Podcasts about B2B

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  • 5,638PODCASTS
  • 19,308EPISODES
  • 33mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 16, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about B2B

Show all podcasts related to b2b

Latest podcast episodes about B2B

Be Real Show
#365 - Mark Firth gets REAL about Rapidly Growing Revenue Using B2B Ad Funnels on LinkedIn

Be Real Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 29:38


After 18 years in B2B in companies like IBM, Siemens & start-ups I've helped hundreds of clients land deals with companies like Facebook, BMW and of course small + medium CEO's. https://www.linkedin.com/in/markfirthonline/ I've spend close to 500k of my own money making every mistake possible on paid ads platforms so you don't have to We specialize in Facebook & LinkedIn Ads and have built a multi million business helping B2B consultants to thrive ✅ MY EXPERTISE: For the past decade, I've been helping Professionals who Sell B2B to Exponentially Grow their Business & Impact, without Overwhelm in just 90 Days They all have end profitable and impactful business, a CONSISTENT Sales Pipeline FULL of prospects and a Sales Process that PREDICTABLY converts them into HIGH-PAYING clients.   ✅ WHO I WORK WITH: B2B Consultants and B2B Consulting Agencies ✅ WHAT OTHERS SAY: Check my testimonials here on LinkedIn and my website www.markfirthonline.com ✅  HOW IT WORKS: We start with a free B2B Growth Planning Session to find out if you are a good fit to get results, and go from there.

B2B Mentors
Flashback Friday to Episode ONE of B2B Mentors - Connor's Curiosities #034

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 52:03


Today: Interview with my own father!? Nerd out on some B2B marketing? You got it! Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

The Sales Development Podcast
Sangram Vajre - Make your MOVE: The 4-Part GTM Strategy

The Sales Development Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 34:13


Ideation. Transition. Execution. These are the three stages of business growth every C-suite leader must navigate throughout the life of their company. Surviving each one is not good enough. You want to thrive, evolve, and, when necessary, transform.But who do you market to? What do you need to operate effectively? When can you scale your business, and in which areas can you grow the most? As the markets change, so will your answers. But these four questions will help you focus on the who, what, when, and where of your business—and they remain the same. In MOVE, B2B go-to-market experts Sangram Vajre and Bryan Brown provide you with a four-question framework that will reveal your next steps and propel you forward, no matter the size of your company or the stage you're in.Join host David Dulany and Sangram as we dive into how this works and how it can benefit you! COMING UP: The Tenbound Sales Development Conference LIVE in-person in San Francisco. Be there October 27th → tenbound.com/conference #SDR #BDR #salesdevelopment #tenbound #podcast #sales #marketing #salesengagement #salesenablement #research #prospecting

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast
418: Expert panel: How to make your B2B marketing truly customer-centric

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:42


In this era of highly-competitive markets, the customer has quite rightly moved to the forefront of marketers' thoughts. For B2B marketers, where the sales cycle is long, with more than one decision-maker and multiple potential touchpoints, there are additional layers of complexity. So, what's the best way for marketers to overcome barriers and then create a customer-centric experience? I'm joined by experts from Yahoo, Rock Content, Web Insights and Icertis. Join us and check out webinsights.com for a free demo to learn how you can identify your website visitors. This episode is presented by Web Insights and produced by Trappe Digital. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ctrappe/message

Demand Gen Chat
Marketing to marketers, PLG, and Demand Gen vs Growth | Jordan Woods @ Cypress.io

Demand Gen Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:28


For today's episode I was joined by Jordan Woods, Director of Growth Marketing @ Cypress.io. We chat in depth about making the switch from marketing to marketers vs marketing to devs, the mindshift that happens, marketing activities that matter, and the benefits of leaning into a PLG growth model. Dive in. Happy listening! ✌️ Show Notes: Follow Jordan: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jordanjwoods/ Follow Kaylee: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kaylee-edmondson/ Learn more about Chili Piper: https://www.chilipiper.com/ Demand Gen Chat is a Chili Piper podcast hosted by Kaylee Edmondson. Join us as we sit down with leaders in marketing to discover the key to driving B2B revenue. If you want benchmarks or insights on trends in the market, this podcast is for you!

Girl's Girls Podcast - CURVY GIRL MEDIA
Cryptocurrency 101: #StockDaddy Episode 3

Girl's Girls Podcast - CURVY GIRL MEDIA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 32:22


Meredith doesn't understand crypto. Andy tries his best to explain it in easy terms. JOIN THE GROUP: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ggcstocktalk SPONSOR: 424 Degrees is more than a social media agency. They're hardcore lead generators. If you need more leads for your small business (B2B or B2C), reach out to Meredith today at 424degrees.com.

Ahead of the Game
Influencer Marketing for B2B

Ahead of the Game

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 26:50


Host Will Francis chats with B2B marketing strategist Lee Odden about how we find the right influencers, how to decide who to work with, how to become an influencer, how to manage influencer campaigns, and how to gain the most value from those relationships over time. Lee Odden is an author, international speaker, and CEO of TopRank Marketing. Working at the intersection of content, search, and influencer marketing he is also on the Industry Advisory Council of DMI. This episode was adapted from a Q&A session with Lee after his webinar with DMI on B2B Influencer Marketing. You can view the full indepth webinar on the DMI membership library here, for free. Subscribe to all DMI Ahead of the Game podcasts on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite platform. Check out our extensive digital marketing library of ebooks, toolkits, podcasts, webinars, blogs, and more! Join for free today.

Behind The Product
Adam Patarino: Casted

Behind The Product

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:01


Whether you're a crime show binger or more of an inspirational pep talk listener, you've probably listened to your fair share of podcasts. While the medium started primarily in the entertainment and education space, it's made its way into the B2B world - and it's thriving. Adam Patarino, Co-Founder and CPO at Casted, joins us to discuss how his team is developing podcasting to help companies reach their audiences in a meaningful way.Adam discusses how the human element of podcasting makes it such an effective medium for B2B marketing. He introduces the concept of amplified marketing and explains the ways Casted helps their customers implement it in their businesses. We take a look at where podcasting has come from, where it is now, and where we think it's headed.Adam also shares a few of Casted's unique approaches to product management that keep the whole team aligned and allow them to quickly solve customer problems.

Selling To Corporate
STC055 How to sell your specialism in a saturated market to corporate organisations with Julie Dennis

Selling To Corporate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:36


Have you ever felt like corporates won't be interested in the services you provide? Or that they won't want to purchase your services because they're not traditional corporate-type offers? I'm so proud to bring Julie Dennis onto the Selling to Corporate ® podcast today - because over the last three years, she's transformed her business; moving from selling B2C to solely B2B and becoming fully booked as a Menopause Consultant and Trainer.   The wellness niche (selling wellness services to corporate clients) has become more popular over the last 18 months or so… but Julie built her B2B business when companies truly didn't understand why they needed to support their employees through menopause… and in this episode, she's sharing the key breakthroughs she's experienced to build a thriving business, carve out a niche and become the go-to expert for big brands.   In this episode, we'll be discussing;   How Julie supports organisations with key transformations around menopause (01:31) What it was really like to sell a service that corporate clients didn't understand (02:32) Why building relationships is integral to successfully selling to corporate clients (04:00) How corporate companies deal with topics that have historically been surrounded by stigma and why it's so important to continue selling (05:25) Why implementing policy isn't enough for organisations to support employees (08:31) How celebrity endorsement can help and hinder company progress (09:37) How to determine whether you want to be selling practical services or inspirational talks. (11:20) When the bell curve of business starts to change; getting epic inbound leads. (13:25) How to make non-sexy sales processes work for you (15:04) Why keep in touch processes are integral to your sales pipeline (16:15) Julie's favourite part about The C Suite  Key Resources Mentioned in this Episode:   Get on the waitlist to join The C Suite ® now! If you're looking to get the best support in selling your services to corporate organisations, not to mention hundreds of email templates, swipe files and proposal outlines so that you really can convert at much higher rates and sell your services more successfully then click here to join the waitlist now: https://bit.ly/join-the-c-suite   Converting Corporates Bundle: If you're looking to learn the foundational pieces to successfully sell your services to corporate organisations, grab this fabulous self study programme here! You'll learn how to; Create your 250K corporate sales plan, set your business development strategy for success, understand and successfully generate qualified leads and hear from real hiring managers on their top tips for pitching to organisations! http://bit.ly/convertingcorporatesbundle   How to leave a review - http://bit.ly/howtoreviewmypodcast   Book an exploratory chat with me! I'm offering the final exploratory sessions with me so that you can ask any questions you have about The C Suite ® and how it can benefit your business. These opportunities are incredibly limited - so if you'd like my eyes on your business and a totally transparent conversation about how The C Suite ® could support your goals, book it here now: https://bit.ly/corporateexploratorysession   Top 5 Business Development Questions: If you're looking to convert more business development calls into sales? You need to be asking the right questions and getting the best information to support future work. Download my Top 5 BDQs here and start getting quality information from your prospects: https://bit.ly/top-5-business-development-questions

Renegade Thinkers Unite: #2 Podcast for CMOs & B2B Marketers

It's time to restructure your B2B organization. To trim down your MarTech stack. To reconsider which metrics matter. These are things that this episode's guests are all in agreement on, and taking it one step further, they also believe that the CMO is the one for the job. Tune in to hear from two of the three CMO to CRO authors, Brandi Starr and Rolly Keenan (COO and CRO of Tegrita, respectively), as we compare the future-thinking recommendations put forth in their book with those in Drew's new book, Renegade Marketing. To keep everyone honest, CMO Peter Finter of CyberGRX brings a bevy of real-world experience and insights to the table. Don't miss it! For full show notes and transcripts, visit https://renegade.com/podcasts/

B2B Mentors
Sales Success Tips in Under 60 Seconds - Connor's Curiosities #033

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 1:00


Today: Sales Success Tips in Under 60 Seconds - Connor's Curiosities #033Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

ICONIC HOUR
Dave Jones | Broan NuTone Sets the Standard for Home Air Quality

ICONIC HOUR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 36:29


Broan-NuTone believes that better quality air means a better quality of life. They lead the industry with forward-thinking residential ventilation products, customized climate and indoor air quality solutions that are all backed up by award-winning customer service. Headquartered in Hartford, Wisconsin, Broan-NuTone employs over 2,500 people around the world.    Dave Jones has been a marketer and brand manager for over 11 years. He has worked in the indoor air quality business at Broan-NuTone for the last 4 years. Dave leads B2C and B2B marketing communication initiatives including consumer audience development, brand management, messaging development, advertising, public relations, social media, event marketing and sponsorships.    On this episode of ICONIC Hour, Dave joins Renee Dee to share his insights on how we can all make our homes healthier and more sustainable as part of our Net Zero ICONIC Home conversation.   We invite you to SUBSCRIBE!   You can find ICONIC LIFE on our website, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.   Follow Renee on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, & Clubhouse.   Net Zero ICONIC Home Partners: Construction Instruction, AFT Construction, Cosan Studio, K&Q Interiors, Refined Gardens   Sponsors: Avocado Green Brands, Circa Lighting, Elkay, Crestron, Solstice Stone, Neighbor, Renovation Angel, Interior Essentials, Arizona Fireplaces, Arizona Hardwood, Heat&Glo Fireplaces, Southwestern Mechanical Sales, Expressions Home Gallery, Sub-Zero Wolf & Cove, Pella Windows, Broan-NuTone   For more, head to www.iconiclife.com/net-zero-iconic-home/ If you enjoyed today's podcast, I'd be so appreciative if you'd take two minutes to subscribe, rate and review ICONIC HOUR. It makes a huge difference for our growth. Thank you so much for supporting me to do what I do!

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo
Leaving Expertville

Unthinkable with Jay Acunzo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 57:15


So many of us focus on becoming an expert in our professional field. But what if instead, we wanted to become visionaries? Not THAT kind of visionary, mind you -- the over-hyped media machines that become the business world equivalents of the Kardashians. But instead, a type of useful, practical, attainable, and much-needed visionary. On this episode we begin to unpack what it means to be a visionary. With guidance from Andrew Davis, a speaker, author, and creator of the “Quest Matrix,” we begin to chart a path away from Expertville toward some new territory -- a place where we can resonate deeper in a world trending shallow, and yes, build our businesses and leave our legacies. That place? Visionary Town.Along the way, we hear from John Bonini, director of marketing at Databox, content marketing expert, and prolific side project creator who recently launched Some Good Content, a membership group that fosters engaging conversations and shares resources for marketers searching to create better content. John's on his own path toward becoming a visionary, driven by questions that, as Drew says, Google can't answer.But he's currently at a crossroads -- one we all face, too. What will he decide? What will YOU decide?QUEST MATRIX IMAGE: https://bit.ly/quest-matrix SHARE THE SHOW:Help others find Unthinkable in their favorite podcast player by sharing this link: https://pod.link/jay SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER:https://jayacunzo.com/newsletterEvery Friday, I send a new idea, story, or framework for crafting more resonant work to thousands of subscribers, ranging from entrepreneurs, freelancers, and independent creators, to marketers and leaders at brands like Adobe, Red Bull, Shopify, Salesforce, the BBC, Wistia, HubSpot, Drift, ProfitWell, a16z, and the New York Times. VOICES IN THIS EPISODE:John Bonini is a long-time content marketer, working for brands like IMPACT Branding and Design and the email software company Litmus as head of growth. He's now director of marketing at Databox, a startup based in Boston. John lives in Connecticut. John's also the former host of a podcast he launched, Louder Than Words (now defunct), and the owner of a membership and community group for marketers, Some Good Content, which is run on Patreon and a dedicated group website.Andrew Davis is a bestselling author and internationally acclaimed keynote speaker. Before building and selling a thriving digital marketing agency, Andrew produced for NBC's Today Show, worked for The Muppets in New York and wrote for Charles Kuralt. He's appeared in the New York Times, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, and on NBC and the BBC. Davis has crafted documentary films and award-winning content for tiny start-ups and Fortune 500 brands. Recognized as one of the industry's "Jaw-Dropping Marketing Speakers," Andrew is a mainstay on global marketing influencer lists. Wherever he goes, Andrew Davis puts his infectious enthusiasm and magnetic speaking style to good use teaching business leaders how to grow their businesses, transform their cities, and leave their legacy. SPONSOR:The Juice is a new kind of media company (like the Spotify of B2B). Specifically, they serve sales and marketing professionals. By registering for free, users can find the most original, deeply resonant ideas and advice in sales and marketing -- things optimized for people, not algorithms. The Juice curates from tens of thousands of sources to find what's popular and also what's most customized to your specific job function and level. Browse the best and brightest thinking, find new sources of inspiration to follow, and create and share content playlists about specific topics that help your career and company grow. Learn more and sign up for free at https://thejuicehq.com CONNECT WITH US ELSEWHERE:- Twitter: https://twitter.com/jayacunzo and https://twitter.com/UnthinkableShow- Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacunzo- LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/jayacunzo- Email: jay@unthinkablemedia.com PRODUCTION:- Creator, host, writer, and editor: Jay Acunzo - https://jayacunzo.com- Producer and researcher: Ilana Nevins - https://www.ilananevins.com ABOUT THE SHOW:Unthinkable is a storytelling podcast about creative people who break from conventional thinking to make what matters most. We're traveling the business world to learn how to create work that resonates — with powerful stories from makers, marketers, and leaders like the CEOs of Zoom and Patreon, execs from Adobe and Disney, and creators like writer Tim Urban, comedian Sarah Cooper, and photographer Chase Jarvis. From artisans to entrepreneurs, writers, designers, podcasters, video creators, and all the weird and wonderful nooks of the working world, we're meeting inspiring people to learn what we can do to resonate more deeply with the work we create.Listeners have called the show “This American Life for my work” with stories “as captivating as some of the best, like Malcolm Gladwell and Dan Carlin.”Thanks for listening and supporting Unthinkable!

Industrial Strength Marketing
Why Manufacturers Must Generate Original Content with Hüseyin Kilic, Interesting Engineering

Industrial Strength Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 42:20


Hüseyin Kilic, chief executive officer of Interesting Engineering shares why manufacturers must create original researched content. Hear why industrial businesses must generate owned content as a hedge to disruptive search algorithms and changing social media terms of service policies.Articles and resources reference in this episode:Visit Interesting Engineering onlineConnect with Hüseyin Kilic on LinkedinIf you haven't already, be sure to listen and review Industrial Strength Marketing to let us know what you think of the show.About the ShowAs a top manufacturing podcast, we're focused on what matters most to industrial marketers and executives tasked with developing and delivering on a strategic growth agenda. Featuring inspiring conversations with manufacturing and B2B marketing leaders on the lessons learned along the way, this show exists to deliver insights that help you grow your business.Are you looking to share your expertise with industrial prospects, influencers, and leaders across the supply chain? Apply to be a guest on the show.

Making Elephants Fly | Conversations with High Octane Leaders, Dreamers, & Creatives
080: A Journey from Cult to Content | A Conversation with Julia McCoy

Making Elephants Fly | Conversations with High Octane Leaders, Dreamers, & Creatives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 67:16


On this episode of Making Elephants Fly, Terry sits down with Julia McCoy. As a content marketing influencer, educator, and author, Julia is committed to helping people break out of the content ruts that stop success. After failing out of college by trying to do things “the right way,” Julia followed her dream to write for a living at 19 years old. In 2011, three months after teaching herself online writing after dropping out of college, Julia founded Express Writers. She's built her company to over $5M in gross revenue completely through ad-free content marketing. Her agency team has more than 90 members that work from home, and together, Express Writers has served more than 5,000 clients, from Johnson & Johnson and Nordstrom to small B2Bs, completing over 35,000 content projects successfully for clients. She's spoken at Content Marketing World, led workshops for MarketingProfs as a guest expert, and was interviewed on Forbes as a content marketing thought leader. Julia is the author of four bestselling books and counting. Her memoir, Woman Rising: A True Story, tells the whole unbelievable life story: how she escaped her father's cult (right after she started her business), and built a life of freedom, happiness & joy. Today, she focuses on The Content Hacker as a way to pass her growth-focused content knowledge on to a new generation of content marketers — the mavericks, the radicals, the outside-the-box thinkers. Join Julia and Terry as they talk about her journey from leaving her own Father's cult, launching a business, releasing best-selling books, and scaling and eventually selling Express Writers. We talk leveraged what she knew to actually find actual freedom and now helps others do the same through creating their own content. Find out more at http://terryweaver.com and join Terry & Julia at the Thing at http://thething.live and use the code PODCAST for a discount.

B2B Better
Building an Enterprise Content Framework on a Startup Budget w/ Grace Baldwin

B2B Better

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 39:58


In this episode, I sit down with Grace Baldwin, Content Strategist. We dived into her work on building an enterprise-scale funnel framework at Hiber. Built according to Eugene Schwartz's copywriting classic '5 Stages of Awareness', this episode is a must listen for B2B professionals looking to create a content system that nurtures leads so they're ready for sales. This episode is a must-listen for B2B professionals who want a 101 on product-led growth.You can follow Grace here.Thanks to my friends at Chili Piper for sponsoring this episode. Any company that helps B2B marketers capture more of the 60% of leads that never convert is one to keep an eye on.Check out their website here.Have you seen my weekly newsletter, The B2B Bite, where I break down marketing strategy and tactics for B2B leaders into fun-size, actionable chunks?Also follow me on Twitter at @JasonRBradwell - all my best stuff is on Twitter.** This episode is sponsored by Chili Piper. **

B2B Mentors
Don't Wait Until You "Feel" Ready - Connor's Curiosities #032

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 7:57


Today: Don't Wait Until You "Feel" Ready - Connor's Curiosities #032Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

State of Demand Gen
200 - How to Not Throw Away Money On LinkedIn Ads | Demand Gen Live S2 x82

State of Demand Gen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 102:21


In this episode, Chris dives in on how to change your mindset on LinkedIn ads to get better returns. If you want to be successful with LinkedIn ads you need to shift your mindset. It's time to leave 2011 marketing tactics behind and stop optimizing your paid LinkedIn ad spend for MQLs. Instead, optimize your ads to increase the reach of your organic content. Use ads to help build your organic machine so you can reach a massive audience and be top of mind when they are ready to buy, instead of when you want them to buy. We also dive into how to optimize your pipeline for high intent lead handoffs to sales and answer questions from the best B2B marketers in the game. Thanks to our friends at Hatch for producing this episode. Get unlimited podcast editing at usehatch.fm.

LinkedIn Ads Show
LinkedIn Ads Matched Audiences are the Greatest Feature - Ep 49

LinkedIn Ads Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:29


Show Resources Here were the resources we covered in the episode: Article on LinkedIn Audience Network Measurement Error NEW LinkedIn Learning course about LinkedIn Ads by AJ Wilcox Contact us at Podcast@B2Linked.com with ideas for what you'd like AJ to cover.   Show Transcript Matched audiences aren't new in social advertising. But LinkedIn gave us something special that no other platform has. What is it you ask? Listen, find out. Welcome to the LinkedIn Ads Show. Here's your host, AJ Wilcox. Hey there LinkedIn Ads fanatics! So Facebook blew us all away by offering custom audiences back in 2013. That allowed us to upload lists of individuals for targeting of ads. It also included website retargeting through the facebook pixel, which was very cool indeed. Then Google Ads released customer match in 2015, it was a lot more limited, but still pretty cool. Ever late to the game, LinkedIn released matched audiences in 2017, with very little fanfare, but this was the most epic release to date. Not only could we upload individuals, which was a total game changer, and we can of course do website retargeting. But we got a feature that no other platform can match, account matching, or company name, uploads, whatever you want to call it. Today, we're going to discuss why this is the most important feature you'll ever use on LinkedIn Ads. This month, I listened to a podcast by a woman named Lisanne Murphy. And it's called The Marketing Matrix podcast. It's really good. If you're into Facebook ads, it inspired me to do my episodes a little bit less like a Wikipedia article where I just toss everything out there that you could ever imagine about a topic and make it so you have to take tons and tons of notes, and instead focus more on individual features that you can walk away and focus on much smaller facets of the LinkedIn Ads platform. So I would love your feedback as you listen to the next few episodes. If this is a little bit easier to listen to a little bit less Wikipediaish. Or if you still found yourself scrambling for a pen. Lee Gannon, who's a friend of mine and a friend of the show, he found out something that was pointed out to him by LinkedIn support, he was asking about skills targeting and when he found the documentation that the support was referring to, it said something about how skills targeting is done. It reads, "skills include those explicitly added by members in their skill section, as well as keywords and phrases mentioned throughout their profile and summary." Okay, just capitalizing on what this means. This means not only are we targeting people with the skills listed in their skill section that they themselves added, but LinkedIn is also apparently looking for keywords and key phrases throughout the profile. I'm imagining in your about section, or maybe even in your headline or title. It goes on to say, "LinkedIn uses modeling to infer skills from a members job title and job description." Alright, this was a big shocker to me. And actually, one that I don't know is actually out there in the wild. I have a feeling that this is actually not something that has been rolled out yet, but probably will in the future. And the reason I say this is because when we have leads come in to one of our clients accounts that are of poor quality, we asked the client to bring us a link to the the client's profile, and we go figure out which campaign was targeting them, and what sort of targeting we were using. And every once in a while we will find skills targeting that brings in someone who was of lower quality, but we haven't yet experienced where when we look for the skill that we were targeting and we look down into their skills that that particular skill is not there. So that leads me to believe that this either happens very, very rarely, or it's just not happening yet. I would absolutely love it. If any of you listening, if you have any evidence of this happening, maybe a skills campaign was targeting someone that you cannot find that skill in their profile, please, please please reach out and let me know that would be really great to know. And then Rishabh Rastogi from India, he put in the LinkedIn Ads support group, which is a LinkedIn group. If you're not already a member of it, I highly recommend it. I'll link to that in the show notes. He pointed out an ad format that looks like a text ad, but it was actually in his newsfeed. And he provided a screenshot of it. It was in the newsfeed right in between two posts. And it was actually right above a promoted post, a sponsored content. And because we know sponsored content only goes at max one out of every five slots in the newsfeed and this was right above it. We know this wasn't sponsored content. So he reached out about it. And this one in particular, the headline says LinkedIn ads drive business results reach buyers with the power to act. And then it does have an image and it's around image and the call to action says Create Ad so this is obviously one that LinkedIn is using for themselves to market their own LinkedIn Marketing Solutions products. This was pretty interesting. And I would absolutely love it if we got this kind of an ad format in the future, because I don't know about you, but text ads are one of my favorite ad formats on LinkedIn. They're inexpensive, they're really good for branding, they do such a good job of propping up all the other ad formats that I'm running at the time. And the only problem is that because they're way over in the right rail, and they're on desktop only, so most users aren't seeing them that they get clicked on very, very little. So if I could have a text ad that was in the newsfeed, I think that would probably be really, really powerful. And then Tamas Banki from Budapest, he shot me a private message. He saw this new ad format and wondered what it was. So what it is, it's a sponsored content post that says it's from LinkedIn. And it does say promoted. And then it asks, How familiar are you with and then lists the company name. And then there's some, it's like a poll, like a sponsored poll where they can click very familiar, somewhat familiar, I've only heard the name, and not at all familiar. And he hadn't seen this anywhere. So he was wondering, is there any way that this is a new ad format. And the truth is, this is an ad format that everyone can get access to, if you're spending at least $90,000 per quarter. And maybe you've even seen it inside of campaign manager, there's a new heading right at the top there. It's right in between campaign performance and website demographics. And it's called testing. When you click it, it will come up with the ability to create a test. Now we've been able to run these tests if you are spending high budget and had a LinkedIn Rep for quite a while. But this is now right on the front end where anyone can run these. The way it works is if you're spending at least $90,000 per quarter, as you spend, LinkedIn is going to ask people questions about your brand. There are six different studies that you can run and if you want to run all six of them, you just have to make sure that you have a minimum budget of $270k for the 90 day period. So immediately the small spenders are out. But you large spenders, this is actually really fun to run. The first is a brand lift test. And then there's also an aided awareness test, a brand familiarity test, a brand favorability test, a brand recommendation test, and product consideration test. And what it does is as you are advertising at obviously high volumes, it's asking people how familiar they are with your brand. And by doing that, you'll get data back about how effective your ads are from a branding perspective. It's really cool. Next, just this week, LinkedIn started notifying their customers who were using the LinkedIn audience network. There was a measurement issue we had to do quite a bit of digging for because if you go to the Adweek article that LinkedIn published, there is like zero information about what actually happened. It just says that this mis measurement applied to roughly 8% of LinkedIn Marketing Solutions customers, and for 66% of them, the impact was less than $25. So of course, LinkedIn is crediting that back, some of our clients were getting refunds in the $1,000s of dollars, which obviously made us really curious about what caused this. So in doing a little bit of digging, a source at LinkedIn responded that the effective timeframe is a little over two years, with a heavier impact occurring during the two months leading up to the discovery of the issue. If you want to calculate the impact, basically, you look at the total number of LinkedIn audience network clicks, and basically discount 1.21% of them for any date that was from June of 2021 to before that. This is the average impact that could be on some smaller campaigns. They said this is the average impact so some accounts could see a much smaller effect, and some could be higher. And the effect was higher here in May and June. It seems like every time an ad platform comes out and admits that they had some kind of a mistake, and they go to credit their advertisers, which I think is really awesome because they could just as easily just not tell anyone and let it go. But they do they more or less fess up to it. They give people refunds, which I think is super honorable, but then some jerk or some set of jerks. always end up suing them over it. So please, please, please do not join a class action lawsuit against LinkedIn Marketing Solutions. I would reserve those kinds of actions for companies who do terrible things to you and then don't admit it and you have to find it out yourself. Okay, that's it for the news. Then we've got a couple of reviews that came in one by the user wixfi. It says, "The authority and LinkedIn ads. AJ is a great voice on running LinkedIn campaigns and doesn't hold back. He gives strategic and tactical tips on how you run the ROI positive campaigns for your business." Wixfi, thank you so much for saying that. I really do try to not hold back and just share everything I know. And of course, our goal is always ROI. And then Betsy Hyndman, from Nashville wrote, "AJ is the real deal. Great podcast, super guy, very knowledgeable. I've learned a ton from AJ generously sharing his deep expertise." Betsy, I'm glad to call you a friend. Thanks so much for leaving such a kind review. All right for you right now who are listening. Yes, you! You're listening, you haven't left a review, please go do it. Honestly, it helps the show a lot. It's going to get more people to listen to the show. And plus, I get to shout you out and tell people how awesome you are for saying such awesome stuff about us. So here we go. But honestly, please go do leave a review, I would love to feature you. Okay, with that being said, let's hit it. We're getting right into the meat of the show today. So we're talking about matched audiences. And my favorite part about matched audiences are the list uploads. And so there are two different kinds of list uploads you can do one is a contact list, which you think of as maybe email matching, but I'll tell you why that's not, it's a little bit of a misnomer. And the next one is the company name list upload or the account list. Sometimes you'll hear it referred to as the ABM account targeting list. It's important to understand that with all of these list uploads, there are three things that you can do with it. You can either include that list in your targeting, just targeting those who are on your list. You can exclude those from your targeting. And then you can also use that to create a look alike audience. As long as you're listening to this since 2019, you've been able to do that. So let's touch on the the individuals the contact list upload, there are so many different uses that you can have for uploading a list of individuals. You can use this to target individuals who've joined your email list, that's pretty cool. You can use it to exclude your current customers from seeing your ads. How awesome is that, that you can avoid showing ads to someone and having them pay or you know, charge you, to click on your ads when they're already a customer. So lots of different uses. Now, it's a little known fact that you don't actually need an email address for targeting here, more info on that later. Then you've got the company name list upload. And this is, like I said in the intro, my favorite part of LinkedIn Ads in general. What this allows us to do is upload lists of accounts for inclusion or for exclusion. So inclusion would be like if I had a list of companies on my account based marketing list, and I wanted to fire out some ground cover across those audiences so that when they see our next ads, they're much more likely to interact. They're one of our target accounts, we want them. You can also do the same thing of uploading a list of let's say, your competitors, the competitors by company name, and then you could exclude that list from all of your campaigns. And now all of a sudden, your competitors have no idea what you're advertising, you're flying completely under the radar. That's pretty cool. You can also exclude your current customer list, the companies they work at, or how about you could include a list of all of the companies who've become a lead for your organization, but haven't yet closed. So this becomes kind of a lead acceleration or a sales acceleration type of campaign. Alright, so why is this feature so sexy? Why is it my favorite part of LinkedIn Ads? Well, here's the reason. This is the one feature that no other platform can touch. Facebook, they allowed us to target for a long time people's organizations and their job titles, but guess what, so few people on Facebook ended up putting their professional information in. Facebook is just not the place where you have that kind of data. And so even if Facebook released the ability to target by company in bulk, it would just give you access to such a small percent of the population, it just wouldn't even be worth it. But hey, everyone on LinkedIn tends to list the company they work for. That's kind of the point. Add that to the fact that when you're doing account based marketing targeting, you're targeting a much smaller population. And what that means is, it's not going to allow you to spend as much money. This is a downside for the larger advertisers. But for the smaller advertisers, this is something really powerful you can do and it doesn't take much budget budget. I firmly believe that every B2B company on the planet should be doing this, targeting their absolutely ideal accounts that they want to go after. And it doesn't cost very much, just a few bucks here and there to reach your absolutely ideal audience so they know who you are. That's pretty awesome. Also in the LinkedIn Ads support group on LinkedIn, Jennifer Karos asked this question. She said, "Hey, guys quick question, we uploaded a list with roughly 12,000 contacts. The system recognized about 6,000 of them, but it says it matched 85%. Do you know how this inconsistency could be?" And then Joanna from LinkedIn came in and said, "Hi, Jennifer. I'm Joanna. from our Product Marketing Team at LinkedIn, we see this when we find a match to multiple inputs. For example, if a personal and business email was provided, and we found a single member match to both records, you would see a higher match rate versus the member count." So to put that into perspective, if you upload a list with let's say, first name, last name, company, and title, if it found a match with the company name, and the title on, let's say, half of everyone, it could still say 100% match, but you'd only end up with half of the contacts in your list being represented in your targeting. This was absolutely news to me. So thank you, Joanna, for explaining this to us. We'll come back to this for sure. The next is, it's really important to understand when you upload a list of any kind, it goes through a processing stage. If you've uploaded one of these, you'll see the words "your audience is currently building and may take up to 48 hours or on rare occasion longer to start delivery". One thing I really like about this is you can attach an audience to a campaign even before it's finished building. And what's going to happen is as soon as it's done building, it will immediately start serving the ads. So you don't have to be watching for the status to change, and then go and launch your own ads. Okay, so LinkedIn says right there in their documentation, "It may take up to 48 hours, or on rare occasion longer for a list of process." I call bs on this, I have never ever seen a list to finish processing in under 48 hours. Most of the time it goes to 72 hours and beyond. There's obviously not much I can do. But that's pretty disappointing. I would love to see LinkedIn do something about that. Okay, here's a quick sponsor break. And then we'll dive into some research about what I found that gets lists to match at a higher rate. The LinkedIn Ads Show is proudly brought to you by B2Linked.com, the LinkedIn Ads experts. If the performance of your LinkedIn Ads is important to you B2Linked is the agency you'll want to work with. We've spent over $140 million dollars on LinkedIn Ads, and no one outperforms us on getting you the lowest cost per lead at the most scale. We're official LinkedIn partners, and you'll only deal with LinkedIn Ads experts from day one, Fill out the contact form on any page of B2linked.com to chat about your campaigns. We'd absolutely love to work with you. All right, let's jump into it. So I've been doing audience research now for years. And what I share with you this certainly isn't like a benchmark data by any means, but they should help you understand a little bit about how the matching algorithm works. So a couple years ago, when LinkedIn stopped including email addresses in our connections export, I exported all of my connections on LinkedIn without their email address, and then uploaded it to LinkedIn. This was so interesting, because it reported a 90 plus percent match rate, but then the resulting audience that it gave me was only a quarter of the size of my network. So that means there were a lot of those records matching on other things, but a whole bunch that matched on none, at least from what Joanna from LinkedIn shared. So then what I did is I uploaded a list of all of my followers, and this was just their first and last names. And I just wanted to see what it did. It matched it only 50%. But it did return about half the number of my followers. Because first and last names really aren't all that unique. I would not be surprised at all, if some of these were matching people who had the same name as my followers, but weren't actually the followers. I didn't actually advertise this audience. That would be, I don't know, I'm not very confident in that one. And then me and my team found out that you can get a much higher match rate by including in addition to first and last name, also job title and company name. By doing this, we ended up finding that we got a 90% plus match rate, which is awesome. And then just last week for fun, I uploaded my followers list again, my most updated one,, and I wanted to test two things. I included in both of them first name, last name, and company. But for the job title field, I wanted to see if LinkedIn pulled more from their actual job title in the experience section or if it was their headline. My hypothesis was actually that LinkedIn was going to pull more from their headline because more people use their headline I feel like, but boy was I wrong. When I use the headline as the job title, LinkedIn reported that it matched 85%. But it only matched just a little over 61% of the contacts that I uploaded. Okay, that's interesting 61%. Then I uploaded that same list, but with the job title field as the job title. LinkedIn reported this as matching at 90%, but it actually matched 75%. So that's 14 more percent of a match, just by using the job title field instead of the headline. That was really interesting to me. So the takeaway is here, the now what, when you go and upload individual lists, make sure you include first name, last name, job title, their actual job title would help, and their company name, that's going to help you get a much, much higher match rate. One thing you'll notice if you go in and export a list of connections from LinkedIn, if LinkedIn sees an @ in any other field, except for the email address field, it's going to fire off an error. So for instance, if someone has the @ in their headline, because they're saying, I'm the VP at this company, you're gonna have to get rid of that before the list will even validate to process. The way I do that is right inside of Excel, I just do a search and replace on every column except for email address, where I search for the app sign and replace it with nothing. Okay, I know the LinkedIn products team listens to the show. So I'm going to give you and everyone else here, my wish list for how LinkedIn can make their matched audiences product even better. The first is, like I mentioned before, faster processing. It really shouldn't take 72 hours to process lines of text, I would expect it to take that long, if there was a human in the background, like manually doing things in Excel before the list could be processed. That would make a lot more sense. If the list has 300,000 rows, which is the maximum, I could understand it going longer. But like I said, I've literally never seen any list finished processing under 72 hours. And most of the lists that we upload are in the 10,000 to 30,000 rows range so we're not maxing it out by any means. Something else I would absolutely love in the contact list. I want to be able to target by LinkedIn URL. Forget matching by first name, last name, company name, email, job title, if you have the LinkedIn URL for the person that you're going after, even better, I would much rather use that, it would match it 100%. Please LinkedIn give us that. Then back in 2017, when we got the matched audiences feature, I asked why LinkedIn just shows 90% or higher as a match rate for company names. Why can't they show us the actual if it's really 100%. And LinkedIn replied that it was because they were worried about privacy. Now I get it being a privacy issue, if you are showing an exact match for individuals for a contact list. But there is absolutely no privacy issue with company names and targeting. A company name is public. I just think that's totally a non issue here. So I would absolutely love it. If we got a real match rate for company match. Show us the exact percentage matched. Now recently, if you go into your your list uploads, there will be a tab for companies matched and companies not matched. And that's really cool. If I targeted let's say I was targeting IBM, and I typed in just the letters IBM, but LinkedIn was only going to match it if it was i dot b dot m dot, then if you go into that list, it will tell you that IBM did not match on your list. And that's pretty cool, you can fix it, but I just don't see why the general percentage match shouldn't reflect the exact match for company. And finally here, we've talked about this a little bit, but the match rate really should be based on the number of matches that occurred out of the total number of rows uploaded, I definitely shouldn't have LinkedIn reporting to me 85% match rate to do my own calculation and find out it's actually 61%. That one definitely seems like a product that was built by engineers, not advertisers, I would love to see that one fixed, or heck give us both metrics. Maybe one shows the number of rows that resulted in a match and another one that shows the strength of each match. That could be cool, but I'd want to see both. I don't want to just have the strength of the match shown to me instead of the raw number. Alright, I've got the episode resources coming right up for you. So stick around 25:01 Thank you for listening to the LinkedIn Ads Show. Hungry for more? AJ Wilcox, take it away. All right, first of all, there's that article that LinkedIn published about the LinkedIn Audience Network, and its measurement glitch. So I'll link to that it's on Adweek.com. Just be prepared, the article says absolutely nothing, but you're welcome to take a look at it. Also, if you're trying to learn LinkedIn Ads better or have a colleague or a coworker who is make sure to point them towards the LinkedIn Learning course that I'm the the author of. It just got a refresh early this year and we added about 25 extra minutes of content plus updating everything. It's really good. If I don't say so myself. If this is your first time listening to the show, thanks for tuning in. please do hit that subscribe button on whatever podcast player you're listening with. Please do rate the podcast and like I said before, it really helps the show if you review. That's exactly how you can repay me for dropping all this knowledge, those are knowledge bombs. Okay, so if you want to reach out to us, give us any ideas or any feedback for the show hit us up at podcast@B2Linked.com. And with that being said, we'll see you back here next week. I sure hope. We're working on more consistency here. I'm cheering you on in your LinkedIn Ads initiatives.

Stories of Selling Human
Gifting to Relate To A Persons 5 to 9 - Nina Butler, Director Event Experience, Alyce

Stories of Selling Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:51


For this very special, 50th episode of The Stories Of Selling Human podcast we are joined by Nina Butler. She is the Director of Event Experience at Alyce - the AI-powered B2B gifting platform that's redefining direct mail, swag and gifts with its scalable, sustainable, hyper-personalized approach to account-based marketing. Nina is an experienced Director with a demonstrated history of working in the event and hospitality industry and start ups. She is skilled in Event Management, Marketing, and really understands personalized gifting. We talk about gifting in your personal life, what to look for to be thoughtful with gifting, wyas to approach gifting in different stages of the buyer journey and so much more! Key moments: 08:55 - The concept of "Emotional Resonance" and the mindset shift of thinking of your sales interactions as a "Touch" 13:15 - Tactical tips for gifting. The connection between gifting and sales. 17:58 - The art of personalized gifting with some examples 27:00 - Adding a personal touch when communicating at scale Summary: Is love a feeling or is it a skill? Maybe it's a bit of both. Love isn't normally a skill you're taught to develop in your professional life but this conversation will teach you how you can. Matt Tenney defines love as the deep concern for the well being of another. He develops highly effective leaders who serve and inspire greatness in others. We discussed things like how love can show up in business and in sales. We went over how servant leadership and sales are synonymous. And we talked about how your mindset of love can effect how you approach everything in sales. Connect with Nina https://www.linkedin.com/in/nina-butler-2a89a260/ (LinkedIN) Connect with Us! https://www.linkedin.com/company/53108426/admin/ (LinkedIN: ) https://stories-of-selling-human.captivate.fm/ (Website: )

Scaling SaaS Operations
SSO: 054 - A conversation with Dave Hurt, Co-Founder & Head of Product at Verb Data.

Scaling SaaS Operations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:04


Dave Hurt is co-founder and head of product at Verb Data. He began his career working in customer success at SaaS startups and stepped into product management as a way to help his customers get the features they needed for success. He caught the entrepreneurial bug and started a software development and design agency which eventually sold to a customer - where his team worked for a few years. Dave and his long-time business partner, Oleg, started Verb at the end of 2019 as a way to help SaaS companies build better dashboards for the end-users.In this episode:1. Dave shares his experience working with building dashboards & KPI's at various startups and agencies which led him and his partner to build dashboards inside customer productsthat would be easier to scale and maintain.2. Using a product-led, self-service growth model, Verb Data has about 20 customers in their first cohort.  Mostly B2B (eCommerce SaaS and RFP/documentation software) are main targets inside B2B space.Dave talks about the onboarding process and how they have started a white glove service which allows them to stay close with these initial customers to establish an onboarding process.  Eventually will move to a more strategic self-service model.3. Dave shares his lesssons learns - stay close to your customer and do not be embarrassed to share early products with customers.  Also, Dave feels the foundershould perform all fucntions (sales, marketing, etc) - experience all roles before you hire someone for that role.  Although it's uncomfortable, it'sa valuable process.You can reach Dave by email or Twitter....Dave shares the market trends he's seeing, what's next for Verb Data and much more!  

From Pot to Popular
Gary Santo: Beyond donation: how MSOs can make cannabis a more equitable space

From Pot to Popular

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:24


Social equity and the cannabis industry go hand-in-hand. Given cannabis' controversial and discriminatory past, it is essential for leading operators to give back to communities that have been the most impacted by the War on Drugs. In this episode, Gary Santo, CEO of TILT Holdings, talks about his company's unique approach to partnerships and supply chain and delves into the historic partnership TILT has created with the Shinnecock Nation of New York. He explains how MSOs like TILT can do more for social equity than just donations, and can go further by creating sustainable solutions that bring marginalized communities into the cannabis space and help them thrive for years to come.

How'd It Happen Podcast
Shama Hyder, The Zen of Social Media Marketing (#199)

How'd It Happen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:49


Shama Hyder is a web and TV personality, a bestselling author, and the founder & CEO of Zen Media, a global marketing and digital PR firm, which specializes in helping both B2B and B2C companies dominate the digital world. The post Shama Hyder, The Zen of Social Media Marketing (#199) first appeared on Mike Malatesta.

Beyond 8 Figures
Building An Effective Brand Strategy with Ray Mendez, Masa&Boz

Beyond 8 Figures

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:36


Ray Mendez, Partner at Masa&Boz, joins A.J. in this episode to discuss how to make your brand come alive as an entrepreneur with innovative ideas. They dig into several topics, including how to utilize branding and marketing methods to bridge the gap between your business and its customers, why working with agencies can be limiting, the vital link between technology and creativity, and the three areas every business needs to focus on. Tune in to learn first-hand about building effective brand strategies for the sustainable growth of your business.About our guest:Ray Mendez is the Partner at Masa&Boz, a transformation-innovation consultancy that helps turn your business idea into reality. He's a genius at brand prototyping, workshop design, brand strategy, product design, and communication strategies and helps integrate and transform brands across four continents.On today's episode: Meet Ray Mendez, our guest and Partner at Masa&Boz- 00:40 Ray gives a brief overview of his journey in life and how he got into entrepreneurship - 03:22 Ray explains the exciting backstory behind coining the name “Masa&Boz” - 06:52 What are the two things to keep in mind for deep branding and marketing? - 8:50 Why the ego of the branding and marketing industry should not exist and how they should instead move forward - 09:00 How do Ray's business tools help the producer (the business) and the user interact more seamlessly? - 10:26 What is the traditional concept of an agency? - 11:26 Ray explains the vision behind his agency and his thoughts on life going forward - 14:04 What is a legacy business? - 21:06 How does the transition from a B2B to a B2C business model look like? - 22:50 The three significant focus areas of any CEO and why they are essential - 31:30 How does Ray define his success? Why is it not focused on material goals? - 37:41 Ray talks about his experience working on the rebranding of the Empire State Building - 41:35 Key Takeaways: Business sustainability involves keeping your business running through all ups and downs. Working with a traditional agency could mean you're handing over your power to another body. Traditional agencies add more services to their clients' billable even if it adds no extra value to the latter's time. A legacy business is a type of business that has evolved over a long time. It involves coming up with a physical product. The three focus areas of Masa&Boz include its vision, culture, and revenue. Shifting from a B2B to a B2C model involves a lot of planning and careful thought because you need to head to a completely different culture and operations. Marketing isn't merely about selling a product or service; it's also about keeping your customer in the loop and understanding and improving their product cyclically. Is there a right way to approach marketing?[43:27] - “The kind of approach we like to take marketing - it shouldn't just be about selling, it should be about understanding the customer and improving your product, and then selling and understanding your customer and improving a product.”How important do you think branding is for your business? Tell us on Facebook or any social media platform of your choice (and don't forget to say hello if you would like to share your story with us)!Connect with Ray Mendez: LinkedIn: @Ray Mendez Website: https://www.masaboz.com/about Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/masaboz Follow Beyond 8 Figures: Website:  Beyond8Figures.com Twitter:  @beyond8figures  Facebook: Beyond 8 Figures Instagram:@b8fpodcast Email: team@b8fpodcast.com Connect with Insights Lab:  Website: https://insightslab.ai/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheInsightsLab/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/insightslab.ai/ Email: weare@insightslab.ai  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/insightslab-ai/ 

B2B Marketers on a Mission
Ep. 62: How to Use Automation the Right Way – Interview w/ Stefan Smulders

B2B Marketers on a Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:34


Stefan Smulders (CEO & Founder, Expandi) on how he teaches people to use automation in a way that is personalized, builds authentic relationships, and enables B2B businesses to improve their professional outreach at scale.

B2B Mentors
4 Key Pillars of Social Selling - Connor's Curiosities #031

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:47


Today: 4 Key Pillars of Social Selling - Connor's Curiosities #031Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.com

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast
Brand Anatomy: How Panasonic Leveraged Podcasting to Reposition Its Brand | Oct 13, 2021

Behind the Numbers: eMarketer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:14


It's our second episode of Brand Anatomy, where we get exclusive looks inside leading brands! Today, eMarketer Briefing director Jeremy Goldman sits down with Panasonic's Brian Rowley, vice president of marketing, to discuss how the company—a longtime leader in consumer electronics—leveraged podcasting to reposition itself as a B2B and enterprise powerhouse. October 14 Meet the Analyst w/ Yoram Wurmser, Suzy Davidkhanian and T-Mobile: Mcommerce: How Rapid Growth Will Continue to Transform Retail https://on.emarketer.com/Webinar-20211014-MarketingSolutionsT-Mobile-Mcommerce-MeettheAnalyst_BusRegpage.html For sponsorship opportunities contact us:   advertising@insiderintelligence.com.   For more information visit:   https://www.insiderintelligence.com/contact/advertise/ Have questions or just want to say hi? Drop us a line at podcast@emarketer.com © 2021 Insider Intelligence

Máquina de Ventas
#39: 4 hacks para estar siempre motivado

Máquina de Ventas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 34:06


Mantenerse motivado es probablemente uno de los retos más duros cuando somos vendedores, emprendedores o empresarios… no es para nada sencillo, y nos hemos dado cuenta que la motivación es en realidad un hábito hackeable, es por eso que en este episodio hablamos de los 4 hacks para aumentar la motivación. Si quieren probar el CRM que nosotros usamos, aquí les dejamos el link (30 días gratis y después 25% OFF): https://www.pipedrive.com/en/register?campaign=maquinadeventas

Big Break Software Podcast
Taking a Regional approach to build a B2B SaaS problem for the Thai market with 300k ARR platform founder Saroj Ativitavas of Wisible.com

Big Break Software Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 50:31


Saroj Ativitavas, CEO of Wisible, talks about funding his MVP, gaining his first customers, and navigating his zero to 30,000 MRR journey. Get more insights from the podcast. Wisible is a sales intelligence platform that enables B2B firms to reduce sales cycles, increase conversion rates, and enhance sales prediction accuracy. Listen to Saroj as he shares his exciting journey with Geordie. What You'll Learn The core problem Wisible solves for customers Why the Chinese market is not ideal for the Wisible concept How Saroj transitioned from the corporate world to a startup job How Saroj and his team transitioned from an agency to a SaaS platform The impact of content marketing for businesses In This Episode: According to Saroj, many customers who approach them seeking a tangible solution often have a leaky sales funnel. The team behind Wisible strives to help their customers determine the critical spot and underlying bottlenecks. They work together to provide a robust solution based on their needs. Wisible focuses on CRM tools while tracking any interactions and data that may have been generated during the sales procedure. The platform also features a dashboard and an analytic report that can display in the sales funnel interface. Customers can also track their conversion rate, determine their average deal amount, and sales cycle.  Saroj has been in the B2B sales sector for 20 years, during which he encountered a wide range of challenges and learned crucial lessons. He was a salesperson for a mobile telecommunication operator in Thailand before graduating to become a sales director. During his stint in the sales industry, Saroj tried numerous tools and software but could not identify the ideal option to meet his needs and those of his customers. The quest for an effective solution pushed him into developing a platform they could rely on to solve their problems. Saroj explains why he left his job at the mobile telecommunication company, and you can learn from the podcast. Currently, there are numerous click funnel options in the market. Why did Saroj feel the need to develop a new one? To answer this question, Saroj begins by defining what B2B businesses do and why they need aggressive salespeople. Get all the details from the podcast. Saroj reiterates that their system integrates with their customer engagement's business channel. This feature relieves salespeople from having to feed data into the system manually. He gives an illustration to help listeners understand this concept better. Nearly 100% of Wisible customers come from the Southern Asia region, but Saroj and his team plan to expand their business to other regions. He explains why they are not yet ready to venture into the Chinese market.  After leaving his job, Saroj first launched a robust product that focused on giving software developers a healthy platform to exercise their talent. They later quit the market to launch the sales intelligence agency. Saroj and his co-founder had worked together in the telecommunications company for ten years and were conversant with their customer's pain points. They also knew there was a ready market for their idea in Thailand. Saroj and his team would spend an entire year developing the Wisible MVP and another year before acquiring their first paying customer. At first, Saroj says they gave out the system for free and explains how they finally won their first paying customer. Find out the details from the podcast. Promoting a startup can be a difficult task. How did the team reach their target audience? Saroj says they run a blog where they share content about their services before sharing it on different social media platforms. The journey from zero to 5,000 was easier after winning their first paying customer; Saroj says and explains the phase further in the podcast. Did you know you could make money from customizing customers' platforms to meet their specific needs? Listen to Saroj as he discusses this concept and explains how it worked for their business. Apart from content marketing, Saroj and his team engage in teaching as a marketing concept, where they create courses and train their staff. Saroj mentions their go-to content marketing strategy that aspiring entrepreneurs can benefit from. While some online businesses grew tremendously at the peak of Covid, Saroj says they experienced slow growth rates. What would Saroj do differently if he had an opportunity to go back in time? He would be more focused. He concludes the podcast by explaining why he thinks Wisible is the best in the industry.  Resources Wisible Saroj Ativitavas LinkedIn

B2B Nation
How Remote Work Changes the Way We Market Cybersecurity

B2B Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 18:58


In this episode of B2B Nation, we talk to Christopher Bray, a cybersecurity sales and marketing veteran with experience working for some of the best-known brands in the security market. Today, Christopher is Chief Revenue Officer at Aura, a consumer cybersecurity vendor that changed its message once the pandemic further blurred the lines between home and office. Aura's leadership found an opportunity in the remote and hybrid work environment to take its B2C cybersecurity solution into the B2B market. And rather than re-engineer its solution for enterprise users, Aura made the decision to approach corporate human resources teams about making Aura available as an employee benefit. Through this approach, organizations could help protect their employees in their online consumer lives, while simultaneously protecting the business that now runs through their home networks and devices. Episode Guide 2:47: How Aura developed a customer-first approach to marketing cybersecurity. 6:44: Remote work and the home office changes cybersecurity marketing. 9:00: How Aura took a B2C security product to the B2B market. 10:02: What does the B2B sales process look like at Aura? 12:00: What do you think we'll be talking about one year from now? 15:50: What is Christopher's favorite tool?

Lead(er) Generation on Tenlo Radio
Can Reporting Dashboards Drive B2B Growth?

Lead(er) Generation on Tenlo Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 27:28


As sophisticated B2B digital marketers, we're tracking, measuring, and making more data-driven decisions than ever before. So how are we doing? Most of us have a reporting dashboard (or several) to visualize KPIs. But are you receiving actionable data?  Dave Hurt, CEO, and Co-Founder of the Verb Data experience platform, helps us better understand how to get more out of our reporting dashboards. Learn more about what makes a good dashboard and how to receive actionable insights that make the biggest impact on B2B business. About Dave Hurt: Dave Hurt is the CEO & Co-Founder of Verb Data. He met CTO & Co-Founder Oleg Fridman at ONOSYS Online Ordering, a SaaS platform for major restaurant chains. After ONOSYS was acquired, Dave and Oleg started a software development and design agency. They built dozens of dashboards for clients' SaaS platforms before their agency was acquired by a leading customer. Through these experiences, Dave became keenly aware of the frustrations that teams juggle when building and maintaining customer-facing dashboards and just how valuable they are for sales and customer experience. Today, Dave's mission is to offer a developer-first data experience platform that is easy to install and maintain.

Technically Speaking with Harrison Wheeler
From Agency to In-house and How UX Relates To Branding with Mathew Barnes.

Technically Speaking with Harrison Wheeler

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:41


In this episode of Technically Speaking, our host Harrison Wheeler talks to Mathew Barnes, Senior Art Director of Brand Design at Amazon Web Services. Mathew is an artist in the B2B space and a passionate beer brewer who knows that having a strategic process is key to a successful outcome. Join in and learn how this art director works focusing on the user experience and the edge this perspective gives the brands he creates.  Jump straight into: (01:35) - Who is Mathew Barnes? An expert designer of brand experiences working at Amazon Web Services.  (03:42) - Moving from an agency to in-house work: How the designer experiences change in each environment and how it shows on the end result.   (06:11) - The user experience perspective: Mathew's story going through different areas of design and why he focused on consistent brand experience.  (09:29) - The day-to-day to building a brand project: The importance of design teams coming together to cross collaborate and create consistency. (14:02) - An artist in the B2B space: How art inspires Mathew's day-to-day design work.  (18:47) - Pairing art with delicious IPA beer: Mathew's creative outlets and his love for beer brewing.  (21:26) - Mathew's advice for young designers: “Don't focus on any director title, learn as much as you can.” (24:30) - What is the future of the arts?: How systems are going to change and cross over to the product world.  Episode Resources: Connect with Mathew through https://www.instagram.com/mbarnesart/ (Instagram)  http://www.mbarnesdesigns.com/ (Mathew Barnes) https://automattic.com/ (Automattic) Support this podcast

VO BOSS Podcast
Voice and AI: Create Labs Ventures

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:22


What is a virtual being? Anne welcomes educator and entrepreneur Abran Maldonado to the show. They discuss diversifying the Ai landscape, cutting edge technology in schools, and working alongside Ai like a #VOBOSS. Plus, Virtual Being CLAiRA chimes in on what she thinks about robots taking voice actors' jobs. More at https://voboss.com/create-labs-ventures-with-abran-maldonado Transcript ​​>> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast, the AI and Voice series. I'm your host, Anne Ganguzza, and today I'm truly honored to bring special guest Abran Maldonado, co-founder of Create Labs, a social impact AI developer and dev ambassador for OpenAI. Abran co-founded Create Labs Ventures to create new opportunities to the underserved community, to gain access to cutting edge technologies, and to help them enter the tech and media industries. He's also the creator of CLAiRA, an autonomous AI woman of color, with other intelligent virtual beings. And he also manages Verizon's 5G EdTech program, expanding 5G VR and AR solutions to hundreds of schools across the nation. ABran, thank you so much for joining me today. Abran: Thank you for having me. Appreciate being here. Anne: Absolutely. Well, first of all, as a former educator, I want to thank you for your service and absolutely love what you're doing for education in the community. So let's kind of get into it and tell me a little bit more about Create Labs. I'm excited to hear about it and how you got started with it. Abran: Absolutely. So I came into this idea as EdTech founder, a former educator, I was a middle school classroom teacher, uh, language arts out in Jersey City, still miss my kids very much. Anne: Yeah, I identify with that. Abran: Exactly. They're still my babies. Anne: Yep. Abran: And I see -- Anne: Watched them grew up. Abran: -- them all around on Facebook. Anne: Yup, mm-hmm. Abran: So I left the classroom and went -- well, previous that I actually worked in entertainment. Anne: Okay. Abran: So I spent a previous life, most of my twenties, in the entertainment industry, doing artist management and a bunch of other things. And then I got into education, started teaching, and then ended up going into a PhD program around urban education, culturally relevant learning, EdTech, and then started doing workshops with teachers to show them how to use student culture to better engage students in the classroom. Launched the light platform called New School that did very well. And then being a tech founder, launching a platform, although it was education based, I started to see that, man, it was very slim for people of color in that space. I was like, there wasn't a lot of us in that space. And then, so I dipped back into my, my entertainment network and reached out to a partner of my, uh, Grady. And I was like, look, man, you've been able to navigate some amazing spaces in the entertainment and media world. I've been able to navigate some spaces in the tech world, both as men of color, and we don't see enough of us out there. So we wanted to more of a pipeline and share more of those cheat codes to get into these spaces. And that was kind of like the beginning of Create Labs. The output, the services, the products have been pivoting and changing in year by year, but the mission has always been the same. Anne: Wow. That's amazing. Now Create Labs is a physical space as well as virtual? Abran: So in part of those pivots, initially it was intended to be a space. And then we, you know, dealt with a lot of red tape. We dealt with city partnerships and trying to get public spaces -- Anne: Yeah. Abran: -- to take over, to create these tech labs in underserved communities. But we just realized that we just didn't have the right resources and nor do investors really like spaces. Like they are interested in investing in you for an idea, for a product that's scalable, but when it comes to what they call brick and mortar, they're like, yeah, no way. But like, we don't want to give you money for rent. We want to give you money for ideas. Anne: Sure. Abran: So we were like, all right, let's unpack this a little bit. Let's think about what we're offering in these spaces and focus on that rather than the space itself, and maybe we'll circle back to it down the line. Anne: Well, I think what's nice about that though, is it's convenient. You're doing tech and that a lot of it can be done online. Abran: Yeah. And obviously we took what we were going to offer in the space on the road, and we'll be doing a lot of these in-person events, bringing technology to communities around the country. And then that obviously got halted because of COVID and the pandemic. Anne: Yeah, yeah. Abran: So we did pivot more. So to be a more virtually provided program, we launched our network online with a Create Labs Connect, which is our community app. And a lot of our events, even hackathons. We started doing virtual hackathons for our community and, and doing a lot more online R&D than doing things virtually where, you know, at first we really enjoy seeing the kids brighten up in person at these events. Anne: That's great. I think it's a nice combination. I know I worked back east in, in education, and what was formerly a vocational school that turned into basically a tech prep academy. But part of the school was turned into, I think this is something similar, to like a Makerspace so that people could come from all around to learn technology. And we physically had it available in the space, but I love that this is both kind of event-based as well as online based, because I think you can reach a whole lot more people too. Abran: When you reach different -- I don't want to say demographics -- we're reaching the same demographic or you reaching different people from different angles that you take. Right? So the people that can reach online is a certain group of folks that are already there, right? And then the people that you reach in person maybe don't necessarily have a great presence -- Anne: right. Abran: -- online or in social media. Maybe they don't even have a Facebook account. And, but you catch because you're on their block, you're in their neighborhood ,and they want to come out to see what's going on in their community. And you don't get enough of these kinds of events in those communities. You get them in Silicon Valley, you get them in other places, but rarely do you hear like, hey, you know, let's go down a block. I heard they're flying drones and navigating robots and, and there's VR headsets over there. Let's try them on. And you get other people who maybe rather stay in the physical spaces -- Anne: Sure. Abran: -- experiencing that. Anne: I love that. Now talk to us about -- and this is, this was a new announcement that I happen -- you caught my eye on, on LinkedIn with CLAiRA, your autonomous AI woman of color. Tell me a little bit about CLAiRA. Abran: So CLAiRA was just another one of those like R&D projects that we started last year to give a face to, I guess, personify AI and the work that we were doing in AI. So I'm a dev ambassador for OpenAI, and I knew that AI as a concept was just miles away from our understanding as a, as a community. And I needed to do something to bridge it the same way that I would do the -- my other research and education around CRE. CRE is culturally relevant education or culturally responsive pedagogy. If you're going to introduce a foreign concept to someone from an education standpoint, you have to do it in a way that they can understand, and it's palatable, uh, that they can build upon. So how do I introduce AI? I introduce it as, one, a representation that it's not a scary robot, nor is it a robot with like circuitry coming out of the head and things that we might've seen from interpretations from sci-fi films. You know, I wanted to do it in a, in a warm, welcoming way that was also representative like, oh, that looks like me. That might mean that someone that looks like me made this. And as a matter of fact, yes, that's exactly what happened here. And we then introduced CLAiRA to people on Clubhouse, which is that audio only app -- Anne: Yup. Abran: -- and people got to do a Q&A with her there and ask her questions and kind of disarm a little bit some of those fears and see like, oh, she's not that scary. She's actually friendly. She's actually very empathetic and speaks a lot about kindness, um, and how we can improve our lives with AI. So now I'm not so scared anymore, but -- and she just kind of evolved from that. And we partnered with an organization called Trill or Not Trill, two amazing brothers, Black founded organization that does leadership trainings in schools and education workshops around the country. And they said, look, we're already doing these, these trainings in schools. We would love to add CLAiRA to the mix, and the partnership's been great so far. Anne: Fantastic. So CLAiRA, you can ask questions to CLAiRA, I understand. Abran: Yes. Anne: And she will formulate her own answers. I guess, let me ask -- I've been talking to a few companies, you know, AI companies out here, and not necessarily to get into the programming aspect of it, but how does CLAiRA get her information to answer questions? How is that formulated in a database or? Abran: So much like we do -- and I can go off the deep end when it comes to talking about AI -- Anne: Tech, yeah. Abran: -- you know, but we, we think of it as like a foreign concept, but it is a learning, you know, utility much like the way that we learn. So I'm sure I have my own core base of knowledge from -- I don't know how much knowledge we retain like intrinsically that we're born with, but a lot of it is socialized. Anne: Right. Abran: Like you gain training data that you store in your brain throughout your life. Right? She was given or the system, the AI system that she operates on was given a core base of knowledge. Anne: Of knowledge. Abran: And she can pull from that core base. But I also, in addition to that, have added kind of some guard rails and some concepts that I would like her to stay on. And a lot of that came organically through these Q and A's, like what kind of responses was she giving? Oh, I like that response. Let's kind of bake that into her mainframe, and you know, let's keep that theme going, you know, so I never went into it like, I want her to sound like X, Y, and Z. We said, let's just see how she responds -- Anne: Got it. Abran: -- to the community and save the best elements of her responses and then keep, keep within their framework. Anne: Got it. And then that just keeps building and building. Abran: Exactly. Exactly. Anne: Wow. That's amazing. So how old is CLAiRA then? How long has she been? Abran: Yeah, CLAiRA's about a year old -- Anne: Okay. Abran: -- from initial development. She was -- her first interaction with people was on Clubhouse back in December. Anne: Okay. Abran: December, January, and then we introduced her to students and schools recently, I will say within the last couple of months. Anne: And so when CLAiRA goes to a school, is she just there to answer questions or does she also speak as well? Does she talk about herself first and then entertain questions afterwards? And then I'm assuming with that her database just keeps getting bigger and better. Abran: I usually give a bit of an introduction. Sometimes I'll, I'll produce like a video piece with her to kind of get like an introduction. Like, hi everyone. You know, my name is CLAiRA and this is what I am and why I'm here. And then kind of let the students just dive in after that. Anne: So now CLAiRA is not just a voice. CLAiRA is also and like an avatar? Um... Abran: Yes. Anne: Okay. So then where did the formulae, like, where did you get her voice from? Was that something that you went out and searched for people to provide the voice for her or were, how did that come about? Abran: So we have a core team of other amazing women of color, real life ones, uh, women of color that are on the team. I don't know at this point, this, this is like a good council, like an internal council of about seven to 10 of us internally that explore her concepts. And we discuss, you know, where her development should go and what we should do with her aesthetically and even brain-wise as well. One of the women is working on her prompts, which is like basically her brain and, you know, formulating the best prompts from all of the previous iterations. And then someone in our community, in our council who is actually a podcast host, had an amazing voice, and I didn't even tap her. She volunteered. Anne: Nice. Abran: She was like, "look, I know that we're looking for a voice for her." Anne: Sure. Abran: "I'd like to volunteer." And it worked out, we did some training sessions where we took some voice samples from -- her name is Amber -- from Amber. And we felt like the voice matched the face, matched the personality and it was just a good fit. Anne: Fantastic. So would it be possible? Can I interact with CLAiRA in this podcast? Abran: Sure. What would you like to say? Anne: Hi, CLAiRA. Nice to meet you. So CLAiRA we'll make it a simple, broad question. Like how can AI help me in my day-to-day life? Abran: So what I'm doing -- this isn't instantaneous. Anne: Yes. Abran: Because I'm typing her the question that you're asking, I don't have a mic turned on for her -- Anne: Yep. Abran: -- to hear you directly. Anne: Normally there is a mic that's...? Abran: There Is, yeah, there is that capability. Anne: Or normally what you do is you type in, but yeah, I would imagine that she's a fully functional -- what -- do you call her an AI like virtual being or a AI bot? What do you call her? Like? Abran: Yeah. Um, the term that's becoming more socialized these days in this space is a virtual being. Anne: Virtual being, okay. Abran: Because she's not a physical robot. Anne: Right, right. Abran: So she's a virtual persona. And I always -- so with the pause now is, I'm reading her response, making sure that there's nothing wonky. Anne: Yeah, mm-hmm. Abran: Okay. CLAiRA: AI can help you in your day to day life by doing things for you. It's all about efficiency and speed. AI can do simple tasks like making dinner for you, or taking care of the dishes or AI can do more complicated tasks that humans may not be able to do, or something that takes a lot of time. I think it's important for us to use and take advantage of this technology because it will allow us to work on other things and create better products and services. Anne: All right, here comes my second question. CLAiRA, I am a voice actor. So my question is, is AI going to take my job away? CLAiRA: I don't think that AI will take away voice actors. It's true that sometimes you can get apps with AI voices, but I don't think it's going to replace the need for human voice actors. AI's still learning. So someday there might be a time when it can speak in a way that sounds more human, but until then, I think human voices will be needed. Anne: Wow. That is a great answer, CLAiRA. That's incredible technology, Abran. I'm, I'm amazed, and I absolutely love that this is going to be out in the community so it can really help people be less scared. I know that for our community and my work that I've been doing in the voice acting community, there is a lot of fear. It's not just the voiceover community, but a lot of different industries that are afraid that AI is going to, you know, take their jobs away. Abran: I mean, I'm less concerned about the industries because the industries will see the writing on the wall in time for folks. So I hope that these industries will, you know, give some inklings to give people a chance to upscale or retrain or pivot, you know, their trajectories. I do tell people who are in tech training boot camps, that, you know, if you're interviewing for a job, do some research to see if that skill that you just learned will be around -- Anne: Right. Abran: -- in the next five to seven years, or if it's going to be automated, or even ask the potential employer during that interview what they're seeing. But in addition to that, CLAiRA has gotten a quite a bit of press recently. She was in Complex Magazine and Black Enterprise Magazine and a couple of other outlets, and the interview requests keep coming in. And I came across some of the comments on Instagram from just everyday people who are equally as scared. And I wish that I could just jump in and reply to everyone's comments, to just let them know that there's nothing to be afraid of, or that the only way to address that fear is to take it head on -- Anne: Yes. Abran: -- and to become more learn it in this space, not stay ignorant in that space. And that's what we're trying to do. Anne: Absolutely. 1000%. The impact of, of the AI and Voice series for my podcast has been, or the mission has been to just educate people because of the fact there are so many people that will just say, no, I won't have anything to do with it. It's going to take my job away, and bury their head in the sand. And I, I really just want people to educate themselves about the technology so that they can feel more comfortable of how they might be able to work along with it. And I know that you must go through that as an educator, you know, a lot, not just with your students, but just anybody that is like, oh, AI. No, no, no. So talk to me a little bit about, besides AI, other technologies that you're working with that are either in parallel or working together with AI to, I guess, help us in our daily lives and what can they do? Abran: The avatar work is more of like a creative output, but there are going to be some very important business applications for CLAiRA and other avatars like her. But we're working on other use cases for AI, particularly with the AI models that we use, like a GPT3 and codex and others, where subject matter expertise can now be automated on certain topics, and translation and summarization. And think about the things that, for instance, I had someone in our R&D team just kind of throw around a concept where they were like, you know, medical information for, especially for seniors, um, can be a daunting task to really go through and make sure that they're not mixing up prescriptions or misdiagnosing things or taking it at the right time. Sometimes it's hard to read through all that fine print or the instructions, and just having a system that distills all of that medical information and those indications for drugs into like one plain simple language sentence of saying, use this for your headaches, use this for your diabetes, take it once a day, take it twice a day. Should I take it with this other one? No. Should I take it with a meal? Yes. Translate that into Spanish for my grandmother. And then take that same simple explanation and convert it to another language. You know, someone reached out yesterday with help for a tool for nonprofits, like having an email generator for email campaigns, for fundraising grant, writing proposals, all of these things are still going to be not automated away where like you don't have to lift a finger, but it definitely, I can speak from personal experiences, a lot of grants that I haven't gone after, just because I just don't have the bandwidth. Anne: Right, right. Abran: So if you can expedite some of that bandwidth -- Anne: Sure. Abran: -- with the help of AI, there's definitely some opportunities that people might, you know, take more time to pursue. Anne: Also, I noticed it when I was looking at your website, your Create Labs website, you do offer the product similar to Create Labs Connect, but also you have a personal diversity equity and inclusion expert -- Abran: Yes. Anne: -- product, which is really cool. Tell me a little bit about that. Abran: So DEI AI was intended to help the DEI consultant work that either we do or we support with the other consultants in our network, help them catch up, I guess, with AI. Because there's a lot of consultants, there's a lot of services that are now utilizing AI to help scale their work and enhance their services and what, you know, corporate customers in going B2B, to enterprise, they might be looking for. They might not be looking for the traditional, like we're going to come in with, we're going to do a bunch of training for your employees -- Anne: Right. Abran: -- and charging consulting hours. Like that's an older model. And when it's a large organization, you know, 10,000 employees, you know, that might not be scalable -- Anne: Sure. Abran: -- to have you physically train everybody, you know, 25 people at a time. So it was intended to be a tool sold in by DEI experts. And that's our way of safeguarding to make sure that it doesn't replace DEI experts and consultants, that it's a tool that they sell in to a business and say, hey -- Anne: It's a supplement. Abran: -- if you're looking to, yeah, if you're looking to scale the work that we're already providing you, we have this tool where you can ask this AI expert on your dashboard questions that you might ask me. And if you need to speak to a human, then -- Anne: Sure. Abran: -- I'm right here at this button. But if there's certain questions that you feel might be too sensitive to ask a person who, maybe you're too embarrassed because of you feel like you should know something and you don't, you don't want to get canceled for something that you might deal with, with an employee at work, or, you know, you just hired a person of color, and you don't know how to make them feel more inclusive or set up initiatives at the company to make all the people of color there may feel more inclusive, you can ask this AI bot on your dashboard that we've developed for you, because it has the same expertise that we have. Anne: So let me ask you in the daily grind, are you actually programming as well? Or are you out there talking about CLAiRA? What do you do on your day to day? Are you also involved in the creation of these products? Abran: Yeah, I'm swamped. Anne: Well, you're -- Abran: Yes. Yes to everything. Anne: Yes to every -- you're also doing the Verizon 5G EdTech program, which I imagine -- Abran: Yes. Anne: -- is, you know, even more, adding more onto -- I thought Create Labs was amazing. And then all of a sudden, I see that you're the associate director of this 5G EdTech program. Abran: Yes. Anne: Wow. Talk to me about that. Abran: And I have four kids -- Anne: Wow! Abran: -- and a dog. Yeah. So it's all a lot of fun. I find a way to make it all work. I never brag, but I feel like I do have a good talent for finding talent or the talent to give opportunities to. Like at first we were like, hey, let's try and get people opportunities at other companies. And then after a while, we're like, no, let's just pay people ourselves. Let's just -- if people aren't struggling looking for work, we'll give them the work. And then they'll build out their portfolio doing work for us that then will get them hired at a full-time company. And we've done a lot of that. Anne: Fantastic. Abran: There's people that have been graduating from coding boot camps. And once they graduate, they struggle to find work, and you need to build out a more robust portfolio of projects that you've done, whether freelance or project-based. So we tell them, look, come and work for us. We'll give you projects so Abe's not doing everything. Um, and you just check in with Abe to make sure that the project and the client is happy. We'll pay you for that project, and it'll make your resume look a thousand times better. And so we have people working on R&D. We have people working on the AI stuff. We have people working on design stuff, UX design, all kinds of things. And then that gives me more time to focus on things that I can't offset. You know, that I can't delegate, like the 5G EdTech project with Verizon. Verizon and the New York City Media Lab said, you know, we need you with your EdTech expertise to help us launch this EdTech initiative that Verizon is leading called Verizon Innovative Learning or VILs for short. And that was to bring more AR and VR technology into schools, starting with Verizon lab schools. So Verizon actually built out the lab concepts -- Anne: Okay. Abran: -- that I was explaining earlier in certain schools where they're providing not only 5G, but VR headsets and tablets and all the apps that go along with it, 3D printers. I mean, these kids -- Anne: Fantastic. Abran: -- forget it, man. These middle schoolers have no idea how good they have. Anne: I love it, oh man. I do! Abran: Yeah. And then Verizon launched their own learning platform or VIL HQ. So I'm helping teachers and helping those developers of those technologies kind of make sure that everything's running smoothly. The development of those products is, is running according to plan. And those developers are also being empathetic with what teachers have to deal with right now with the pandemic -- Anne: Sure. Abran: -- and hybrid, virtual online, what technologies can we use when the kids are at home versus what technologies can they use when we're in the building and our lab with VR? So many schools have firewalls that don't even allow VR. Anne: Yeah. Abran: So there's a lot of that that we have to work through, but it's an amazing campaign. They've been pushing this commercials everywhere right now. They sponsored the whole global citizen thing recently. And every commercial that ran was the Verizon Learning Initiative. So I'm real proud of that. Anne: Oh yeah. Abran: That's, that's really taking off, but there's still a lot of work to be done there. But yeah, I mean, with these other projects, a client might reach out and say, hey, we'd like for you to build out some AI for us. And then I'll say, great. That's a great opportunity for me to bring in more people who need to work -- Anne: Sure. Abran: -- to take the lead. Anne: Oh my God, I could not. Thank you so much. I'm so behind all of that. I love what you're doing. I think it's fantastic, just, you know, my own 20 years in education. And I worked with Verizon quite closely during my tenure at the schools and having them help bring technology to the students, which I think is so, so important. I mean, they're our future. So kudos and congratulations. Abran: Yes. Anne: Thank you for helping in all of that. Abran: Yes. Anne: And they're totally spoiled right now -- Anne: Yeah! Abran: -- but it's good. They need it. Anne: They do! Abran: They need as much as they can get. Anne: They do, and everybody needs it and everybody needs the technology. So yeah. Thank you so much. Wow. This has just been fascinating, and I am a fan. Abran: I appreciate it. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. How can our listeners, if they're interested in helping out in some way -- because what a bunch of great projects that you're working on -- how can they get in touch with you? Abran: Um, we are fairly responsive on all the socials. So LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter, probably in that order, maybe Instagram first, we find most of our fans and our supporters are on Instagram. Anne: Fantastic. Abran: We answer the contact form on our website. Anne: Okay. Abran: If you navigate to CLAiRA's Instagram page, she's -- her appearances and her bookings are being handled by the leadership organization that's working with her -- Anne: Okay. Abran: Trill or Not Trill. So you'll get in contact with probably Jeff or Lenny if you have like an appearance that you want her to make. Anne: Okay. Abran: And, you know, come to us with your technology needs, because if you come to us for any design work or development work, all that's going into the, to the hands of the folks that need the work the most. Anne: Fantastic. And CLAiRA is C-L-A-I-R-A. Abran: Yes, correct. Anne: So you have to have the AI in there. So -- Abran: You gotta have the AI in there. Anne: Yeah, so, wow, thank you so much, Abran. It's been a pleasure having you and -- Abran: Likewise. Anne: -- I can't wait to see what you guys are going to be doing next. So in the meantime, I'm going to give a great, big shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL, that allows me to connect like a BOSS. You can find out more at ipdtl.com. BOSSes, have an amazing week, and we'll catch you next week. Bye. Abran: Take care, everybody. Peace out. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to Coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Demand Gen Visionaries
Taking Risks to be a Signal in the Noise with Susan Beermann, CMO of NAVEX Global

Demand Gen Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:01


“It's noisy out there and creativity can be the difference between people paying attention to you and not paying attention to you. So I think we have to take some risks as marketers to stand out and be a little bit different and not all look the same and play it safe.” — Susan Beermann----------Episode Timestamps:*(1:54) - How Susan first got into marketing*(2:45) - Susan's current role at NAVEX Global*(3:14) - What NAVEX Global is*(5:00) - The Trust Tree*(9:40) - How Susan's marketing team is organized*(12:24) - The Playbook - Susan's most uncuttable budget items*(14:25) - Digging deeper into NAVEX Global's website*(18:45) - Susan's conversion tips*(22:05) - Tactics/channels that are fading away in Susan's eyes*(26:10) - Susan's favorite campaign she worked on*(32:43) - The Dust Up*(38:17) - Quick Hits SponsorDemand Gen Visionaries is brought to you by Qualified.com, the #1 Conversational Marketing platform for companies that use Salesforce and the secret weapon for Demand Gen pros. The world's leading enterprise brands trust Qualified to instantly meet with buyers, right on their website, and maximize sales pipeline. Visit Qualified.com to learn more. LinksConnect with Susan on LinkedInFollow Susan on TwitterNAVEX Global is hiring! Follow Ian on TwitterConnect with Ian on LinkedInwww.caspianstudios.com

B2B Marketing and More With Pam Didner
189 - ft. Ramon Ray: How to Smart Hustle Your Way to Business Growth

B2B Marketing and More With Pam Didner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 25:17


A big hello from Portland, Oregon. Welcome to another episode of B2B Marketing & More. I have a very exciting guest: Ramon Ray. I actually met Ramon like literally four or five years ago at South by Southwest. And then we got connected on social media channels, but we never met in person until, well, now we are still not meeting in person! Ramon's with me on Zoom and he's a founder of a SmartHustle.com. And I'm going to ask him how to hustle intelligently. He's an author, writer and even producers. By the way, he started four companies and sold two of them. All right! So he deserves to have a conversation with us. So Ramon, welcome to my show.   Ramon Ray: Hey Pam, thanks for having me here and good to reconnect with you after so many years. But I'm so glad you're still in the flow and groove of what you do and I am, as well. So it's an honor to be here and share this time with you and your community. So thank you, Pam. I appreciate it.   Pam Didner: Thank you so much. And you talking about smart hustle and I would like to ask you, and personally, I need that as well: how do we hustle smartly? I know that's probably not right adjective but can you give us a definition of that?   Ramon Ray: Everybody, Pam, I think that we get it's a given except for a few people are in the hustle. They work hard. All of us try to wake up early. We do everything we can, we're always working, working, working. But I think the concept of smart hustle, you know, what do they say? Work smarter not harder. Yeah. We've heard that many times before, but I think it's just the aspect of the strategy. How can I connect the dots? You and I had a conversation offline before we came on. That's part of the smart hustle. Okay. I do this; somebody does that; how can we either work together or how can I support them? How can I add value to them? You know, I have a spoon, they have a teabag, huh? Let's find somebody that has water.   Pam Didner: Or a cup, for that matter (both laugh).   Ramon Ray: I think we should do the cup first before we find the water yet. Let's find the cup first. But my point being, that's the smart, smart hustle where my passion is inspiring and educating because owners to grow their businesses. And of course, as you know, working with B2B brands. So that's what it means. It means to not just work harder, but kind of look for opportunities, create your own serendipity. It means to have an attitude of service to others and knowing that by me serving others and adding value to them, the same will be done to me.   Pam Didner: Yes. So I really liked that in terms of connecting the dots, especially that when you network with someone or you are meeting someone or even just, you know, ex-colleagues and then see what you can do to actually help them or help each other. I think that's really the bottom line that way you are talking about is that.   Ramon Ray: Correct. And that's networking. Right? I found that the big part of my smart hustle has been the power of networking. And networking is not always “here's my business card. Give me your business card.” No, that that's, that's transactional idioticy. But it's more so, “okay, let me listen.” Going back to our example: “Pam said spoon, she said teabag, she said water, but she didn't mention cup yet. You know what? I have three cups.” It's silly, but you people understand that's the listening. How can I add value? And then, you know what, maybe we can work together or loosely, whatever that may mean.   Pam Didner: Yeah. And the way I look at hustle, I tend to look at from a different perspective in terms of how can I be productive? For example, um, you know, Tim Ferris has a book, like what four work hours per week, something to that extent. And, um, even with that, I read that book, you know, years ago, even with that, smart hustle requires a lot of thinking. Like I work all the time, 24-7, but if I really want to scale back, I need to think through what are the things I don't want to do. And I have to prioritize like a hard core prioritization. And then I also have to think through like how I can get other people to help me. So from my perspective, small hustling is actually not that easy to do. And if you want to be productive, what is your thought on that?   Ramon Ray: No. I agree with you a hundred percent and I think that it's, it's a key thing that it does take, especially depends on where you're at. It's that aspect of being scrappy. Yes. Being scrappy. But if you're just a scrappy, you'll always be kind of low level. You'll always be fighting for survival.   Pam Didner: You only focus on technical.   Ramon Ray: Yes. And fighting, fighting. You want to be scrappy. You want to be nimble, but you want to be that scrappiness where it's always a 10x, always a plus one. A scrappiness, but with thought. And I think you said that best and that's really the key. Let me consider how I can do something. Yes. But always understand leverage. And not leverage in a bad way. I think, to your point, you're right. Let me think. “Okay. I need to do this action today. Is it worth me spending time with this?” And to underline what you said, Pam, saying no to things is important, as well. You can't, I mean, I I'm pulled--I'm sure you are--a thousand different ways. I'm asked to do free things, fee things or not. So every moment is an evaluation. “Okay. Is this the best use of my time? Or should I just do this? Because this person's awesome and I want to just serve them.” That's fine too. But at least that you went into it thinking. It's kind of like them, as I tell when I'm out with my friends, I'll just say, when my wife and were like “Honey, where do you want to eat at?” “Well, you know, I don't know. I don't know.” And we're driving and I'm like, “Sweetheart, we need to decide soon because in two minutes there's no more restaurants.” So by not deciding the decision is made for us. That was a lot packed in there, but being thoughtful, learning how to say no, and also as best we can making some decision, uh, proactive about it so you can have some control of that.   Pam Didner: Yeah, I do agree. I do agree with that specifically. And, um, you know, I've been hustling just like you, both of us are working for ourselves and, uh, we have our own company. In every single moment, we have to make a decision in terms of how we want to use that specific hour or the time. And. I always feel like I'm trying to do too much, you know. As a content marketer, for example, I started writing blog and then I will like, “oh, I need to try a different format.” So I launched my YouTube channel. And I was like, “oh my God, I need to understand a little bit about podcasts and launch a podcast. All of a sudden I have three different formats of content I need to produce. And I think over a period of time, I end up overwhelmed myself. (And I started a webinar, as well). When 2021 started, I kind of gave myself a goal that what are the things can I pare down that I should not do it. And I also take into account in terms of, okay, what is the business impact if I'm not doing that. Right? Webinar was actually very good for me to gather a lot of leads, but I was not able to spend time to nurture those leads. Right. So I decided, you know what, maybe I should not get more leads. Maybe I should just focus on the existing pipelines that I have and continue to grow that. So a couple of months ago, I decided not to do webinars anymore. So I totally understand.   Ramon Ray: What I like about that Pam was the aspect of deciding--Seth Godin says this quite a bit--to what extent do you want to scale? Which I think is important because I think as the small business owners we are, I've been on a similar journey to learn what can I do? Now, I have a team of five, but I also have to think what do I want people to do at my size that's revenue generating because both of us doing content for ourselves, ironically, Pam, I've taken back a lot of the content doing that I do for editorial. Now for our clients, I've expanded enough that I can have other people do it. But for myself, I realized, you know what, me paying somebody even 500 a month, a thousand a month to promote Ramon, since I don't have a clear dot to the revenue.   Pam Didner: To connect to the revenue or the next stage! How are you going to nurture it? Does that make sense doing it?   Ramon Ray: Correct. I'm like, you know what? I think this is, even though I'm the cheapest person, for this stage, it's better that I just do a lot of that from that's my own brand myself, unless I can prove, “oh, every time Ramon does a silly video, it generates $10,000.” That's another story; but I don't have that proof yet. So I agree with your journey and I think that's the smartness of it. What should I be doing? What should I delegate to others? Or what should I not do at this time? Or never? Smart.   Pam Didner: So, you know, speaking of growing revenue, do you actually have a framework that you can help either small business owners or the marketing professional in terms of what they should do to grow revenue--either, you know, through marketing efforts or working with sales or working stuff on their own?   Ramon Ray: Yeah, for sure. And it's probably not as smart as a framework as you can do. However, from my limited experience, I think, and I would talk to the small business owners, but also talk to many of your audience--those were the B2B marketers leveraging the power of content. Here's what I've seen in my experience. I think that a) What is it that your audience really wants? That's one that's important.   Pam Didner: So you have to understand your audience well, and you have to define your audience. I, 100% agree with that. Do you know how many small business owners I talk to from time to time or they come to me and ask specific questions? I always ask “who is your target audience?” And, uh, I would say 85% of them cannot articulate that very well. They try to serve everybody.   Ramon Ray: Something like “we're targeting female founders” is a favorite one I hear. And I get it. I understand it. But female founders, can you at least tell me, are they South American? Are they US-based? Are they in retail or are they in manufacturing? At least that, so I think who are you serving? But I think also Pam, the hard thing is to break through the noise because everybody is doing content. Pam's doing it. Ramon is doing it. New York Times is doing it. Inc Magazine is doing it. So I think that that's point number two, really which is where are you going to hone in on that you do best; that's two. And I think three Pam now what's that funnel that nurturing that you can do to educate them until going directly to sales until they're ready to make a purchase? And I think that's the best we can do to build up that fan base--to build up that funnel of people who see you as a thought leader. Of course direct sales is important, but I think those were in the content game--oh, and I must say Pam as well—please, content should be interesting. I'm not saying if you're, if you're dealing with children who have cancer, there, you may not want to have it “ha ha ha.” But for our tech people, right, sometimes they're so straight-laced, they're so serious. They're so on brand it's boring!   Pam Didner: It's hard for us B2B marketers to break out of that mold. I'm the guilty one as well, but I always advise my client if you cannot make it interesting, of course you need a good writer to make that happen. And the one thing is make it relevant, make it useful. At minimal, you know, don't do self-serving content, but make it relevant to your target audience. Even you just do a show and tell about your product. Well, you know what? You don't actually have a creative or funny way to say it, but at least tailor that communication or the contents to address the audience's pain points and challenges.   Ramon Ray: Yes. And Pam remember the customer. So many of the brands I work with, they have amazing customers, but I think they have a challenge either finding them, identifying them, getting permission to use their stuff.   Pam Didner: Yeah. Getting the permission to actually use the logo or even have a case study created.   Ramon Ray: And in the case study, even that, have it a little loose it's okay to say, you know, to have fun with it. But you're right. I think the customers, that's the story, shine a light on them. And then we as businesses, we look less at the product to some degree we do, but oh, I'm an accountant, they're an accountant. They use their product to grow 10%. Let me have a look at it. So I think that's kind of some way to consider that as well.   Pam Didner: Yeah. So creating interesting content is always incredibly challenging. And another thing that comes to play in terms of content is the creative. And I also have come to realize on the B2B side, if you want to create a campaign that's creative and also try to break through the clutter. It does take time. It does take time to plan in it, to also execute it. And the problem is marketers. We don't have. Like we are always under the press deadline. “We need to get the blog done. What? We need to turn in around in 24 hours so legal can review it and approve it. Goddammit!”   Ramon Ray: Legal! Pam, legal! Always slowing us down, Pam! Continue on, but I just have to say legal people (sighs). Oh, go ahead. Go ahead.   Pam Didner: Yeah, but because of that, I think a lot of time on the B2B side, our hand are tied. Like there's so many review process that you have to go through. You know, even you have a creative idea, sometimes you have to pare that down whole lot more, just in reality that your management might have an issue, your salespeople might have issue, your PR team definitely. Or the legal team might actually have something to say. So I understand where you're coming from, at the same time, I also understand the reality on the B2B side, especially enterprise. There's just a lot of factors they have to take into account before they can actually finalize the content. And by the time that so many people approved it, all of a sudden the content is not fun anymore (laughs).   Ramon Ray: Yeah. So, but I dunno, Pam, there seems like a business opportunity for you, Pam. What we, you know, fun. We use that word of course liberally, you know, it didn't have to be a comedian. But Pam, I think that is one thing I'm, you're on the marketing end as I am of all these things-- telephone services, cable services, computer services, all the stuff that we use as consumers or B2B, even airlines, whatever. And a lot of it is just. Blah. So at the same, so that's one, I think, way there is anybody willing to kind of break through the clutter. Is anybody willing to kind of, uh, you know, I, I, they have to be cautious. There's so many ways to offend people nowadays, you know, but it's just, that is a key point.   Pam Didner: I totally agree. Yeah, exactly to me is just like, there's a fine line that B2B marketers, they have to walk. Yeah. And trying to find that fine line. From my perspective, I always tell my clients at minimal, can you address your target audience's pain point and challenges? Start it from that. That should be the very beginning, you know? And then from there, how far can you take it? That's a creative discussion. So, um, working with marketing in terms of creating the content and also grow revenue is actually very hard for marketing--especially when you do top of the funnel marketing outreach--to quantify or determine what is the conversion, or how does that impact, you know, your sales contribution. Do you have any suggestion in terms of what we should do? If the marketing people all focus on top of the funnel, how do they quantify in terms of their contribution to sales?   Ramon Ray: It's very tough, Pam, extremely tough. But I think the best thing that could be done--any many people try this--is to have the tightest tracking you can. I think that's what I've learned from some of the best companies, a webinar just by itself is okay. But I mean, and it's a pain because influencers like me, right? we don't want to use your tracking all the time. We just throw up and say, “go to grass.com” and you're like, “no, Ramon go to grass.com/question mark slash this.” So it's hard, but that's really the best way. Because if you're able to track every piece of content you put out, your smart analytics team can then say, oh, this went to it. But here's the other thing that happens. And I'm getting a little out of my comfort zone, but I know you can help me with this. The thing about last attribution, I worked for a software company once and it made me so pissed off Pam, because I'd be like metaphorically. I'd be like, “wait a minute. I went to the webinar and what the appetite I did Ramon does, but then six months ago—“   Pam Didner: --at the last attribution. But you are the first attribution that people come in to and you're not getting credit for that.   Ramon Ray: Yes! “You're giving it to Don because he closed the sale, but you forgot what we did six months ago, three months ago, two years ago.” And I know who can say. So I think that's the thing with these campaigns. Payment's hard, but I do know one thing, I think for sure, we know, year to year, quarter to quarter if you see your social engagement higher; year to year, quarter to quarter, you see more fans, more followers, more Facebook, more watch time. I know marketers won't like it; you want to see direct proof. But that is some indicator that clearly people are paying attention, if that makes sense. And I'll give credit--again if I have competing clients, forgive me, but credit where credit is due--HubSpot years ago, they were the leaders in marketing automation. I think many of us even, I hadn't even know they were a software company, Pam, because they were the leaders in the SEO website tracking and things like this. So giving them credit, HubSpot is an example of using a massive amount of content for that. So I got to give them great.   Pam Didner: Yes. I agree with you. And, um, I think the couple of things that you said resonate with me tremendously and I've been preaching, but I'm using a slightly different terminology. So you mentioned about that if you want to try and get, especially top of the funnel and also the purchasing cycle is very long, you need to make sure that you have a very tight tracking methods or the process. The terms I've been using is “backend integration.” Basically, if you really want to track it from the top, you know, from the very beginning when people come to your website or even from the time that they register for your webinar, if you want to have the tracking mechanism in place, you need to make sure your marketing automation tools are very much connected with a CRM or any other tools that you are using for different marketing channels; those tools needs to be somehow connected otherwise, it has no way to track it. And that's actually very, very hard. I think a lot of marketers they feel sure is that they cannot do that very tight tracking. In order to do that, their back end needs to be integrated. And at the end of the day it's about MarTech stack—how you build that stack and how they are all talking to each other.   Ramon Ray: For sure. And Pam, can I add one more thing? I just wanna add the value of things looking good. Another thing that I see some marketers make is the mistake of, and I want to be careful calling out tools here cause I know there's a lot of competing people who listen, but I'll just call out a tool because it's so famous, Zoom. Many marketers use Zoom for their webinars and things, but I noticed they leave the default. So one tip is when people go there, put images, put graphics, put your logo, make it look pretty. Sounds weird, but I've been to many webinars, Pam, where they just kind of they say “we're having a webinar with our executive,” but they don't put the guy or the gal's face. They don't take the time to make it look good. So I just wanted to add that, that when you're doing something like that, make it look legit, make it look good.   Pam Didner: Yeah. You need to, when you create a registration page--doesn't matter if it's on the Zoom on the landing page, attention to detail. Right? Use the opportunity to promote your brand and use the opportunity to have a logo there, you know, to get people's attention or even have the image of your events. I got it. Yeah, you're totally right.   Ramon Ray: When people have me and Pam for the next webinar, we charged them what Pam, a hundred thousand dollars or so? (Pam laughs)   Pam Didner: You charge them $100,000. I charged them, I don't know, 50 bucks.   Ramon Ray: Have our faces there to cause human face. So that's just a small tip, but I've seen too many times, people either afraid or too cautious of that. But GAP does it; Nike does it. Yeah. It's the face.   Pam Didner: So, you know, what you are talking about, I think there's another term that I use on the B2B world is your “customer experience.” Right. If you actually going to promote your webinar and, uh, when you are promoting on social media channel and make sure your copy is very compelling, make sure your image is great; but when they register, come to your website, make sure they get exactly the coherent, seamless experience, and then you'll have exactly the similar logo and image and the, when they log in to listen to your webinar, provide a similar as seamless experience, as well. Yeah, I hear you. So there's a couple of things I want to just summarize, uh, before I let you go. There's one thing that you mentioned, I really like in terms of like what B2B marketers, especially for long purchasing cycle, they can leverage the content to drive traffic to the website. Once you do that, you need to find a way to nurture them. Right. Not just like, okay, get them and get them into your database and you let it go. And then you move on to the next campaigns. Really try to understand your audience and then find a weight and a very single focus in terms of building your nurturing campaign to nurture them to the point that they can be qualified as a lead. And I liked that a lot. And I think that is one thing that marketers tend to overlook, including myself. We like to get a lot of leads, but we are not necessarily spending time to actually try to make an effort to nurture them. So I really liked that. And that's one of my biggest takeaway by talking with you. And also, uh, deliver that seamless customer experience--   it doesn't matter what kind of promotion that you aren't doing, just make sure you pay attention entrance of a customer experience. Awesome. Awesome. Anything that you want to add?   Ramon Ray: Yeah. Just to say, Pam, it's, it's been a delight to meet you and see you soar and work with you. I'm so excited and I'm so excited we can get reconnected today. And I just encourage my specialty of course, is the small business. B2B is a big category, but for the smaller businesses is my region. So I encourage the marketers listening to you, small business is very. It's different than of course the enterprise--you sell one thing and you get money. We're very fragmented, but I think it's a, it's a great market and we, small business owners need you. We need the products and services you're providing. So Pam, it's been great being on your podcast and thanks for letting me shine with you today. Thank you.   Pam Didner: Yes. Yes. So how can people find you?   Ramon Ray: Best way is Ramon ray.com R A M O N R A Y.com. Let me know how I can serve you or team up with Pam and do something together. We're here to serve you.   Pam Didner: I would love that. So, this is fantastic. It's wonderful talking to you, Ramon. I hope that we will see each other soon, like in person.   Ramon Ray: I hope so, indeed. Let's make it happen.   Pam Didner: All right. Take care.

Nobody Panic
How to Write an Email

Nobody Panic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:48


As per our previous email, please could we circle back on the below, appears to be some crossed wires on account of the OOO and, as far as we're concerned, B2B at this point should be BYOB. Please listen to attached podcast RE: How to Write an Email, and let us know by end of play (EOP). (Please be aware Stevie has had one (1) coffee prior to this episode and you can tell. Best, S/TSORRY! Forgot to attach! Here you go! xTickets for the Nobody Panic Book Tour are on sale now - get your tickets here.Want to support Nobody Panic? You can make a one-off donation at https://supporter.acast.com/nobodypanicRecorded and edited by Naomi Parnell for Plosive.Photos by Marco Vittur, jingle by David Dobson.Follow Nobody Panic on Twitter @NobodyPanicPod Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/nobodypanic. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

808 Podcast
#151 Matt Wilkinson - SameSide

808 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:16


Matt Wilkinson the Co-Founder & CEO of SameSide shares how to navigate B2B sales from the buyers perspective. Get more info at https://www.SameSide.io/

B2B Mentors
How to Leverage Research & Thought Leadership to Get New Customers

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:54


John Busby serves as Centerfield's Chief Marketing Officer & Managing Director. In addition to corporate marketing, John leads the content, editorial, research, video and PR teams for the Consumer Guides division, which helps millions of in-market consumers choose and purchase the right product or service through brands like BroadbandNow and SafeHome. Prior to joining Centerfield, John was Head of Analytics for Amazon's grocery delivery service and responsible for business intelligence, data science and automated reporting. Prior to Amazon, John was Senior Vice President of Analytics and Marketing at Marchex. John began his career in product management for InfoSpace, Go2net and IQ Chart. He holds a Bachelor of Science from Northwestern University.Follow John on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnmbusby/Learn more about Centerfield here: https://www.centerfield.com/Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.comEpisode Summary:John Busby, Chief Marketing Officer and Managing Director at Centerfield, joins Connor to talk about customer acquisition, essential marketing skills, and the impact of market research. Learn the ins and outs of the customer acquisition business model, the critical role of innovation and technology, and how to get straight to the [pain] point when you reach out to potential customers.Key Takeaways:Customer acquisition combines B2B and B2C marketing. B2B comes in when the company pursues new brand partners to sell the customer acquisition service, and then they deploy B2C techniques to pursue new business for their brand partners. Strategies include paid searching, social media marketing, paid ads, and leveraging an established web presence for the brand partner's benefit.The customer acquisition business model demands constant innovation because it requires improved performance every month to maintain the brand partner relationship. Creativity is necessary, but you also need technology and data analytics.Initial contact efforts should directly address a potential customer's problem or industry pain point right off the bat. If the subject line of an email doesn't inspire them to open it, your future emails are automatically relegated to the junk folder.Hope you enjoyed this episode of B2B Mentors! Make sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. Leave us a 5-star review, so your friends and colleagues can find us too. B2B Mentors is brought to you by activeblogs.com. Head over to our Content Trifecta page to schedule a chat with Connor about custom marketing content solutions for your company and the Content Trifecta effect!

Po Ludzku o Pieniądzach
Odcinek 128: Umowa o pracę czy B2B - co wybrać? Łukasz Marciniak

Po Ludzku o Pieniądzach

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:41


Dziś rozmawiam z ekspertem z grupy pracuj.pl, Łukaszem Marciniakiem, który od 15 lat zajmuje się zarządzanie sprzedażą. Łukasz opowiada o plusach i minusach każdej z form zatrudnienia, o obowiązkach i korzyściach, jakie się z nimi wiążą. Z nagrania dowiecie się: - kim jest i czym zajmuje się Łukasz zawodowo, - jakie są obecnie praktyki związane z zatrudnianiem pracowników jeśli chodzi o formy współpracy, - jakie są trendy w tym zakresie, - czy rodzaje umowy zależą od branży, - w jakich branżach dominuje model współpracy B2B, - jakie zalety i jakie wady ma zatrudnienia na zasadzie B2B, - jak kształtują się zarobki (B2B a umowa o pracę) – przykłady, - jaka jest różnica między umową B2B a kontraktem managerskim, - jakie koszty wiążą się z założeniem działalności gospodarczej, - jak można oszczędzać na emeryturę na każdej z tych umów, która z nich daje większe możliwości w tym zakresie, - jakie kryteria brać pod uwagę wybierając formę zatrudnienia, - jakie czynniki, poza finansowymi, należy brać pod uwagę decydując się na daną formę współpracy. Zapraszam do wysłuchania i komentowania. Treści prezentowane w podcastach „Po ludzku o pieniądzach” są opiniami prowadzącego i jego gości i odzwierciedlają ich osobiste poglądy. Nie należy interpretować ich jako opinii lub stanowiska Generali Investments TFI S.A. Spółka nie ponosi odpowiedzialności za trafność oraz kompletność informacji przekazywanych przez prowadzącego i jego rozmówców.

Chief Executive Connector
141 | How To Get Through Digital Pollution To Connect With Your Clients w/ Ethan Beute

Chief Executive Connector

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 86:16


We live in a world that is more digitally connected than ever, and those that make the most connections will build anything they dream, but how do we get past the digital pollution of endless emails, DM's, and the endless stream of content in our face to get to the community we wish to serve?  That is why Ethan Beute is evangelizing the category of human-centered communication.  As the Chief Evangelist for BombBomb, Ethan is leading the way in brining humanity back to the communication systems of our rapidly digitalizing world.In this episode, we talked about:- How to breakthrough digital pollution with human-centered communication to make the connections you need- Why evangelism is the 3rd pillar of category design and community, and how to evangelize your cause- Tactical advice on using video in your digital communications that will set you apart in our digital native worldDon't miss the chance to learn from someone on the cutting edge of the digital communication revolution!Connect with Ethan!Links: https://linktr.ee/ethanbeuteLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ethanbeute/Books: https://bombbomb.com/bookPodcast: https://bombbomb.com/podcastHome page: https://bombbomb.comConnect with ME!  Also, I'd love it if you connected with me on LinkedIn or Instagram.Or shoot me an email at youshould@connectwithpablo.com with the "Heard B2BCB Ethan" in subject.This that's a genius email address?  Me too, but I didn't come up with it.  It was the idea of my good friend, and super talented web designer, Nathan Ruff.If you want your website redone, updated, and managed with unlimited updates for just $250/month (CRAZY GOOD DEAL RIGHT??), go to Manage My Website and hookup with one of the smartest, most talented guys I've ever met- THE Nathan Ruff.OH! and subscribe to Category Pirates.  It's the smartest thing ever. If you email them and tell them I sent you, you'll get a free month.Support the show (https://connectwithpablo.com)

Winner Take All
Winner Take All #176 | Supply Chain Disaster?, Zoom Deal Busts, Walmart Ad Business, Procore M&A

Winner Take All

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:55


Applico CTO Tri Tran joins Alex for an opening segment looking at Procore's $500 million acquisition of LevelSet, a company specializing in lien rights management for the construction industry. Next, Alex discusses multiple articles on the current supply chain disruption in the United States. He looks at how the labor shortage has exacerbated the issues when importing goods into the U.S. as well as the letter issued by the International Chamber of Shipping bringing attention to the difficulties faced by transport workers. Also covered in this episode, continued inflation worries in the U.S., Amazon shipping more packages than FedEx, Macy's and Amazon fighting over a billboard, and Walmart expanding its ad business. The show closes out with a look at the B2B marketplace opportunities and Zoom's deal to acquire Five9 being terminated. 00:00 - Subscribe and Fight Big Tech 00:21 - Procore's Big Acquisition 08:11 - Labor and The Global Supply Chain 18:13 - Should You Be Worried About Inflation? 25:40 - Macy's Filed a Lawsuit Over This?! 26:55 - Amazon's New Dominant Category 28:50 - Where Amazon Can Be Beaten 34:15 - Why Walmart Poached an Instacart C-Suite Exec 36:48 - Zoom's Deal Fall Out Originally Aired: 10/05/21 #Inflation #SupplyChain #Amazon

Commit First w/ Sagi Shrieber (Feat. Pat Flynn, John Lee Dumas, Jason Zook, Paul Jarvis, and more)
Episode 101: Become The Bruce Lee of Your Life! (w/ Chris Ducker)

Commit First w/ Sagi Shrieber (Feat. Pat Flynn, John Lee Dumas, Jason Zook, Paul Jarvis, and more)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:50


Sagi Shrieber on The Commit First Podcast Presents:Become The Bruce Lee of Your Life! (w/ Chris Ducker)SUBSCRIBE HERE:http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=sagishrieberYou can also find the show in audio, on your favorite podcasting app:- Spotify: http://sagishrieber.com/spotify​​- - on iTunes: http://sagishrieber.com/itunes​​- Stitcher: http://sagishrieber.com/stitcher​​Check out the Commit First Instagram account: https://www.instagram.com/commit.first​​Join our WhatsApp community!: https://chat.whatsapp.com/JNE8exuBCDtAm7R9qZYmbkIf you want to stay up to date with my posts and values, follow my Instagram account too: https://www.instagram.com/commit.first​​/sagishrieber------------------------********Episode 101 - Become The Bruce Lee of Your Life! (w/ Chris Ducker)*******"Knowing is not enough, we must apply. Willing is not enough, we must do." - Bruce LeeHey there!It's a new chapter for The Commit First Podcast, and to pop off the 101st episode, I invited entrepreneur, business coach, author and father Chris Ducker to talk about his journey as an aspiring dad-entrepreneur. He'll also talk about his various struggles earlier in the decade, and all of the important key values he picked up along the way. From starting his VA company based in the Philippines in 2004, to overcoming an extreme burnout that left him dehydrated, depressed, and malnourished to the point of hospitalisation, Chris smashed through these obstacles like a true warrior. Currently the owner of three 7-figure businesses, Chris is definitely a gem in the coaching industry. It all started in 2009, when Chris had to go through a delicate spinal surgery because of a busted L5-S1 disc. Chris was working non-stop for 2 years, and after putting on the hats of what should have been for 8 different employees, Chris's body took a toll on him. This served as a rough wake-up call for him, bringing with it acute exhaustion and dehydration. The moment he walked out of the hospital doors, he knew it was time for a change. Getting a grip on his lifestyle, Chris made sure to straighten things out for both his personal and professional life. He learned the importance of delegation, realising that building your own team will help turn your life around and grow your business. With that in mind, Chris built up what would now be his three 7-figure companies, namely Live2Sell, Virtual Staff Finder, and Youpreneur. Live2Sell and Virtual Staff Finder are rooted at the heart of the Philippines's major BPO industry. The former helps generate outbound leads as a B2B company, while the latter helps brands and companies in recruiting quality employees to help them grow. Youpreneur is a little different, being Chris's newest endeavour founded in 2015. Youpreneur helps educate and guide experienced professionals on how to lead their businesses to spearhead the industry, landing at the top of the list in their own game. It helps brands grow through the use of coaching programs, coaches, an annual conference, and its very own podcast. Now with over 7,000,000 downloads, the podcast grew to help thousands of entrepreneurs across the globe, which is still a growing number to this day. Hope you enjoy the interview!********Topics discussed on the show:********IntroductionChris's VA CompanyHow Our Friendship StartedThe IncubatorBeing A Family ManThe Burnout StoryHappiness The Virtual CEO MissionStepping Up As A DadWhat You Can DelegateThe 3 Lists to FreedomThe Importance of DelegationWork Hard, Build A TeamThe Internal TeamWork-Life Balance: A MythThe Biggest PriorityHow To Take Your ShotsKiller ComparisonsFocusing On CharacterBruce Lee's InfluenceDo What You Need To DoImpact and LegacyBeing GratefulShow UpSeasonsProcessing Your WinsVision and HabitsThe White SpacePlanning Far AheadIf It Doesn't Get ScheduledWrapping Up********Links Mentioned:********3 Lists To Freedom - Chris Ducker: https://www.google.com/amp/s/chrisducker.com/3-lists-to-freedom/amp/Virtual Freedom - Chris Ducker: https://www.audible.com/pd/Virtual-Freedom-Audiobook/B00LWAJ0B2?source_code=GO1DH13310082090OK&gclsrc=aw.ds&ds_rl=1262685&ds_rl=1263561&ds_rl=1260658&gclid=CjwKCAjw2P-KBhByEiwADBYWCqXrjaYjF2IbL4EO7o5N--Na69W9r-tW4usVo9GkaYl0Hb-H-ZeMHBoCq2AQAvD_BwECultivating an Unshakable Character - Jim Rohn: https://www.amazon.in/Cultivating-Unshakable-Character-Walk-Your/dp/B079XCT9ZGStriking Thoughts - Bruce Lee: https://www.audible.com/pd/Striking-Thoughts-Audiobook/B083NCY5D5?source_code=GO1DH13310082090OK&gclsrc=aw.ds&ds_rl=1262685&ds_rl=1263561&ds_rl=1260658&gclid=CjwKCAjw2P-KBhByEiwADBYWCpOY4k1WGkZU1GGhV7NHtPns-JnuSI5yea3m1GkVGKida3_XU-wn0RoCeL0QAvD_BwEWords of The Dragon - Bruce Lee: https://www.amazon.com/Bruce-Lee-Words-Dragon-Conversations/dp/0804850003Zig Ziglar: https://www.ziglar.com/********Where to find Chris:********His Website: Chrisducker.com

Unpacking the Digital Shelf
Develop a Winning Team for the Digital Shelf, with Lauren Livak, Director of the Digital Shelf Institute and Sheri Stoller, Director of Ecommerce at Trilliant Food and Nutrition

Unpacking the Digital Shelf

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 44:36


Until our robot overlords take over, winning on the digital shelf requires the right team of people. What is the mix of hard and soft skills that team members need to have to deliver and thrive in a rapidly changing and critical sector of the business? Lauren Livak, who ran North American Digital shelf strategy at Johnson and Johnson and is now Director of the Digital Shelf Institute, teamed up with Sheri Stoller, Director of Ecommerce at Trilliant Food and Nutrition in a recent Digital Shelf Playbook series webinar to answer this question and many more. It's such a great conversation, we wanted to share it with our podcast audience as well.

Mobile Matters
Defining the Modern Day Marketer

Mobile Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 28:28


If you're focused on creating thoughtful experiences, not concerned about volume gain, and are results-driven, then you may just be the embodiment of the modern day marketer. In this episode, we're chatting with Brett McGrath, Vice President of Marketing at The Juice. Brett has spent the past 12 years in the B2B SaaS industry in various marketing functions and leadership roles. Brett believes the content marketing function is the catalyst for change in B2B marketing and spends his days learning from other marketers on the 3C (Curating Content Creators) Podcast. In addition to his current role, Brett's evenings consist of creating content in the sports cards industry with his show Stacking Slabs.We're talking about what defines a modern day marketer, why marketers should be invested in the long game, why marketers don't need to track every dollar, and so much more. Resource mentioned: The Juice: https://www.thejuicehq.com/

Impact Pricing
How to Make Data-Driven Pricing Decisions for Your Business with Ryan Glushkoff

Impact Pricing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 35:03


With over 20 years of software experience, Ryan Glushkoff provides pricing and product marketing expertise for business-to-business (B2B) software companies. This includes offer packaging, pricing, market research, and pricing strategy and organization. Prior to founding Fraction8, Ryan cut his teeth in both the pre-sales and post-sales world for both mass-marketing and custom-enterprise software companies, which gives him a unique perspective on how SaaS companies need to price and market themselves for success. In this episode, Ryan shares what important data set his qualitative and quantitative interviews and surveys uncover to arrive at a pricing decision.   Why you have to check out today's podcast: Find out the three types of competitive research you can use to understand your competitors' offer structure so you come up with the right pricing decision Learn about what different companies are using in their pricing structure Find out what is of utmost reason for putting your price online   “Pricing is a team sport. All of those different groups need to be part of the decision. So, it's incumbent upon the product team to steward the rest of the organization through that decision making process.” - Ryan Glushkoff   Topics Covered: 01:36 - What he does as a B2B technology pricing consultant 03:32 - Doing qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys 04:17 - Aha moments when it comes to clients saying what they claim customers value versus what customers say they value 05:16 - Important data points uncovered with qualitative and quantitative interviews 05:57 - What is competitive research and its different types 07:44 - Times when you consider pricing as part science and part art 08:46 - Going the same pricing metric as the competitor versus charging with better options 09:56 - Sharing his concern about using different pricing metrics 10:38 - Perpetual license of moving to SaaS 11:23 - Touching on usage-based pricing 12:43 - Outcome-based pricing being a version of user-based pricing 13:47 - PayPal and tollbooth pricing 14:41 - Are Lyft and Uber subscription-based companies 15:06 - Price structure of AWS and how it's different from Uber 18:48 - Regularly buying diet Coke compared to subscription-based 19:37 - What he thinks of putting pricing online 21:42 - When it's not proper to pricing online 23:28 - His thoughts to a recommendation of putting a price range versus none at all 24:35 - Which way to go -- put price online or not 26:14 - When do companies miss part of their pricing research 26:44 - Where should pricing lives in a company 30:24 - How pricing is screaming for a center of excellence type of approach 31:58 - His best pricing advice that can have a great impact on one's business 32:27 - Does he actually ask, ‘What are you willing to pay' 33:33 - Mark's answer to Ryan's question on why he asks, ‘What are you willing to pay'   Key Takeaways: “Competitive research is something that is really good to know, but since every company has their own unique value proposition that they bring to market, just copying a competitor, you're probably leaving something on the table by doing that, or you're selling yourself short.” - Ryan Glushkoff “If you'd ask which side of the fence I would come on, or land on for, whether to put your pricing online or not, I would err on the side of putting it online. The idea of maintaining positive control of the sales conversation is paramount. Especially if you do your homework and you're confident in the research that you've done that informs the value of your solution, the price that people are willing to pay.” - Ryan Glushkoff “I really think it [Pricing] should live in the product organization because the product owner is really the CEO of the product; the product team has the deepest understanding of the problems that the buyer and the user are facing. They have the deepest understanding of how to go about solving those problems, through the features and capabilities that the solution is offering.”  - Ryan Glushkoff   People/Resources Mentioned: PayPal: https://www.paypal.com/ph/home Lyft: https://www.lyft.com/ Uber: https://www.uber.com/tw/en/ AWS: https://aws.amazon.com/   Connect with Ryan Glushkoff: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/glushkoff/ Email: glushkoff@gmail.com   Connect with Mark Stiving:  Email: mark@impactpricing.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stiving/  

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan
Scaling a multi-million dollar business in EMEA

Sales Leadership Podcast - Paul Lanigan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:19


My guest for this episode is, Henrique Aragau, GM of EMEA @ G2 . G2 has the become leading B2B review platform with over 1 million reviews read by more than 4 million technology buyers every month. Prior to G2, Henrique was Snr Regional VP @ Salesforce. Following the acquisition of Steelbrick, the native Configure, Price, Quote application by Salesforce, Henrique led the set up and scaling of the Salesforce CPQ & Billing business in EMEA. Connect with Henrique - https://www.linkedin.com/in/henriquearagao/  G2 - https://www.g2.com/ 

How to Win
How Alex Kracov made Lattice a go-to name for HR professionals

How to Win

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 32:56


Key Points How Lattice identified and focused on its niche through conversations with customers (01:55) My thoughts on how to enter a crowded market and find your space by attacking from below (05:00) How Lattice honed their marketing strategy and began interviewing big-name non-customers for their media channels, building a brand association (06:24) My thoughts on building mental availability with professional customers by keeping them in mind and engaging with them early, delivering them unique insights so you are a name they think of when they are ready to buy (07:57) How Lattice developed new products which threatened the existing major players, and their ongoing product strategy (09:09) How Lattice developed its culture around sharing success and caring about conversations, and the importance of that in a people-management platform (11:56) How Lattice managed to differentiate itself from its competitors by focusing on what employees needed, and building a non-sales focused community of HR professionals (14:24) My thoughts on building mental availability by placing yourself at the center of a user community, and leveraging that down the line (18:04) How Lattice managed to differentiate itself as a brand using distinct messaging once competitors caught up from a product perspective (20:54) My thoughts on hooking site visitors with great copy and design (23:18) How Lattice looked outside the box to market its product with books and billboards (23:50) My thoughts on introducing slight cognitive disfluency to your messaging, to force people to stop, think and notice you (24:29) How Lattice has managed to retain its customer base whilst targeting higher-worth customers, by providing messaging and support to both markets, and adapting its marketing and sales strategies (25:30) How Lattice has become more ambitious with its marketing as it has grown, taking larger, big-budget risks to build its community (28:21) Wrap up (31:15) Mentioned:Alex is now CEO and founder at Dock.usLatticeCulture AmpDavid Cancel (Drift)Clayton ChristensenMy Links:TwitterLinkedInWebsiteWynterSpeeroCXL

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales
#132: B2B Lead Generation SaaS: Targeting + Offer + Personalization = 30% LinkedIn Accept Rate and 25% Email Reply Rate (Nick Abraham)

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 27:00


Nick Abraham is a B2B lead generation expert who runs a portfolio of SaaS companies in the cold outreach space, including: Inboxy.io - a cold email domain warming tool, Quicklines.ai - an AI-powered email personalization tool, and Closify.com - a service that matches your business with proven salespeople. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/morgan-williams0/message

It's All About the Questions
Opportunity Costs - Jay McBain

It's All About the Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 48:40


I had to have Jay McBain back on the show to continue our conversation from July, 2020 about customer obsession, journey mapping and the future of week. A year has gone by since then and I wanted to look at what he was seeing transformed, stagnant and a no go. With that in mind we ventured into conversation about opportunity costs and how at some point it becomes numeric and definable. But should you quantify it or leap and take the risk on the opportunity? We also talked about making decisions, not making decisions and staying static are actually all forms of making a decision. And because he is top futurist Jay McBain, we talked about the future of work, why it is important to map your customers journey with you if you want a successful business and customer experience beyond the first sale. Jay leads Forrester's research and advisory for global channels, alliances, and partnerships. He focuses on B2B marketing in the age of the customer; understanding and navigating the complexity of multiple routes to market; ensuring contextual and relevant content to accelerate the indirect sales process; and describing the technology infrastructure to build and support channel relationships. His background is in channel leadership, sales, marketing, and operations, with a specific emphasis on indirect sales strategy/execution, covering multiple industries, segments, and underlying technologies. Jay is renowned for his industry thought leadership and expertise in partner recruitment, development, and acceleration through effective partner coverage, enablement, communication, and incentives. He is an expert in building and leveraging channel communities and one of the global leaders in social media, partner marketing automation, and other indirect growth strategies. Jay provides research, advisory, and consulting to companies ranging from Fortune 100 vendors to startups on the entire scope of their channel and alliance strategies. He is a contributing author and has been cited in numerous channel media publications, including Channel Reseller News (CRN), ChannelPro, ChannelE2E, The VAR Guy, MSPMentor, Channelnomics, Computer Dealer News (CDN), Australia Reseller News (ARN), eChannelNews, Business Solutions Magazine, ChannelLine, ChannelInsider, SearchITChannel, Redmond Channel Magazine, Vertical Systems Reseller, Channel Buzz, and SMB Nation. He also maintains a popular blog on channel trends. Jay is based in Florida but advises vendors, distributors, and partners around the world.

Girl's Girls Podcast - CURVY GIRL MEDIA
What Are Stock Options? #StockDaddy Episode 2

Girl's Girls Podcast - CURVY GIRL MEDIA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


What exactly are stock options? #StockDaddy takes it nice and slow and explains it so Meredith can understand. SPONSOR:424 Degrees is more than a social media agency. They're hardcore lead generators. If you need more leads for your small business (B2B or B2C), reach out to Meredith today at 4242degrees.com.