Podcasts about trinny london

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Best podcasts about trinny london

Latest podcast episodes about trinny london

Women on The Move Podcast
London CEO helps women find and flaunt their unique beauty

Women on The Move Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 36:19


  Trinny Woodall wants all women to experience the joy of showing your best self. As CEO and founder of global beauty brand Trinny London, Woodall creates makeup personally tailored to women's unique skin, hair, and eyes. “I love that feeling somebody gets when I make them feel better, it's just such a secret sauce, such a magical thing to be able to do,” she says.   In this episode of Women on the Move, host Sam Saperstein sits down with Trinny to discuss her passions, her path to success, and lessons she's learned along the way as a renowned makeover expert, best-selling author, mother, and TV personality. Listen in as they discuss Trinny London's unique approach to personalization and its mission to give customers the confidence to be their best.   A passion for the power of makeup Trinny started her career in finance, before getting her break as a fashion columnist for the Daily Telegraph in the 1980s. She and her columnist partner soon enjoyed success as fashion makeover experts. From there, she tells Sam, the transition to the makeup industry was a natural step for her. “I think that founders come either from a passion of understanding a hole in the market or that coupled with what they really would want for themselves,” she says. For her, it was both: Her years working with fashion had taught her how much women value the concept of an individually tailored makeover, and her personal experience with makeup gave her a passion for it. Growing up with acne, she explains, made her fall in love with what she calls the power of makeup at a young age. At 15, she recalls, her godmother took her to a makeup counter in New York City. “And going into an American beauty counter at that stage when England was so boring and behind . . . there was that feeling of, I can be transformed by this,” she recalls. “For me, it's like, how can I be the best me, but still be me? And that was always what I felt as a woman. I didn't want to become somebody else. I wanted to just be able to look in the mirror and feel happy with what I saw.” It was the idea to personalize makeup that helped her stand out in the market. She says that once she had identified the need, she wanted to invent trends, not follow them. “And so I thought, okay, don't put red on every single person, because this woman has brown skin, a blonde hair, a greener eye,” she explains. “This woman has a peaches and cream skin and a blue eye and a brown hair. So why would you do the same thing? And I just thought back in my head, I'd love it. And that was that beginning of all, match-to-me technology.” She began making the formulations in her bathroom and sending them off to the lab. Early clients would come to her bathroom, and she would track their products on a large physical chart on the wall. From that early data, she developed an algorithm and “things evolved from there.” Today, clients log onto the Trinny London website, put in their skin profile, and get customized examples and suggestions of what to pick.   Lessons learned Trinny says she was confident early on that personalized makeup would work. “I knew from the 5,000 women I've made over in that 10 years, I knew there was a need,” she says. “I knew women would love it.” Developing Trinny London into what it is today, however, was facilitated by the help and advice of others. One mentor “was fantastic,” she recalled. “She said, you need suppliers. You need somebody who can help you manufacture what you're making in your bathroom. So, she put me in touch with people. I developed relationships.”   She credits much of Trinny London's success to her staff and her hiring philosophies. “At Trinny London, we look for raw talent,” she explains. “I literally glide over somebody's university degree. When I look at the CV, I glide over nearly everything. I just want to kind of understand What's their passion? What's their motivation? What motivation have they inherited from their family life?”

Marilyn Denis Does a Podcast
EP 61: Trinny Woodall: On Business & Beauty

Marilyn Denis Does a Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 35:44


Once you hear this podcast, you'll understand why thousands of people around the world are loyal members of the Trinny Tribe! When my fashion stylist, Alexis Honce, told me Trinny Woodall, the Founder & CEO of the beauty company, Trinny London, is her industry idol, I had to unite them. From building a successful brand to finding your true sense of style at any age – this is one conversation you don't want to miss!   

The Glossy Beauty Podcast
Trinny London's Trinny Woodall on building "a brand she can live the rest of her life with"

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 44:04


Trinny Woodall was well-known and beloved in her native U.K. as style writer and "What Not to Wear" host, well before she started her DTC makeup brand Trinny London in 2017. But, Woodall, who acts as founder and CEO of her brand, doesn't think of herself as an "influencer" who is dabbling in beauty. "I'm not really an influencer who's launched a brand. I think I always knew I would launch a brand," she said on this week's episode of the Glossy Beauty Podcast. Woodall said her business was on her mind for at least five years prior to its debut, but actually started taking shape when she was a child. "From six years of age, I did makeovers on girls in my boarding school, and I think I got the bug then of how you could transform how a person feels by these different aspects: by doing their makeup, their hair, their clothing. I spent 20 years refining that." The pandemic helped solidify Woodall's point of differentiation. Her brand remains digital-only -- a saving grace during Covid-19 -- and banks on its Match2Me technology that personalizes the makeup assortment a customer sees based on their hair, eye and skin color. Last year, Trinny London hit about $62 million in revenue, and growth is on Woodall's mind -- but not necessarily in the same way that others increase their market share. "I don't want to be a [founder] that goes in and says, 'OK, here's brow. Let's see if the 28 different variations of brow we can do [work],'" she said. "I feel that, because we have so much choice, it makes it harder and harder to decide what woman you are and what you want to buy."

Secret Leaders
Trinny Woodall reveals her surprising, untold startup journey - from dotcom bust to beauty boom today

Secret Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 55:07


Most people recognise Trinny Woodall for being one half of Trinny and Susannah from their breakout TV show: What Not To Wear, but not many people know this side of her story. Trinny is a serial entrepreneur. She was a founder in the dotcom bubble back in the day, and is the founder of soaring makeup startup, Trinny London, which booked £42m of revenue in the last year. What happened? How did she get here?In today’s episode of Secret Leaders, Trinny shares her really surprising entrepreneurial journey that doesn’t get told.“Susannah and I started the idea [their first entrepreneurial venture], it was a very lucky break. And I did that for eight years. And then from that television came and then I started writing books and that whole part of my career, when I look back now, brought me to being the CEO of Trinny London.”It doesn’t matter if you’re a budding founder or a seasoned entrepreneur, this episode with Trinny is not to be missed. From hiring interns with a twinkle in their eye, to having to sell her clothes to fund her startup, to understanding the need for personalisation in a brand, Trinny has a wealth of experience every founder needs to hear. “Through building Trinny London, advice I always give to other entrepreneurs, younger entrepreneurs, is stay in your own lane. Because if you look too much at the competition, you dilute the uniqueness of your offering.”We chat about:Her partnership with SusannahThe genesis of Trinny LondonFinancing Trinny LondonHow she handled fameCreating a community on social mediaWant to receive our podcast on a weekly basis? Subscribe to our newsletter!

Grazia Beauty Life Lessons
Trinny Woodall

Grazia Beauty Life Lessons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 32:17


TV personality, entrepreneur, and founder of the Trinny London cosmetics range, Trinny Woodall tells Joely why she decided to dedicate her working life to creating innovative beauty products. Her advice also includes going easy on the fake tan.

Out of Office
Trinny Woodall: On Business, Beauty and Reinventing Herself at 50

Out of Office

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 42:21


The entrepreneur who shot to fame with the makeover series “What Not To Wear” talks about founding a makeup business, Trinny London, at 50. With her trademark raw honesty that’s won her a loyal tribe of global followers, Trinny Woodall takes us through her professional journey that took her from a less than exciting stint in commodities to building a beauty empire. She talks about creating stackable makeup, why she isn’t interested in creating a perfect face, and explains why she’s never felt more comfortable in her own skin than she does in her 50s.

Out of Office
Trinny Woodall: On Business, Beauty and Reinventing Herself at 50

Out of Office

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 42:21


The entrepreneur who shot to fame with the makeover series “What Not To Wear” talks about founding a makeup business, Trinny London, at 50. With her trademark raw honesty that’s won her a loyal tribe of global followers, Trinny Woodall takes us through her professional journey that took her from a less than exciting stint in commodities to building a beauty empire. She talks about creating stackable makeup, why she isn’t interested in creating a perfect face, and explains why she’s never felt more comfortable in her own skin than she does in her 50s.

Out of Office
Trinny Woodall: On Business, Beauty and Reinventing Herself at 50

Out of Office

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 42:21


The entrepreneur who shot to fame with the makeover series “What Not To Wear” talks about founding a makeup business, Trinny London, at 50. With her trademark raw honesty that’s won her a loyal tribe of global followers, Trinny Woodall takes us through her professional journey that took her from a less than exciting stint in commodities to building a beauty empire. She talks about creating stackable makeup, why she isn’t interested in creating a perfect face, and explains why she’s never felt more comfortable in her own skin than she does in her 50s.

Out of Office
Trinny Woodall: On Business, Beauty and Reinventing Herself at 50

Out of Office

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 42:21


The entrepreneur who shot to fame with the makeover series “What Not To Wear” talks about founding a makeup business, Trinny London, at 50. With her trademark raw honesty that’s won her a loyal tribe of global followers, Trinny Woodall takes us through her professional journey that took her from a less than exciting stint in commodities to building a beauty empire. She talks about creating stackable makeup, why she isn’t interested in creating a perfect face, and explains why she’s never felt more comfortable in her own skin than she does in her 50s.

You Beauty
'Skincare Infused Makeup Is Like Lounge Wear For Your Face'

You Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2021 10:25


Welcome to You Beauty Daily. Over the next 20 days, we're going to be bringing you a daily dose of You Beauty. And today, Kelly and Leigh try a trend... Leigh is demanding more from her makeup than just coverage and colour... And she thinks we should all be doing the same!  Thankfully we're set to see more skincare infused makeup than ever this year with all the big brands jumping on the bandwagon.  Kelly and Leigh are here to help you decide which one is right for you.  The list of products mentioned in this episode are below... IT Cosmetics CC Cream $63 https://bit.ly/3cHiqml Thin Lizzy https://bit.ly/3oIKyYu Nude By Nature https://bit.ly/3auBnFP Tarte Babassu Foundcealer Multi-Tasking Foundation $60 https://bit.ly/3pL07A3 L'Oréal Paris True Match Liquid Foundation $14.97 https://bit.ly/3tnxDig Trinny London BFF De-stress tinted serum $75 https://bit.ly/3j94m6c Trinny London BFF Cream skin perfector $65 https://bit.ly/3pIsPBT Trinny London BFF Eye serum concealer $48 https://bit.ly/3axqlQa Morphe Hint Hint Skin Tint $26 https://bit.ly/3asoJr9 Cover FX Pressed Mineral Foundation $38 https://bit.ly/3tkA7hl REVLON Photoready Candid™ Concealer $19.95 https://bit.ly/2MSMOio Perricone MD No Foundation Foundation Serum $96 https://bit.ly/3jdV1K9 IT Cosmetics Bye Bye Breakout Treatment Concealer Oxygenetix Foundation $95 https://bit.ly/2YHI0z2 Elizabeth Arden Flawless Finish Skincaring Foundation $56 https://bit.ly/3j9ADKq Clinique Even Better Clinical™ Serum Foundation $55 https://bit.ly/3cBMPlW   CREDITS Hosts: Leigh Campbell and Kelly McCarren Producer: Lize Ratliff & Gia Moylan GET IN TOUCH: Got a beauty question you want answered?  Email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au or call the podphone on 02 8999 9386.  Join our You Beauty Facebook Group here...  https://www.facebook.com/groups/2112109512358240/ Want this and other podcasts delivered straight to your inbox?  Subscribe to our podcast newsletter...  https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribe/ You Beauty is a podcast by Mamamia. Find more shows here .... https://www.mamamia.com.au/podcast/ Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fat Mascara
Ep. 271: Trinny Woodall on Evolving Your Look

Fat Mascara

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 48:59


Style expert Trinny Woodall is a master of transformations—and her life is no exception. In this interview (which she recorded in her closet!), she talks about starting her beauty business, Trinny London; how to approach change so it’s less scary; and what she’s learned about beauty from years of hosting What Not To Wear. -- Want more of our beauty podcast? Episode Recaps & Notes: fatmascara.com/blog; Our Private Facebook Group: Fat Mascara / Raising a Wand; Instagram: @fatmascara, @jessicamatlin, @jenn_edit; Twitter: @fatmascara; Email: info@fatmascara.com; To Leave a Voicemail & Be Featured on a Future Episode: 646-481-8182. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Small Business Snippets
Trinny Woodall: 'I was doing this fast – very weird thing. But my brain became clear'

Small Business Snippets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2020 23:19


In this episode I talk to Trinny Woodall, TV presenter, author and founder of makeup brand, Trinny London. We discuss influencer marketing and augmented reality within the beauty industry.   You can also visit smallbusiness.co.uk for more on SEIS and the importance of communities. Remember to like us on Facebook @SmallBusinessExperts and follow us on Twitter @smallbusinessuk, all lower case. Would you prefer to read Trinny Woodall's podcast interview instead? Hello and welcome to Small Business Snippets, the podcast from SmallBusiness.co.uk. I’m your host, Anna Jordan. Today we have Trinny Woodall, fashion and beauty guru, TV presenter, author, entrepreneur and new entrant in the Telegraph’s Top 100 Tech Entrepreneurs 2020. Formerly one half of Trinny and Susannah earlier in the 2000s, she now runs Trinny London, an online make-up company providing personalised stackable products. It includes the Match2Me service which matches Trinny London make-up to a person’s skin tone, hair and eye colour. The business is worth £46m. We’ll be looking at influencer marketing and the changing habits of beauty consumers.     Anna: Hello Trinny. Trinny: Hello, Anna. How are you? Anna: Yeah, I'm doing all right. Thank you. How are you? Trinny: Very well, thank you. Anna: Great. First, I’d like to talk about your business background. Trinny London is pretty on the pulse when it comes to emerging business trends – personalisation, building social media communities, the founder being an extension of the brand. Of course, you will have a team behind you, but it looks like there is some knowhow there already. Is this your first foray into business particularly in the pre-Trinny-and-Susannah days? Trinny: Even pre-Trinny-and-Susannah days, I had gone into finance. So, I started my career in commodities, selling commodity funds, which I detested. I would go down from Earls Court to Tower Hill and I would have the FT on the outside and inside, I'd be reading the Daily Mail. But there was an obligation in my mind, because my dad was a good businessman, an entrepreneur. I was the youngest of six kids and I think I didn't feel smart enough for university. I started as a secretary in a physical trading house. I was surrounded by business conversations at the dining room table because my father, brother and brother-in-law were involved in the same business. And then, when I was doing my foray into the City, I realised how much I disliked it and I wanted to do something else. But there was a part of me that wanted to have a business. I think I always had that from a very young age. I fell into television and before I even did TV, Susannah and I had a column and the internet started emerging as a as a platform that econ was just starting in ‘98. I really thought it was so interesting that you could do some form of personalisation online. And with all the traction we had with our followers on Trinny London, I remember I spent a weekend and I was doing a fast, I had very bad skin, so I was doing this fast, very weird thing. But my brain became very clear. I thought, ‘What can one do that could bring together what the internet's beginning to offer and refine choice?’ I think the idea of refinement of choice was a really big one for me. And that came about in Ready 2, which was something that we started in 1998. By 2001, it had closed. The idea for it was a portal for women with fashion and clothing and beauty. We just couldn't get to the profitability, because there wasn't enough traction online of being able to do a transaction so you could take a commission, so it didn't happen, but I loved it. Susannah didn't love it, because for her, she loves more the creative side of things. We then did television and spent ten years doing TV shows around the world. And during that time, we had an agent. I also was more of the kind of driver of the business side of what we would do next. I’ve got lots of beeps by the way going in this podcast because as much as I love tech, I cannot for the life of me get my notifications to turn off on this laptop. I will apologise for the beeps. I'm trying to get Slack to quieten down, but it's not going to happen. So, there was that moment, after about 10-15 years working with Susannah where we both felt a fatigue with what we were doing. I think I will never stop loving the concept of making over a woman. And by that I don't mean make somebody who looks bad look good, but just moving their sense of how they see themselves. Then I had this idea for Trinny London at the back of my mind, and I didn't realise until I look back at certain things, and people remind me how early on I had that idea. And in those last few years of making over women in every different country, I would be in Poland using Inglot makeup, and then I'd be in Israel using MAC and then somewhere else, I noticed the team of makeup girls would always do the same look on everyone and I felt that I kept saying to them, ‘Look, they have all have a different skin, hair, and you must look at colour palettes and look at how you can put them differently on women.’ And I felt that was something that really didn't exist, that level of personalisation. And I also felt that it's something that really didn't happen in store. I thought, okay, it's going to be online. And by the time I made that decision, I'd started developing with an SEIS scheme, I'd gone and I thought, ‘How can I raise some money?’ I was really coming to the end of my royalties from the different shows I'd done. Probably I was the most broke I had been in 15 years. But sometimes that's when you got to do stuff. With the SEIS scheme, you can raise up to £150,000 and it's 50 per cent tax back. Two people who were kind of committed to me as a businesswoman, they knew I had a good work ethic, a friend of mine’s mother and well, one of my daughter's friends. The mother who I didn't know that well, but was in beauty. She runs beauty at Mintel research, and my daughter's Godfather, both believed in my work ethic. So I asked them, and they put in £150,000 between them. I then had the opportunity to explore. I think if you look at all different entrepreneurs, they either start tiny, and every time they get a tiny bit of revenue, they invest in something else. And I think the younger you are, the easier that is to do. But I was 50 when I started this, so I knew I needed to really accelerate to get that proposition out there. I raised that money – probably the most expensive money I raised in terms of the percentage of revenue I gave away, the percentage of the value of the business I gave away for that. But I wouldn't have got it got off the ground. And one thing I've learned in life is you must never ever regret any decision you make. I got to that point and I think then I knew from what I'd learnt in the past with Ready 2 is I had felt an inexperienced businesswoman so I had hired what I deemed to be really experienced people in their field. The CMO I paid at that time £100,000 to because I'd raised £7m for Ready 2. I hired a CEO who came from Barclays, because I thought she'd be a good – CFO, CEO background – and a lot of other women who were in quite high-powered tech. There was a huge amount going out in salaries and a really high burn rate per month.   I knew that with that £150,000 I've got to do a really good business plan, I've got to show a prototype, I've got to show where I'm going to get it made, I've got to show how I'm going to make the money. And I was building up a little social media following. I'd started on it – I realised I just wanted to do video because I come from television. And it was gaining traction. By this stage, I had a very nice guy called Mark who became my COO, and he had a CFO background. When we were doing those spreadsheets, which any small business, you spend days doing those projections, months doing those projections. People can do crazy projections. And I kind of knew, I wanted projections that, when I went into an investor meeting, I could say, ‘This is really why I believe I'll get to that revenue in 2020,2021 and 2022.’ We did it as a percentage of a conversion of my social media following. And as that social media following grew, we felt that between two and two and a half per cent of those people would buy from the brand. And now, three years later, the valuations are actually probably double what you said, because we've had huge growth in the last six months. But it's been based on that, there hasn't been a huge amount that's changed. I hired that middle management, that C-suite, a year and a half into the business. I hired a CMO. I hired a strategic CTO, I have a very nice CTO who started with us early, but he was more he's now head of development. And I hired an MPD. And I was at the stage where I got enough revenue in and I thought I can sustain those salaries. Because otherwise all you're doing is earning money to pay the salaries, and I wanted to earn the money for growth. Absolutely. As you there are a few different things in there that I'd like to pick up on. First of all, women investors, especially when they're pitching, they have a harder time because they’re often all-male panels or a majority male panels. What kind of unique challenges did you face, being a woman but also being a woman in her 50s? Trinny: I think the challenges I face were those two plus somebody who was known, but known in a different industry. That might have got me the meeting, but it was oddly prejudicing in other ways. People put you in a box. And we think in the press, they make assumptions. They don't know what you're like as a businesswoman, they've just seen you on television, which might seem to investors a light-hearted industry. There's a sort of double importance to make them appreciate and understand that you will know how to run a business and get the right people at the right time to support you in running that business. I probably went to see 22 VCs before I had somebody say. ‘Actually, I get it.’ I always thought I want to be more than a makeup brand owner. I want this to be a community for women to feel good. It was about having every age represented, every skin tone represented, every type of woman could feel that she could identify with what we were offering. So convincing investors of that, instead of our target market is 18 to 34. Because many investors said to me, ‘Love it, but can you just skew the whole thing and do it for the Millennials?’ And I was like, ‘No, to me, the gap in the market is 35 to 55.’ It's for everyone, but this is a huge gap. So I want to definitely have over 50 per cent of my customers from 30 to 60. So I just felt that there was this real untapped market in a very, very crowded area. Yeah. And you've got to stick to that vision I think if I look at the difference between what Trinny London represents and what Trinny Woodall represents, they're not all the same customer, but a lot of people from Trinny will convert to become a Trinny London customer. And there's a lot of people on Trinny London who don't even follow me, so I love that.   We have these Trinny tribes that have stopped around the world and about 70,000 women around the world who are part of our Facebook tribe, which is in their area. And that, to me, is that other part of the business when I say that Trinny London isn't just a makeup brand. I think that the word ‘community’ has been very overused in brand building, because it might have been started by some men in dark suits in a room of a very commercial business. I think community has to start organically. And then you have to feel how can you harness what is in fact, a sort of fan base, a passion? People are the most passionate about your brand, how can you harness them? It's not going to become a multi-level marketing business. That's not what we are. But how can we make them feel good about the fact that they, for free, love to chat about Trinny London?    Yeah, you were saying as well, one of the problems you had earlier on was of personalisation and reaching enough women and even on What Not to Wear, in a series you can only do maybe six people at a time. Whereas with social media that's completely revolutionised that and you can have a much broader reach now. That has brought about the Trinny Tribes on Facebook. I'd quite like to know, was that part of your plan originally? Or did that come about organically? Trinny: I think that the very original Trinny Tribe were people who follow me on my Instagram. And some of those were like, ‘Are you the person who used to be Trinny of Trinny and Susannah? Yeah, I used to be that person. Now I just do my own thing. And they follow that. There was a woman called Kelly in north west England and she just started a Facebook fan page. And she took a bit of our logo and called it Trinny Tribe and said if there’s anyone else who’d like to know what she's doing at the moment and follow her. This is, as we launched the brand, I mean, literally, maybe a tiny bit before. These people started joining. And then somebody said, ‘Well, I'm in London, I might start a London one.’ And so we saw our logo on Facebook, or a picture of me or a bit of yellow, really random little things that you put on Facebook. And so we thought, ‘Okay, well, what we can't have this very fragmented interpretation of our brand, because it sort of dilutes what we are and, and in a way there is an association there with the word ‘Trinny’. We approached the admins, and we said, ‘Look, we just love what you're doing, would you like to be more connected to us, and we can give you a nice logo for your area and think of ways that we could… you could come in for a drink occasionally and it’d be lovely to meet some of you.’ They were very excited. And so that's in a way how it began. And then we assigned a woman who did a lot of stuff on social media called Paris, to be the contact for those people. We then said, ‘Look, we think admins a horrible word, let's call you ambassadors, or ambassadresses.’ So they love that too. We have some of them in unit for a little brainstorm, what they liked about things and what they'd like more of, just so there was that feeling that they are a part of the growth of what Trinny London represents. Yeah, exactly. I know I can imagine that over COVID the habits of beauty consumers has changed because Trinny London has quite a soft, radiant glow-y type of makeup which people are actually saying is quite good for Zoom calls rather than something that's very heavy that you'd see more on a night out. How would you say that your customer base has changed over COVID? Is it more people who would be going to the makeup counter who are now looking online? Trinny: For sure. And as you were saying there is a certain advantage to having the social media videos because you bring in the people who are less seasoned when it comes to makeup, maybe want to try and explore it a bit. They have tutorials on how to layer different pots. There are a couple of things I would like to talk about before we wrap up. First off, within the beauty industry, we see a lot of influencer marketing but with your Ambassadresses is there as much a need for that? What kind of role does [influencer marketing] play? Trinny: it's interesting, in a way, because I have across Instagram and Facebook, about 2m followers, I am to an extent an influencer. And because Trinny London is my revenue stream and my brand building, I've never done any deal with anyone. I talk about Zara a lot on my own channel, because I think it's the most internationally available. And I talk about what I love. I was very reticent [about influencer marketing]. When we tried very early on, we worked with rewardStyle. And we paid – what for us then – was a fortune to get them to select the people they thought were good influencers, and I found incredibly low conversion. I think our strategy has been far more that when we look at for Facebook advertising, for example. Facebook advertising has changed their algorithms, so that instead you can still designate an audit audience. But they can also say, ‘Okay, we'll take control of that earlier stage.’ And we will find the algorithm of the people who are buying from you already and match it and do their weird magic, which… it's a computer teaching another computer to teach another computer, it's like a dark hole. Any brand that's going down that route, and deciding to do it, and I do think it's a far more successful route for the influencer route and for our brand, is the importance that these shouldn't really always look like ads. And because people are engaged by something that grabs them that they think is something they're going to learn from. So sometimes you and I would look on our feed and would see an ad, it will grab us, because it's a really clean ad, it's like this will clean your teeth better than any other toothbrush. And you're like, ‘Okay,’ but some other things need a story to be told. And sometimes you think you've got 30 seconds to tell that story, or you've got five minutes to tell that story. But some of our most successful ads on Facebook are just actually women saying, ‘I'm trying this’ and they're telling their story. We have a lot of content, we have at any one time about 200 ads running on Facebook. And that is a strategy that was implemented when our CMO joined us, Shira. Because she said, ‘Look, we really want to put in the marketplace a lot.’ And everyone is going to be attracted by a different bit of content. I think there are some good influencers. But generally, an influencer is a business. And we must respect and appreciate that as a business. But I think to be a really successful influencer, you have to have a proportion of your feed being, ‘This is what I really love, and there's no ad or whatever involved.’ And when you see an influencer, where it's basically ad or affiliation, ad or affiliation, that’s it, there's no objective, ‘This is what I really think about the product.’   The other problem we've got as consumers is magazines are drying up and magazines are going online. The concept of the war between advertising and editorial, which used to be quite strict in a magazine, is very blurred online. Because magazines need to make a revenue, and the revenue is they write an article and the user clicks through and they have an affiliation to that product. And that happens whenever I'm on any magazine. That's a revenue stream. We know that if we read an article in a magazine, and these are the top 10 there'll be a click through to all of them and the magazine is making money because that's the only way they can make money. They are an influencer on a grand scale, but they are still getting the cut like the small influencer is getting a cut, so I'm not sure. But to answer your question in a very long-winded way, for our business, the influencer model is not the right model. There are beauty businesses in Germany, there's a young beauty brand called Bananas or something I can't remember, it's quite often young brand, like a Glossier but younger. And their model is a purely influencers. They put all their revenue that I might put into Facebook into 200, 300, 400 key influencers and it's very successful with them. Is that an age thing or an attitude thing? I'm not sure. Anna: I guess knowing your business as well. I mean, it's going to be different. You're going to have different target audiences, you'll find them in different places. So I definitely think that you do what's right for you. Okay, last thing I'd like to talk about is the the future of Trinny London, and where it's going. Match2Me is a huge part of the overall brand. Do you see yourself moving it on a bit? Say, with augmented reality. We were seeing it with L'Oreal, having apps that you can put makeup on your face virtually, things like that. Do you ever see Trinny London going that way? Trinny: I think that's the fundamental difference between what a lot of brands did during COVID is they did virtual trial, because they knew all their customers wanted to try. Virtual try-on to me, to date, is still gamification. The majority of them come with filters. And it's kind of, for some women, it's like, ‘I know, I'm not going to look like that, because they've made my face perfect.’ Is it just a fun way to play? And would it make me buy the lipstick? On some brands, the conversion is great, because it's catering to an audience that already is building and doing filters on Instagram and Snapchat and TikTok and therefore, they love it. And it kind of makes sense. I think Match2Me is unique, because there is no other beauty brand that is actually saying, ‘Let's look at your skin, hair and eye. And let's look at the refinement of choice of colour that suits you.’ I think that can't be replicated. I mean, I haven't seen anyone do it. And I've been working with four or five different augmented reality and virtual trial brands and have come to the conclusion that, in fact, we are going to develop something internally. Because what I see is very set out of the box plug-ins, and I want to do something which is a step ahead of what these people are currently offering. There is a huge, very interesting opportunity for brands to really personalise and personalise to their customers. But I think there's going to be cleverer ways than just what is still a little bit of gamification. Anna: So, something that perhaps isn't on the market yet? Trinny: Not on the market yet. Anna: Well, that sounds like a good place to wrap up. Thank you for coming on the podcast, Trinny. It was great to have you on. Trinny: It was lovely to talk to you.              You can find out more about Trinny London at trinnylondon.com. You can also visit smallbusiness.co.uk for articles on starting a business of your own and building social media communities. Remember to like us on Facebook at SmallBusinessExperts and follow us on Twitter @smallbusinessuk, all lowercase. Until next time, thank you for listening.

Action and Ambition
Trinny Woodall Creates the Disruptive Beauty Brand Trinny London After A Tremendous Career As An Elite Fashion Advisor and New York Bestseller Author

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2020 42:34


Welcome to another episode of Action & Ambition with your host, Phillip Lanos. Trinny Woodall, founder and CEO of the disruptive beauty brand Trinny London has had a successful twenty-year career in the media. She established herself as a fashion advisor, initially as a columnist for The Daily Telegraph, and later as a co-host for What Not to Wear and The Trinny and Susannah makeover shows, filmed across 20 countries. Trinny has spent her career helping people find their most flattering styles, the best skincare, and perfectly matched, foolproof makeup. In 2017, equipped with her unique idea of portable stackable premium makeup, she founded the highly successful beauty brand Trinny London. You’re going to love this episode. Let’s get to it! What can someone do to draft a potential workshop or webpage of what they could be? How do they set themselves apart from the rest? (3:12) For Trinny, it is easy to think back retrospectively and think what the consistent thing that always brought her joy was. Looking back now, she knows that when she was much younger, she went to boarding school.  She stayed at boarding school a lot of the weekends with a few of the other girls, so she had a kind of connection to them, and she loved giving her friends makeovers. She loved the feeling of it.  She lived in Germany at the time, and her boarding school was in France. She would bring back slightly unusual clothing that wasn’t in England then, and she liked doing that. As a child, she found it hard to form friendships, and this was the language she had learned that allowed her to make somebody else think.  Trinny is happy to see training because she had thought a lot about the imposter syndrome where you feel there is an element you don’t believe you are good enough in. She has been through that personally where she did not think she was good enough in terms of addiction and recovery.  She has been through that whole journey. When she was much younger, before starting that war and certainty manifested in partying too much, she did have a sort of joy she felt while giving her friends makeovers.  Trinny is the youngest of six kids. Her father was a banker, and there was a part of her that thought she should be in finance, but she was not smart enough to go to college. She had had a dream of going to Harvard, but her imposter syndrome had kicked in and made her believe she was not good enough to even go to university. And so Trinny became entrepreneurial. She started her first business in high school.  How does Trinny manage her time? (9:15) It did not happen overnight for Trinny. At the very beginning, she went from doing a whole bunch of mixed jobs to burning out. In 2016 she realized what she wanted to do was help women, so by a lucky break, she got a column in a paper similar to the New York Times, and she did that for seven years.  That position gave her access to about 2 million people who choose to read her column, so it was a platform. She found a platform similar to today’s social media following platforms. She built up her audience.  She achieved a fantastic career. She sold 3 million books from the 11 that she wrote, and she even had an interview about one of her books on the Oprah Show, where it went on to become a New York Bestseller.  She had an incredible ten years of significant growth and success. She then scaled out, and she got overheads, and there was no apathy in the market she was in, and lots of people started to pop up who was doing the same thing she was, so she was forced to reinvent herself and expand what she was doing.  Thinking back on the last 15 years and what she had been doing, Trinn y felt a pull towards business. She tried to do online business in 1999, and she raised $7 million in three months from Whitney and Atlanta’s ventures that gave her an early B fund.  She went to the market with the concept, which was partial to women to get personalization, but it was not for a path of profit. There was no way that Trinny could commercialize that. It always went back to the high street or shopping mall, so it felt like it would never work.  Trinny had amassed by that time information on 200,000 women, which was an unbelievable data capture for that time, and she always had a sense of personalization. When Trinny did makeup shows, all the women would notice the makeup first, and Trinny loved makeup, but she had never been a professional makeup artist. She decided to give it a try.  What is next for Trinny? (30:14) Trinny is moving into the American market. At least 10% of their customers are in the US, while 59% are in the UK and about 17% in Australia, and the rest are scattered across the world.  She would like to get her US market up to 25%, so that is her goal that is coming up. They have about seven to eight months to complete it, and they have bought a PR company onboard that thinks differently to help them achieve this goal.  Trinny wants to gently transition into using Facebook ads and other means of advertisement, and she believes there is an art to advertising like this. It needs to capture your audience’s attention while being subtle enough to think it is someone they are already following that caused them to receive the ad.  They have used a lot of subtlety while building the brand, and she states that 52% of it is organic, and 48% of it is paid. It is an essential ratio to distinguish for Trinny. A few years ago, many brands were doing the blitzkrieg method of growth, and they have seen a few of these companies succeed.  Trinny always felt something strange about that way of growth because of its quick, sound development. You suddenly have a massive amount of customers, and you don’t know where else to go. You end up being a one-trick pony, and these companies do not survive because they do not have adaptability in the long run.  Trinny London Trinny London is the ultimately comfortable, modern, do-it-everywhere, premium beauty brand. Cream-based, versatile products are personalized to you. Resources Connect with Trinny: LinkedIn Trinny London: Website Connect with Phil: LinkedIn

Style Natters
'Style Natters' - Episode 3

Style Natters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2020 19:42


Welcome to another 'Style Natters' - thank you for listening...We thought it is worth mentioning that everything we natter about in this podcast are things we love or inspire us, they are not gifted.Here's what we're nattering about in this episode:We are hoping to be more sustainable with our wardrobe and love the idea of breathing new life and restoring our shoes and bags with the help of a service provided by The Restory which provides luxury aftercare for shoes, bags and leather goods: https://the-restory.comWe had a wonderful morning last week at a glorious pop-up curated by Isobel Spearman called the Daily Dress Edit. We headed to much loved Elizabeth Street for an inspiring morning which we have documented on our Style Natters instagram. Head over to see Camilla in a gorgeous O Pioneers dress www.opioneers.co.uk There were so many designers featured including Kemi Telford, And Daughter, Anna Mason, Cabbage & Roses and Seraphina London (amongst others). We are loving Selfridges - 'Project Earth' initiative, lots to thought provoking initiatives in store for sustainability and ethical shopping in mind. Do check out their website for more information including online interviews/events.We are missing attending evening talks in person at the V&A, but we're thrilled to see they are hosting talks online to feel informed and inspired.We are longing to visit the new beauty destination by Harrods, H Beauty in-store at Intu Lakeside, Essex www.harrods.com/en-gb/h-beautyWe chatted about 'Maskne' (that's acne or spots caused by wearing face masks!). We have been taking much more care of our skin recently and using some great new products. Emma is a big fan of Trinny London, https://trinnylondon.com specially BFF cream and Miracle Blur. Camilla loves Charlotte Tilbury www.charlottetilbury.com Magic Cream Moisturiser.If you're looking for a new book, we are longing to settle down and indulge ourselves in Designer Tabitha Webbs new book 'No Regrets'. It has had some brilliant write ups... we can't wait to read it!Camilla is longing to get a new pair of boots and has her eye on a pair from https://ivyleecopenhagen.com And for something more relaxing, she also has her recommendations for somewhere to enjoy a spot of afternoon tea, new new Connaught Patisserie...Thank you so much for listening, and do please DM us on our instagram 'Stylenatters' with any feedback or comments, we'd love to hear from you.Love, Camilla & Emma x

All Bases Covered
Spooky Season

All Bases Covered

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2020 43:54


EPISODE 82./ Love lawn? So do we. Love gardening? Us even more! Strap yourselves in for 3 solid minutes of garden chats at the beginning of this episode. Beauty news will come in time but there are more important things to cover first. It’s a special time of year at the moment, a time for all our inner goths and emos to rejoice as Halloween is right around the corner, and the pumpkin themed spooky holiday palettes have arrived in force. Quickfire new launches this week include: an addition to Trinny London’s makeup line, Sunday Riley newness, Wayne Goss blush palettes, marc jacobs holiday launch, mmmmitchel makeup line, new Melt contour stacks!!, Rina Beauty This week Lisa and Alex trialled the Esmi Skin Minerals Probiotic Mylk. We’re very excited to let you know what we think of this super affordable solution for someone looking to repair their skin barrier, tackle redness and lightly hydrate too. Our non beauty faves include Face masks as we find out that Lisa has a pea-sized head and our beauty faves, cover a foundation that people have been dying for a review on, and Alex’s well-loved mask that Lisa has only just tried!! Products Mentioned:Trinny London BFF De-stress: https://bit.ly/30wzKTW Sunday Riley Fairy God Mother: https://shopstyle.it/l/bm0Zm Sunday Riley Saturn Spot Treatment: https://bit.ly/3la14zb Sunday Riley all over mask: https://shopstyle.it/l/bm0Ti Esmi Minerals Probiotic Skin Mylck: https://bit.ly/2EXzjdO Everlane Face Mask: https://bit.ly/2SlDt2m Country Road Face Mask: https://bit.ly/2Gxnqf5 Hourglass Radiant Bronze Light: https://shopstyle.it/l/bm00u Shisedo Syncro Skin Foundation: https://bit.ly/3irczR1 GO-TO transformazing mask: https://bit.ly/3nbL69T If you enjoyed listening to this week’s episode. Please review us, and head over to @allbasescovered.pod on Instagram so that you can chat with us :) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

That Beauty Podcast
We're Back! With Trinny Woodall! Talking About Her Product That Broke The Internet!

That Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2020 40:12


** Trigger warning: Mention of suicide. If you, or anyone you know needs help, please call Lifeline Australia 13 11 14 ** We're back from our very short break because how could we POSSIBLY chat to Trinny Woodall and not drop the episode as soon as we humanly could? Maybe you know her and love her from the days of Trinny & Susannah or maybe you're part of the Trinny Tribe and have more Trinny London stacks than you can count. Or maybe you don't know Trinny Woodall at all (you, my friend, are missing out) and this is your first introduction. So what's in store for you today? MVPs, obviously, with a side of how to actually use dry shampoo, and we chat to Trinny about the skin gadgets she uses in the morning and why lymphatic drainage is so damn good for you, how COVID has affected her business, all the glorious ways stress actually affects your skin, and, of course, the product that crashed the Trinny London website, had a 10.5k waitlist on launch date, and kept Trinny up til 3am chatting to her community to deal with it - BFF Destress Tinted Serum. Also, Trinny's life advice is not-to-be-missed. Hit play, write us a lovely little review, then come on back here for all the products we and Trinny mentioned in the ep. MVPs of the week Bettina - Klorane Detox Scalp Dry Shampoo with Aquatic Mint: https://bit.ly/3462moe (And Carli's Holy Grail Batiste: https://bit.ly/3kWWaWh) Carli - Ultracetuical Ultra Retexturising Body Complex: https://bit.ly/338So6e The Jocelyn Petroni Anti-Ageing Manicure: https://bit.ly/2S4yLWu (And PS, the technical name for chicken skin is Keratosis pilaris) Trinny Woodall's morning facial tools The NEWA skin tightening device: https://bit.ly/3kTG6EM (+ her cheap Amazon Aloe Vera: https://amzn.to/3jdMx50) The Light Salon Boost LED Face Mask: https://bit.ly/3icqY3B The LightStim: https://bit.ly/3n0dYSb The Internet-breaking Trinny London product BFF Destress Tinted Serum: https://bit.ly/33bt27R Follow Trinny! Trinny Woodall: https://www.instagram.com/trinnywoodall Trinny London: https://www.instagram.com/trinnylondon Credits: Your hosts: Carli Alman & Bettina Tyrrell. (Follow us! @carlialman & @bettinatyrrell). Special thanks to our guest, Trinny Woodall. Produced by: Bettina Tyrrell. Ask a beauty question, tempt yourself with some new products, and come join the fun at That Beauty Podcast Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/260952718436828/ And follow @thatbeautypodcast: https://www.instagram.com/thatbeautypodcast/ Don't forget to subscribe, and if you've loved what you heard please swing as a rating and review (we love 5 stars and many compliments!)

Lady Startup
BONUS: Trinny Woodall Knows What's Marketing Bull**** And What Works

Lady Startup

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2020 28:11


Know Your Customer. Know what problem your business is solving. Don’t be a bottleneck in your business. These wise words come from the one and only Trinny Woodall, founder and CEO of international makeup brand, Trinny London. Trinny has seen plenty of challenges in both life and business. Her ex-husband took his own life, plunging her into grief and a financial mess, right when she was trying to start her business. But now, with investors, 85 staff and hundreds of thousands of adoring fans, followers and customers, how has business changed during the time of COVID-19?  In this episode, Trinny joins Mia Freedman to talk about how you keep your staff calm, inspired and motivated in the face of a global recession.  This episode was brought to you by the MYOB & Smiling Mind Small Business Program. Partnering to make mental health everyone’s business. You can listen to previous No Filter interviews with Trinny HERE and HERE. And you can shop Trinny London HERE. CREDITS: Host: Mia Freedman You can find Mia on Instagram HERE and get her free weekly newsletter HERE.  Guest: Trinny Woodall Producers: Leah Porges and Samantha McDonald TechnicalProducer: Lem Zakharia JOIN THE LADY STARTUP COMMUNITY: Are you busting to start your own business but you don’t know where to start? Get info about The Lady Startup Activation Plan here... https://www.ladystartup.com/pages/waitlist/ Want insider tips and tricks for your business direct from Mia Freedman each week? Get the free Lady Startup newsletter here... https://www.ladystartup.com.au/ Want to help lift other women higher and maybe get a boost for your biz? Follow us on Instagram… https://www.instagram.com/ladystartups/ Looking for a community of kickass Lady Startups (and other women who want to start businesses)? We have a free one for you right here... https://www.facebook.com/ladystartups/ Need more lols, info and inspo in your ears? Find more Mamamia podcasts here... https://www.mamamia.com.au/podcasts/ Feedback? We’re listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au

No FILTER
How Are You Doing? A Check In With Trinny Woodall

No FILTER

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2020 18:02


Today, I’m Skyping with Trinny Woodall: TV host, author, fashion and makeover expert, founder of beauty company Trinny London.  Trinny is isolating in her London home with her family, including her teenaged daughter Lyla and her partner, 76 year old advertising executive Charles Saatchi. Her mother, in a care home, has been diagnosed with COVID19 and is a super-carrier.  I asked her about that, and how she's going running her business from home.  You can listen to Trinny on No Filter HERE.  And you can have a great time on her IGTV HERE.  And if you’re suffering from anxiety and need some support, check out our online anxiety course with psychologist Amanda Gordon here. Credits: Host: Mia Freedman . You can find Mia on Instagram here and get her free weekly newsletter here.  Guest: Trinny Woodall  Producer: Luca Lavigne  Executive Producer: Melanie Tait See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NO FILTER
How Are You Doing? A Check In With Trinny Woodall

NO FILTER

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2020 18:02


Today, I’m Skyping with Trinny Woodall: TV host, author, fashion and makeover expert, founder of beauty company Trinny London.  Trinny is isolating in her London home with her family, including her teenaged daughter Lyla and her partner, 76 year old advertising executive Charles Saatchi. Her mother, in a care home, has been diagnosed with COVID19 and is a super-carrier.  I asked her about that, and how she's going running her business from home.  You can listen to Trinny on No Filter HERE.  And you can have a great time on her IGTV HERE.  And if you’re suffering from anxiety and need some support, check out our online anxiety course with psychologist Amanda Gordon here. Credits: Host: Mia Freedman . You can find Mia on Instagram here and get her free weekly newsletter here.  Guest: Trinny Woodall  Producer: Luca Lavigne  Executive Producer: Melanie Tait See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

No Filter
How Are You Doing? A Check In With Trinny Woodall

No Filter

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2020 18:02


Today, I’m Skyping with Trinny Woodall: TV host, author, fashion and makeover expert, founder of beauty company Trinny London.  Trinny is isolating in her London home with her family, including her teenaged daughter Lyla and her partner, 76 year old advertising executive Charles Saatchi. Her mother, in a care home, has been diagnosed with COVID19 and is a super-carrier.  I asked her about that, and how she's going running her business from home.  You can listen to Trinny on No Filter HERE.  And you can have a great time on her IGTV HERE.  And if you’re suffering from anxiety and need some support, check out our online anxiety course with psychologist Amanda Gordon here. Credits: Host: Mia Freedman . You can find Mia on Instagram here and get her free weekly newsletter here.  Guest: Trinny Woodall  Producer: Luca Lavigne  Executive Producer: Melanie Tait See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beauty Full Lives
Trinny Woodall

Beauty Full Lives

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2020 48:21


Author, presenter, and founder of TRINNY LONDON joins me in this episode to talk about everything from growing up with acne while her older sister breezed through adolescence with spot-free skin, learning to loathe fake tan, managing an addiction to sugar, handling her mental health during challenges like IVF, tackling money issues, and the thrill of not knowing 'what's behind the closed door.'‘Your make-up can age you, and define the decade in which you felt your most beautiful. Taking away that protective thing is the hardest thing to do, but once you say “look, you can make yourself ageless by giving yourself a glowing skin, giving yourself that energy from within. Begin that process of exfoliation if you never do it, consider an acid, look at a retinol, protect your face from the sun, wear a white trainer with everything - you will look ageless suddenly, and then you will not be judged by decades in which you felt your happiest. Make this the happiest decade.’Products, and places, mentioned:Eve Lom CleanserNo 7 LipstickClinique 3 Step skincare routineErno LaszloShannon at Nicola Clarke's branch of John FriedaEvolve Gel Balm Cleanser Santa Maria Novella Pot PourriForeo LunaBiologique Recherche P50Julia Hunter Maximal Strength Night RegenerationAmeliorate Body LotionFaceGym ProNuFACE Microcurrent Facial Toning DeviceHeliocare SPFAllies of Skin Vitamin C 35%Colbert, Sloane SquareScott's, MayfairThe Wolseley, Picadilly Beauty Full Lives is hosted by Madeleine Spencer, produced by Charlie Jones, and with artwork by Sung Lee. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

My Wardrobe Malfunction with Susannah Constantine
S1 Ep5: Trinny Woodall and her pink suit farce

My Wardrobe Malfunction with Susannah Constantine

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2020 39:08


Find Trinny on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and on Trinny London’s website.Thanks to our stupendous house band ‘duo’. Find them on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and on their website.And, of course, huge thanks to you for listening! If you like the episode, please give us a five-star rating and review.Finally, we’d love to hear about YOUR wardrobe malfunctions. Please email us at help@mywardmal.com. And you can also follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and on our website. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

My Wardrobe Malfunction with Susannah Constantine
S1 Ep5: Trinny Woodall and her pink suit farce

My Wardrobe Malfunction with Susannah Constantine

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2020 39:08


Find Trinny on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and on Trinny London’s website.Thanks to our stupendous house band ‘duo’. Find them on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and on their website.And, of course, huge thanks to you for listening! If you like the episode, please give us a five-star rating and review.Finally, we’d love to hear about YOUR wardrobe malfunctions. Please email us at help@mywardmal.com. And you can also follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and on our website. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Emma Guns Show
Trinny Woodall Returns | When do you know you've reached success?

The Emma Guns Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2020 62:50


Trinny Woodall is an entrepreneur, writer, presenter, business owner and mother who returns to the podcast to tell me how her beauty brand, Trinny London, has grown and developed since her last visit to the podcast - Trinny Woodall | Stacks, Authenticity and Burnout.We also discuss spirituality, bringing back the phone call, being honest, excesses, failure, entrepreneurship, mental health and much more...Click here for the Trinny London Match2Me service.The book I mention that has changed my relationship with food is Brain over Binge by Kathryn Hansen.To join the closed Facebook group for the podcast click here >> The Emma Guns Show Forum.To follow me on social media >> Twitter | Instagram. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Glow Journal
Trinny Woodall | Founder of Trinny London

Glow Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2019 56:44


In episode thirty one of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts sits down with Trinny Woodall, founder of Trinny London. Whether you’re familiar with Trinny Woodall’s work as a fashion columnist, host of one of television’s many iterations of Trinny and Susannah or as the founder of beauty brand Trinny London, there’s one constant- Trinny genuinely wants to make women feel amazing. Trinny’s media career began in 1994 after she was introduced to the woman who would become her best friend and collaborator, Susanna Constantine. The pair began writing their Daily Telegraph column, Ready To Wear, soon thereafter, with the column growing to become a business, a book and, in 2001, a TV show- BBC’s What Not To Wear. Trinny and Susannah’s mission was simple- to make woman feel their best. Trinny describes the feeling of making women feel good about themselves as her “food,” telling me that “A woman should always feel utterly present and recognised.” It was that mission that saw Trinny develop and launch Trinny London in 2017. In the same way that she worked to make fashion less intimidating to women around the world, Trinny now works to ensure that women understand that beauty is, quite literally, for everyone. In this conversation, Trinny shares why she finds fashion shows deeply unsatisfying, the link between fashion, beauty and confidence, and how women can and should find the courage to put their big ideas out on the table. You can read this interview now at: glowjournal.com/interview-trinny-woodallFollow Trinny Woodall on Instagram @trinnywoodallFollow Trinny London on Instagram @trinnylondonStay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at hello@gemkwatts.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

You Beauty
Trinny Woodall Practically Bathes In Serums

You Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2019 24:29


Many of us know Trinny Woodall from Trinny and Susannah’s iconic British makeover TV show ‘What Not To Wear’. But in 2019, the media personality, TV star, author and entrepreneur is all about beauty.  With her trademark ‘no bullsh*t’ attitude and real talk approach to dishing out advice, Trinny is changing the way women are getting ready with her cosmetics line TRINNY LONDON. In this episode of You Beauty, Amy chats to Trinny about how she’s seen fashion and beauty evolve over the last three decades, and if anything has changed about being in the business of making women feel good. Plus, Trinny shares her skincare extensive (and expensive) skincare routine and her philosophy on beauty. And in our Spendy Savey section, she gives us the Vitamin C serum she thinks is just as good as the $200 SkinCeuticals one everyone raves about. The list of products mentioned in this episode are below;  GOLDFADEN MD Doctor’s Scrub Advanced, $150. https://www.mecca.com.au/goldfaden-md/doctors-scrub-advanced/I-021947.html? SkinCeuticals by C E Ferulic, $200. https://www.adorebeauty.com.au/skinceuticals/skinceuticals-c-e-ferulic-serum.html Timeless Skin Care 20% Vitamin C + E Ferulic Acid Serum, $81.94. https://www.fishpond.com.au/Beauty/TIMELESS-SKIN-CARE-20-VITAMIN-C-E-FERULIC-ACID-SERUM-30ML/9999093369016? Jan Marini C-Esta Serum, $148. https://shop.janmariniaustralia.com.au/c-esta-serum-30ml/ Allies of Skin Vitamin C 35% Collagen Rebuilding Serum, $196. https://mamamia.com.au/trinny-woodall-skincare-routine/ Julia T. Hunter MD Maximal Strength Vitamin A Plus Serum, $217 (US$149). https://www.juliathuntermd.com/product/maximal-strength-vitamin-a-plus-serum/ Nannette de Gaspe Art of Noir - Baume Noir Face, $491.70. https://www.net-a-porter.com/au/en/product/1102720/Nannette_de_Gaspe/art-of-noir-baume-noir-face-50ml- Vinter's Daughter Active Botanical Serum, $269.95. https://thelaborganics.com.au/product/active-botanical-serum/ DCL C Scape High Potency Night Booster 30, $202 (£108). https://www.cultbeauty.co.uk/dcl-c-scape-high-potency-night-booster-30.html Julia T. Hunter MD Maximal Strength Night Regeneration, $239 (US$164). https://www.juliathuntermd.com/product/maximal-strength-night-regeneration/ Neostrata Corporal Heliocare Airgel 360 SPF50, $42.55. https://au.carethy.net/cosmetics/neostrata/p-79116 Trinny London BFF Cream Skin Perfector SPF 30, $65. https://trinnylondon.com/au/products/bff-cream?variant=lightest Trinny London Just A Touch Foundation/Concealer, $50. https://trinnylondon.com/au/products/just-a-touch?variant=zandy Trinny London BFF Eye Serum Concealer, $48. https://trinnylondon.com/au/products/bff-eye?variant=victoria NARS Climax Mascara, $37. https://www.mecca.com.au/nars/climax-mascara/V-033434.html Trinny London Lip Love Metallic Lip in Sacha, $45. https://trinnylondon.com/au/products/lip-love?variant=sacha Trinny London Lip Treat, $36. https://trinnylondon.com/au/products/lip-treat Julia T. Hunter MD Maximal Strength Whole Body Renew, $141 (US$97). https://www.juliathuntermd.com/product/whole-body-renew/ Dyson Airwrap, $799. https://shop.dyson.com.au/dyson-airwrap-styler-310729-01 Wella SP System Professional Styling Resolute Lift, $38.50. https://www.ozhairandbeauty.com/products/wella-sp-system-professional-resolute-lift-250ml? Rita Hazan Root Concealer Touch Up Stick, $35. https://www.sephora.com.au/products/rita-hazan-root-concealer-touch-up-stick-for-temporary-gray-coverage/v/light-brown? CREDITS Hosts:Amy Clark  With thanks to: Trinny Woodall Producer:Lem Zakharia GET IN TOUCH: You Beauty is a podcast by Mamamia. Find more shows here .... https://www.mamamia.com.au/podcast/ Got a beauty question you want answered?  Email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au or call the podphone on 02 8999 9386.  Join our You Beauty Facebook Group here...  https://www.facebook.com/groups/2112109512358240/ Want this and other podcasts delivered straight to your inbox?  Subscribe to our podcast newsletter...  https://www.mamamia.com.au/subscribe/

No FILTER
There's A Lot You Don't Know About Trinny Woodall

No FILTER

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2019 45:56


This episode contains a discussion of suicide.  If this brings up any issues for you please call Lifeline on 13 11 14. Trinny Woodall spent the early 2000s giving women makeovers with her partner in fashion crime, Susannah.  Their books and TV series, What Not to Wear, were iconic in the 2000s.  Now Trinny has a makeup company called Trinny London, which she launched at the age of 53 after her show was cancelled and her income dried up overnight. Trinny has had had a lot of ups and downs in her life. She tried for a long time to get pregnant before finally having her daughter Lyla when she was 40.  Then after 10 years of marriage, Trinny divorced Lilly's father Johnny in 2008. But they remained good friends until tragically, Johnny, who battled with addiction and other issues, took his own life. So how did she get through that?  And what does it look like when you have to rebuild yourself and your brand when you're already famous and in your 50s? Click here to subscribe to No Filter. CREDITS: Host: Mia Freedman  With thanks to special guest Trinny Woodall. Producer: Rachael Hart  GET IN TOUCH: Call the PodPhone on 02 8999 9386. Email the show at podcast@mamamia.com.au Find any book mentioned at apple.co/mamamia No Filter is a podcast by Mamamia. Find more shows here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NO FILTER
There's A Lot You Don't Know About Trinny Woodall

NO FILTER

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2019 45:56


This episode contains a discussion of suicide.  If this brings up any issues for you please call Lifeline on 13 11 14. Trinny Woodall spent the early 2000s giving women makeovers with her partner in fashion crime, Susannah.  Their books and TV series, What Not to Wear, were iconic in the 2000s.  Now Trinny has a makeup company called Trinny London, which she launched at the age of 53 after her show was cancelled and her income dried up overnight. Trinny has had had a lot of ups and downs in her life. She tried for a long time to get pregnant before finally having her daughter Lyla when she was 40.  Then after 10 years of marriage, Trinny divorced Lilly's father Johnny in 2008. But they remained good friends until tragically, Johnny, who battled with addiction and other issues, took his own life. So how did she get through that?  And what does it look like when you have to rebuild yourself and your brand when you're already famous and in your 50s? Click here to subscribe to No Filter. CREDITS: Host: Mia Freedman  With thanks to special guest Trinny Woodall. Producer: Rachael Hart  GET IN TOUCH: Call the PodPhone on 02 8999 9386. Email the show at podcast@mamamia.com.au Find any book mentioned at apple.co/mamamia No Filter is a podcast by Mamamia. Find more shows here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

No Filter
There's A Lot You Don't Know About Trinny Woodall

No Filter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2019 45:56


This episode contains a discussion of suicide.  If this brings up any issues for you please call Lifeline on 13 11 14. Trinny Woodall spent the early 2000s giving women makeovers with her partner in fashion crime, Susannah.  Their books and TV series, What Not to Wear, were iconic in the 2000s.  Now Trinny has a makeup company called Trinny London, which she launched at the age of 53 after her show was cancelled and her income dried up overnight. Trinny has had had a lot of ups and downs in her life. She tried for a long time to get pregnant before finally having her daughter Lyla when she was 40.  Then after 10 years of marriage, Trinny divorced Lilly's father Johnny in 2008. But they remained good friends until tragically, Johnny, who battled with addiction and other issues, took his own life. So how did she get through that?  And what does it look like when you have to rebuild yourself and your brand when you're already famous and in your 50s? Click here to subscribe to No Filter. CREDITS: Host: Mia Freedman  With thanks to special guest Trinny Woodall. Producer: Rachael Hart  GET IN TOUCH: Call the PodPhone on 02 8999 9386. Email the show at podcast@mamamia.com.au Find any book mentioned at apple.co/mamamia No Filter is a podcast by Mamamia. Find more shows here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

GET LIPPY
Trinny Woodall Has One Message For Women

GET LIPPY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2019 31:36


Yes, we know. It's confusing. We're always in your ears on a Monday but today we're dropping a special episode because we've got Trinny Woodall of What Not To Wear fame in the house. Trinny is an author, stylist and businesswoman who has just launched her line of makeup Trinny London in Australia, and she sits down with Sally and Bettina to chat all things beauty. From the product she puts on her face that makes her smell like a farm animal - her words, not ours - to why she wears a sheet mask on the back of a motorbike, and the real reason she created her makeup line. If you're a Trinny fan, this episode is not to be missed. See the full range of the Trinny London products here: https://trinnylondon.com/ukFor more beauty bits from Carli and Bettina, follow That Beauty Podcast (launching soon!):@thatbeautypodcastYour hosts:Sally Hunwick, Beauty Director marie claire (@sallyhunwick)Bettina Tyrrell, Beauty Editor, InStyle (@bettinatyrrell)Executive Producer: Elissa RatliffTo get in touch, email us at getlippy@beautycrew.com.au or join our Get Lippy Facebook group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/381222152715449/ )(or DM us directly). Don't forget to rate, review and subscribe! And make sure to share this episode with your friends. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Keeping it real by Caroline & Sophie
A force of nature meet Trinny

Keeping it real by Caroline & Sophie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2019 54:10


We were delighted to be joined this week by founder and CEO of Trinny London, mummy and fashion guru meet the lovely Trinny. A total inspiration and unstoppable force of nature. We loved hearing how it all started from the early days on TV to love, being a mummy and launching her fabulous makeup brand, thank you Trinny for sharing so honestly and openly with us we absolutely loved having you. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Thinkergirls Pod Channel
Summer Sessions: Trinny Woodall on Aussie Style, Designing a makeup range and choosing not to regret

The Thinkergirls Pod Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2019 38:00


Welcome to our 2018 Summer Sessions! We’re going back and bringing you our fave eps from this year to get you through the summer.Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from Team Thinkergirl! This Episode… Trinny Woodall on Aussie Style, Designing a makeup range and choosing not to regret6:54 - Being in a partnership, over time you become the Yin and the Yang.9:22 - What is Trinny Time and why does she love it so much?13:27 - Trinny has so much self-confidence. How did she get to that point in her life?15:56 - How did Trinny’s makeup OCD give birth to Trinny London?19:33 - The best ideas come from things that you need.19:46 - Match 2 Me – how does it work?!23:42 - Trinny doesn’t like to regret, so she tries not to look back.27:28 - The evolution of Trinny’s career is mind boggling.31:56 - Trinny defines Aussie women’s style.35:04 - How can women give each other confidence?The Thinkergirls: Bra Fitting. Watch HEREEP 121: Rae Morris On Learning Through Fear, The Highs Of Her Career And What Editorial Really Means. Listen HERETrinny London – Match 2 MeMore from The Thinkergirls:Email us – hello@thinkergirl.com.auFacebook – https://www.facebook.com/thinkergirlsInstagram – https://instagram.com/thethinkergirlsAll Podcasts – http://bit.ly/2wviSir See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Thinkergirls Pod Channel
EP 132: Trinny Woodall on Aussie Style, Designing a makeup range and choosing not to regret

The Thinkergirls Pod Channel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2018 36:45


On EP 132 of The Thinkergirls Pod Channel, Stacey June and Kristie Mercer creators of some of the most successful female podcasts and content in Australia sit down with another incredible guest… Stylist, TV Icon and Makeup Guru Trinny Woodall!5:34 - Being in a partnership, over time you become the Yin and the Yang.8:02 - What is Trinny Time and why does she love it so much?12:07 - Trinny has so much self-confidence. How did she get to that point in her life?14:36 - How did Trinny’s makeup OCD give birth to Trinny London?17:13 - The best ideas come from things that you need.18:26 - Match 2 Me – how does it work?!22:22 - Trinny doesn’t like to regret, so she tries not to look back.26:08 - The evolution of Trinny’s career is mind boggling.30:36 - Trinny defines Aussie women’s style.33:44 - How can women give each other confidence?The Thinkergirls: Bra Fitting. Watch HEREEP 121: Rae Morris On Learning Through Fear, The Highs Of Her Career And What Editorial Really Means. Listen HERETrinny London – Match 2 MeWe’re going on a national tour! Tickets are on sale HERE.Want to join our VIP Posse? (For a small amount of $$ each month have access to a tonne of extras and join the online community.) Learn more HERE More from The Thinkergirls:Email us – hello@thinkergirl.com.auFacebook – https://www.facebook.com/thinkergirlsInstagram – https://instagram.com/thethinkergirlsAll Podcasts – http://bit.ly/2wviSir See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SheerLuxe Podcast
SheerLuxe Success Stories: Trinny Woodall

SheerLuxe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2018 46:58


This week’s Success Stories looks at the extraordinary career of Trinny Woodall. From her days as one half of the nation’s best-loved style duo Trinny and Susannah, to the book deals and TV shows that went global, Trinny Woodall has been ingrained in the world of British fashion since the 90s. Styling and helping thousands of women the world over, be it sartorial or emotionally, first-hand or through our TV screens, she fast became a darling of the TV fashion world, and still is to this day. In her Success Story Trinny talks candidly about her big break, working with Susannah and what it’s like to go it alone and build your own company. Swapping women’s wardrobes for their make-up bags, the last few years has seen Trinny start her own beauty brand, Trinny London. From getting investment to the power of digital, here’s her story so far. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Is It Just Me?
Trinny Woodall, Uniforms, Phone Calls & Train Makeup

Is It Just Me?

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2018 40:08


The multitasking goddess that is Trinny Woodall joins Jo and James for this week's podcast: having built up a huge social media following for her outfit and makeup trials, Trinny is soon launching her own show on Facebook Watch (fans of What Not To Wear, take note!), and of course, there's Trinny London, the makeup range she launched in October.Is it just James who has a work uniform? Is it just Trinny who only gets four phone calls a day (and all from her daughter)? And a listener IIJM: Natalie Adams asks: is it just her who finds it fascinating when people put a full face of makeup on on the train?This week's episode was recorded on March 12. It was edited by Kat Brown, with music by Martin Austwick.Join in the conversation using #isitjustmepodcast, email us your IIJM's on isitjustmepodcast@gmail.com, and follow us online:Jo Elvinwww.twitter.com/jo_elvinwww.instagram.com/jo_elvinJames Williamswww.twitter.com/JamesConradW12www.instagram.com/jamesconradw12Kat Brownwww.katbrownwrites.comwww.twitter.com/katbrownwww.instagram.com/katbrown82And our special guest, Trinny Woodallwww.facebook.com/TrinnyWoodallwww.instagram.com/trinnywoodallAnd thank you for listening! We'd love it if you rated and reviewed us on iTunes as it helps other people to find our show. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ctrl Alt Delete
#120 Trinny Woodall: Fashion, Instagram & Career Chapters

Ctrl Alt Delete

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2018 26:42


My guest today is Trinny Woodall, author, fashion advisor and beauty entrepreneur.You may know her from the hugely popular Trinny and Susannah makeover days. Her and Susannah met in 1994 and wrote a weekly fashion column for The Daily Telegraph. This led to the launch of their own fashion-advice business and first book.They were then commissioned by the BBC to host What Not to Wear in 2001. The following year they released their second book with the same name as the show What Not to Wear. In total they co-wrote eleven style advice books, many of which became hugely successfully best-sellers in the UK and America.They co-hosted What Not to Wear for five series and appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show as style and make-over advisors, Trinny still makes regular appearances on ITV’s This Morning show as their fashion style expert.In this episode we talk about the launch of her Trinny London make-up range, her new Facebook show, how your career can move in cycles, and why she doesn’t do sponsored posts.(ps. I am loving the Trinny London make-up, they come in little metal pots that you can stack together and it’s super simple. If you’re a fan of Glossier, you’ll really like Trinny’s range. It’s creamy, effective and easy to use. I love it because I can use it quickly when I’m running late!) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Emma Guns Show
Being wicked

The Emma Guns Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2017 7:18


In this episode: A #40daysof40 update featuring theatre trips to Wicked and The Book of Mormon. I've been using my Trinny London stack and explain my favourite products plus Sali Hughes' piece on the collection here.  Support for the show from Refinery 29, Marie Claire and The Coveteur.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Emma Guns Show
Trinny Woodall: Stacks, authenticity and burnout

The Emma Guns Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2017 71:31


Trinny Woodall joins me in this episode of the show to talk about: Her range of stackable makeup Trinny London Finding her authentic voice Being a social media superstar - watch her Facebook lives here >> Trinny Woodall Facebook Avoiding burnout Learning lessons from, and not being felled, by failure Bringing a new concept to the beauty industry Being a businesswoman and what that really means... The role her social media followers played in helping her develop her range Polarising opinion and much more... Find your personalised Trinny London colours here >> MATCH2ME     See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

SheerLuxe Podcast
SheerLuxe Highlights: Guest Star Trinny Woodall: Is Buying Designer Worth It?, New Beauty, High St Vs Designer

SheerLuxe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2017 43:34


This week’s guest needs no introduction, from one half of What Not To Wear to her regular This Morning slot, Trinny Woodall is one of TV’s best-loved fashion authorities. Most recently, Trinny has become one of our favourite Instagram and Facebook Live stars – if you haven’t watched her Zara try-ons or bathroom beauty hauls, check them out – we promise, you’ll be hooked.Trinny and the SL team talk fashion, naturally – from which trends they love to why high street can be just as good as designer. Plus, Trinny confesses her 250-strong coat obsession, why she wears clothes backwards and talks the team through her new beauty venture, Trinny London.Plus,12 PIECES TO TRANSFORM YOUR AUTUMN WARDROBE http://sheerluxe.com/2017/10/20/12-pieces-transform-your-autumn-wardrobe COOL FRENCH BRAND YOU NEED TO KNOW http://sheerluxe.com/2017/10/19/cool-french-brand-you-need-know 12 BEST MASCARAS APPROVED EXPERTS http://sheerluxe.com/2017/10/23/12-best-mascaras-approved-experts 11 REASONS GET EXCITED ABOUT AUTUMN http://sheerluxe.com/2017/10/25/11-reasons-get-excited-about-autumn See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.