode of the podcast.  We're taking a break for the week and bringing you a great conversation Michael had on The Voice of Retail podcast with best-selling author Dan Pink. Dan believes that regret is our most misunderstood emotion.In his quest to reclaim the power of regret as a force for good, Dan has written a breakthrough book, The Power Of Regret, which speaks to regret as a critical component of human existence. This emotion prompts us to look backwards to clarify how we want to move forwards. I loved the book, enjoyed the interview, and appreciate Dan's remarkable take on regret and I'm delighted to share it with you.And don't forget, if you live in the US or Canada you can get the Kindle version of my book Remarkable Retail: How to Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Digital Disruption for just $1.99 for a very limited time. Just head on over to Amazon.We'll be back next week with our regularly scheduled show.But for now, let's listen to Michael's interview with Dan Pink.Michael's first interview with Dan About Daniel PinkDaniel H. Pink is the author of several provocative, bestselling books about business, work, creativity, and behavior.His books include:When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing unlocks the scientific secrets to good timing to help you flourish at work, at school, and at home. When spent four months on the New York Times bestseller list. It was also a Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Publishers Weekly, and USA Today bestseller. Several outlets (including Amazon, iBooks, and Goodreads) named it one of the best non-fiction books of 2018.  It is being translated into 33 languages.To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others, which uses social science to offer a fresh look at the art and science of sales. To Sell is Human was a #1 bestseller on the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post lists and has been translated into 34 languages. More than a dozen outlets, from Amazon.com to The Washington Post, selected it as one of the best books of the year. It also won the American Marketing Association's Berry Book Prize as the year's best book on marketing.Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, which draws on 50 years of behavioral science to overturn the conventional wisdom about human motivation. Along with being a Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and Publishers Weekly bestseller, Drive spent 159 weeks on the New York Times (main and extended) bestseller lists. A national bestseller in Japan and the United Kingdom, the book has been translated into 40 languages.A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future, which charts the rise of right-brain thinking in modern economies and describes the six abilities individuals and organizations must master in an outsourced, automated age. A Whole New Mind was on the New York Times (main and extended) bestseller lists for 96 weeks over four years. It has been a Freshman Read at several U.S. colleges and universities. In 2008, Oprah Winfrey gave away 4,500 copies of the book to Stanford University's graduating class when she was the school's commencement speaker.The Adventures of Johnny Bunko: The Last Career Guide You'll Ever Need, the first American business book in the Japanese comic format known as manga and the only graphic novel ever to become a BusinessWeek bestseller. Illustrated by award-winning artist Rob Ten Pas, The Adventures of Johnny Bunko was named an American Library Association best graphic novel for teens.Free Agent Nation: The Future of Working for Yourself, a Washington Post bestseller that Publishers Weekly says “has become a cornerstone of employee-management relations.” In 2013, the U.S. Department of Labor and the Library of Congress selected Free Agent Nation as one of 100 Books That Shaped Work in America.Pink was host and co-executive producer of “Crowd Control,” a television series about human behavior on the National Geographic Channel that aired in more than 100 countries. He has appeared frequently on NPR, PBS, ABC, CNN, and other TV and radio networks in the US and abroad.He has been a contributing editor at Fast Company and Wired as well as a business columnist for The Sunday Telegraph. His articles and essays have also appeared in The New York Times, Harvard Business Review, The New Republic, Slate, and other publications. He was also a Japan Society Media fellow in Tokyo, where he studied the country's massive comic industry.Before venturing out on his own 20 years ago, Dan worked in several positions in politics and government, including serving from 1995 to 1997 as chief speechwriter to Vice President Al Gore.He received a BA from Northwestern University, where he was a Truman Scholar and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and a JD from Yale Law School. He has also received honorary doctorates from Georgetown University, the Pratt Institute, the Ringling College of Art and Design, the University of Indianapolis, and Westfield State University.Pink and his wife live in Washington, DC. They are the parents of two recent college graduates and a college freshman.Buy the book:   https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/the-power-of-regret-how/9780735210653-item.html?ikwid=the+power+of+regret&ikwsec=Home&ikwidx=0#algoliaQueryId=6502f49431a758699c7276ecce7d1ae6Our previous interview on The Voice of Retail :  https://the-voice-of-retail.simplecast.com/episodes/tal-zvi-nathanel-ceo-of-showfields-and-dan-pink-nyt-best-selling-author-share-their-insights-on-retail-experience-working-and-adapting-in-the-covid-19-ear About UsSteve Dennis is an advisor, keynote speaker and author on strategic growth and business innovation. You can learn more about Steve on his       website.    The expanded and revised edition of his bestselling book  Remarkable Retail: How To Win & Keep Customers in the Age of Disruption is now available at  Amazon or just about anywhere else books are sold. Steve regularly shares his insights in his role as a      Forbes senior contributor and on       Twitter and       LinkedIn. You can also check out his speaker "sizzle" reel      here.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest venture for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!  

The Career Refresh with Jill Griffin
The Great Reassessment: Preparing Your Mindset, Managing Perfectionism, Ageism, and the New Midlife Crisis

The Career Refresh with Jill Griffin

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 36:39


Is there a perfect age to be looking for your next career move? Is your perfectionism ruining your career? How do you make your internal sense of your professional identity match the external perception? There are ways to take the reins, be yourself at work, and create a career path you love. In this episode, I speak with Dr. Sarabeth Berk,  the leading expert on hybrid professional identity, and a hybrid professional herself. She was featured in Forbes, is a TEDx speaker, and is the author the book of More Than My TitleIn this conversation, we discuss:How your self-awareness shapes your professional identity and helps you communicate your valueTips to fight ageism in the  job searchHow to shift your belief system when you think you need to be perfect in order to be accepted, valued, or successful at workWhat it looks like to be in the "prime" of your career-building years and still thrive for years to comeMentioned on the show: Get my Top 10 Pro Tips to Stand Out on LinkedIn HERECheck out my Recent Article on FastCompany.com: 4 Ways to Fight Ageism in Your Job SearchFollow @jillGriffinOffical on Instagram for daily inspiration. Visit JillGriffinCoaching.com for more details on my private and group coaching programs. Follow Dr. Sarabeth BerkWeb: https://www.morethanmytitle.com/​Instagram @morethanmytitleBuy the book "More than My Title"

B2B Mentors
How to Become a Billion-Dollar Marketer (Expert Interview)

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 35:55


How to Become a Billion-Dollar Marketer (Expert Interview) Jess Iandiorio is the Chief Marketing Officer at Starburst, an analytics startup valued at $3.3B. She's held marketing leadership positions at Mirakl (Valued at $3.5B), Drift (Exited to Vista Equity Partners for $1B), Acquia (Also exited to Vista Equity Partners for $1B+), and Endeca (Acquired by Oracle for $1B+). Jess is an expert on go-to-market strategy and category creation, is a start-up addict, and loves to build high-performing teams. Jess co-authored The SaaS CEO's Guide to Happier Customers where she created a framework for a Go-To-Customer (GTC) strategy as the next era for SaaS growth. Jess is also a passionate advocate for diversity in tech, and making start-ups family-friendly. Her most recent work focuses on an unfair judgment passed on many women which prevents their growth which she calls "She's Not Strategic" or SNS Disease. Her articles can be found on Fast Company, Venture Beat, and The Startup.Follow and connect with Jess on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jess-iandiorio-514859/Key Takeaways:-When seeking an extremely successful company to work for, look for a large market, a differentiated product, leadership you want to work for, and long-term financial stability.-Investing in paid LinkedIn marketing allows you to target precisely, and paired with metadata, to scale your spend for tighter management of ROI and lead flow.-When advancing into a billion-dollar market, be pragmatic in your approach, focus on your ideal customer profile, and identify what winning looks like in each unique industry.Join our free B2B Mentors networking and mastermind group: https://www.activeblogs.com/liveevent/

The Strategy Skills Podcast: Management Consulting | Strategy, Operations & Implementation | Critical Thinking

Welcome to Strategy Skills episode 242, an interview with the CEO of YSC Consulting, Eric Pliner. In this video, Eric shared his career journey, experience with adjusting to consulting, and how to become a successful consultant while maintaining a healthy life balance. He discussed the reasons why his company survived and thrived during the pandemic. As a CEO, he spoke about the top things that he looks for when promoting an employee and the red flags that employees must be aware of to avoid or eliminate.  Eric shared the realizations that made him a stronger leader over the course of his journey to the top of his company. He emphasized the importance of constant learning and listening to other people, and that as a leader, you have to get over the idea that your job is to make everyone happy. You will disappoint people down the road, but how you handle that disappointment will make the difference between being a long-term leader or a short-term leader. Eric shared his advice on how to better make difficult decisions and how to build confidence when facing challenging decision-making situations.  For more than twenty-five years, Eric Pliner has been a recognized leader in the fields of leadership development, organizational culture, education and training, and strategic diversity and inclusion. He is Chief Executive Officer of YSC Consulting, a global leadership strategy consultancy headquartered in London. Eric's writing on leadership has been featured in Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, and a host of other business and industry publications. He is a Board Director with Hip Hop Public Health, a member of the Dramatists' Guild of America, and an author/co-author of a wide variety of published academic, creative, and professional works, including award-winning case studies on leadership; the U.S. National Standards for Health Education; and an off-Broadway theatrical parody of television cartoons for adults (with Amy Rhodes). He lives in Brooklyn, New York. Get Eric's book here: Difficult Decisions: How Leaders Make the Right Call with Insight, Integrity, and Empathy. Eric Pliner Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Secrets Of The Most Productive People
How to avoid inadvertently being a bad boss

Secrets Of The Most Productive People

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 30:58


Kate Davis talks with Diana Kander about the pitfalls even the most well meaning manager might fall into and how to avoid them. Diana is an author, keynote speaker, and host of The Growth League podcast, which catalogs rules for growth from remarkable women. She also co-authored a Fast Company article titled “We interviewed 50 ‘bad bosses' to learn it only takes a few toxic behaviors for everything to go” 

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2: Own it. Love it. Make it Work. Carson Tate

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 34:23


Think about it, we're all here at the moment in time that has rattled our work-life reality. As employees and employers, we are in the middle of what's become known as The Great Resignation. However, is resigning the answer, or could there be other opportunities you never even considered?  In many of my articles, I've spoken about how the Great Resignation is in fact, The Great Pause. We've all been given an extraordinary moment to examine what matters most to us. But does that always mean walking away from the job you are in? Or might there be an opportunity to co-create your dream job? You might be amazed. Our guest for the next two episodes is Carson Tate. Carson serves as a consultant and coach to executives at Fortune 500 companies including Deloitte, FedEx, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Heinz, Synchrony, Wells Fargo, and many others. Her work has been featured in top-tier business media including Bloomberg, Businessweek, Business Insider, CBS Money Watch, Fast Company, Forbes, Harvard Business Review Blog, The New York Times, USA Today, Working Mother, and more.  Carson Tate knows that when employees thrive, business thrives. She is the author of two books, Work Simply, and Own It. Love It. Make it Work. How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job. Carson's practical, tactical, science-backed strategies and methodologies have enabled Fortune 500 companies to amplify team performance, engage their employees, and increase workforce productivity. Website   http://www.workingsimply.com Social media  https://www.linkedin.com/in/carsontate Part 1) Make Any Job Your Dream Job It all starts with Self-Awareness The Pause and Ask Strategy! The Right Reason to Divorce or Stay December 26th - The Moment of No Return The Universal Need All Employers MUST meet Employees and Employers Pretending to be Psychics.  What's the Framework for Healthy Negotiation?  Curious to discover how tapping into the Anatomy of Meaning can #actualize your #business, #culture, #Leadership and #tribe DovBaron.com "Those Who Control Meaning for The Tribe, Also Control The Movement of The Tribe" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Principled
S7E13 | How corporate purpose is foundational to business innovation and success

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 29:48


What you'll learn in this podcast episode As the business world makes an overdue shift from shareholder to stakeholder capitalism, is it possible that we will see an erosion of innovation? How does a company's purpose impact its success? In this episode of the Principled Podcast, LRN Chief Advisory Officer Ty Francis MBE talks about how corporate purpose and stakeholder capitalism fuel innovation with Mark R. Hatch, CEO of clean energy startup SiLi-ion, Inc., an instigator of the maker movement with the founding of TechShop, author of The Maker Movement Manifesto and The Maker Revolution, and researcher on the influence of “organizational purpose” on innovation and business transformation at Pepperdine University. Mark has dedicated his career to educating the business community on innovation and advanced manufacturing and has spoken at the White House on these topics. Listen in as the two discuss what it means to help people—and companies—around the world do the right thing.   Featured Guest: Mark Hatch Mark R. Hatch is an advanced manufacturing entrepreneur, writer, and sought-after speaker and advisor on innovation, the maker movement, digital strategy, and advanced manufacturing. He has held executive positions for innovation, disruptive technology, entrepreneurship, and intrapreneurship in various industry sectors. Mark is the CEO of clean energy startup SiLi-ion, Inc. and an advisor to Studio MFG, an advanced spatial-web innovation consulting and manufacturing design firm. Mark has dedicated his career to educating the business community on innovation and advanced manufacturing and has spoken about these topics to various audiences—including the White House, TEDx, Global Fortune 500 firms, and Harvard University. He has appeared on prominent media outlets such as ABC, CBS, NBC, Bloomberg, CNN, and Fox, and has been quoted in Bloomberg Business, FastCompany, Forbes, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The LA Times, and The San Francisco Chronicle among other publications. An avid researcher on the influence of “organizational purpose” on innovation and business transformation, Mark is working on his DBA at Pepperdine University and is a faculty member for digital innovation and strategy at Pepperdine's Graziado School of Business. He is also an entrepreneur in residence at UC Berkeley. Mark holds an MBA from the Drucker Center at Claremont Graduate University and a BA in economics from UCI.   Featured Host: Ty Francis Ty Francis MBE is a Welsh-American business development, operations executive, and subject matter expert in Corporate Governance, Ethics, Compliance and Culture and is currently LRN's Head of Advisory Services, and a member of the Executive Team as a Special Advisor to the CEO.  Ty has utilized his expansive network of industry experts and thought leaders to help companies enhance corporate character, culture, D&I and transparency and has launched E&C programs and forums in the US, UK, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Brazil, Singapore, Brazil and the Middle East. He spent over a decade in New York City where he was EVP of Global Programs at the Ethisphere Institute and prior to that led the Corporate Board member business at the New York Stock Exchange's Governance Services division.  In 2019, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Business by the UK's Solent University for his outstanding contribution in the field of corporate governance and international trade. In 2017, Ty was appointed a Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE), by Queen Elizabeth II, in recognition of services to business.  Ty also studied at Stanford's Rock Centre for Corporate Governance and Oxford University's Said Business School and is a Certified Compliance & Ethics Professional (CCEP).    Principled Podcast Transcription Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders, and workplace change makers. Ty Francis: As the business world makes an overdue shift from shareholder to stakeholder capitalism, is it possible that we'll see an erosion of innovation? How does a company's purpose impact its success? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm your host, Ty Francis, Chief Advisory Officer LRN. Today I'm joined by Mark Hatch, an accomplished entrepreneur, advanced manufacturing expert, and sought after speaker on topics of innovation, disruptive technology, and the future of work. Mark holds an MBA from the Drucker Center at Claremont Graduate University. And is presently pursuing a DBA, a doctor of business administration, from Pepperdine University. We are going to be talking today about corporate purpose, stakeholder capitalism, and what it means to help people, and companies around the world do the right thing. After several successful decades in business, Mark is now researching the influence of organizational purpose on innovation and business transformation at Pepperdine, while simultaneously serving as CEO of the clean energy startup, SiLi-ion, amongst other things. Mark Hatch, thanks for joining me on the Principled Podcast. Mark Hatch: Thank you very much, Ty. It's great to be here. Ty Francis: Okay so, for those of us saying to ourselves, "Where have I heard this name before," please tell us a little bit about your professional history. Now, we know you as the founder of TechShop, and an instigator in the maker movement. What else? Oh, yes, you've spoken at White House about advanced manufacturing, and at the Clinton Global Initiative, something my wife [inaudible 00:01:58] was actually involved in during her time at Swiss Re. Mark Hatch:   Oh, how fun. Ty Francis: Yeah, she was at Swiss Re for about 10 years and worked very closely with President Clinton. So, that's a name, it's all too familiar in my household. But I also know you're involved in the Singularity University, which sounds very Star Trekky, which is an interesting side note, especially since we're talking about purpose today. So, I've given an overview, but can you give us a little bit more about your backstory Mark? Mark Hatch:   Oh, hit a couple high points. I'm a former green beret, so I was in the army for three years coming out of high school, which was quite entertaining. And then, I started my first company, an interactive multimedia company back in '80s. One of the things I've discovered that I'm really good at is jumping into something way too early. And then, getting beaten up for years and years until it becomes the obvious next thing. The interesting thing about that interactive media though, was that John McAfee of McAfee Antivirus was one of my first investors. I actually got to know John before he became infamous, I guess. I spent a little bit of time at Avery Dennison, a big package goods company. A little bit of time at Kinkos, where I launched the e-commerce portion for Kinkos. And pulled T1 lines around the United States to wire them all up. Spent a little bit of time doing a health benefits ASP and so forth. But most people, if they know who I am at all, is from the maker movement days wrote a couple books in it, and spent a lot of time traipsing around the globe trying to get people to make things again. Ty Francis: Well, I want to touch a couple of those things. So now, you aren't the average professor, as we've just heard, because you've got some real bites to your bark. Within what you just told me, I did read that you raised over $20 million and turned TechShop into that leading brand in the maker movement, growing it from 1 to 12 locations. And more impressively membership and revenue 20X in five years. I got that right, 20X? Mark Hatch: 20, yeah. As long as you start from a very small base, it's really easy to hit those high numbers. Ty Francis: I think you and I have got a different definition of the word easy.  If that wasn't impressive enough, you also grew that $200 million business at Kinkos by 18%. But I think more impressive than that, and someone who runs a P and L you cut costs by 15 million in a single year. Mark Hatch: In a single year, yeah. Ty Francis: That is both impressive. And I get, your students get a kick out of all that experience. We had a pre-conversation before. And I mentioned that I'm lucky enough to know Sir Richard Branson. And he told me years ago how he went into a bookshop, and pulled a bunch of books off the library that were about business. I think the first 20 he counted, none of the authors had actually been in business, or run a business, and were anecdotal at best. Looking at what you've done and what you've succeeded, how has that happened? And how has that paradigm shifted to you now? Mark Hatch: One, I do actually tend to live in the future. It's a bad habit. I've got a very, very clear view of what I believe is going to happen. And I clearly did not take my desert training in the Special Forces very well, where they beat into your head, never mistake a clear view for a short distance. It will kill you. So, I saw interactive multimedia early. I saw dot com early. I've seen many of these things. What I managed to do with TechShop was raise funds, and grow the base quickly enough so that we actually survive for a solid 10 years. But what I do is innovation. My entire career has been on the edge between in a research and development, or the most recent trends, and then commercializing them, turning them into something that a consumer can understand, and acquire. Ty Francis: So, I am seeing a Star Trek theme in all of this, by the way. Seeing into the future. A Q-esque type person here. But this is fascinating. And you, obviously, have an incredible foundation [inaudible 00:06:08] what you are doing, looking at the past, predicting the future. But I do want to tap more into the research you're doing at Pepperdine. And as part of your DBA, again, I'm looking at this and I have an honorary doctorate, and I feel very, very small right now. Mark Hatch: Congratulations. That's quite impressive actually. Ty Francis: Yeah, but apparently when the air cabin crew asks if there's a doctor on the plane, I'm not allowed to raise my hand. When they say, "What can you help this person with?" I can say, "Well, I've got an interesting anecdote about business." So the DBA you're pursuing right now, I mean, I particularly admire the notion of going back to school for an advanced degree. I've had a limited amount of business success. And during the lockdown, I took three courses, one at a side business university at Oxford, one at Stanford, and one at the London School of Economics. The recurring theme through all of those courses... One was executive leadership. One was DEI and leveraging business through it. And the other was international relations and global politics. Organizational purpose was a common theme through all of those postgraduate and diplomas. And it was fascinating how that was a theme, and linking back into business. So, I want you to talk about your work on organizational purpose. But first of all, can you give me, or us a definition of your definition of organizational purpose? Mark Hatch:    There are like three versions of what purpose means. But to get a little bit technical, the short version is really simple. Like the single word, the single concept is why a corporation exists. That's what purpose means, why? Now, usually, when you use the term, what is your corporate purpose? You're not thinking of the single thing that the word means. You're thinking of a corporate purpose statement, or a development of a series of concepts. Or, as they say in business speak, it's a construct. So, I have adopted George et al's from 2021, which is interesting. Most of this good work has happened just in the last few years. So, purpose in the for profit context captures the essence of an organization's existence by explaining what value it seeks to create for its stakeholders. So, you're creating value. But then he goes on and defines it a little bit more, which I like. "In doing so purpose provides a clear definition of firm's intent, creates the ability for the stakeholders to identify with and be inspired by the firm's mission, vision, and values, and establishes actionable pathways, and an inspirational outcome for the firm." Sorry, that's very technical, but that's the best broad version that includes mission, vision, and values, which people tend to associate with purpose when you ask them what a corporate purpose is. But let me back up a little bit. So, the reason I got intrigued with this was, well first of all, I'm very purpose driven personally. I was, usually, involved with technologies that I found intriguing, and could improve humanity in some way. But my experience at TechShop was at a completely different level. People were joining because of the purpose of this idea that we could remake our lives by going to a shop that had, basically, democratized access to the tools of the industrial revolution. We were giving the average Joe access to tools that they had never had access to, unless they were 80 years old, had come up at three machine shop or something. But we were giving them laser cutters, and 3D printers, and so forth.  And I personally got a level of satisfaction out of that. And I got my staff members to perform at levels I had never seen before. We had members that are evangelists. I mean, it seemed like sometimes they would go out on the street and tell people, "Have you heard of this place? You've got to come in." We had this one member, he quit his job. And he didn't have a great job to begin with, but he quit his job as a night watchman, came up and couch surfed. Like that was a thing for a while, couchsurfing.com where you could go and spend the night at somebody's house randomly. This was well before hotel folks came along. He would evangelize each couch that he slept on became a member, like not the couch, the people. Every place that he went, we got new members. And we thought about maybe paying him just to hang around, and sleep on a new couch every night because he was our best attractor. And so, this got me really interested in this concept of what is your corporate purpose? And how does it play out and impact the organization at large? Ty Francis: I think the biggest question that we have, and I have is when people are talking about this concept, how organizations are dealing with this, how are you articulating this to companies, to brands, to leaders, and how to actually put this into practice? Because many of the conversations I have with boards, with GCs, with anyone, they understand the problem. They see what's happening. They read and they see blogs, and they have conversations with the fellow board members. But it's actually the tangibility of creating a strategy that puts this into place. And something they can follow. I guess what's the sticky sauce? What's the magic wand that you throw over your clients, your peers on how do I actually put this into play? Mark Hatch: So the research that I'm doing specifically came out of kind of the question, how do I deal with the naysayers? How do I convince a board, or a C-suite folks that are like, "Yeah, yeah, yeah, whatever, whatever, whatever. I've got my ESG guy and they're going to keep me between the lanes, and everything's going to be fine." I started down this path as like, what do we actually know about corporate purpose? Where did it spring from? Actually, I go all the way back. What's the original concept of a corporation? Where did that come from? And it goes all the way back. It's crazy. It goes all the way back to pre-Babylonian times. And I won't bore you with all of that, but it turns out you couldn't have a corporation without having a purpose of some kind. It wasn't allowed. The state would not allow it. The king would not allow it. I've got a great quote out of the Law of Corporations 1702, "The sole purpose of a corporation is to improve the society and support the king." Full stop. You can't say, "Okay, I'm here to do like, blah, blah, blah. And I'm going to make this." No, no, no, no. How are you going to help your customers? How are you going to improve society? And how are you going to support the king? And if you don't have an answer to that, I'm sorry, not only will I not give you corporation, if I happen to have given you one, and you have strayed too far, I will shut you down. And this was actually the norm up to about 1880 globally. And there's this great quote. It was Massachusetts Bay Company and they charged this poor sod 200 pounds for overcharging his customer. And then, on Sunday morning, the preacher got engaged talking about the egregious greed, and what can happen. And it was simply against the law. And then, things changed with the 14th amendment, some other bizarre things. But we've had this like weird era, and that's how I would describe it, between 1886 to about 1950, we were set loose. You didn't have to have a purpose at all. You actually didn't need any purpose at all. You could just go down to Delaware and say, "I want to set up a company." And they go, "Great." They still would ask, what are you going to do? And so, in your mind, you had to at least have a customer, or somebody you were going to steal money from. You had to have some idea. So even today in your charters, you have to say, "Okay, I'm going to be in this industry segment," which by the way, you just send them a note and that can change. But about around 1950, that started to shift. So, that was a long winded way of saying, so how do we deal with these guys? And what I wanted to do, and what I'm doing is I'm a practical guy, I'm a practitioner. I don't want to sell them something that doesn't work. What does that mean for your purpose? And so, I'm really intrigued with this idea of empirically based management tools. How do you know something works? Not one of those 19 books that Sir Branson was talking about, but the one that comes out of the trenches. So, I've gone back and I've done a fairly significant review of all of the literature on corporate purpose. What's actually known from a theoretical perspective from doing interviews, which I don't put a lot of weight into because you get what you want out of your interviews. But actual empirical work that's been done in this space. And it turns out those corporations that do have a purpose that's more than simply serving customers, they have substantially superior financial returns. And actually, I think your firm is an example that promulgates that point of view based on research you guys have done in the past. Ty Francis: Our tagline is, principle performance. And I'll add that some research we did last year echoes most of what you're saying. I mean, all of what you're saying. My own advisory team released a report alongside our marketing team. And we called it our LRN Benchmark of Ethical Culture, which is a multi-year, it's a collaborative research effort, which draws data from nearly 8,000 employees, 17 industries, 14 countries. And that study conclusively proves that ethical cultures don't just protect corporate reputations, but they propel the bottom line. Companies with the strongest ethical cultures, strongly outperform by approximately 40% those with weakest ethical cultures. And that was across all measures of business performance, customer satisfaction. You talked about employee loyalty, innovation, adaptability, and growth. It's very simple, and you can make a lot of links to this. But if you keep people happy, if people believe in what you are doing, they will stay. If they stay, they will not leave. If they will not leave, they will not take IP with them. They will not go somewhere else. So, all that money you've invested in hiring them, training them, making them better people they will not take that somewhere else. Mark Hatch: Yeah, your brand positioning, your ability to [inaudible 00:16:32]. The theory is actually pretty well illuminated. Actually, the step that I'm taking... I think we have, in fact, proven that having a higher purpose can, or will result in superior financial success. So, there's my answer to the naysayers. This is really simple besides being the right thing to do, and to feel good about yourself, and your company when you go home at night, and you talk to your kids about what you're doing, your returns are higher. But the next question that I asked is, okay, show me how? Just throwing a purpose together and announcing it from the mountaintop is not the right answer. Now, we are getting results, so kudos to the companies that are executing. But I'm trying to answer the question, okay, how do you operationalize a superior purpose? What are the actual specific financial drivers that create superior firm performance? Innovation, and then specifically radical innovation is historically the largest way that firms create superior returns by far. There are other ways of doing it: brand, financial management, operations, Six Sigma, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But the number one way of improving your financial performance is actually to do innovation. And then radical innovation in particular. That's my little chunk that I'm chewing on is can I show that firms with a higher aspirational purpose actually get superior innovation returns and superior radical innovation returns? And the quantitative numbers have come in. I'm now working on writing it up. And it's clear like it's 0.0001 chance that it's false. In fact, a higher purpose does drive radical innovation in a very significant way. It explains 30% of the variance of that. And like 35 to 37% of all variance in your innovation. It's huge. So, my answer is, okay, install, purpose, and innovate. Point this amazing effort that you've created, point this missile down the range at radical innovation because you're going to get an enormous return out of it. Ty Francis: You've actually answered the next question I was going to ask about, what this means for the future of business, and what is your vision for how company leaders can apply these insights? As you said, it's not enough for somebody to read in a book about what's happening. It's how they can relate that and put that into practice to change the dynamic of their own companies. We're not just talking about this. Investors are asking companies point blank, define your purpose. What are you doing to make the world around you better? Larry Fingers, writing to CEOs every single year. In the UK, the banking industry are asking, "Yes, we get it. You're raising capital for people, but what else are you doing?" It's a little bit, what have you done for me lately kind of thing. Mark Hatch: We've come full circle now. In 1886, we decided, okay, you don't have to have a purpose. But now, we are rewriting the laws. The SEC in the US, the UK, as you mentioned, the French have done it. The Italians have done it. The Germans did it ages ago. But there's an enormous amount of pressure now on corporations to be able to explicitly measure what their social good is. They don't necessarily call it your purpose, but that's what they're getting at. When I came at this, of course, I have the context of working at Singularity University as a speaker. And I know, I know a friend of mine is Salim Ismail, who's driving this whole exponential organization's effort globally. And, in it, he said, sidebar conversation. "So Mark, I've tried to do these exponential innovation efforts without a massively transformative purpose at the beginning of the effort because the corporation was like, 'Yeah, you're making me feel kind of weird about this idea of changing the world and all that. We're an X company, let's just do the execution part and skip the massively transformative purpose part.'" And he said, "Every single time we did that, it failed. Every single time. We got nominal innovation out of it." And it actually makes sense when you think about the internal resistance of individuals in their risk profiles. Typically, you go to work and you want to have things normal. And then, what's going to happen all day long, and you're competent and so forth. But when you start doing innovation and, particularly radical innovation, you don't know what tomorrow looks like. You don't understand who your customer is. You don't know what the value is per se. And you're thrown in the deep end and you got to figure it out. Now, it's not quite that bad, but it is substantially different than your day-to-day. And it's hard. Doing radical innovation is the hardest part of being in business because you don't know how it's going to come out. That as a background, is like, "Oh my goodness, you're kidding me. You just told me that one of the keys to being able to execute this isn't actually reaching for the stars." It's not like, can we get a 15% increase in this? Or can we cut costs by 10% or 5%? It's can you cut cost by 50%? Can we double our market share? Can we open up an entirely new market segment? Just saying those words creates a new tension in somebody's head. You bring them in and say, "Okay, we're going to get 10% here, and 15% there." And everybody goes, "Oh cool, I don't have to change anything. I can go back to my desk and keep stamping those pieces of paper. And I'm good." You come in and say, "I want a 50% increase. And I need a 30% reduction over here," actually you've lost the audience because for the next five minutes, all they're going to be wondering is whether or not they have a job. Am I qualified to do this? That's what got me going. And we live in the most exciting time in all of human history. We've got more technologies coming on stream in amazing and radical ways, and how they're interacting with one another is absolutely stunning. So, this is the best time in all of human history to do radical innovation. This is the best time to go after actually deep purposes. And I feel sorry for these corporations who are going, "Okay, let's try to get a 12% bump over the next two years." They're doomed. In my mind it's like, forget it. You and I and others in this world are going to teach the executive suite that radical innovation is possible, it will drive the bottom line, make them feel better and will, in fact, change the world. And I'm proving it empirically. That's kind of what I'm excited about. Ty Francis: It reminds me of a quote that was a famous NFL coach. And I can't remember it now and I'll come back to you by the end of the podcast. But it was about reaching for perfection that you'll never attain it. But on the way down, you will hit excellence. And I think this is an area why people aren't reaching for the stars is surprising because it's that competitive advantage. When we talk about how this is a competitive advantage, not just on a social scale, but on a business scale, we've been talking to board directors. We had a collaboration with a group called Tapestry Networks. We spoke to 40 directors of publicly traded companies, I mean 40, 50 companies. And they represented about 70 or 80 different companies across their different board positions. We did this specifically to talk about purpose and culture. We released the findings in a report called Activating Culture and Ethics for Boards late last year. And the results, albeit mostly predictable, the boards want to put culture at the top of their priority list, but they still don't fully understand how to measure it. The refreshing part was that they see that the paradigm shifted from board members having a nose in, fingers out ability to more having nose and fingers in because they are starting to see this as a competitive benefit to having both strategy and culture and purpose aligned. And with that, I think they're seeing they have a better understanding of what corporate purpose should be. I think we're trying to see a tangible move in the... I'm using quotation marks here, a "tone from the top" conversation on how boards are impacting priorities, and are influencing culture. So, how does that help your research for what you are doing now for the future of work? Mark Hatch: You've done the surveys, you know what the answers are. But what I'm trying to do is start a small renaissance around, prove it to me. What are the actual ways that you operationalize it? It's like, okay, employee retention. Okay, measure employee retention. But don't just measure employee retention, invest in your employees. If you know that they're going to hang around longer, don't just sit on your hands, and say, "Oh cool, they're going to be here longer. Woo hoo." No, no, no. What that means is you can't actually invest in them in ways that your competitors can't. That's operationalizing this idea of this competitive advantage, invest in your customers, invest in your brand. What are you doing specifically to drive your brand in relations in a deeper way? You've created this competitive advantage. You've got this great purpose now sitting on the shelf. Great. How are you going to operationalize it? And can we measure it? That's my point. It's can we actually measure it and see what the returns are? Ty Francis: The measurement, that's the trick. Everyone knows what they should be doing, but they don't know how they should be doing it. Mark Hatch: And if you don't measure it, then you don't care about it. Ty Francis: Wasn't that the famous misquote from Peter Drucker what you can't manage, you can measure, or the other way around? Mark Hatch: Right. Ty Francis: So we've been talking a lot about boards and purpose, but we know the SEC, and we're talking about the US. Obviously, although I'm American, I'm also Welsh. So, I'm curious if your research extends to Europe, or other regions. I mean, is this universal? Or is it just stage one USA, stage two [inaudible 00:25:55]? Mark Hatch:    It does work at least in the UK. So, I chose my sample's 50/50, US/UK. 50/50, male/female. Native English speakers, try to control for some other variables. This is clearly true in the UK and the US. My suspicion, obviously, is that it's true in a lot of other parts of the world as well. Other research suggests that it is at least pan-European. Gartenberg's work and others. Gartenberg did some quantitative research that had 500,000 companies in it from around the globe. And they were able to show empirically that purpose does, in fact, drive superior financial returns, similar to what your research did. Ty Francis: When you're talking about this corporate purpose, I've noticed working in the States for a long time, that there is in the States and, to a certain extent, in the UK as well, there's a shareholder driven purpose kind of alignment where there's in broader Europe, France, and Germany, and Italy there's more of a stakeholder driven perception. So, there you see in Germany where you've got the different kind of board levels, and with the very straight labor laws in France, you are seeing that connection between leadership, and the employee base having to be aligned because they've got no choice because if they don't like what their companies are doing, they can change it, and quite dramatically. So, that would be interesting to see how that dynamic between the UK and the US, but then certainly further afield of that, how the European companies and organizations are actually using this corporate purpose vehicle to their competitive advantage. Mark Hatch: Right. One might hypothesize that corporate purpose, that's a fundamental driver. But how you operationalize it may vary from region to region. Maybe brand is a better tool than radical innovation. Maybe employee retention is a better one. I'm not sure. I doubt it, frankly. I think innovation is one of the fundamental things that you do as a business. Drucker would say, you're not even an entrepreneur, if you're not doing innovation. You can call yourself a businessman, but you're not an entrepreneur. And so, I suspect that innovation. And then as we're moving, again, the opportunity set available now to innovate is phenomenal. Radical innovation, it should be a fundamental strategy for any business that's trying to drive purpose into their organization, and with their stakeholders. Ty Francis: Well, before we sign off, and before I get a raft of my very angry American listeners asking why this British guy is talking about American football? It was Vince Lombardi, [inaudible 00:28:28]. And his quote was, and I'll see if I can get this right, "Perfection's not attainable. But if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence." Mark Hatch: Yeah. Ty Francis: So Mark Hatch, this has been a fascinating conversation and one that we have merely pricked the surface of. And I'd like to have you back to talk a little bit more definitively, especially when the research is done, to look at those results. Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me today and us on this episode.       My name is Ty Francis. I want to thank you all for listening to the Principled Podcast by LRM. If you have enjoyed the conversation today, please do give us a top rating on your favorite podcast app. Goodbye for now. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more. And if you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen. And don't forget to leave us a review.