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Latest podcast episodes about bakersfield

KGET 17 News
17 News @ Sunrise 7/1/2022

KGET 17 News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 16:08


Top Stories:-Two people are hospitalized after an explosion rocked a central Bakersfield apartment building-The Kern County Fire Department says it's confiscated more than 3,000 pounds of fireworks ahead of the Fourth of July holiday-The annual state gas tax hike takes effect today

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 100 - Sexercise

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 21:56


Episode 100: Sexercise. Written by Valerie Civelli, MD. Comments by Namdeep Grewal, MD; and Hector Arreaza, MD. Have you ever wondered if sex is a good workout? Drs. Civelli, Grewal and Arreaza discuss the topic based on evidence offered by science. The following episode is not recommended for young children or people who consider sex a sensitive topic. This is the Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care provider for additional medical advice.___________________________Sexercise. Written by Valerie Civelli, MD. Comments by Namdeep Grewal, MD; and Hector Arreaza, MD. A: If I say “bow chika wow wow” what's the first thing that comes to mind? The Chipmunks movie right?B: Yes, exactly, I can hear Alvin in his high-pitched voice, [higher tone] “bowchicka wow wow”. For those of you unfamiliar with this movie, don't feel too left out because even Alvin was hinting to exactly what you're thinking.A: Yep, we're going there today people.  Let's talk about sex.  Medically speaking of course. B: That's right because 1. If you're doing it, your risk for heart attacks and strokes are decreased after age 50 and 2. If you're not doing it, ask you're doctor, we should be discussing it and why not.A: Yes, that is the guideline-directed recommendation actually. We're recognizing more and more the importance of sexual activity in medicine and its impact on overall health, quality of life and even level of risk for mortality. However, given the sensitive nature of sexuality, few studies have been done to better correlate and define exactly what this means for our health specifically. Sex can be an embarrassing topic to discuss by patients, doctors and researchers which has been largely influenced by culture, religion and other societal norms.  Well, today let's break this proverbial glass. B: I agree, let's talk about sexuality activity and what research do we have.A: It has been said that Dr. Masters and Dr. Johnson were the earliest pioneers of this type of investigation. They published the first study of its kind in 1966, which examined the physiological responses of sexual activity. This was an 11-year observational study involving 382 females, ages 18 to 78, and 312 male volunteers, 21 to 89 years of age. The study identified a progressive increase in respiratory rates, up to 40 per minute, an increased heart rate 110 to 180 beats/min and an increase in systolic blood pressure by 30 to 80mmhg during sexual activity. In 1970, Hellerstein and Friedman identified the mean heart rate at the time of orgasm was 117.4 beats per minute with a range of 90 to 144. This was done in middle-age men, average age 47.5. Interestingly, the 24-hr ekg monitoring also identified a lower peak post coital heart rate, which was usually lower than the heart rates achieved with normal daily activities (around 120.1 beats per minute). In 1984, Bohlen et al. did a racier study with 10 couples using ECG, oxygen consumption (measured using a fast-responding polarographic O2 gas analyzer), heart rate and blood pressure monitoring before and during 4 types of sexual activity. This study obtained data during self-stimulation, partner stimulation, man-on-top and woman-on-top coitus.  The men were aged 25 to 43 years of age.  Results showed that self-stimulation increased the heart rate by 37 % from baseline to orgasm compared with a 51 % increase with man-on-top coitus. B: So already it was clear in 1966 to 1984 that physical exertion in the bedroom correlates to physiologic responses like increased heart rate, blood pressure, etc.  However, our question of the day is, does sexual activity count as exercise, and to that question we ask why or why not?A: When I think about exercise, I think about heart rate and blood pressure.  I think about indicators of energy expenditures and/or intensity. And specifically, while I'm working out…I'm talking about at the gym, and I'm running on the treadmill for example, my mental state is, how much longer until I can quit.  Duration and level of intensity while under this physical exertion feels most important. And according to the AHA, this has been heavily studied.  That's why 150 active intentional minutes of exercise are recommended per week to improve cardiovascular health. Does this translate to sexual activity? B: Well before we answer this, let's first mention the Bruce protocol. Have you ever heard of this? The Bruce protocol is a standard test of cardiovascular health, comprised of multiple stages of exertion on a treadmill, with three minutes spent per stage. Also at each stage, the incline and speed of the treadmill are elevated to increase cardiac work output, which is called METS. Stage 1 of the Bruce protocol is performed at 1.7 miles per hour and a 10% incline. Stage 2 is 2.5 mph and 12%, while Stage 3 goes to 3.4 mph and 14%. If you're a pilot for example, the FAA expects testing to achieve 85-100% of Maximum Predicted Heart Rate (220 minus your age) for a 9-minute duration.  With the Bruce protocol in mind, we circle back to our question of the day, does sex count as exercise?A: In 2007, Palmeri et al. reported that in 19 men and 13 women aged 40-75 years old, the intensity of sexual activity was comparable to stage II of the standard multistage Bruce protocol (moderate intensity) on a treadmill for men and stage I (low intensity) for women. In addition, maximal heart rate and blood pressure during sexual activity was approximately 75 % of that attained during maximum treadmill stress testing of the Bruce protocol. Collectively, based on these above studies, the physiological responses of sexual activity seem to be at a moderate intensity. B: Okay, so “you're saying there's a chance.” Right, one in a million Lloyd. Another movie reference, if you've seen the American classic Dumb and Dumber, you can appreciate it.  The point is, the level of intensity was identified by Palmeri's research but are we convinced sex may be used as exercise based on studies that were conducted more than a quarter of a century ago? As a studious, thriving resident physician, with a heavy background in research, I turned to Up to date for more data, and recommendations.  I had zero findings. Naturally I turned to Men's Health magazine to see what is out there to the general public:A: “You're in bed with your partner and you just finished a vigorous sex session. You're hot and sweaty, worked past that side cramp you got while thrusting, and are convinced you just burned as many calories as you would at the gym. You figure you can skip the treadmill today since your sex workout—a.k.a sex exercises, a.k.a sexercises—got you plenty of cardio.Well, we may have bad news: it depends on the type of sex you're having—specifically, how active you are during it, and how long you're having it—but unless you're really going at it for a couple of hours, odds are, it wasn't that great of a workout. To better quantify this, couples were evaluated while running on a treadmill for 30 minutes and compared to their sexercise. The results, which were published in the journal PLOS ONE, concluded that men burn 100 calories during the average sex session, while women burn about 69 calories. The researchers estimated that men burn roughly 4.2 calories per minute during sex, while women burn 3.1 calories. B: Men may be more physically active during sex which potentially explains why they burn more calories, study author Antony Karelis. But the main reason, Karelis told Time, is that “Men weigh more than women, and because of this, the energy expenditure will be higher in men for the same exercise performed.”It's also worth knowing that sex sessions in the study lasted an average of 25 minutes That's far longer than average. Times varied in the study, ranging from 10 to 57 minutes.  A: The longer the session, the more calories burned.  B: One study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that most sex sessions last six minutes. A: Here are some tips for burning more calories during sex:Make some moans and sighs to burn some extra calories.Change your position to make it more of a workout, especially women. If you're on top, move your hips like a belly dancer. It will feel good while giving you a workout.Experiment with a position where you squat on top of your partner and then bounce up and down. That's a great way to work out your thighs and rear.Try being on top rather than on the bottom, because research suggests that requires more energy.Kiss in unusual positions. Have the guy on his back. Do a push up on top of him. Come down to kiss him and then push back up.Take off your clothes in ways that burn calories. Draw it out and make it part of your foreplay. Or tease him as you get undressed. Do a seductive dance with a silk scarf, for example.Give a good massage to get your heart rate up. Ramp things up by going deeper. It's more sensual and works different muscles. Take turns so you can both get the calorie burn and its arousing impact. B: Harvard source:  During sexual intercourse, a man's heart rate rarely gets above 130 beats a minute, and his systolic blood pressure nearly always stays under 170. All in all, average sexual activity ranks as mild to moderate in terms of exercise intensity.  A: As for oxygen consumption, it comes in at about 3.5 METS (metabolic equivalents), which is about the same as taking a walk or playing ping pong. Sex burns about five calories a minute; that's four more calories used than watching TV. B: How do we decide if one is fit enough for sexual activity? For a 50-year-old man, the risk of having a heart attack in any given hour is about one in a million; sex doubles the risk, but it's still just two in a million. For men with heart disease, the risk is 10 times higher — but even for them, the chance of suffering a heart attack during sex is just 20 in a million. In short, if you are able to climb 3 flights of stairs, you are safe to proceed.  A: Circling back to exercise, keep in mind 4-5 calories burned per minute is still better than zero. Any time spent engaging in any level of physical activity is better than sitting on the couch.  B: Further, “Having sex for at least 10 minutes contributes to your cardiorespiratory health, increased serotonin levels (the happy hormone), and improved sleep,” Silberstang says. Studies have found that sex can relieve everything from anxiety and depression to high blood pressure.  A: When men orgasm, their bodies release serotonin, oxytocin, and prolactin, all hormones associated with better moods, relaxation, and lowered stress. Multiple studies have also found links between regular sex and a reduced risk for heart disease and prostate cancer, and a stronger immune system. One reason that sex isn't classified as a workout is due to its average duration: 3 to 13 minutes,” Silberstang explains. “So, naturally, one of the ways to make sex more of a cardio workout is to increase the time of the act.” C: The present study indicates that energy expenditure during sexual activity appears to be approximately 85 kcal or 3.6 kcal/min and seems to be performed at a moderate intensity in young healthy men and women. These results suggest that sexual activity may potentially be considered, at times, as a significant exercise. Moreover, both men and women reported that sexual activity was a highly enjoyable and more appreciated than the 30 min exercise session on the treadmill. Therefore, this study could have implications for the planning of intervention programs as part of a healthy lifestyle by health care professionals. B: We look forward to future studies that may further show the relationship between psychosocial/qualitative factors and energy expenditures which could explain how these variables could affect overall health and quality of life.____________________________Now we conclude episode 100, “Sexercise.” If you ever wondered if sexual intercourse was a good workout, today we learned that in general it is not an energy-demanding activity. The average man burns just 24 kilocalories during sex, but with some adjustments you can burn more calories, especially if the activity takes longer. If your patient is not having sex, they do not have to start having it just to exercise, remind everyone to be sexually responsible to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Today we thank doctors Valerie Civelli, Namdeep Grewal, and Hector Arreaza. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week!_____________________References:Frappier, Julie; Isabelle Toupin, Joseph J. Levy, Mylene Aubertin-Leheudre, and Antony D. Karelis. Energy Expenditure during Sexual Activity in Young Healthy Couples, PLOS One, plos.org, Published: October 24, 2013, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0079342. Casazza, Krista, Ph.D., R.D.; Kevin R. Fontaine, Ph.D.; Arne Astrup, M.D., Ph.D.; et al. Myths, Presumptions, and Facts about Obesity, N Engl J Med 2013; 368:446-454 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMsa1208051 Blaha, Michael Joseph, M.D., M.P.H. Is Sex Dangerous If You Have Heart Disease?. Health. Jons Hopkins Medicine, accessed June 20, 2022. https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/is-sex-dangerous-if-you-have-heart-disease    Jackson G. Erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Arab J Urol. 2013;11(3):212-216. doi:10.1016/j.aju.2013.03.003. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4442980/   DeBusk R, Drory Y, Goldstein I, Jackson G, Kaul S, Kimmel SE, Kostis JB, Kloner RA, Lakin M, Meston CM, Mittleman M, Muller JE, Padma-Nathan H, Rosen RC, Stein RA, Zusman R. Management of sexual dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease: recommendations of The Princeton Consensus Panel. Am J Cardiol. 2000 Jul 15;86(2):175-81. doi: 10.1016/s0002-9149(00)00896-1. PMID: 10913479.Davey Smith G, Frankel S, Yarnell J (1997) Sex and death: are they related? Findings from the Caerphilly Cohort Study. BMJ 315: 1641-1644. doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.315.7123.1641. Ebrahim S, May M, Ben Shlomo Y, McCarron P, Frankel S et al. (2002) Sexual intercourse and risk of ischaemic stroke and coronary heart disease: the Caerphilly study. J Epidemiol Community Health 56: 99-102. doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.56.2.99. Laumann EO, Glasser DB, Neves RC, Moreira ED Jr. (2009) A population-based survey of sexual activity, sexual problems and associated help-seeking behavior patterns in mature adults in the United States of America. Int J Impot Res 21: 171-178. doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/ijir.2009.7. Lindau ST, Gavrilova N (2010) Sex, health, and years of sexually active life gained due to good health: evidence from two US population based cross sectional surveys of ageing. BMJ 340: c810. doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c810. Lindau ST, Schumm LP, Laumann EO, Levinson W, O'Muircheartaigh CA et al. (2007) A study of sexuality and health among older adults in the United States. N Engl J Med 357: 762-774. doi:https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa067423. McCall-Hosenfeld JS, Jaramillo SA, Legault C, Freund KM, Cochrane BB et al. (2008) Correlates of sexual satisfaction among sexually active postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative-Observational Study. J Gen Intern Med 23: 2000-2009. doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-008-0820-9. Bartlett RG Jr. (1956) Physiologic responses during coitus. J Appl Physiol 9: 469-472. Bohlen JG, Held JP, Sanderson MO, Patterson RP (1984) Heart rate, rate-pressure product, and oxygen uptake during four sexual activities. Arch Intern Med 144: 1745-1748. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.144.9.1745.  Hellerstein HK, Friedman EH (1970) Sexual activity and the postcoronary patient. Arch Intern Med 125: 987-999. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.125.6.987.  Larson JL, McNaughton MW, Kennedy JW, Mansfield LW (1980) Heart rate and blood pressure responses to sexual activity and a stair-climbing test. Heart Lung 9: 1025-1030.  Masini V, Romei E, Fiorella AT (1980) Dynamic electrocardiogram in normal subjects during sexual activity. G Ital Cardiol 10: 1442-1448. Nemec ED, Mansfield L, Kennedy JW (1976) Heart rate and blood pressure responses during sexual activity in normal males. Am Heart J 92: 274-277. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-8703(76)80106-8.  Palmeri ST, Kostis JB, Casazza L, Sleeper LA, Lu M et al. (2007) Heart rate and blood pressure response in adult men and women during exercise and sexual activity. Am J Cardiol 100: 1795-1801. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.07.040. Casazza K, Fontaine KR, Astrup A, Birch LL, Brown AW et al. (2013) Myths, presumptions, and facts about obesity. N Engl J Med 368: 446-454. doi:https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMsa1208051. Haskell WL, Lee IM, Pate RR, Powell KE, Blair SN et al. (2007) Physical activity and public health: updated recommendation for adults from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association. Med Sci Sports Exerc 39: 1423-1434. doi:https://doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e3180616b27.  Drenowatz C, Eisenmann JC (2011) Validation of the SenseWear Armband at high intensity exercise. Eur J Appl Physiol 111: 883-887. doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-010-1695-0.  Johannsen DL, Calabro MA, Stewart J, Franke W, Rood JC et al. (2010) Accuracy of armband monitors for measuring daily energy expenditure in healthy adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc 42: 2134-2140. doi:https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181e0b3ff. Mackey DC, Manini TM, Schoeller DA, Koster A, Glynn NW et al. (2011) Validation of an armband to measure daily energy expenditure in older adults. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 66: 1108-1113.  Mignault D, St-Onge M, Karelis AD, Allison DB, Rabasa-Lhoret R (2005) Evaluation of the Portable HealthWear Armband: a device to measure total daily energy expenditure in free-living type 2 diabetic individuals. Diabetes Care 28: 225-227. doi:https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.28.1.225-a.  Ryan J, Gormley J (2013) An evaluation of energy expenditure estimation by three activity monitors. Eur J Sport Sci: 1-8. St-Onge M, Mignault D, Allison DB, Rabasa-Lhoret R (2007) Evaluation of a portable device to measure daily energy expenditure in free-living adults. Am J Clin Nutr 85: 742-749. Welk GJ, McClain JJ, Eisenmann JC, Wickel EE (2007) Field validation of the MTI Actigraph and BodyMedia armband monitor using the IDEEA monitor. Obesity (Silver Spring) 15: 918-928. doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.624. Wetten AA, Batterham M, Tan SY, Tapsell L (2013) Relative Validity of Three Accelerometer Models for Estimating Energy Expenditure During Light Activity. J Phys Act Health. Brazeau AS, Karelis AD, Mignault D, Lacroix MJ, Prud'homme D et al. (2011) Test-retest reliability of a portable monitor to assess energy expenditure. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab 36: 339-343. doi:https://doi.org/10.1139/h11-016. Haskell WL, Lee IM, Pate RR, Powell KE, Blair SN et al. (2007) Physical activity and public health: updated recommendation for adults from the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association. Circulation 116: 1081-1093. doi:https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.107.185649. Ainsworth BE, Haskell WL, Herrmann SD, Meckes N, Bassett DR Jr. et al. (2011) 2011 Compendium of Physical Activities: a second update of codes and MET values. Med Sci Sports Exerc 43: 1575-1581. doi:https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e31821ece12.  Steinke EE, Jaarsma T, Barnason SA, Byrne M, Doherty S et al. (2013) Sexual Counseling for Individuals With Cardiovascular Disease and Their Partners: A Consensus Document From the American Heart Association and the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). Circulation. 

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)
Mini Truckin OG Alan Paradise

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 134:57


Sponsors: Orange Beach Invasion, Scrapin the Coast, & Bayou Showdown + Kern County Showdown (Feb 2022 Bakersfield, CA) & Mini Truck Showdown in Las Vegas which was cancelled for 2022!  ODB does a shortened intro for the episode  ODB interviews Alan Paradise covering many topics a few of which are How he met Steve Stillwell (RIP) The early days of Mini Truckin' Magazine How the main Mini Truckin' logo was created and WHO made the logo His passion for everything automotive including his killer Isuzu Pup and other rides Working on screenplays and writing for TV shows etc. You won't believe the movie he wrote which came out in the past 10 years!  A tribute to Steve Stillwell and a Courtney Halowell story + MUCH MUCH MORE!  RIP Mark “Papa Smurf” Ballard! We miss you Dad.  Stay On Da Rise! 

KGET 17 News
17 News @ Noon 6/30/2022

KGET 17 News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 9:37


Top Stories: - Fire in an East Bakersfield duplex that forced two families out of their homes- Fire in southwest Bakersfield on Gambel Oak Way displaced two people -Illegal firework and dog safety during Fourth of July

KGET 17 News
17 News @ Sunrise 6/30/2022

KGET 17 News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 12:27


Top Stories:-Justice Stephen Breyer is officially retiring from the U-S Supreme Court today-Two families are now looking for a new place to stay after a duplex fire forced them out of their homes-Two people are out of their home and lost their truck in a different fire in southwest Bakersfield

Dynasty Defined
2022 Off-Season: Merle Haggard and Championships with Dustin Plott

Dynasty Defined

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 45:21


- Dustin Plott, born in Bakersfield. - Overcoming adversity. - Who to look out for to crack the 2022-2023 lineup. - Competitive spirit.

Talkhouse Podcast
Jonathan Davis (Korn) with Danny Brown

Talkhouse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 40:31


On this Talkhouse Podcast, we've got one of those chats that feels like it's going to lead to something bigger down the road: Jonathan Davis and Danny Brown. Neither of these guys probably needs an introduction, but here goes anyway: Jonathan Davis is the frontman of the band Korn, which basically invented a sound and subsequent genre about 30 years ago. I'm not sure if people still say “nu metal,” but whatever you want to call it, it never really seemed to leave the cultural zeitgeist once it took hold. Korn always seemed to have a wider variety of influences than some of their peers, taking bits and pieces from goth, metal, and hip-hop to make a strange new brew. They've released an impressive 14 albums, taking stylistic turns like 2011's The Path of Totality, which incorporated dubstep and drum-and-bass elements. The band's latest is Requiem, which was written and recorded during Covid's enforced ban on touring. It's a bit of a return to their classic sound, and it's gotten incredibly positive reviews from fans and critics. Danny Brown is a rapper and, more recently, a comedian who broke out of his hometown of Detroit around 2010, and has released a series of groundbreaking, incredible records that never seem to sit still—just like him. He's had huge singles and collaborated with everybody from Eminem to Purity Ring to Kendrick Lamar to A$AP Rocky. And though he hasn't put out a proper album since 2019's killer U Know What I'm Sayin', Brown has kept busy making music, making his stand-up comedy debut, doing the hilarious Danny Brown Show on YouTube, and allegedly prepping a new record with the working title Quaranta. He's described the record as “all over the place,” which makes sense considering Brown's varied list of influences—one of which is Korn, which is how we got here in the first place. This genesis of this conversation, Davis and Brown's first, was Brown covering Korn's classic “Freak on a Leash” live in concert last year. Like I said, this is the first real conversation that Brown and Davis have ever had, and they get along great—great enough that they're instantly talking about meeting up in person to collaborate at Davis' Bakersfield, California studio. They get into Korn's songwriting process, Covid-inspired depression, and how the internet provides the kind of instant rejection you had to work harder for in the old days. It's a great chat, I hope you enjoy it. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Jonathan Davis and Danny Brown for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please subscribe via your favorite podcasting app, and while you're already there, go ahead and rate us. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!

Our Two Cents Podcast
145 - Public Transportation is for Everyone

Our Two Cents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 46:06


Karen King started her career as a bus driver and grew that into a long career in public transit, most recently serving for the past fourteen years as the CEO of the Golden Empire Transit District in Bakersfield, California. She started her career at Utah Transit Authority before moving to California. She worked at Long Beach Transit and then expanded her career to include rail service development and operations as Executive Director of North County Transit District in San Diego. Karen holds a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Utah and a Master of Science degree in Transportation Management from the University of Denver. She presently serves as the Chair of the Executive Committee of the California Transit Association and is on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee at the American Public Transportation Association. Attorney Kyle Jones and Dave Plivelich from The Marcom Group sit down with Karen King the CEO of Golden Empire Transit and Janet Sanders the Marketing Director of Golden Empire Transit. Karen explains how taking the bus is not only beneficial to the rider but to the entire community as well, since it reduces emissions and the number of vehicles on the road. In addition to buses, GET is now offering micro-transits in limited areas, which is similar to popular rideshare services such as Uber and Lyft, at a significantly reduced cost from 7am to 7pm with the goal of being available to the entire metropolitan Bakersfield area. Karen also shares GET's goal of becoming 100% emission free. Stay tuned to hear the different services GET has to offer and how it might just apply to you and find out what Karen did before entering the transportation industry. LEARN MORE ABOUT GET BUS: Website: www.getbus.org/ Email: kking@getbus.org Phone: 661-869-2438 Instagram: @GETbus Facebook: Golden_Empire_Transit Twitter: @GetBus  

The Moneywise Guys
6/28/22 One-cent sales tax increase + Business Editor, John Cox joins the Moneywise Guys

The Moneywise Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 46:27


The Moneywise Guys Tuesday, June 28th BE MONEYWISE. Moneywise Wealth Management I "The Moneywise Guys" podcast call: 661-847-1000 text in anytime: 661-396-1000 email: info@moneywiseguys.com website: www.MoneywiseGuys.com Guest: John Cox, Business Editor for The Bakersfield Californian website: www.Bakersfield.com  

Feudal Future
BizFed CEO Tracy Hernandez on what you can do as a small business owner in California

Feudal Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:22


Can we restore the California Dream? Join us with BizFed CEO Tracy Hernandez as she discusses what you can do as a small business owner in California . Tracy Hernandez is a narrative-transforming leader who has spent more than three decades convening and giving voice to diverse thinkers on myriad platforms. She is the Founding CEO of the Los Angeles County Business Federation, widely known as “BizFed.”The nonprofit alliance of business networks is a grassroots advocacy powerhouse that advances policies, projects, and pragmatic solutions that benefit working Angelenos and the health of the economy. BizFed is unique in its successful organization and unification of more than 225 organizations representing 410,000 companies employing 5 million people throughout the greater Los Angeles region. Its first franchise sister organization, BizFed Central Valley, mobilizes another 80 united groups from Bakersfield to Fresno.  Tracy and her close-knit team are proud to amplify the voices of a vast array of employers and civic leaders, large and small, representing all sectors and communities. Their work impacts decisions at all levels of government.BizFed has grown in scope and impact since its launch in 2008. Tracy also founded and oversees BizFed Institute and BizFed Political Action Committee. The Institute is a 501(c)(3) that acts as the data center and educational arm of BizFed. The PAC identifies, trains, and elects pro-jobs candidates and is the only business political action committee focused on local elections in all 88 cities in L.A. County.We want California to come back. Will you join us in this fight?If you haven't downloaded the report, see it here: https://joelkotkin.com/report-restoring-the-california-dream/

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Doug Roeder - 2022 UNBOUND 200 Finisher

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:47


This week we sit down with Doug Roeder to discuss the 2022 UNBOUND 200. The draw of this event came at Doug from many directions and he has now set an audacious goal to join the 1000 mile club. Episode Sponsor: Athletic Greens Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Doug Roeder [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist.   [00:00:28] Craig Dalton: This week on the show, we've got Doug rotor. Doug. And I actually know each other, gosh, for a couple decades. Now we met through mutual friends and recently reconnected over the sport of gravel cycling a few years back. Doug reached out knowing that I did this podcast and mentioned that. He was heading out to Unbound. I knew he was also heading back here in 2022. So I thought it'd be interesting to get them on the podcast and just talk through his journey with Unbound. Talk about this year's event. Talk about how he's managing to fit it all in as a professional with a family here in the bay area. I really enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too. Before we jump in i need to thank this week sponsor our friend at athletic greens. A G one by athletic greens is a product I use literally every day. It's got 75 high quality vitamins minerals, whole food source, superfoods, probiotics, and antigens. To help you start your day. Right. This special blend of ingredients supports your gut health, your nervous system, your immune system. Your energy recovery, focus and aging. All the things. 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Let's jump right in to my conversation with doug rotor Doug welcome to the show. [00:03:24] Doug Roeder: Hey, Greg. Thanks a lot. Great to be here [00:03:26] Craig Dalton: I appreciate you taking the time to join me after Unbound 200. I'm glad you got to the finish line. I can't wait to dig into your adventure out there. [00:03:34] Doug Roeder: and adventure. It was and yeah, happy to talk. Great to see you. Great to be with you. Can't wait to get out with you sometime live on a bike. This will have to suffice for now, though. [00:03:43] Craig Dalton: Indeed. So for the listener, Doug and I met each other, gosh, I don't wanna date us too much, but it's probably 20, 25 years ago. [00:03:50] Doug Roeder: Long time ago. Yeah. Team and training up in the city, [00:03:53] Craig Dalton: And through mutual [00:03:54] Doug Roeder: And mutual friends. [00:03:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah, exactly. So to set the stage, Doug, are you, or are you not a professional athlete? [00:04:01] Doug Roeder: No, absolutely not. No, not even anywhere close. [00:04:04] Craig Dalton: So, so Doug's an endurance athlete, like most of us and, and not an unaccomplished one you've you've achieved multiple Ironmans. If I'm, if I'm remembering correctly and always been fit. [00:04:16] Doug Roeder: Yeah. So well, yeah. I, I guess right around the time we met, I was very unfit. I had kinda worked 80 hour weeks all through my twenties and didn't. It finally got to a place in my career in my late twenties, where I had a little bit more predictability on my schedule. And so started joined team in training and did one and only one Ironman with team in training. But in training for that had did a half Ironman and some other events and really kind of felt like, triathlon was a, a great way to kind of get out in the bay area and, and try different things. And so I would never say I was a triathlete. I'd do one or two a year wildflower in particular, the long course there. But cycling kind of became part of my life at that point. I met my wife on a blind date, bike ride. I started spending time up in Santa Rosa for work every other month. And a gentleman up there took me on a lot of road rides, your pine flat east side, west side, Sweetwater Springs. Always told me that if I ever had a chance to ride king Ridge, I should. So when Levi started his ride, I started doing that. And so it was kinda I'd pick one or two big things a year to do and train for those. And that was kinda my, my. [00:05:11] Craig Dalton: That makes sense. And then at what point along the way, did you discover gravel cycling? [00:05:16] Doug Roeder: So, yeah, I kind of just for a decade plus kind of kept doing the same couple of things over and over cycling with something I would do with work colleagues. I commuted from the city down to the peninsula once a week. Once I had little kids just to get along one long ride in a week. And then it was 2018, I think. Was the last year that wildflower happened and I was kind of poking around for something new to do. And a buddy on the east coast who I'd ridden quite a bit with and remembered that I was from Kansas said, Hey, you wanna check out this thing? In Kansas, there's this big race, this big bike ride. It's a gravel ride it's called it was called it's on dirty Kansas. I said that's Ryan that's. That's ridiculous. Why would I, I go to Kansas to ride a bike. Like I go there to go to a chief's game or go see family and friends. That's that's insane. And plus the roads in Kansas, like why would you do that? Why would I ride dirt roads in Kansas and just promptly about it? Dismiss it outright. No joke. A week later, I'm talking to my father who lives, he's retired in central Kansas. He's got 30 cattle. He's kind of a hobby rancher. And he had been staying with a. At a little town outside, Amoria called Opie. This was in may. And when he was there, he drove around the Flint Hills. He's telling me how beautiful the Flint Hills were in the spring. The Emerald green, after the ranchers burn off all the grass, it comes back this beautiful green and to someone from Kansas. I mean the Flint Hills, I I'm from Western Kansas central Kansas went to high school and Eastern Kansas. So I'm kind of from all over Kansas, the Flint Hills are just something you drive past on your. Somewhere else. There's really no, there, there there's, it's too Rocky to farm. There's no major population centers. It's pretty, you see it from the highway, but there's really no reason to go there. So my father lived his entire life in Kansas had never spent any time in the Flint Hills. And so he, he was there with this old friend toured around the Flint Hills and he's telling me about it and he's like, oh, and there's this big bike race. Have you heard of it? And I'm like, yeah, a buddy just told me about it. I can't believe thousands of people travel. To Emporia, Kansas, which again, to native Kansas, Emporia's kind of the middle of nowhere. It's like for a bike race. And my father tells me that his friend, they they're looking to, they wanted to rent their house out to some racers, but they didn't wanna rent a stranger. So he said, if, if you ever wanna come to Kansas and do this bike race, you know, you got a place to stay, you can rent this house outside just outside of town. So I'm like, yeah, no, that's why I'm not. That's ridiculous. Why would I do that? And then a few weeks later, this was like the third, the straw that broke the camels back. Right. We have a friend staying with us, a friend of my wife's it's an ER doc in Philly. And he had come out to do escape from Alcatraz, big multi-sport athlete CYC lacrosse racer, and he was staying with us at our house. And were we my wife and I had signed, but do escape that. And we're talking to, to Dr. Lambert and he said, Hey, you're Doug, you're from Kansas. Have you heard of this big bike race in Kansas? My coach. And I really want to do it. And I'm like, you're the third person who's mentioned this thing to me in the last, like 10 days now. I'm, I'm kind of intrigued. And he had a plot to, to kind of hack the lottery at the time. Yeah, they were promoting and I'll just keep talking, you cut me off, whatever, but I figure you can edit a lot of this. So he his, his idea was his coach was a woman and there was a, they were trying to get more women to ride. The race, then 200 for 200 was the promotion 200 women ride 200 miles. Remember that. And Dr. Lambert's coach Amelia woman really wanted to come and do the race as well. And at the time you could, I think you still can, you could register as a group. So it was an all or nothing kind of thing, or up to four people could register for the lottery together. And he said, well, make Amelia our, our, you know, team captain quote unquote, and she'll get in. Then the rest of us will draft off of that. And I was like, you know, I have this high school buddy. That I've run a couple of ultras with in Kansas. He's just the kind of guy, cause they also gave preference to locals. I was like, we'll sign him too. I'll give him call. And so the four of us signed up and we got in that way on the lottery. And I don't know if our, our hacks helped or not, but one way, you know, we got in. So now it's January of 2019. And I'm, I've been accepted to Unbound, wildflower had been canceled. So, you know, now I've got a new thing to train for. And I had to go get a gravel bike and try and figure out what the heck gravel biking was all about. And I had taken an old road bike and put the fattest tires I could on it and kind of started exploring some, some non paved roads down here. And it seemed like a not insane thing to do. So I went up to my local bike. And they're a specialized dealer. So I ended up with a diverge and set it up tubus and started training. [00:09:41] Craig Dalton: Great. You know, that's amazing. It, it sounds like you were going to be haunted by Unbound until you did it with all [00:09:48] Doug Roeder: That's kind of, [00:09:49] Craig Dalton: you [00:09:49] Doug Roeder: it was kind of, yeah, that was everybody was coming at me about it. And I then a, a great guy wanted to actually travel to the middle of Kansas. And I think this is a good point to state it's. It's hard to overstate. How preposterous, the notion of Unbound gravel sounds to like a native cans who, who wasn't a cyclist as a kid, but learned to cycle in the bay area. I mean, the notion that thousands of people from all over the country, or even all over the world would travel to Emporia, Kansas to ride hundreds of miles of the crappies roads. You can imagine in the middle of tornado season. It's just it's ridiculous, but yeah, you're right. I was kind of being haunted by it and there, I was at a point where I needed, I kind of wanted to try something new and so I signed up. [00:10:35] Craig Dalton: And you sign up directly for the [00:10:36] Doug Roeder: Yeah. And there was some debate around that. My, my buddy in Kansas who had, who had never, you know, he'd done some writing. He'd never, I don't think he'd ever run ridden a century before. He's like, you sure we should do the 200, maybe we should do the hundred. And I mentioned that to our, our friends from Philly and they're like, no, if we're gonna travel all the way to Kansas, we're, we're gonna, we're gonna get our money's worth. And I was like, yeah, no, it's kind of 200 or nothing fell. And I kind of felt the same way actually. So yeah, we went straight for the 200. [00:11:01] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I feel like back in 2019 and, and earlier, like the 200, the, the 100 felt different when you were signing up for it. Not that I've done it, but these days I feel like it's got equal promotion. Certainly the two hundreds, the marquee part of the event, but also that they realized like a hundred is pretty good as well. [00:11:18] Doug Roeder: Oh, and a lot of fast riders. So yeah, no, it's the a hundred has definitely become a thing and yeah, even the shorter distances are, are filling up with people now, too. So. [00:11:28] Craig Dalton: And so 2019, that was pre pandemic. Right? So the race actually went off at that point. [00:11:33] Doug Roeder: The race went off. It was hot and humid and we, it was the north course. It was the first year they had switched back to the north course, which I guess they'd done it a few times. And we had a nice, strong south wind out of the gates. So we flew 60 miles with a tail. made the turn and on that north course, most of the climbing is kind of in the middle section. So right around the time of day when it gets hot you start putting in some, a lot of kinda steep climbs on rough roads. And our two C cross buddies took off at that point. And I was sticking with my high school buddy. And I think the, the, you know, growing up. Growing up cycling wise here in the bay area, climbing's comes pretty easy. You get, you can't really ride 10 miles without climbing a thousand feet around here. So, I was having a decent time. The heat's a little tough to deal with. But my friend kind of got pummeled and we emerged from those Hills into the headwind. We got to council Grove and he was suffering from heat exhaustion at that point. And so I ended up riding, riding it in myself, late in the race and finished after midnight. And that was that. [00:12:34] Craig Dalton: to get to the finish line in your first one. I think that's pretty amazing. Did you. I know I want to talk about this year's version, but I feel like talking about your first experience is also equally valuable because going, going in there naive about what you were to experience, how did you prepare for it? Obviously, you you'd done Ironman triathlons. You'd done these long distance events that might have taken you north of 10, 12 hours. How did you get, what was the mindset going into 200 miles? Had you ever ridden that far before? Okay. [00:13:05] Doug Roeder: No, no. I think the longest ride I had done was, you know, what was Levi had his long course, which had a couple of different names the Panser whatever. And so that was kinda a hundred, 1,320, I think, with a lot of climbing. And I had done the version where you get off road onto some gravels. So I took my, my road bike on some gravel roads up in Sonoma county, which was a great way. Break a carbon wheel, which I did. But anyway, that's a different story. So the mindset was just to get, and I'd trained for some long runs as well. So I'd done some 40 and 50 mile runs. And you know, when I was training for those, I never, you never go out and run 40 or 50 miles, but yet stack up big days, you know? So you go run 21 day and maybe 25 the next. So I took the same kind of approach cycling wise. I would do. You know, you know, kind of do my normal early morning rides with my buddies and then maybe get out for 180 or 90 mile and then try the next day to go then ride 60 or 70 gravel miles over in the east bay on the east side of the Dunbarton bridge, where it gets good and windy out there on those salt pond levies felt like that was a pretty good Kansas simulator. And so I would try and stack up a couple of big days and then, you know, every few weeks kind of build back up to. And the mindset was just survival. We just wanted to finish. We didn't really have a time goal. It was just get her done. And that's kinda, that's sort of how it went, [00:14:27] Craig Dalton: That's what I always thought about with training here in the bay area, because we have so much climbing, I'm UN very, very unlikely to hit that mileage. Like even if it made sense to ride 200 miles, unless I was riding on the road, I'm not gonna hit that mileage, but I can certainly do a absolutely punishing day of climbing. [00:14:45] Doug Roeder: Yeah, no. And that's, that is the challenge, cuz I mean, if you go, when I go ride 80 or 90 miles, you're gonna climb eight or 9,000 feet around here. Now you've got the benefit. You can look at some of the Strava's of some of the, the gals up in your neck of the woods who kind of tend to win that Unbound and see what kind of stuff they do. They'll go do hundred 40 mile crazy stuff. So yeah, I, for me trying to find, you know, in Kansas, the wind is always a factor. Finding a place where you can ride for, I don't know, four or five, six hours where it's a steady effort is kind of hard in the bay area. And so I've found this, you know, again, east side of the Dunbarton bridge, the coyote Hills, regional park, there's a nature preserve. So you can kind of get a 30 or 40 mile flat-ish gravel loop in over there. And I'll do a few of those. And like I said, it's generally windy in the afternoon, so it's, that's kind of become, I can't get anyone to do it with me. So I'm listening to your podcasts or music and the earbuds, but. So I do do a little bit of solo training for it, but yeah, that's kind a key training [00:15:39] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's interesting. It's so often I talk and think about the type of gravel that's underneath our wheels. When we go to these different parts of the country, but climate and wind play equally at big factors. And. It feeling hard and different. Like I know when I ride in wind, which I don't tend to ride in a lot of like, that's demoralizing to me. So imagining like pointing myself a 40 mile headwind section in Kansas might be a little difficult. [00:16:07] Doug Roeder: Yeah, but it's great. You can go, you can practice it here in the bay area. There are places, but yeah. Getting your it's, you know, psychological training for that kind of torture is is a big part of it. And you know, the other aspect of getting ready for that first one was just preparing to be able to fix my bike. I've got a great local bike shop here at Melo. They've taken great care of me over the years, but like what, what, what am I gonna do if I, you know, flat my tubus tire or. Bust my chain and a water crossing, which I ended up doing. So I had to stop. I had to pop out a, a link and fix my chain. You know, there's all kinds of stuff you gotta do. If you, if your goal is to finish you gotta be ready. And fortunately, I've watched a few YouTube videos and had the right tools to take care of that, that first year. But it was, it was non trivial getting across the finish line. And especially, yeah, once my buddy was suffering from, you know, heat exhaustion, We were at the last checkpoint minutes before they were gonna shut it down. And he packed up his bike and put it in the minivan. And I rode off into that by myself with lights and just kind of chased fireflies and other racers. And at that point in that race, the sun's going down, it cools off. It actually kind of became my favorite part of that race. It's just a different trippy thing on the north course. You'd end up going across this lake whole lake. You ride across a dam, there's people, boats partying, and you've fireflies, and it's just so surreal 70 into your day to be in that place that it does kind of, yeah, it's, it's quite an experience for sure. [00:17:28] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I can only imagine. So of the four of you, it sounds like what just did three of [00:17:33] Doug Roeder: Three finished. Yeah. The two cycle crossers. I think they, they finished around 10:00 PM. I, I rolled in after my late start and waiting for my buddy at kinda one 30 in the morning. But even then rolling down commercial street Emporia, I had a dozen kids chasing me down the shoot on both sides. I mean, it was just a bizarre trippy thing. And my buddy was at the finish line smiling at that point, he had recovered. So it was quite it was a really fun thing to finish and a hard, a hard, hard thing to do for sure. [00:18:01] Craig Dalton: huge accomplishment. Now, are you one of those people that can finish an event like that? And someone puts the sign up form in front of you and you're like, sign me up. I'm gonna do it the next year. [00:18:11] Doug Roeder: Absolutely not. So the, yeah, you know, the wildflower lawn course is a great example. I did. I think I did that thing 16 times and every time I swore I would never do it again, I was like this, this was awful. I feel terrible. I'm not ever gonna do this again. But then a week later you're like, I think I could probably do it a little bit better next time. Right. And so, and there was the fact that my buddy didn't finish and he had never DNF anything in his life. He's actually the one who talked me into doing my first ultra. And so he was furious, absolutely furious that he did not finish that race. And so he's like, no, we're signing up. We're gonna go do it. I'm gonna finish. And I'm like, okay, I guess. And then the pandemic hits and it got canceled in, in 2020. But we signed back and he trained like a maniac all through the pandemic. I ended up spending a bunch of time in Kansas during the pandemic. [00:18:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah. [00:18:56] Doug Roeder: So he, and I would go out for rides in the Flint Hills and I would rent bikes at sunflower bike shop in Lawrence, Kansas, and just, they had their divergence set up with tubes and I just was blowing the things up right. And left. And so, decided I, I bought a Kansas bike found a salsa cutthroat, which is a monster truck of a bike with 29 inch mountain bike wheels and got that, put it in my buddy's garage. And so that's. So he, he, he used that to train on used that as sort of, and, and got himself a better bike as well. But we were kind committed once and I think had he finished, we may never have done it again, but the fact that he didn't finish, we kinda signed get him the finish line in and had two years to train for it. [00:19:38] Craig Dalton: and so were you successful getting 'em across the finish line? [00:19:40] Doug Roeder: We did, we, we got it done. Went out at a nice, slow pace. We did not have the rest of the crew with us. One of 'em had a baby, so it was just the two of us that year. And his 80 year old dad who lives in Bakersfield came to be our support crew. So coverage, Flint, where to the same north course, we kind set up the day before, but we went out and again, south wind, hot, humid just punishing. But we took our time. Got the nutrition ride, you know, any of these long events, they're, they're eating competitions as much as anything. But he had had two years to train and, and we got it done. We finished around 1230. So again, I guess they call it that the breakfast club. So we both, we crossed the finish line together just a wonderful day out on the bike. And it was really gratifying to, to get him over the line. And that was when he was, he told me that we were going for the thousand mile cha [00:20:30] Craig Dalton: And what is that? [00:20:32] Doug Roeder: So, you know, if you ride the 200 race five times, they give you a CICE and it's part it's on the, you know, in the award ceremony on Sunday morning. And yeah, it's, it's something. So he, he and I are never gonna, you know, win our age group. That's just not who we are. But we could, we're pretty good at not stop 'em. So that's the goal now, apparently. And so, yeah, [00:20:56] Craig Dalton: Now you're slightly. You're slightly off sequence with your buddy. You may get there ahead of him. Are you gonna go for six? If that's the case? [00:21:04] Doug Roeder: I don't know. We'll see. And, and then, and you know, crazy things happen. I may be injured. I may not make one. So you just dunno how these things are gonna go, but become a goal here now in ours to try and finish that thing. And yeah, [00:21:16] Craig Dalton: Okay. [00:21:16] Doug Roeder: we're even more off sync. Once we get to 20 to this year's event, I'll tell you about that, but it's become a thing, you know, I go back there. I see family It's you know, as complicated as life gets later on with work and kids and everything to have a day or two a year, where all you gotta do is one simple thing. And it may a hard thing, but it's just one it's it's it's really enjoy. Wake up in old and try and bang out two miles and miles bike is it's refreshing psychologically. And it kinda helps me focus my training. [00:21:46] Craig Dalton: I [00:21:47] Doug Roeder: Yeah, we're gonna stick with it until we can't here for the next few years. [00:21:50] Craig Dalton: I love, I love how this all comes back to your connection to, to Kansas, and it's gotta make it even more special just to be there and be on that journey. [00:21:59] Doug Roeder: It is. And it's yeah, I mean, on that Northern course, there are some of those roads that I swear. I, I hunted pheasants on with my grandfather when I was a kid. And it's just surreal that again, thousands of cyclists from all over the planet are riding down these roads, getting flaps, just dealing with terrible conditions. Know, you might have it's the beauty is stark. And it's, I'm not gonna say it's as stunning as the grand canyon, it's not, but there is a similar discrepancy between the pictures you see and what you experience there. Just the vastness of it just can't on film. And when you're out there with this, you know, huge crowd of people it's, it's pretty stunning and and it's hard and. Yeah, my relatives, my aunts and uncles, I, I got buzzed by an aunt and her pilot boyfriend in school, bus, Piper, Cub in 20. So it's become a thing everyone forward to coming and doing it's lot for that reason. And then it's kinda crazy too. You've got all these great bay area athletes who come out there and, you know, Alison Terick from Penn, she's a household name in Emporia. You know, the winner the first year we did, it was Amity Rockwell. It just was amazing to me, the. Bay area cyclists. Who've made their names in Nowheresville, Kansas. It's just kind of cracks me up. So [00:23:11] Craig Dalton: It really is. You were talking about pacing in your 20, 21 effort. Do you find it hard? Not to get sort of wrapped up in the pace of everybody else? Were you and your, your buddy [00:23:21] Doug Roeder: yeah, that's [00:23:21] Craig Dalton: of just specifically disciplined and chastising each other? Don't chase that wheel. We gotta go slower. [00:23:27] Doug Roeder: that's you know, even though. Our focus, especially after having the one DNF in 19 was to maintain a steady pace, not go out too fast. You get that tailwind, you get in a group. Drafting's wonderful. But then you get to that first rough road. And at that point, You know, we saw Quinn Simmons running along the side of the road. You know, pros have blown up, you hit the rough flinty, gravel at speed and bad things start happening, but it's also great to be in a pack. We met two high school buddies who were half our age from Wisconsin, from some little town. They were doing their first race together. First bike race ever for the first bike event that I had signed up for the 200. So we started riding with them and we're trading poles. Next thing, you know, you know, there's not a cloud in the sky, but you feel a spray on, you know, a moist spray on your back and I'm like, what's going on back there? Oh man, you got sealant spraying all over the place. It's like pin wheeling outta your wheel. And so, yeah, it's easy to get caught up in the fun, especially early on. And man, we sprayed sealant all over two counties, but never went flat. But yeah, then we reeled it in the, the Hills eventually, or the heat will reel you in at some point or the headwind or ball three. But yeah, it is, it's difficult, especially early on when you're riding with a pack. [00:24:39] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Since I haven't been out there myself, I'm finally getting a picture after having spoken to so many people about this event in particular, my conversation recently with Mark Allen and he was describing, you know, you're following some wheels and you'd see someone get antsy because they wanted to pass someone and they would think, oh, I can just kind of ride over this Rocky section really fast. And sure enough, those Flint rocks, it's a recipe for a flat tire right [00:25:03] Doug Roeder: Yeah, it's just right there. And then every water crossing. I mean, I, this year, every water crossing, there were at least half a dozen people in the next quarter mile fixing flats. And I learned that first year in 2019, I, I dinged my chain in the water crossing and ended up having to fix it that you gotta be real careful, especially in that murky water. You can't see the bottom. You have no idea how deep it is. All, all kinds of sharks and yeah, you learn some things, but. [00:25:26] Craig Dalton: what's your, what's the technique then? Are you just kind of easing off and not kind of trying to keep full speed through the water sections? [00:25:32] Doug Roeder: Definitely. Yeah, you gotta slow down. Or if you see people, you see someone hit a line and they emerge safely. You take that line. If you're on your, at that point, depending where you're on the race, the Northern course didn't have that many water crossing this Southern course, especially with all the rain in the weeks, leading up to lot of water crossings. And I think a lot of flats came out those water crossing. So it's, [00:25:51] Craig Dalton: Yeah. [00:25:52] Doug Roeder: you just gotta be careful and they can be slick. And then there's just a whole wide variety of treachery out there. [00:25:57] Craig Dalton: In 2022 had a new variety of treachery that the last few years hadn't really been known for, as I understand it. [00:26:04] Doug Roeder: Indeed. And we were all excited. The Southern course, a little bit less vertical kind of had a reputation for kinda more rolling Hills rather than the sharp. I had been in Kansas for 10 days, like leaning up to the race and so knew that it had rained a lot knew that we were in for some wet conditions. But the temperatures were pretty cool and kinda day before it, you kinda not rain at all, then some popped overnight. And and yeah, but the, the cooler temperatures were just wonderful. I mean, you rolled out in the morning and it was a lot of people were chilly right. Outta the gates. But yeah, not much wind either. That was kind of a nice thing. And it was just kind of a nice, fun, easy role. And again, we were trying to, trying to get everybody over the line. So we we got to all the first neutral water stop. We were climbing the hill up to that at around mile 40. And I'm on the left side of a double track behind this woman. And I hear a guy shouting over my shoulder on your. On your left? No, we're coming up the middle and I look over my shoulder and a dozen dudes just blazing up this hill right down the grass between the two tracks. And it was the lead group from the hundred mile race. We the course with them up to that 40 mile point, they, and we kept going south. But as they blasted by the guy across from me said, Hey, that was Peter Shagan. And I'm like, what? This. time, green Jersey winner just blew by me in the middle of Kansas. How weird is that? And the day just got bizarre, more bizarre from that point on. [00:27:28] Craig Dalton: So, let me ask you a question. So that going into this one in 2022, it's your third year. what are a couple things you learned in the first two that you took, whether it's changes in your gear, changes in what you had when you were coming to your pit station? [00:27:42] Doug Roeder: Yeah, lots of real food pit stations be very disciplined about checking the chain. Luing the chain get more water than you think you need. Cause 40 miles might go by in a couple hours, or it might go by if you hit a stiff wind in some obstacles or a flat or something, it could take a lot longer. And as chilly as it was early in the day, I mean, the sun did pop out later in the day they got real hot. So if you kind of planned your hydration based on. What you were doing early in the day that, that didn't work later in the day. So to always take more hydration than you need real food versus just, you know, all goose, we'd roll up some sandwiches or whatever different things. And then we carry a lot of extra, you know, CO2 S and tube and, and things to fix punctures, which fortunately we didn't have to use this year, but. I think just being prepared for everything so that you don't end up in a situation where you have a mechanical, that requires you to all the way to you didn't have the right tool or you know, ran out whatever it would be very frustrating. And so [00:28:42] Craig Dalton: be a shame, particularly if tr trying to train up to 200 miles, you, you put in so much time and then to go do that and have something that you could have solved toward you would be terrible. So were, were you wearing a hydration pack? [00:28:56] Doug Roeder: Yes. Yeah, definitely. I got, I take a two and a half hydration pack and then two bottles. The other big learning is you gotta keep the bottles covered or have 'em someplace safe because the water it's all cattle, ranch land. And especially when you're spraying a lot of water everywhere once they get muddy, you don't really wanna drink out of them. So people will rubber put baggies over 'em things like that. Or some of 'em now have caps on 'em. So yeah, you learn a few things like that. [00:29:22] Craig Dalton: Yeah, so interesting. Okay. So interestingly, you know, when I've been hearing accounts of the 2022 event, depending on your pace, people seem to have had very different experiences. So when, when you listen to the pros, they seem to have gotten through some of these. Hugely muddy sections either got through it before it rained. So they just rode, rode the road. When you guys might have been hiking at early slopping through mud, or they had, you know, it just hit 'em at a different point in the race. When were you encountering mud and what was it like? [00:29:56] Doug Roeder: Yeah, mile 1 25. . We, we rolled into that. And I was on, you know, the salsa cutthroat with the 29 inch wheels and 2.2 inch tires. And I'm like, ah, this thing's, this thing's a mountain bike. I can ride through this. No problem. And I made it, I don't know, maybe 50 yards and just was slipping and sliding. Then it was time to hike and the smart folks, maybe some. Folks with cyclo cross backgrounds picked up their bikes. So they didn't keep accumulating mud fools like me pushed it along until the mud kind of clogged my wheel. Then I was stuck. Fortunately I had noticed in the shops in Emporia the previous day, everybody was handing out those paint sticks, the paint, stirring sticks. I was like, huh, maybe they know something that, that I, that I should know. And I, so I grabbed a couple of those and they were incredibly useful for cleaning the mud off. And that's, you know, I kinda. Tried a couple different tactics but pushed through it as fast as I could and got to the end. And there was kinda a stream where you could rinse your bike off. I hit it faster than my buddy did. And when he, he hit it a little after I did and it slowed him down a lot more. So I ended up waiting probably 20 minutes for him to get through it and it kind of crushed him carrying his bike through that. He came out the other side and was just an absolute wreck. So, and at that point, the sun came out. So we had just kinda, I'd had a nice break. He had suffered through carrying his bike through this stuff, [00:31:12] Craig Dalton: Yeah. If you think about it, you know, he is got a, you know, call it a 20 pound bike. He probably had 10 pounds of mud on it and gear, you know, it's just backbreaking work, pushing a bike. They just weren't designed to be pushed. [00:31:24] Doug Roeder: push or trying to carry it with a, you know, a bag strapped underneath it and a bunch of gear inside it. I mean, it was just a freaking mess and. Yeah, everybody was in that stream, washing their bikes off. It was a pretty miserable scene. And there were these two little kids that were, they were promising everybody. That that was the last. Which it ended up not being, and I'm still those I'm those two little kids sour folks and trying every, but was brutal was [00:31:50] Craig Dalton: Yeah. [00:31:52] Doug Roeder: both through that. [00:31:53] Craig Dalton: And I just think about that at mile 1 25, having to kind of reset and just having gone through that moment and say, I've got 75 frigging, more miles of gravel to go, not even thinking about there being mud because of the lying kids. You thought you were gonna be cruising back into Emporia. So you guys get back on your bike, you start hitting it is your buddy starting to recover a little. [00:32:13] Doug Roeder: No, cuz there was a, there was some decent climbing right after that. And around mile one 30, there was kind of a long climb. Like I said, the sun was back out at the time we were doing it and his stomach just failed him at that point. He got sick on the side of the road, tried to remount, tried to keep going and couldn't do it. He was done. So, he was upset. I was upset, sad for him. Really sad for him at that point I kinda looked at my watch. I was like, If I take off now, I know I'd kind of been resting a little bit waiting for him. I was like, I could, I could get in before midnight. I could, you know, and the party closes down and pour you at midnight. So I'd never experienced the post party. So I was all motivated to make some, some lemonade outta the lemons and and took off at that point. Yeah, I, [00:32:53] Craig Dalton: what a tough moment for you. Just, I mean, to know that he had, he had had that issue a couple years back. And to go on and go forward when he's sitting there on the side of the road, which obviously I'm sure any friend would want you to continue, but I'm sure you rolled out with a little bit of a heavy heart. [00:33:09] Doug Roeder: Well, I just knew that I'd have to come back one more time. So yeah, I, you know, these things happened and he was upset. I was upset. I felt a little bit of a heavy heart, but mostly like, okay, this is just things happen out here. And he called the Jeep and they came to get him. I failed to mention, you know, his dad who's 81, 82 and had been our support crew. The previous year. He had so much fun being our support crew that he had signed up for the five mile race and had bought a bike and was, and so I was, he was looking forward to just getting back to seeing how his dad, when he'd received some texts from his dad, A picture of him in the pouring rain and saying how much funny it had. And so he was excited to get back and see his dad and meet me at the finish. So we were actually in pretty good spirits. Surprisingly, it's just, again, it's one of those things that happens and if you can't eat and stomach's, can't go on. So he's a pretty upbeat dude. And so I took off at that point and rode hard for 70 miles. I finished around 11, 15 in the dark and party was still going on. So I got, got a couple free beers and some tacos and it was it was really fun. And we we had, I didn't mention this. We had given a few folks rides from Kansas city down to Emporia, and that was kind of a crazy experience too. Two folks two cyclists from New York, apparently there's a New York city gravel scene. And one of the racers was a 25 year old with a, a bike packing background. She was coming to do the 200, the other racer was a 37 year old father with a road racing background. He was there to do the hundred. Neither of 'em had been to Kansas before. Their flight had been delayed and they got in at like four in the morning. And so their friends had gone down to Emporia. They needed a ride. They got on the Facebook page and my friend had noticed them and we had room in the car. So just riding down to Emporia again with these two folks. Had never been to Kansas before they're New York city, gravel writers and they're, they're coming here to, to challenge themselves. It was, it was pretty shocking for two like high school buddies from Kansas to see that. And so one of them came across the finish line while we were sitting there around midnight. And again, it's the range of folks you encounter there. Folks like the last gentleman you had on Peter Sagan gravel writers from New York. It's just, it's, it's very strange to me. And and kind of fun. [00:35:18] Craig Dalton: Have you noticed it blow up even further from the 2019 experience to now in terms of the scale of everything? Yeah, [00:35:23] Doug Roeder: The scale the range of backgrounds it's it really has kept, kept going and it's, it's. Again, you know, we have some of the most amazing cycling on the planet here in the bay area. But I still get a big hoot outta going and riding crappy roads in Kansas with thousands of all over the world. It's, it's a weird thing, but its. [00:35:42] Craig Dalton: I think that, I mean, the team, we started it always. Had this idea of what the community experience was gonna be like for the event and always, and this is what I, I love about every event organizer that I talk to. It's a, it's a love letter to your local trails, right? You're you've got the opportunity to put on an event and you're gonna just wanna showcase everything that your home town has to offer. And that's when we get the best events, like when they come from the. [00:36:09] Doug Roeder: And it's inspired. I mean, there's a, there's a gravel ride in the Kansas or Missouri area, like every weekend now. So it's, there's a lot of folks, you know, and then there are people kind of replicating the model in other states and and I mean, the grasshoppers have been going on out here forever, but it, it it's really kind of created a template, I think for a lot of folks to create races in places where folks hadn't thought to do it before and a lot of fun. [00:36:35] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think that's, I've talked to with a bunch of event organizers about sort of the economic impact of bringing these types of events to rural communities and the dynamics that come into play. You actually get supportive city councils and land [00:36:47] Doug Roeder: Yes [00:36:49] Craig Dalton: Whereas I, you know, [00:36:50] Doug Roeder: I mean, I, yeah. [00:36:51] Craig Dalton: Yeah, yeah. You get the high school kids coming out. Whereas out here in the bay area, you get nothing but resistance cuz no one wants anybody to come ride here. [00:37:00] Doug Roeder: Yeah. And as big as Levi's rad got at one point, I mean, there were thousands and thousands of people. I think you, you might meet a few locals. Who'd be out cheering on their front lawn, but a lot of folks just resented all the cyclists, you know, hogging the roads that day. And whereas out in the middle of Emporia, I mean, everybody is incredibly happy to see you. It's it's really kind of fun. [00:37:19] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I imagine out in the smaller communities or even going by someone's house, out on the Prairie, like they're out there just enjoying the spectacle that comes by once a. [00:37:28] Doug Roeder: I think, you know, in the, the, what's the name of the town where the second checkpoint was Madison, I think the entire town showed up downtown. You know, and that was, they were just having a big whole party and it's yeah. So the communities where they have the support stops really show up in force You got volunteer kids, you know, Manning the crew for hire. And it's just a, yeah, there's a lot of enthusiasm for the racers and the race. [00:37:52] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah. Amazing. Well, thanks Doug, for sharing so much about this story, I love that you've been doing this. I love that gravel's kind of reconnected us socially and we'll definitely get out and do some riding together at some point in the near future. [00:38:04] Doug Roeder: Congratulations on the podcast. It was it really warm my heart to find this. As I kind of discovered the whole gravel scene, I was oblivious to it. Like I said, until, you know, a few random people clued me into this race in Kansas and it's it's been really fun to reconnect and see, see what you've done with this podcast. And I hope to get you out to Emporia. We gotta bed for you and Kansas. Anytime you're ready to come out. [00:38:24] Craig Dalton: I love it. The draw continues to get heavier and heavier for me. So I think I'll get out there one of these days [00:38:30] Doug Roeder: Sounds good, Craig. I'll be. [00:38:32] Craig Dalton: upstairs. Right on. That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Huge. Thanks to my friend, Doug, for joining us and huge kudos to Doug for. Getting across that finish line of which sounded like a tough deal this year. If you're interested in connecting with me, I encourage you to join the ridership. Simply visit www.theridership.com. That's a free global cycling community, lots of smart and passionate athletes in there to connect with from all over the world. If you're able to support the show. Please visit, buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Or if you have a moment, ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated. Another thank you to our sponsor athletic greens. They've been a long time sponsor of the show and a product that I really enjoy and use every day. So be sure to check it out@athleticgreens.com slash the gravel ride. That's going to do it until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels

Notorious Bakersfield
E55: Deadly Pizza Delivery

Notorious Bakersfield

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 16:42


Tony Azevedo was murdered in 1996 while delivering pizzas for Pizzaville USA. This is his story. If you'd like to support the Notorious Bakersfield podcast, you can buy me a coffee. Visit here to make a donation:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/NotoriousVisit the Notorious Bakersfield website: https://www.notoriousbakersfield.com/Email: notoriousbakersfield@gmail.com

Cali-Gutterz Podcast
To Baby or Not to Baby...

Cali-Gutterz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 84:58


Talking retro stores and vintage merchandise in Bakersfield. Then we have the Roe vs Wade debate. and we also give out shout outs.

Cali-Gutterz Podcast
Maybe We're Crazy

Cali-Gutterz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 82:36


This week we talk about Bakersfield concerts and give some Movie reviews. Lightyear discussion plus Obi-Wan. then we have a round of Oldies But Goodies.

Crazy Women Country
Ash Taylor Interview with CWC

Crazy Women Country

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 38:03


Welcome Friends to another Crazy Women Country Episode! In Today's episode, we will get to know the incredible Ash Taylor! Join us as we discuss her newest projects, the women who inspire her, and get to know her better with our 20 crazy questions! Ash Taylor is a Bakersfield California-born and raised woman who now calls Nashville Tennessee home. Her Bakersfield EP was released (add the date here) and included songs like Cake, Watch It Burn, and of course Bakersfield. Some of Ash's most significant influences include Brandy Clark, Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, Gretchen Wilson, and Clay Mills. For more on Ash including her latest projects and tour dates check out https://www.ashtaylor.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/crazywomencountry/message

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 99 - Intermittent Fasting

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 22:51


Episode 99: Intermittent Fasting 99. By Danish Khalid, MS4; Sapna Patel, MS4; Ross University School of Medicine. Comments by Valerie Civelli, MD; and Hector Arreaza, MD.Intermittent caloric restriction may seem like a new trend, but Sapna and Danish discussed that actually fasting is practiced in different cultures and it has many health benefits, including weight loss. .  This is the Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care provider for additional medical advice.D: Welcome and thank you for tuning back to our Nutrition series! Today, we want to give a shout out to one of our listeners. She brought up a topic that has recently gained public interest. Intermittent fasting. So, if you're listening, Hina Asad, this one's for you! Let's jump in! V: 2/3 women are overweight and obese. 1.5 pounds gained/yr on avg age 50-60's.S: So like we said earlier, intermittent fasting has recently gained much public interest as a weight loss approach. Or should I say, revitalized itself, as it has been around for years. It describes an eating pattern in which you alternate between periods of eating and fasting (or not eating). The length of each fast can vary in duration. A: There are feasting and fasting periods, or fed states and fasting states. What is more effective: Intermittent restriction of calories or continuous restriction of calories?  D: Before we dive in, let's go back. We know that calorie reduction has been consistently found to produce reduction in body weight and improve overall health. We talked about how to calculate our basal metabolic rate and subtracting calories from our daily caloric intake to result in weight loss. However, this can be difficult to sustain over a long period. Additionally, it requires that you adjust your caloric needs every so often as you lose weight, which can further make it difficult. So how is intermittent fasting different from this?   S: Well, in contrast to calorie reduction, intermittent fasting focuses on when calories are consumed and the total quantity consumed. Intermittent fasting works through an altered liver metabolism, referred to as the “metabolic switch.” It's where the body periodically switches from liver-derived glucose to adipose-derived ketones. In doing so, it stimulates an adaptive response including improved glucose regulation, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased stress resistance via conditioning. V: When you eat is more important than what you eat. Benefits: reducing cancer, Alzheimer's, DM risk, better sleep, less hangry(*find evidence).  D: What happens when we fast? In our previous podcast we mentioned ketosis, but let's talk about the physiology behind fasting.Feeding: blood sugar levels rise as we absorb food and insulin levels rise in response to move glucose into the cell. Excess glucose is stored as glycogen in the liver to convert it to fat.S: Postabsorptive phase (6-24hrs after beginning fasting): Blood glucose and insulin start to drop. To supply energy ,the liver starts to breakdown glycogen, releasing glucose. Glycogen stores last 24-36hrs. V: Insulin levels are low, and fat stores are available and improves mental clarityD: Gluconeogenesis (24hrs - 2 days after beginning fasting): Glycogen stores run out. The liver manufactures new glucose from amino acids called “gluconeogenesis” ( literally “making new glucose) S: Ketosis (2- 3 days after beginning fasting). A: Autophagy: “Auto” means self and “phagy” means eat. So the literal meaning of autophagy is “self-eating.”S: The protein conservation phase (5 days after beginning fasting): High levels of growth hormone maintain muscle mass and lean tissues. The energy for basic metabolism is mostly supplied by fatty acids and ketones. Blood glucose levels are maintained by gluconeogenesis using glycerol. Increased adrenaline levels prevent any decrease in metabolic rate. There is a normal amount of protein turnover, but it is not being used for energy. V: How long should we fast for?  D: Fasts can range from 12 hours to three month or more. We can categorize them as short (24 hours). However, shorter regimens are generally used by those mostly interested in weight loss. The short daily fasting regimens can be divided into the length of fasting - 12 hours fasts, 16 hours fasts, and 20 hours fasts.  S: Daily 12 hour fasting introduces a period of very low insulin levels during the day with 3 equally spaced meals throughout the day. This prevents the development of insulin resistance, making the 12 hour fast effective against obesity. Although a great preventative strategy, it is not the most effective at reversing weight gain.  D: Fun Fact: In years past, the 12 hour fasting period was considered a normal eating pattern. This probably explains why prior to the 1970s, there was much less obesity. It wasn't until the 1970s when the USDAs made dietary changes making a higher-carb and lower-fat diet a staple. That's when obesity started to rise.  S: On the other hand, during the 16 hour fasts most people skip the morning meal to account for the extra hours. In this regimen, you have an 8-hour eating window period, this is why it's also called time-restricted eating. Although you can still eat 3 meals most people tend to stick to 2 meals. The 16 hour fast certainly has more power than the 12 hour fast, but it should be combined with low-carb diets to allow for a slow and steady weight loss.  A: Feasting periods should not be so liberal, and over time it becomes easier to control hunger.  V: Feeding hours: healthy fats, proteins, fish, avocados, grass fed butter, unprocessed carbs (especially Low glycemic berries, squash, quinoa, vegetables, Low sugar, low alcohol intake… eating healthy basically. D: Fun Fact: A Swedish bodybuilder named Martin Berkha popularized this regimen, which is why you will also hear it being called the LeanGains method. V: Skipping breakfast reduces caloric intake by 20-40%, addresses visceral fat.S: Lastly, the 20-hour fasting regimen, also known as “the Warrior diet.”  Ancient warrior tribes such as Spartans and Romans devised a “warrior diet” in which all meals are eaten in the evening during a 4 hour window. This results in a 20-hour fasting period each day. This diet also emphasizes natural, unprocessed foods and high-intensity interval training. A: Summary: 12-hour, 16-hour, 20-hour. Dr. Jason Fung also recommends 24-hour fasting. It is basically skipping breakfast every day and skipping lunch 3 times a week. “Hunger is your friend”. D: Before we move forward, I just want to add that not all fasts are the same. For instance, I'm a Muslim, and there's a month where we fast for religious purposes, called Ramadan. During this time we fast from sunrise to sunset, or dawn to dusk. In contrast to traditional fasting, this fasting differs in that we don't eat or drink anything. Even water. Whereas in intermittent fasting it's different. Now, there have been studies done where they studied individuals during this time to see if there was any weight loss during this period. It was found that people typically lost about 1-2 pounds of weight. However, I do want to clarify this weight loss could be fat loss or muscle loss.  A: Another group of people who fast are Mormons. They traditionally fast once a month, the first Sunday of every month. It's a complete abstinence of food and water for 24 hours, skipping 2 meals. Fasting periods are linked to improve your spiritual well-being as well.  S: Certain Hindu festivals and holy days require devotees to observe fasting as part of their worship.  For example, Navarātrī, the nine-night celebration that occurs yearly. Some people take only water during these nine days, while some eat fruit while some eat one meal a day.  Hindus will observe fasts of varying strictness depending on individual beliefs or practices. Here are some examples of common fasts observed by Hindus:not partaking any food or water for a set number of days.limiting oneself to one specific vegetarian meal during the day.eating or drinking only certain food types for a set number of days.Avoiding eating certain food types for a set number of days.' S: So what can I consume when I fast? Do I have to completely stop eating and drinking for those hours? D: Only certain fluids can be consumed during fasting periods: water, tea and coffee ( iced or hot) and homemade bone broth. It's important for you to drink water frequently throughout the day. You can enjoy flat, mineral or carbonated water.   V: While Fasting: ok to have coffee, tea and water. Fasting creates a state of alertness.   S: What can you add to your water? Limes, lemons, sliced fruit (do not eat the fruit itself), vinegar, Himalayan salt, chia, and ground flaxseeds ( 1 tbsp in 1 cup water). Do not add sweetened powders even if it's sugar-free. D: You can consume up to 6 cups of caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee on a fasting day. Black coffee is preferred, but you can add up to 1 tbsp of certain fats in your coffee. These include: coconut oil, medium chain triglyceride oil (MCT oil), butter, ghee, heavy whipping cream (35% fat), half and half, whole milk, ground cinnamon for flavor. V: Ghee butter is clarified butter with no lactose.  A: You can curve appetite by drinking water, eating grains of salt, and drinking pickle juice (use a straw to avoid dental problems) S: You can consume unlimited herbal tea during your fasting period.  I know Danish and I both are Tea Connoisseurs. Right Danish? Teas can suppress your appetite, lower your blood sugar levels and are otherwise beneficial (positivi-tea). Bitter melon tea, black tea, cinnamon chai tea and oolong tea, help lower blood sugar levels. Peppermint tea and green tea help suppress appetite. Peppermint is good for GI discomfort such as gas and bloating. A: Peppermint oil is good for IBS. D: It's not uncommon to experience some lightheadedness during your first few days of fasting periods. This is often caused by dehydration and decreased levels of electrolytes. An easy remedy is a good homemade broth. Both vegetable and meat or bone broth will work. Things you can include in your broth: any vegetable that grows above the ground, leafy greens, carrots, onions, bitter melon, animal meat and bones (mostly bones, any animal), Himalayan salt, any herbs or spices, ground flaxseeds. Avoid vegetable puree, potatoes, yams, beets or turnips and store bought broths. (Dr. Fung). A: This is the end of this part on “How to fast”. Some people think fasting includes being hungry the whole day, but the “hungry” feeling goes away after 1 hour, and you learn to recognize the cues from your body about hunger and satiety. ___________________________________________________________________________ Now we conclude our episode number 99 “Intermittent Fasting 99.” This is not a complete guide to fasting, it's only a brief overview. Fasting has become a new nutritional trend with proven benefits. Remind your patients that one of the secrets of fasting is “delay, don't deny”, meaning they can delay eating a few hours and then enjoy what they like the most. Sapna, Danish and Dr. Civelli also reminded us to eat with moderation after breaking our fast to maintain the benefits of fasting. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Sapna Patel, Danish Khalid and Valerie Civelli. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week!_____________________Resources: Fung, Jason, MD; and Jimmy Moore. “The Complete Guide to Fasting.” Victory Belt Publishing. 2016. p179-189;199-209. 

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)
Best of OLP - Mike Finnegan

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 63:47


Sponsors: Orange Beach Invasion, Scrapin the Coast, & Bayou Showdown + Kern County Showdown (Feb 2022 Bakersfield, CA) & Mini Truck Showdown in Las Vegas which was cancelled for 2022!  ODB intros the episode  ODB runs Mike Finnegan's audio from late July '2018; Episode 75 title guest Mike talks mini trucks, working at Sport Truck & Mini Truckin' mag, Road Killer Garage and so much more!  RIP Mark “Papa Smurf” Ballard! We miss you Dad.  Stay On Da Rise! 

Our Two Cents Podcast
144 - The Rise In New Forms of Media

Our Two Cents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 53:09


Richard Beene was raised in Atlanta and graduated from Georgia Southern University. He worked at The Los Angeles Times for seven years and was part of the Pulitzer Prize winning team of reporters and editors who covered the Rodney King riots and the 1994 Northridge earthquake. He also spent seven years overseas working as a foreign correspondent, living and working in Egypt, Spain, and Mexico. Richard has lived in Bakersfield since 1994 where he has served on numerous local boards and organizations, including serving as president of the Bakersfield Museum of Art board of trustees and president of the Rotary Club of Bakersfield. He also served on the Memorial Hospital foundation and the CSUB foundation. Richard was the CEO of The Bakersfield Californian from 1998-2016 and is currently the host of Bakersfield Observed podcast. Dave Plivelich sits down with Richard Beene to learn about what drives him as he discusses how the media industry has evolved over the years and how print is essentially obsolete. Richard also explains how our homelessness problem cannot be solved with appeasement and the steps we, as a society, need to take. The show ends with Dave and Richard discussing the division that politics has created within our country and how we hold on to hope that we can once again become a united nation. LEARN MORE ABOUT RICHARD BEENE:  Website: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bakersfield-observed-with-richard-beene-the-podcast/id1570782507 Email: richard.beene@gmail.com Instagram: @RevRico Facebbook: @Richard_Beene  

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 128 with Vania Patino, Journalistic Prodigy and Thorough and Reflective Reporter

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 70:35


Episode 128 Notes and Links to Vania Patino's Work        On Episode 128 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Vania Patino, and the two discuss, among other topics, her early love of reading in Spanish and English, Twilight, a formative experience for Vania as a high school reporter, her busy and educational college years, the power of Chicano Studies and Ethnic Studies classes, and ideas of objectivity and balance in journalism.        Vania Patino is a news reporter for KERO-TV in Bakersfield, CA, a former reporter for KFDA in Amarillo, Texas, and a former standout student in Pete's English 10 honors class. For Latino Reporter: “After El Paso shooting, Texans seem divided over looser gun laws”   Video from Cal State Fullerton's Al Dia Newsmagazine   Video and Article by Vania: "In Tex-Mex country, ‘el sabor' helps Boricua culture thrive" At about 1:40, Vania gives background on her relationship with language, learning English as a second language, and her early love of reading, including her love of a particular teen series   At about 5:00, Pete and Vania discuss the phenomenon that was the Twilight series    At about 7:00, Vania describes how Spanish specifically calls to her, interests her, etc., as well as how she re-embraced the beauty of speaking Spanish    At about 10:00, Vania wows with an amazing story from her third day on the job in Amarillo that highlights    At about 12:50, Vania highlights important lessons learned in college ethnic studies and Chicano history courses   At about 14:40, Vania discusses interesting conversations around identity that came up during her enjoyable college years   At about 16:25, Vania responds to Pete's questions   At about 18:20-27:30, Vania recounts an incredibly impactful experience in covering a 2015 Donald Trump speech in San Pedro    At about 27:35, Vania talks about her time in Amarillo, Texas, including covering a different political arena than she was used to   At about 29:50, Vania talks about formative experiences from her busy college days, and shouts out mentor Inez Gonzalez   At about 32:00, Vania recounts a funny anecdote about interning with NBC News with Lester Holt    At about 37:00, Vania gives the story of the horrific tragedy in Thousand Oaks, sadly the first of many mass shootings that she has covered    At about 42:30, Vania tells a story that is emblematic of being innovative and dogged in pursuing a local angle to a national story    At about 46:15, Vania explains the writing and background work for a news “package”   At about 50:55, Vania responds to Pete wondering about how she balances formal and informal presentations of the news   At about 53:30, Vania discusses ideas of objectivity in reporting, particularly post-Trump as POTUS   At about 57:30, Vania answers Pete's question about which tv shows/movies “get it right” with regard to a realistic view of the newsroom   At about 59:40, Vania responds to Pete's question about the responsibilities that come with doing translation in news   At about 1:04:30, Vania discusses future projects   At about 1:08:40, Vania gives contact information/social media info        You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.      This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.     Please tune in for Episode 129 with Sam Quinones, a journalist, storyteller, former LA Times reporter, and author of three acclaimed books of narrative nonfiction, including The Least of Us: True Tales of America and Hope in the Time of Fentanyl and Meth, released in 2021, and his 2015 release, Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic.  The episode will air on June 28.

Notorious Bakersfield
E54: Trial Of The Century

Notorious Bakersfield

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 21:19


In 1961, Spade Cooley, a Country Music star, brutally murdered his wife in Willow Springs near Tehachapi.His murder trial in Bakersfield attracted enormous public interest. It was a media spectacle, the likes of which hadn't been seen before, and wouldn't be seen again...until another celebrity...OJ Simpson...was tried for a similar crime...decades later.If you'd like to support the Notorious Bakersfield podcast, you can buy me a coffee. Visit here to make a donation:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/NotoriousVisit the Notorious Bakersfield website: https://www.notoriousbakersfield.com/Email: notoriousbakersfield@gmail.com

Deeper Roots Radio Podcast
Episode 123: California Dreamin'

Deeper Roots Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 116:20


A little bit of surf…just a bit…and some folk favorites right alongside some local performers in this week's episode brought your way directly from the KOWS Studios in downtown Santa Rosa, California. Our theme is the Golden State where the living may be costly but the core soul is one of progressive culture and hard work: whether that's in the fields, behind the desk, in the service industry, or on the road. This week's show focuses on California, from the LA Freeway to the Streets of Bakersfield, on up to Lodi and the Monterey Bay. The past century has found the state a popular subject of song and we've got some favorites and off-the-wall nuggets just for you this Friday morning including tracks from Dave Alvin, Albert Hammond, and Red River Dave. Tune in.

KQED's The California Report
Warriors Win Fourth Championship

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 11:01


The Golden State Warriors went on the road and defeated the Boston Celtics in Game 6 of the NBA Finals, 103-90, to clinch their fourth NBA title in the last eight seasons. Guard Stephen Curry was named Finals MVP, after leading the team with 34 points in the finale. A Bay Area state senator is introducing a bill that would require California gun owners to have liability insurance. The bill from Senator Nancy Skinner of Berkeley would make gun owners take out policies similar to car insurance, that would make them financially responsible for injuries, damages, or deaths caused by the negligent or accidental use of their weapons.  Reporter: Nina Thorsen, KQED Immigrant detainees who work at two privately run detention facilities around Bakersfield have confirmed they are on strike. This comes as California's workplace health and safety regulators have opened an investigation into their working conditions at one of the detention centers. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED

KGET 17 News
17 News @ Sunrise 6/17/2022

KGET 17 News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 15:32


Top Stories:-A shooting at a church potluck in Alabama, where a gunman killed two and wounded a third-The City of Bakersfield is attempting to help law enforcement crack down on catalytic converter thefts-More than a dozen people were burned out of their homes yesterday when an apartment building caught fire in Oildale

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 98 - Apretude and Code Blue

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 21:02


Episode 98: Apretude and code blue. Apretude is a new injectable medication for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), Dr. Yomi presents how to use it. Then, Mandeep, Jon, and.  Introduction: Apretude, a new injectable for HIV PrEP.  By Timiiye Yomi, MD. Moderated by Jennifer Thoene, MD.   What is HIV PrEP? Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) consists of taking medication when a patient has a high risk of contracting HIV to lower their chances of getting infected.  Who can take HIV PrEP? Individuals who may benefit from PrEP include but are not limited to: Male who have sex with male (MSM), people with multiple sexual partners with no consistent use of condoms, or people who have been diagnosed with an STD in the past 6 months, IV drug users who share needles, syringes, or other injection equipment. History of HIV PrEP: In 2012, the first medication for HIV PrEP was approved—Truvada® (tenofovir-emtricitabine). Truvada is a once-daily oral prescription drug. Seven years later, in 2019, the next medication for HIV PrEP was approved— Descovy® (tenofovir alafenamide and emtricitabine). It is also a daily PO medication. But today we want to introduce you to the newest medication for HIV PrEP—Apretude® (cabotegravir). On Dec 20, 2021, FDA approved Apretude (cabotegravir), an extended-release injectable for HIV-1 pre-exposure prophylaxis for at-risk adolescents and adults who weigh at least 35 kg (77 lbs). Mechanism of action: Apretude is a long-acting integrase inhibitor that works by binding to the HIV integrase active site and blocking the strand transfer step of retroviral DNA integration. How is it given? Comes as a 600-mg (3-mL) injection. Patients receive 2 initiation injections administered 1 month apart, thereafter every 2 months. Patients can start medication immediately or first take the oral formulation for 4 weeks to assess how well they tolerate the medication before beginning the injection. Trials: The safety and efficacy of Apretude in reducing the risk of contracting HIV-1 were evaluated in two randomized double-blind trials comparing Apretude and Truvada (once-daily oral medication).Trial 1: Participants who took Apretude had a 69% less risk of contracting HIV compared to Truvada.Trial 2: Participants who took Apretude had a 90% less risk of contracting HIV compared to Truvada. Common side effects: Fever, malaise, fatigue, sleep problems, myalgias and arthralgias, headache, rash, red and swollen eyes, edema of face, lips, mouth, tongue; GI discomfort, hepatotoxicity, and depression. Note: Some drug-resistant HIV variants have been identified in people with undiagnosed HIV prior to beginning Apretude. People who test positive for HIV while on Apretude must transition to a complete HIV treatment regimen as Apretude is not approved for HIV treatment.  Requirements to receive Apretude: -Patient must be HIV-1 negative-Patient must remain negative to continue receiving Apretude-Patient must not miss any injections as this increases their risk of contracting the virus Apretude does not protect against other sexually transmitted infections. Patients must be sexually responsible and use other forms of protection such as condoms during sexual intercourse. This is the Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care provider for additional medical advice.___________________________A code blue in clinic.  By Manpreet Singh, MS3; Jon-Ade Holter, MS3; and Sheinnera Gerongay, MS3. Ross University School of Medicine. What is a code blue?Arreaza: Today we will present to you a case to remind you about some principles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The term “code blue” in the United States refers to a situation where a patient is in cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, unresponsive, or experiencing another medical emergency that requires immediate attention. “Code blue” is commonly used in hospitals and clinics to call a rapid response team to arrive immediately to evaluate the patient. We hope you can benefit from this brief review and feel ready for your next code blue. Of course, you will need more than we provide during these few minutes, but we hope it triggers your curiosity to keep learning or practicing. By the way, “code blue” is not standard for medical emergency in the whole world. For example, in the United Kingdom, they call it “code red”. Case presentation: Mr. DD 56-year-old man with a past medical history of coronary artery disease, recent MI, DM2, and CHF presents today to our clinic for hospital follow. He had an MI 2 weeks ago. He reports that when he was at home working in the yard, he suddenly had 8/10 retrosternal chest pain, pressure-like, accompanied by shortness of breath and diaphoresis. The pain radiated to the left side of his neck/jaw and down his left shoulder and arm. Jon: Nitroglycerin was taken by Mr. DD 3 times without resolution of symptoms. The patient was taken by EMS to Kern Medical ER. In the hospital, there was a 4mm ST elevation on ECG on leads II, III, and aVF. Q waves were also seen in anterior leads V4-V6. Patient was taken to cath lab and stent was placed in the RCA. ECHO showed decreased left ventricle wall motion and dilated left ventricle with an ejection fraction of 28%. Mr. DD was discharged after 5 days in the hospital.M: He is currently on lisinopril, carvedilol, atorvastatin, aspirin, clopidogrel, metformin, and digoxin. He states he is not compliant with all the medications because he forgets to get refills at times. He has a 35-pack year history of smoking and drinks 3-4 4oz drinks every day after work. He states he has used methamphetamine and cocaine intermittently within the last 6 months.J: Today, he lets the MA know that he is having some chest pain at night, shortness of breath with minimal activity for the last week, and at times he feels his heart is beating too fast. He has a follow-up appointment with cardiology in 2 weeks. The MA tells you that the patient vitals today are BP:195/105, HR: 108, RR: 28, and O2% 89% on room air. M: You are reviewing the patient's chart when you hear a loud thud coming from the room, you rush into the room and find the patient on the ground. The patient is unresponsive and is not moving. What is your next action? A. Try to lift the patient off the ground and back onto the chair or bed B. Give the patient nitroglycerin sublingually C. Call and wait for the EMS before proceeding D. Obtain IV accessE. See if the patient is arousable and check pulse and breathing E is the correct answer to this question because before initiating any type of treatment, first, you must assess the patient for alert response and their basic vitals such as their pulse and breathing.J: We do this because we need to know if the cardiopulmonary systems are intact. When they are not intact, regardless of the level of medical training, we must start CPR protocol. M: This patient most likely suffered a tachyarrhythmia, a very common post-MI-complication that causes the highest mortality rates. The most common cause of death are ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. J: These are the steps we must take in order to start resuscitation of the cardiopulmonary system in any environment before the patient can be taken to a higher level of care. In this situation, Doctor Holter and Doctor Singh will perform 2-patient CPR. This is only an introduction of basic life support and advanced cardiac life support. You will need additional training to get the BLS and ACLS certificates. M: First, assure your environment is safe before preceding to render care. You want to be able to give the best uninterrupted care to your patient without becoming a patient yourself. Jon: Doctor Holter. Mandeep: Doctor Singh.J - Doctor Holter: I will reach down and check the patient. “Sir, Sir, are you okay” – I am assessing for reactions from visual or verbal cues given by me. When the patient is unresponsive to verbal and visual cues, I will give a painful stimulus to the patient such as a nail bed pinch or sternal rub. Next, it is necessary to assess the pulse and breathing of the patient. Narrator: The reason we check if the patient is alert is to assess the neurologic activity. The lack of response to painful stimuli indicates there is no self-protect response. To assess the carotid pulse, you must palpate the carotid artery by placing the index and middle fingers near the upper neck between the sternomastoid and trachea roughly at the level of the cricoid cartilage. Assess breathing by checking the rise and fall of the chest. Lack of responsiveness, pulse, and breathing indicates that immediate Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) needs to be initiated. J - Doctor Holter: Please call 911 and get an AED.M - Doctor Singh: I will call 911 and get an AED.J- Doctor Holter: I will place the person on their back and start single-person CPR until Doctor Singh comes back. Narrator: CPR is performed by placing the patient flat on their back on an even surface. Place the heel of your hand on the center of the person's chest (on the mid sternum) then place the palm of your other hand on top. Press down 5-6 cm (2-2.5 inches) at a rate of 100-120 beats per minute. Compressions should not be interrupted because they serve as an artificial way of contracting the heart and circulating the blood to maintain blood perfusion. For 1 or 2 person CPR on an adult: Give 5 cycles of 30 compressions to 2 breaths.For 1 person CPR on a child: Give 5 cycles of 30 compressions to 2 breaths.For 2 person CPR on a child: Give 5 cycles of 15 compressions to 2 breaths.M - Doctor Singh : Doctor Holter, continue the compressions and I will give rescue breaths and start to place the AED pads on the patient. Let me know if you are tired and we can switch to give high-quality CPR with adequate depth and rate. Narrator: The AED comes with a diagram made on the pads to instruct where to place the pads. Once an AED is positioned correctly on the patient's chest, let it detect if a shockable rhythm is present. Shockable rhythms include ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. If there is not a shockable rhythm detected, then continue with CPR until a higher level of care is reached. If a shockable rhythm is detected, the AED will advise the users to step back and verbalize “clear” in order to ensure that everyone is clear of the patient. It will then administer a shock to the patient in the range of 120-200 Joules, based on the device manufacturer's recommendation.M - Doctor Singh: Doctor Holter, stay clear of the patient. The AED advises shocking the patient. I will press the button to administer the shock now.Narrator: After administration of the first shock, ACLS guidelines recommend continuing CPR for 2 minutes without checking for a pulse, as effective cardiac contractility lags behind the restoration of an organized electrical rhythm. After the next 2-minute cycle of CPR, the AED will reanalyze the patient's rhythm to determine if the rhythm is once again shockable. J - Doctor Holter: Doctor Singh , continue high-quality CPR while I initiate ACLS protocol. I will get an IV and start epinephrine. M- Doctor Singh: I will continue CPR in the meantime. Narrator: ACLS starts with again CPR, AED rhythm reading, and shock administration but with a higher level of care (ACLS). You must obtain IV or IO access. Epinephrine is administered every 3-5 minutes during the cycle in doses of 1 mg at a time. After each dose of epinephrine and CPR for 2 minutes the AED should reassess if the rhythm is shockable, and then continue CPR for another 2 minutes. At this time, it is recommended to use amiodarone or lidocaine. CPR will continue but at this time patient will likely be in the ambulance on the way to the hospital, and EMS will be managing the cycles. The cycles will continue until return of spontaneous circulation is obtained.J: Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation, along with coronary artery disease. If CPR does not resume spontaneous circulation within 40-50 minutes, there is a decreased chance of recovery. Spontaneous circulation may be achieved in patients with refractory Vfib with coronary revascularization. Therefore, in addition to traditional CPR, venoarterial ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) can be used as an adjunct and can result in much better systemic perfusion. Essentially, this is a technique in which blood is drained from the body and circulated outside through an oxygen and heat exchanger and is then reintroduced into the body. This technique can be used if preparing for coronary revascularization. M: Vfib is a great risk in the acute phase after MI, up to 72 hours after revascularization, due to the recent ischemia and reperfusion. After the first 72 hours and up to a month following, Vfib remains a risk due to the continued remodeling of the heart. This newly remodeled tissue can cause interruptions in the normal electrical signaling of the heart leading to dissociated contractions and subsequent lack of perfusion through the body, which can quickly lead to death within minutes if not recognized and managed immediately with CPR and defibrillation as described.J: Clinicians should be aware of their patients who would be more susceptible to serious events such as this and be on top of their training about management. This may not be a common occurrence in clinics, but it is a very serious event and requires a prompt and appropriate response. Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 98 “Apretude and code blue.” Dr. Yomi concisely explained how to use the new injectable medication for HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). Then, Manpreet, Jon, and Sheinnera presented a case that can actually happen in clinic and anywhere. CPR is a life-saving skill that needs to be learned and practiced over and over so we are not taken by surprise. Remember that heart disease continues to be the number 1 killer in the United States. So, make sure you know where your AED is and be ready to use it when needed. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Timiiye Yomi, Jennifer Thoene, Manpreet Singh, Jon-Ade Holter, and Sheinnera Gerongay.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week!_____________________References:American Heart Association 2022 CPR cheat sheet. American Heart CPR Class, BLS, ACLS Ft. Myers all Lee County. (n.d.). Retrieved June 2, 2022, from https://www.cprblspros.com/cpr-cheat-sheet-2022. Algorithms. CPR & First Aid, Emergency Cardiovascular Care, American Heart Association, cpr.heart.org. Retrieved June 2, 2022, from https://cpr.heart.org/en/resuscitation-science/cpr-and-ecc-guidelines/algorithms. Bhar-Amato J, Davies W, Agarwal S. Ventricular Arrhythmia after Acute Myocardial Infarction: 'The Perfect Storm'. Arrhythm Electrophysiol Rev. 2017 Aug;6(3):134-139. doi: 10.15420/aer.2017.24.1. PMID: 29018522; PMCID: PMC5610731. Farkas, J. (2021, November 29). Post-mi complications. EMCrit Project. Retrieved June 2, 2022, from https://emcrit.org/ibcc/post-mi-complications/#ventricular_tachycardia. 

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)
KIK Stuart Daigle

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 106:10


Sponsors: Orange Beach Invasion, Scrapin the Coast, & Bayou Showdown + Kern County Showdown (Feb 2022 Bakersfield, CA) & Mini Truck Showdown in Las Vegas which was cancelled for 2022!  ODB & The Mayor intro the episode covering Scene Updates ODB interviews Stuart Daigle from Kustom Ink Klothing aka KIK to discuss many topics including How he got involved in the truck scene Tragedy that lead to an ownership change with KIK How KIK has moved forward and continues supplying the scene with killer kustom threads Running Last Resort + much much more  RIP Mark “Papa Smurf” Ballard! We miss you Dad.  Stay On Da Rise! 

A Base da Base
A Base da Base #3 - Liderança | Cesar Benatti

A Base da Base

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 69:25


Para Lao Tzu "um líder é melhor quando as pessoas mal sabem que ele existe, quando seu trabalho estiver feito, seu objetivo alcançado, e elas dirão: nós mesmos conseguimos." Falar sobre liderança é falar sobre servir. Quais são as bases para uma boa liderança? Será que é mais importante saber os tipos de liderança ou os fundamentos? Nós professores e técnicos de voleibol damos a devida atenção a esse tópico essencial do nosso dia a dia? Nossa conversa de hoje foi com meu amigo Cesar Benatti, membro da comissão técnica da equipe da California State University em Bakersfield, CA, nos Estados Unidos. Seguem as indicações de leitura do nosso convidado. No vídeo alguns livros são apresentados com o título original, mas encontramos todas as traduções em português (exemplares disponíveis no Brasil), com exceção da indicação #6 (apenas em inglês, mas também disponível no Brasil) e os listamos a seguir: #1: James C. Hunter. O monge e o executivo. Sextante, 1989. #2: Mike Krzyzewski. Liderar com o coração. Sextante, 2016. #3: Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg, Alan Eagle. O coach de um trilhão de dólares. Planeta Estratégia, 2019. #4: Phil Jackson, Hugh Delehanty. Onze Anéis: A alma do sucesso. Rocco, 2014. #5: Jon Gordon. The no complaining rule: positive ways to deal with negativity at work. John Wiley & Sons, 2008. #6: Shawn Achor. O jeito Harvard de ser feliz: o curso mais concorrido da melhor universidade do mundo (The happiness advantage: the seven principles of positive psychology that fuel success and performance at work). Benvirá, 2012. #7: Daniel Goleman. Inteligência emocional. Objetiva, 1995. #8: Carol Dweck. Mindset: a nova psicologia do sucesso. Objetiva, 2017. #9: James Kerr. Legado: 15 lições de liderança que podemos aprender com o time de rugby All Blacks. Benvirá, 2016. #10: Jocko Willink, Leif Babin. Responsabilidade extrema: como os navy seals lideram e vencem. Alta books: 2021. #11: James Clear. Hábitos Atômicos: um método fácil e comprovado de criar bons hábitos e se livrar dos maus. Alta Life, 2019. #12: Bernardinho. Transformando suor em ouro. Sextante, 2011. #13: Jon Gordon. O poder da liderança positiva. Alta Books, 2018. Siga o Cesar também no Instagram: @cesarfeijaobenatti. Gostou da conversa? Não esqueça de deixar seu like! Inscreva-se no canal! Música de abertura e encerramento: Windy City Long (jingle).

You Should Check It Out
#149 - Bakersfield's World Records | Code in Music | Music Snobbery

You Should Check It Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 56:00


Jay brings us a genuine feel good story this week. World Records, in Bakersfield California, is celebrating its 40th year in business and it is quite a success story. A recent article in SFGate applauds their model and notes they've been able to do live music without relying on any major ticketing service. You buy your ticket at the record shop and the show is in the back, it's pretty sweet!Song: Joe Maneri - “Paniots Nine”Nick came across a wild story in Wired this week about a saxophonist that smuggled messages into the USSR via encoded music notation. Merryl Goldberg's trip makes for quite a story, as the KGB suspects her ensemble is somehow communicating with members of the Phantom Orchestra, but never thought to look closer at the pages of music she had alongside her the whole trip. Check out the story over at Wired.Song: GoGo Penguin - “The Antidote is in the Poison”Finally, Greg noticed, on his social feeds, that there seemed to be a lot of music snobbery about kids getting into an old Kate Bush song after it was used in a particular scene in Stranger Things. Feeling like we're safely on the other side of this 20/30-something phenomenon, we discuss whether we have an issue with discovering music from popular television shows (we don't), times in our lives when we've been the music snob and why we can't condone it anymore. It was quite an interesting conversation, hope you enjoy! :-)Songs:Galactic - “Crazyhorse Mongoose”Kate Bush - “Running Up That Hill”

Our Two Cents Podcast
143 - Helping The Foster Care System One Move At A Time

Our Two Cents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 32:33


Chris Shipp was born and raised in Bakersfield and is proud to call it home as he raises his two beautiful daughters alongside his wife. He started a moving company named “ Smooth Move” but the name was unfortunately already trademarked, which is how Mentors Moving came to be! In addition to Mentors Moving, Chris has coached at Garces Highschool for 9 years. He has a hunger for knowledge and all things leadership, finance and business development which has contributed to his many successes. John Duffield sits down with Chris Shipp, the President of Mentors Moving to hear how he and his partner Jesse started their moving company. Chris explains that he and Jesse always wanted to start their own business and when the opportunity presented itself they never looked back. Even though they faced struggles at the beginning they are now a successful company that is partnered with The Dream Center, a local program that helps those in foster care who have aged out. Stay tuned to hear Chris's inspiring story! LEARN MORE ABOUT CHRIS SHIPP: Website: https://mentorsmoving.com/ Email: chris@mentorsmoving.com Phone: 661-220-5155 Instagram: @MentorsMovingandStorage Facebook: @bakersfieldmentorsmoving  

Heather Whatever
Episode 1-Heather Whatever is Born

Heather Whatever

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 52:24


Heather and Nick, owners of The Heather Presley Collection jump right into the podcast world with a wildly-entertaining debut including discussions on how to leverage platforms like Only Fans to helps their business. Nick admits to being social-media-challenged after being catfished by a dude presenting as a woman and how he almost ended up in a sketchy apartment with a lot of explaining to do. Plus some stories from their "Tinder days" and how that little app started it all for this creative couple. 

90’s Galore Music & Entertainment
Filmmaker - John Uranday

90’s Galore Music & Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 72:11


John hails from Bakersfield, CA, and he's a veteran in the world of entertainment. Having started as a rapper in the mid 90's, he transitioned to filmmaking in the early 2000's and hasn't looked back. A graduate of the Los Angeles Film School; creator of two Apps - MUSEC & Lyrically Speaking, John continues to inspire us all. Tune-in and hear all about where and how you can connect with his work.

KGET 17 News
17 News @ Sunrise 6/14/2022

KGET 17 News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 13:28


Top Stories:-A CHP officer in Los Angeles is in critical condition after being shot during a traffic stop last night in Studio City-A close call for two Bakersfield police officers, when a suspected dui driver slammed into two patrol cars last night-The House January 6th committee continues to make its case about what led to the capital riot

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 127 with Raina Kelley, Innovative, Creative Storyteller and Vice President and Editor-in-Chief of Andscape

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 53:58


Episode 127 Notes and Links to Raina Kelley's Work        On Episode 127 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Raina Kelley, and the two discuss, among other topics, their shared love of the Oxford Comma, Raina's single mindedness in reading widely, her circuitous route from studying theater to journalism, cultural criticism, and editorship, the intricacies of keeping a multimedia presence, Andscape's mission and goals and structure, and political activism in sport.        Raina Kelley is Vice President and Editor-in-Chief of Andscape, formerly The Undefeated, a Black media platform dedicated to creating, highlighting, and uplifting the diverse stories of Black identity. She is also a former deputy editor at ESPN The Magazine. ESPN Press Room Bio for Raina Kelley   Andscape Website   Raina on ESPN PRod Pod in March 2022   February 2022 Article from New York Times: “ESPN Rebrands Black-Focused Undefeated Site as Andscape” At about 1:25, Raina talks about her “superpower” of always reading    At about 3:40, Raina discusses One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest as an indicator of grade-level reading    At about 5:00, Raina discusses favorite books   At about 6:45, Pete and Raina investigate Castaway and its a passive/proactive protagonist   At about 7:45, Raina responds to Pete's questions about Raina's writing and reading journey, and Raina gives background on her formidable drama base   At about 10:20, Pete and Raina geek out over Anna Deavere Smith's “magnificent” Twilight: Los Angeles   At about 12:30, Raina keeps it cool about her alma mater Yale's Skull and Bones, and how her career path took shape after college   At about 15:20, Raina talks about her “long and winding road” to journalism, and how “storytelling” was always her highest priority   At about 16:10, Pete asks Raina to compare and contrast theater writing and journalism    At about 17:50, Raina and Pete reminisce and lament over 2008-2022 in talking about the drastically-different worlds of Obama and Trump   At about 20:20, Raina talks about ideas of “authenticity” and inclusion in contemporary society    At about 21:00, Pete uses James Patterson's recent comments as a springboard to ask Raina questions about her experiences as a Black woman in worlds often heavy on white men's influence   At about 25:50, Raina explains her role at ESPN: The Magazine, including a detailed explanation of what a “deputy editor” does   At about 28:00, Raina responds to Pete's questions about an editor's balancing act in respecting a writer's autonomy and voice while performing one's editing duties   At about 31:00, Pete wonders about Raina's sports fandom/interest   At about 33:05, Raina shouts out the Best American anthology and its collections of great sportswriting   At about 35:00, Raina is asked about reasons for the rise or perception of the rise of players as activists   At about 37:50, Raina talks about multimedia's rise in line with the decline of physical newspapers and magazines   At about 41:25, Raina talks about what drew her to The Undefeated    At about 43:30, Raina discusses the audiences for The Undefeated and Andscape and “fine-tuning” voice and inclusion   At about 44:40, Raina talks about a dream collaboration with Hamilton and The Undefeated, under the care of Kelley L. Carter   At about 45:40, Raina further discusses Andscape's name origin and its changing role in 2022   At about 47:50, Pete and Raina talk about the idea of the diversity within and among Black points-of-view   At about 49:10, Pete highlights three representative articles from the week's Andscape that show a diversity of thought and subject matter    At about 50:00, Raina discusses future projects for Andscape, including Jason Reid's book, The Rise of the Black Quarterback, being published through the company's imprint    At about 51:30, Pete's son and his jaguar toy make an appearance!   At about 52:20, Raina gives contact/social media info     You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.     Please tune in for Episode 128 with Vania Patino. Vania is a news reporter for KERO-TV in Bakersfield, CA, a former reporter for KFDA in Amarillo, Texas, and a former standout student in Pete's English 10 honors class. This is going to be quite a treat for Pete!  The episode will air on June 21.

Notorious Bakersfield
E53: Death Of A Businessman

Notorious Bakersfield

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 20:39


Tom Dertinger called his wife Barbara on the afternoon of January 10, 1986. He told Barbara he was leaving his office to run some errands.Later that afternoon, Tom called his secretary to tell her he was at the apartment of an acquaintance to buy a three-wheeled motorcycle...an ATV. He told his secretary that he wasn't sure if he'd be done in time to get back to the office to close up...but he'd call back to let her know if she needed to secure the business before she left for the day.That call never came.******Link to Newspaper Archive through the Kern County Library.https://login.ke.ezproxy.sjvls.org/login?qurl=http://access.newspaperarchive.com%2fIf you'd like to support the Notorious Bakersfield podcast, you can buy me a coffee. Visit here to make a donation:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/NotoriousVisit the Notorious Bakersfield website: https://www.notoriousbakersfield.com/Email: notoriousbakersfield@gmail.com

The Moneywise Guys
6/10/22 Inflation, Market Slide, and disussion on Multiplier's with Business Consultant, Pat Collins

The Moneywise Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 47:15


The Moneywise Guys Friday, June 10th BE MONEYWISE. Moneywise Wealth Management I "The Moneywise Guys" podcast call: 661-847-1000 text in anytime: 661-396-1000 email: info@moneywiseguys.com website: www.MoneywiseGuys.com Guest: Patrick Collins, Sales Associate for Sunbelt of Bakersfield  

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 97 - EAT and NEAT

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 15:12


Episode 97: EAT and NEAT. Your body burns calories not only if you exercise. Sapna, Danish, and Dr. Arreaza explain the different ways you can burn more calories.Introduction: Energy in and Energy outBy Hector Arreaza, MD. Read by Suraj Amrutia. Our bodies are not machines. The simplistic concepts of energy balance, i.e., “energy in and energy out,” are influenced by a myriad of physiological processes and systems that include neurotransmitters, hormones, genetic and epigenetic factors, and many more. The combination of all these processes is called metabolism. The use of energy varies greatly among humans, that is why we come in many shapes and forms. If we apply the principles of thermodynamics to humans, people who eat the same amount of calories, have the same body weight, and have the same level of physical activity should have the same weight. But that theory has been debunked by multiple studies. That explains, for example, why some people who are naturally “thin” can remain thin regardless of their caloric intake and their physical activity. Today we will explain how our bodies use the energy that goes in, or in other words, how we spend our calories. We hope you enjoy this conversation. This is Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice.___________________________EAT and NEAT. By Hector Arreaza, MD; Sapna Patel, MS IV; and Danish Khalid, MS IV.  A: Energy expenditure is the amount of energy people need to carry out their physical functions. Energy expenditure is made up of resting metabolic rate, physical activity, and dietary thermogenesis. The widest variance in energy expenditure among most individuals is physical activity.S: For individuals with moderate physical inactivity the distribution of energy expenditure is:~70% resting metabolic rate, ~20% physical activity, ~10% diet-induced thermogenesis.D: Exercise Activity Thermogenesis (EAT) consists of physical activity that is planned, structured and repetitive done with the purpose of improving our well-being. Some EAT include sports, gym, etc. Just like gasoline for motor vehicles, available energy in muscle (ATP) is used for mechanical work, and some energy is released as heat (thermogenesis). The efficiency in converting ATP to mechanical work is ~30%; it means that out of 100 ATPs produced, 30 result in muscle work. A: An increase in body temperature triggers the CNS to cool the body via increased dilation of skin smooth muscle blood vessels, increased heart rate, and increased sweat production – all that help facilitate the release of heat during physical exercise. S: Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis (NEAT) consists of physical activity that is not typically considered exercise (e.g., maintaining posture, standing, walking, stair climbing, fidgeting, cleaning, singing, and other activities of daily living.) Walking can be considered EAT or NEAT.NEAT often represents the widest variance in total energy expenditure among individuals. NEAT can range between 150-500 kcal/day, which is often greater than bouts of exercise. D: NEAT is an example of a behavioral factor to explain the perception that some people are “naturally skinny” and can maintain a healthier body weight compared to others, even with the same caloric intake and same routine “exercise” activity. Increasing your number of steps per day can be achieved by altering daily activity, or by scheduled walking/running. S: For example: Parking far away, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, going to your coworker's office instead of calling.A: You can monitor your number of steps per day with a pedometer or other tracking device (cell phone). The number of steps recorded by different pedometers can vary.D: Less than 5,000 steps/day is average for U.S. adults, and it is considered sedentary.S: 5,000 – 7,5000 steps/day is low active, and 7,500 – 10,000 steps/day is somewhat active.A: More than 10,000 steps/day is desirable (active). 10,000 steps per day x 7 days per week x one calorie per 20 steps = 3,500 calories burned per week.D: On average, 1 calorie is “burned” for every 20 steps, it means 4,000 steps / 20 = 200 calories.S: Definition of rest days. Rest days are any days that don't involve heavy lifting and focus on cardio or core exercises. Rest days are an important part of any exercise routine as it gives your body a chance to repair and recover. At least one rest every week. D: On the other hand, workout days involve heavy lifting: push, pull, legs, etc. For example, on rest days I do cardio and abs.Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 97 “EAT and NEAT.” Keep in mind the ways your body uses the energy you put in. Energy is used by our resting metabolic rate, our exercise activity thermogenesis (EAT), our non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), and our food-associated thermogenesis (the energy we burned while we eat). We tend to underestimate the power of NEAT, but parking your car far away, taking the stairs, and increasing your daily steps can make a big difference in your daily energy expenditure. Let's remember the virtues of physical activity to promote good health. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Sapna Patel, and Danish Khalid. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week! References:Levine JA. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT): environment and biology. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2004 May;286(5):E675-85. doi: 10.1152/ajpendo.00562.2003. Erratum in: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jan;288(1):E285. PMID: 15102614. Bays, Harold E. and William McCarthy, Obesity Algorithm® 2021©, Obesity Medicine Association. 

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)
OLP Best Of - DTE Chris Couto

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 97:44


Sponsors: Orange Beach Invasion, Scrapin the Coast, & Bayou Showdown + Kern County Showdown (Feb 2022 Bakersfield, CA) & Mini Truck Showdown in Las Vegas which was cancelled for 2022!  ODB intros the best of episode  Lauren covers updates for Scrapin the Coast 20th event coming up in 2 weeks  OLP runs Chris Couto's audio who is an OG member of Down II Earth aka DTE which originally air'd 2 years ago in April 2020 RIP Mark “Papa Smurf” Ballard! We miss you Dad.  Stay On Da Rise! 

Not Your Final Girl
New Release Wall: Crimes of the Future (2022) Minisode

Not Your Final Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 19:22


Ghouls, it's time for a smoke break in the back room! Join Candace and Ariel as we give our spoiler-free thoughts on David Cronenberg's latest body horror film, Crimes of the Future (2022). This film should be in a theatre near you (because if it came to Bakersfield, CA, chances are you've got access to it), so you can either catch it first or let this minisode whet your appetite for a horny, dystopian, and cerebral sci-fi movie that is rich in both metaphors and worldbuilding. Get ready to believe that the Body is Reality, Surgery is the New Sex, and don't forget to be gay and do future crimes. Links: IG- instagram.com/nyfgpod Twitter- twitter.com/nyfgpod FB- facebook.com/nyfgpodcast/ Pod merch- https://society6.com/nyfgpod I am Not Your Final Girl by Claire C. Holland- https://www.amazon.com/Am-Not-Your-Final-Girl/dp/0692966633 Bandcamp- arieldyer.bandcamp.com Show art by Brian Demarest: instagram.com/evilflynn

Valley Edition Podcast
Valley Edition - June 3, 2022 - The first Black umpire in baseball's National League, a history of the local LGBTQ community, and the power of storytelling from The Other California

Valley Edition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 52:55


On this week's Valley Edition: a look back at the life of Art Williams. The National League's first black umpire started off as a farm worker in Bakersfield. Plus, Fresno State students explore the history of Fresno's LGBTQ community in a new podcast. And we return to Woodlake for our final episode of The Other California.

KGET 17 News
17 News @ Sunrise 6/7/2022

KGET 17 News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 18:26


Top Stories:-One person is dead following a violent and fiery crash in Oildale yesterday-The Bakersfield police department is mourning the loss of retired K-9 officer, Bronx-In honor of Flag Day coming up on June 14th we are inviting you to drop off your torn, worn, and faded flags to us, here at KGET

Notorious Bakersfield
E52: Murder On Rosewood Avenue

Notorious Bakersfield

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 18:02


When Jimmy and Sharon kissed their mother Patricia Leard goodbye on their way out the door for school on September 5, 1978, that was the last time they ever kissed their mom.If you'd like to support the Notorious Bakersfield podcast, you can buy me a coffee. Visit here to make a donation:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/NotoriousVisit the Notorious Bakersfield website: https://www.notoriousbakersfield.com/Email: notoriousbakersfield@gmail.com

KGET 17 News
17 News @ Sunrise 6/6/022

KGET 17 News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 14:23


Top Stories:-At least a dozen Bakersfield residents are left without a home after smoke and flames consumed a East Bakersfield apartment complex this weekend-An elderly man is under arrest after a hit-and-run crash left a child severely injured in northwest Bakersfield over the weekend

The California Report Magazine
New Podcast Visits Central Valley Towns, and Celebrates 'The Other California'

The California Report Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 29:40


To a lot of people outside our state, California is one of two places: L.A. or San Francisco. Hollywood or high tech. The beaches or the redwoods. And frankly, to a lot of Californians who live here, there's a vast part of our state between L.A. and S.F. that people consider “drive-through” country: the San Joaquin Valley, which stretches from the Sierra Nevada to the Coastal range, from Stockton to Bakersfield. It's a place that – culturally, politically, and geographically – could almost be its own state. It's “The Other California.” That's the name of a new podcast from our friends at KVPR that explores the richness of this region. Each episode takes listeners on a journey to visit a different small town. We'll hear excerpts from the podcast, and chat with host Alice Daniel and reporter Kathleen Schock.

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 96 - Tirzepatide

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 22:54


Episode 96: Tirzepatide. By Maria Beuca, MS3, Ross University School of Medicine. Comments by Hector Arreaza, MD.  Today is May 19, 2022, and we want to talk about a new drug that was recently approved by the FDA on May 13, 2022, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.  This is Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home.This podcast was created for educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice.This drug is known as tirzepatide, also known by the brand name Mounjaro®. It is an injection given once a week that mimics the effects of two hormones: GIP (Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide) and GLP-1 (Glucagon-Like Peptide-1). These two hormones are involved in lowering blood glucose levels after eating by stimulating insulin release, they are “incretin” hormones.  What is unique about this new drug, tirzepatide, is that it is the first and only approved single molecule that binds and activates BOTH GIP and GLP-1 receptors. Because of this dual incretin action, it has also been referred to as a “twincretin.” It increases first and second-phase insulin secretion AND decreases glucagon levels in a glucose-dependent manner, and this lowers both fasting blood glucose levels and post-meal glucose levels.  It is also an appetite suppressant, causing significant weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes.  Tirzepatide vs semaglutide: Semaglutide (Ozempic®) was approved for the treatment of type 2 Diabetes in December 2017, and then approved for weight loss in June 2021 under the brand name Wegovy®. Semaglutide is a GLP-1 receptor agonist, but it does not work on GIP receptors. Due to this dual incretin action of tirzepatide, it has now been shown to be superior at all doses to semaglutide.  Evidence: There was a 40-week study done in July 30, 2019- February 15, 2021, called “SURPASS-2” where 1879 patients were assigned in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to either semaglutide 1 mg or to the 3 different doses of tirzepatide (5 mg, 10 mg, 15 mg). The patients all had a mean HbA1c of 8.28% at the start of the study.  By the end of the study, the patients on tirzepatide at the different doses had an A1c of 6.2% for the 5mg dose, 6 % for the 10 mg dose, and 5.9% for the 15 mg dose, whereas the patients on semaglutide had their HbA1c at 6.42%. On tirzepatide, about 82-86% of patients decreased their HbA1c below 7.0%, compared to 79% of the patients on semaglutide. Comment: It seems like a race: All GLP-1 RA are competing to reach the lowest A1C and get the lowest weight. What is more amazing is that up until now, an A1c level < 5.7% without a risk of hypoglycemia was not considered attainable with current treatment options, but with tirzepatide, this goal was met.  Fasting Serum glucose levels prior to treatment: 173. Fasting Serum glucose after treatment with:Tirzepatide 5 mg: 117.0,     10 mg:  111.3,    15 mg:  109.6. Semaglutide 1 mg: 124.4.Comment: No hypoglycemia. Weight loss for patients on Tirzepatide was also greater, patients lost about 4 to 12 lbs more (1.9 to 5.5 kg) than with semaglutide. Weight loss in 40 weeks: Tirzepatide:  5mg: 16 lbs (7.6 kg), 10 mg: 20 lbs (9.3 kg), 15 mg: 24 lbs (11.2 kg). Semaglutide: 12 lbs (5.7 kg). Other positive effects that many patients experience were: improved lipid profile, blood pressure, liver enzymes, and improved biomarkers of insulin sensitivity. Another Phase 3 clinical trial of tirzepatide that is currently ongoing is the SURMOUNT-1, which focuses on the weight loss benefits of the drug, and results are expected in 2023. Preliminary data shows that tirzepatide has similar weight loss as bariatric surgery.  Cost: Tirzepatide (Mounjaro) is a rival for Novo Nordisk's semaglutide sold as Ozempic and Wegovy. Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) released the final report for tirzepatide cost: $5,500-5,700/year. Semaglutide: Ozempic, Wegovy ~ $16,000/year without insurance. Comment: [3 times cheaper]. 4x more expensive in the US, rarely covered by health insurance for weight loss Administration: 1x week, any time, with or without meals.  Doses: 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 7.5 mg, 10 mg, 12.5 mg, 15 mg. Week 1-Week 4: Start with 2.5 mg injection 1x week. Treatment initiation, not intended for glycemic control. Week 5-Week 8:  Increase to 5.0 mg 1x week. >Week 9: may increase dose another 2.5 mg every 4 weeks as needed for glycemic control. Maximum dose: 15 mg 1x week. Adverse Reactions: Nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, vomiting, constipation, dyspepsia, abdominal pain.  Drug Interactions:  Delays gastric emptying, can affect absorption of oral medications taken at the same time. Warfarin = monitor more closely. Contraindications: Type 1 diabetes, pregnancy, personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma or Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2: medullary thyroid cancer, parathyroid tumors, and pheochromocytoma). Thyroid c-cell tumors were noticed in rats. Symptoms of thyroid cancer: mass in neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness. Warnings & Precautions:Pancreatitis: Has been reported in clinical trials. Discontinue if suspected. Hypoglycemia: May cause hypoglycemia if used with insulin or insulin secretagogues (sulfonylurea). Reducing dose of these may be necessary.Hypersensitivity is possible.Acute Kidney Injury: No dosage adjustment needed, but monitor renal function if patient has renal impairment with severe GI reactions. It may cause nausea, vomiting and diarrheaà dehydrationà acute kidney injury. Can worsen chronic renal disease or renal impairment.Severe gastrointestinal disease: May cause Gastrointestinal adverse reactions, sometimes severe. Not recommended in patients with severe gastrointestinal disease, may aggravate symptoms, has not been studied.Acute gallbladder disease: Also has occurred in 0.6% of patients in trials. monitor and follow-up if cholelithiasis is suspected. Diabetic retinopathy: Not studied, monitor for complications. Rapid glucose control can cause temporary worsening of diabetic retinopathy, monitor these patients. Pregnancy: May cause fetal harm.Females of Reproductive potential: If using oral contraceptives, switch to non-oral contraceptive or add a barrier method for 4 weeks after starting drug and for 4 weeks after increasing dose.____________________________Now we conclude our episode number 96 “Tirzepatide.” Maria explained that tirzepatide has a dual effect on both GLP-1 and GIP receptors. The medication has been approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but it has been proven to be very effective for weight loss also, almost comparable to bariatric surgery. Remember the contraindications and side effects of this medication to use it appropriately. The good news with tirzepatide is the cost —almost 3 times lower cost than its main competitor. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.This week we thank Hector Arreaza and Maria Beuca.Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. If you have any feedback, contact us by email at RioBravoqWeek@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. See you next week! _____________________References:Dockrill, Peter. “Experimental Drug Breaks Record for Weight Loss in Latest Clinical Trial Results.” ScienceAlert, 9 May 2022, https://www.sciencealert.com/experimental-drug-breaks-record-for-weight-loss-in-latest-clinical-trial-results.Frías, Juan P., et al. “Tirzepatide versus Semaglutide Once Weekly in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Nejm.” New England Journal of Medicine, 5 Aug. 2021, https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2107519. “Label as Approved by FDA. - Pi.lilly.com.” Mounjaro Prescribing Information, Lilly USA, LLC, May 2022, https://pi.lilly.com/us/mounjaro-uspi.pdf. Mounjaro. Prescribing Information. Lilly USA, LLC.  May 2022. https://pi.lilly.com/us/mounjaro-uspi.pdf?s=pi

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)
Mini Truckin' w/ Cliff Josey

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 190:11


Sponsors: Orange Beach Invasion, Scrapin the Coast, & Bayou Showdown + Kern County Showdown (Feb 2022 Bakersfield, CA) & Mini Truck Showdown in Las Vegas which was cancelled for 2022!  ODB & The Mayor cover Scene Updates ODB interviews Cliff Josey from the Pacific Northwest to talk 80s Old school BMX TV shows Mini Trucks (of course) + so much more  RIP Mark “Papa Smurf” Ballard! We miss you Dad.  Stay On Da Rise!     

Our Two Cents Podcast
141 - Key Budge on The Wonderful City of Tehachapi

Our Two Cents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 39:49


Key Budge coordinates all communication efforts for the City of Tehachapi and has more than 30 years of experience working in government, (25 years as a Deputy Sheriff in LA, 6 years with the City of Tehachapi and 2 years at the City of Palmdale). He also has more than 12 years in media related fields including on air at KUZZ in Bakersfield as a news anchor and DJ. Key has called Tehachapi home for almost 20 years after migrating from the greater LA area. Scott Hanson and co-host Dave Plivelich sit down with Key Budge, the Community Engagement Specialist for the City of Tehachapi. He tells us that despite living and serving as a Deputy Sheriff in LA he prefers the caring community of Tehachapi. Key discusses the transparency, involvement, and connection that their local podcast, TehachaPod, provides the community. Key also expresses the city's need for both police officers and engineers. They wrap up the episode with fun events that we can expect to see in the next couple of months. If you are looking for a fun weekend not too far from home, tune into this week's episode! LEARN MORE ABOUT KEY BUDGE: Website: www.liveuptehachapi.com/ Email: kbudge@Tehachapicityhall.com Phone: 661-822-2200 Instagram: @CityOfTehachapi Facebook: @CityOfTehachapi Twitter: @CityOfTehachapi LinkedIn: @CityOfTehachapi  

KQED's The California Report
More Than A Dozen Oil Wells Found To Be Leaking Methane In Bakersfield

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 18:04


There's growing concern about the potential health and safety risks from more than a dozen leaking oil wells in Bakersfield. At least five of the wells were found to be emitting methane at high enough levels that could either be explosive or cause serious health risks. Reporter: Keith Mizuguchi, The California Report With the primary election coming up next month in California, many voters will be casting their ballot for the candidates they feel best represent their interests and needs. But is there equal representation in the state? Guest: Joe Mathews, Policital Columnist and President of the Global Forum on Modern Direct Democracy During the worst months of the pandemic, many childcare providers had to temporarily close their doors. That pushed some providers over the edge, especially in low income communities.  Reporter: Claire Trageser, KPBS  

Notorious Bakersfield
E51: Melee At Juvenile Court

Notorious Bakersfield

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 12:26


On May 7, 1954, a domestic dispute turned deadly at the Kern County Juvenile Court building. Two people died and two others were wounded. If you'd like to support the Notorious Bakersfield podcast, you can buy me a coffee. Visit here to make a donation:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/NotoriousVisit the Notorious Bakersfield website: https://www.notoriousbakersfield.com/Email: notoriousbakersfield@gmail.com

Dream Big Podcast
DB 306: The Power Of Compliments. And We Can Prove It!

Dream Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 12:09


This weekend, we went to an art, yoga and music festival called Lightning It A Bottle (LIB) at Buena Vista Lake, just outside of Bakersfield, California. It was our first time camping at a festival like this with tens of thousands of people, and needless to say, our family saw people wearing outfits and expressing themselves in ways that you don't typically see at your local CVS. Sophia loves to give compliments and so as we were walking through the festival, she would constantly be stopping people and telling them how much she liked their hat, sunglasses, or dress.. We saw firsthand the power of compliments as she brought such huge smiles to everyone she complimented, and even had a few people gift her the things she complimented them on (as you'll hear in the episode). You'll love hearing Sophia and Olga describe our experience at the LIB festival and Sophia issues a challenge to all Big Dreamers that you won't want to miss!

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)
OLP Best of Series - Craig Fraser

Our Lifestyle Podcast (OLP)

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 96:07


Sponsors: Orange Beach Invasion, Scrapin the Coast, & Bayou Showdown + Kern County Showdown (Feb 2022 Bakersfield, CA) & Mini Truck Showdown in Las Vegas which was cancelled for 2022!  ODB gives a quick 4 mins intro during their "off week" - #RIPSteveStillwell Craig Fraser from Air Syndicate / Kal Koncepts came on OLP back in Aug 2017 and it is one of our MOST downloaded/streamed shows of all time. We had to hit you with this one again.  Thanks //FL Tim for the idea/concept behind this episode our Best of Series!  RIP Mark “Papa Smurf” Ballard! We miss you Dad.  Stay On Da Rise!     

Ear Hustle
Last Memory: Michael

Ear Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 29:26


The day before committing the crime that sent him to prison, Michael stood in a parking lot in Bakersfield, California, and looked up at the sky. Twenty-two years later, Earlonne and Nigel visit that same parking lot, then return to San Quentin to tell Michael what they found. If you need help for yourself or someone else, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or suicidepreventionlifeline.org. As always, big thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Broomfield for their support of the show. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com. We're more than halfway to our goal of 1,000 donors! Donate to help us get there and unlock a matching gift of $25,000.