Podcasts about Midtown

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Latest podcast episodes about Midtown

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
A Broadway Museum opens in the theater district and an armed robbery in midtown

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 5:29


This is the All Local morning update for November 15th, 2022

Unresolved
The Little Rock Slasher

Unresolved

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 28:58


"There is a strong possibility the person who did this continues to work and/or live in our community. He likely has familiarity with the area in which the victims were attacked."Between August 2020 and April 2021, four brutal knife attacks were reported in the Midtown neighborhood of Little Rock, Arkansas. The first two victims, Larry McChristian & Jeff Welch, were each murdered in residential neighborhoods in August and September of 2020. The third and fourth victims, Debra Walker and Marlon Franklin, were attacked separately in April of 2021. Only one, Debra Walker, survived, but was treated for more than fifteen stab wounds after being left for dead.Just weeks after the final two knife attacks, police in Little Rock - aided by the FBI's Behavioral Analysis Team - came forward with information pointing to a burgeoning serial killer. However, in the year-and-a-half since, this aspiring killer has gone quiet, and it remains undetermined whether he has moved on to new territory or is simply biding his time... To watch the surveillance footage of this unknown offender, please check out the following link at the Little Rock Police Department YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvrw4NkD2Is Research, writing, hosting, and production by Micheal Whelan"Unresolved" themes composed by Ailsa TravesLearn more about this podcast at http://unresolved.meIf you would like to support this podcast and others, consider heading to https://www.patreon.com/unresolvedpod to become a Patron or Producer

This Was The Scene Podcast
Ep. 198: REPOST Midtown w/ Rob Hitt

This Was The Scene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 160:49


Click here to buy tickets to the Lanemeyer show at Stanhope House in Stanhope, NJ on Dec 1, 2022. This is a REPOST of Episode 87 where I interviewed Rob Hitt about Midtown and this is what we chatted about. Constantly playing a song on repeat The bands that influenced Midtown Writing really high notes in Lanemeyer His first band which wasn't Professor Plum Meeting Josh from Humble Beginnings How Midtown formed Gabe's usage of big words in songs Buying CDs with friends and dubbing them for each other Jay Pinball New Found Glory Their first album being amazing Vinnie from I am the avalanche singing background on a Midtown song Fenix TX and Drive-Thru Records Almost getting fired from the band Being roommates with Max Bemis And a ton more Check out his label here http://isurrenderrecords.com/ Check out Bodega cats https://www.bodegacats.nyc/ I'll link to the video for the song on the This Was the Scene's Instagram Story so you can check it out. American Television plays The Fest, Sunday, October 30th, 9:40pm at Vecinos. Get your Realtor Instagram Stickers by clicking here. Check out my new book The Couples' Checklist for my webcomic dailyBred. It's a great gift for Valentine's Day. I also have an Instagram for it. If you market aggressively on Instagram Stories and want custom stickers then go here to get custom stickers or just email mike@drive80.com and I can send you samples. These are great for B2C companies and Realtors. Feel free to support the podcast for as little as $1 a month through Patreon Or go to thiswasthescene.com to possibly buy some merch.

The Geoff Calkins Show
Herrington on Grizz vs. TWolves preview/Midtown Coffee & Jeffrey Jeff$ Bet$ College Football in Seg 2 WEEK 11

The Geoff Calkins Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 42:21


Herrington on Grizz vs. TWolves preview/Midtown Coffee & Jeffrey Jeff$ Bet$ College Football in Seg 2 WEEK 11

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
New Yorkers brace for the remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole to hit. The city will close the Randalls Island migrant center and move its occupants to a hotel. Some city officials push for a pedestrian-friendly midtown this holiday season.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 5:32


1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
NYC braces for remnants of Hurricane Nicole... Veterans Day Parade underway in Midtown... Another attack in the subway

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 6:43


Midtown Fellowship: Lexington
Midtown Midweek | An Anchor in the Storm

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightThe Whig - 1200 Main St, Columbia, SC 29201Resource SpotlightClick here to volunteer with us at Celebration Sunday!Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)------Closing song “Heal Our Hearts” by Midtown Music, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
Midtown Midweek | An Anchor in the Storm

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightThe Whig - 1200 Main St, Columbia, SC 29201Resource SpotlightClick here to volunteer with us at Celebration Sunday!Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)------Closing song “Heal Our Hearts” by Midtown Music, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Indy Audio
The Indypendent Midterm Election Night Special on WBAI // 08 Nov. '22

Indy Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 290:42


Over the past couple of years, The Indypendent News Hour has become the premiere news and public affairs show on WBAI, a listen-sponsored community radio station whose signal beams 90 miles in all directions from atop a Midtown skyscraper. On Nov. 8 2022, we expanded our normal one-hour news show into a five-hour election night special. We not only keep track of key races in New York and nationally but provide a deeper analysis of the issues that have animated the midterms — crime, inflation, abortion rights, the threat to democracy — and ones that haven't been discussed nearly enough: the racist backlash to Black Lives Matter, the demise of local news and the spread of conspiracy theories, the growing power of the billionaire class over the rest of society. Throughout the show, we heard live interviews with NYC voters by roving Indy reporters. Here is the five-hour breakdown. FIRST HOUR —Interview with Ben Max, editor of Gotham Gazette, about the most competitive governor's race in New York in a generation as well as key congressional and legislative races that could swing the balance of power in Washington and Albany. —Interviews with Socialist state legislators Jabari Brisport and Phara Souffrant Forrest about Kathy Hochul turning to the New York Left to save her floundering campaign. SECOND HOUR —Interview with legendary NYC journalist Tom Robbins. —Interview with Bob Hennelly about the demise of local media and the national media echo chamber that has been promoting the “red wave” for weeks. —Grassroots report from Florida where Gov. Ron DeSantis is pioneering is testing out his version of homegrown American fascism as prepares to run for President in 2024. THIRD HOUR —Interview with acclaimed Marxist-feminist-anti-racist scholar Linda Martín Alcoff. Will there be a backlash against the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade? If not, why not? —Interview with Indy Contributing Editor Nicholas Powers about the underlying causes of the public hysteria over crime, the rise of conspiracy theories and why working class people of color are now also starting to move away from supporting the Democrats. FOURTH HOUR —Grassroots report from North Carolina where Cheri Beasley is trying to become the first Black woman from the South to be elected to the Senate. —Interview with Mondale Robinson of the Black Male Voter Project. —Interview with Carrie Santoro, executive director of Pennsylvania Stands Up. —Interview with historian Max Elbaum about what the left must do to defeat MAGA and reset U.S. politics in a more progressive direction FIFTH HOUR —Interview with Linda Sarsour, Brooklyn-born Palestinian-American activist, Women's March co-founder and national surrogate for Bernie Sanders in 2016 and 2020. —Grassroots report from Arizona. —Interview with Ron Daniels, President and Founder of the Institute of the Black World 21s Century about the Midterm elections and their impact on Black America.

The Lunar Society
Kenneth T. Jackson - Robert Moses, Hero or Tyrant of New York?

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 93:53


I had a fascinating discussion about Robert Moses and The Power Broker with Professor Kenneth T. Jackson.He's the pre-eminent historian on NYC and author of Robert Moses and The Modern City: The Transformation of New York.He answers:* Why are we so much worse at building things today?* Would NYC be like Detroit without the master builder?* Does it take a tyrant to stop NIMBY?Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here.Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you share it, post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group chats, and throw it up wherever else people might find it. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.A huge thanks to Graham Bessellieu for editing this podcast.Timestamps(0:00:00) Preview + Intro(0:11:13) How Moses Gained Power(0:18:22) Moses Saved NYC?(0:27:31) Moses the Startup Founder?(0:32:34) The Case Against Moses Highways(0:51:24) NIMBYism(1:03:44) Is Progress Cyclical(1:12:36) Friendship with Caro(1:20:41) Moses the Longtermist?.TranscriptThis transcript was produced by a program I wrote. If you consume my podcast via transcripts, let me know in the comments if this transcript was (or wasn't) an adequate substitute for the human edited transcripts in previous episodes.0:00:00 Preview + IntroKenneth Jackson 0:00:00Robert Moses represented a past, you know, a time when we wanted to build bridges and super highways and things that pretty much has gone on. We're not building super highways now. We're not building vast bridges like Moses built all the time. Had Robert Moses not lived, not done what he did, New York would have followed the trail of maybe Detroit. Essentially all the big roads, all the bridges, all the parks, the United Nations, Lincoln Center, the World's Fairs of 1939 and 1964, and hundreds of other things he built. And I think it was the best book I ever read. In broad strokes, it's correct. Robert Moses had more power than any urban figure in American history. He built incredible monuments. He was ruthless and arrogant and honest. Okay.Dwarkesh Patel 0:00:54I am really, really excited about this one. Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Professor Kenneth T. Jackson about the life and legacy of Robert Moses. Professor Jackson is the preeminent historian on New York City. He was the director of the Herbert H. Lehman Center for American History and the Jock Barzun Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, where he has also shared the Department of History. And we were discussing Robert Moses. Professor Jackson is the author and editor of Robert Moses and the Modern City, the Transformation of New York. Professor Jackson, welcome to the podcast.Kenneth Jackson 0:01:37Well, thank you for having me. Okay.Dwarkesh Patel 0:01:40So many people will have heard of Robert Moses and be vaguely aware of him through the popular biography of him by Robert Caro, the power broker. But most people will not be aware of the extent of his influence on New York City. Can you give a kind of a summary of the things he was able to get built in New York City?Kenneth Jackson 0:02:03One of the best comparisons I can think of is that our Caro himself, when he compared him to Christopher Wren in London, he said, if you would see his monument, look around. It's almost more easier to talk about what Moses didn't do than what he did do. If you all the roads, essentially all the big roads, all the bridges, all the parks, the United Nations, Lincoln Center, the World's Fairs of 1939 and 1964, and hundreds of other things he built. I mean, he didn't actually do it with his own two hands, but he was in charge. He got it done. And Robert Caro wrote a really great book. I think the book was flawed because I think Caro only looked at Moses's own documents and Moses had a very narrow view of himself. I mean, he thought he was a great man, but I mean, he didn't pay any attention to what was going on in LA very much, for example. But clearly, by any standard, he's the greatest builder in American history. There's nobody really in second place. And not only did he build and spend this vast amount of money, he was in power for a long time, really a half century more or less. And he had a singular focus. He was married, but his personal life was not important to him. He did it without scandal, really, even Caro admits that he really died with less than he started with. So I mean, he wanted power, and boy, did he have power. He technically was subservient to governors and mayors, but since he built so much and since he had multiple jobs, that was part of his secret. He had as many as six, eight, ten different things at once. If the mayor fired him or got rid of him, he had all these different ways, which he was in charge of that the mayor couldn't. So you people were afraid of him, and they also respected him. He was very smart, and he worked for a dollar a year. So what are you going to get him for? As Caro says, nobody is ready to be compared with Robert Moses. In fact, compares him with an act of nature. In other words, the person you can compare him with is God. That's the person. He put the rivers in. He put the hills in. He put the island in. Compare that to Moses, what Moses did. No other person could compare to that. That's a little bit of exaggeration, but when you really think about Robert Moses and you read the Power Broker, you are stunned by the scope of his achievement. Just stunned. And even beyond New York, when we think of the interstate highway system, which really starts in 1954, 55, 56, and which is 40-something thousand miles of interstate highways, those were built by Moses' men, people who had in their young life had worked with the parkways and expressways in and around New York City. So they were ready to go. So Moses and Moses also worked outside New York City, mostly inside New York City, but he achieved so much. So probably you need to understand it's not easy to get things done in New York. It's very, very dense, much twice as dense as any place in the United States and full of neighborhoods that feel like little cities and are little cities and that don't want change even today. A place like Austin, for example, is heavy into development, not New York. You want to build a tall building in New York, you got to fight for it. And the fact that he did so much in the face of opposition speaks a lot to his methods and the way he… How did Moses do what he did? That is a huge question because it isn't happening anymore, certainly not in New YorkDwarkesh Patel 0:06:22City. Yeah. And that's really why I actually wanted to talk to you and talk about this book because the Power Broker was released in 1974 and at the time New York was not doing well, which is to put it mildly. But today the crisis we face is one where we haven't built significant public works in many American cities for decades. And so it's interesting to look back on a time when we could actually get a lot of public works built very quickly and very efficiently and see if maybe we got our characterization of the people at the time wrong. And that's where your 2007 book comes in. So I'm curious, how was the book received 50 years after, or I guess 40 years after the Power Broker was released? What was the reception like? How does the intellectual climate around these issues change in that time?Kenneth Jackson 0:07:18The Power Broker is a stunning achievement, but you're right. The Power Broker colon Robert Moses and the fall of New York. He's thinking that in the 1970s, which is the… In New York's 400-year history, we think of the 1970s as being the bottom. City was bankrupt, crime was going up, corruption was all around. Nothing was working very well. My argument in the subtitle of the 2007 book or that article is Robert Moses and the rise of New York. Arguing that had Robert Moses not lived, not done what he did, New York would have followed the trail of maybe Detroit and St. Louis and Cincinnati and Pittsburgh and most cities in the Northeast and Midwest, which really declined. New York City really hasn't declined. It's got more people now than it ever did. It's still a number one city in the world, really, by most of our standards. It's the global leader, maybe along with London. At one point in the 1980s, we thought it might be Tokyo, which is the largest city in the world, but it's no longer considered competitive with New York. I say London too because New York and London are kind of alone at the top. I think Robert Moses' public works, activities, I just don't know that you could have a New York City and not have expressways. I don't like the Cross Bronx expressway either and don't want to drive on it. How can you have a world in which you can't go from Boston to San Francisco? You had to have it. You have to have some highways and Carroll had it exactly wrong. He talked about Moses and the decline of public transit in New York. Actually what you need to explain in New York is why public transit survived in New York, wherein most other American cities, the only people who use public transit are the losers. Oh, the disabled, the poor and stuff like that. In New York City, rich people ride the subway. It's simply the most efficient way to get around and the quickest. That question needs, some of the things need to be turned on its head. How did he get it done? How did he do it without scandal? I mean, when you think about how the world is in our time, when everything has either a financial scandal or a sexual scandal attached to it, Moses didn't have scandals. He built the White Stone Bridge, for example, which is a gigantic bridge connecting the Bronx to Queens. It's beautiful. It was finished in the late 1930s on time and under budget. Actually a little earlier. There's no such thing as that now. You're going to do a big public works project and you're going to do it on time. And also he did it well. Jones Beach, for example, for generations has been considered one of the great public facilities on earth. It's gigantic. And he created it. You know, I know people will say it's just sand and water. No, no, it's a little more complicated than that. So everything he did was complicated. I mean, I think Robert Caro deserves a lot of credit for doing research on Moses, his childhood, his growing up, his assertion that he's the most important person ever to live in and around New York. And just think of Franklin Roosevelt and all the people who lived in and around New York. And Moses is in a category by himself, even though most Americans have never heard of Robert Moses. So his fame is still not, that book made him famous. And I think his legacy will continue to evolve and I think slightly improve as Americans realize that it's so hard, it's hard to build public works, especially in dense urban environments. And he did it.0:11:13 How Moses Gained PowerDwarkesh Patel 0:11:33Yeah. There's so much to talk about there. But like one of the interesting things from the Power Broker is Caro is trying to explain why governors and mayors who were hesitant about the power that Moses was gaining continued to give him more power. And there's a section where he's talking about how FDR would keep giving him more positions and responsibilities, even though FDR and Moses famously had a huge enmity. And he says no governor could look at the difficulty of getting things built in New York and not admire and respect Moses' ability to do things, as he said, efficiently, on time, under budget, and not need him, essentially. But speaking of scandal, you talked about how he didn't take salary for his 12 concurrent government roles that he was on. But there's a very arresting anecdote in the Power Broker where I think he's 71 and his daughter gets cancer. And for the first time, I think he had to accept, maybe I'm getting the details wrong, but he had to accept salary for working on the World's Fair because he didn't have enough. He was the most powerful person in New York, and he didn't have enough money to pay for his daughter's cancer. And even Caro himself says that a lot of the scandals that came later in his life, they were just kind of trivial stuff, like an acre of Central Park or the Shakespeare in the park. Yeah, it wasn't... The things that actually took him down were just trivial scandals.Kenneth Jackson 0:13:07Well, in fact, when he finally was taken down, it took the efforts of a person who was almost considered the second most powerful person in the United States, David Rockefeller, and the governor of New York, both of whom were brothers, and they still had a lot of Moses to make him kind of get out of power in 1968. But it was time. And he exercised power into his 70s and 80s, and most of it was good. I mean, the bridges are remarkable. The bridges are gorgeous, mostly. They're incredible. The Throgs Neck Bridge, the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, the Triborough Bridge, they're really works of art. And he liked to build things you could see. And I think the fact that he didn't take money was important to it. You know, he was not poor. I wouldn't say he's not wealthy in New York terms, but he was not a poor person. He went to Yale as a Jewish person, and let's say in the early 20th century, that's fairly unusual and he lived well. So we can't say he's poor, but I think that Carol was right in saying that what Moses was after in the end was not sex and not power, and not sex and not money. Power. He wanted power. And boy, did he get it.Dwarkesh Patel 0:14:37Well, there's a good review of the book from, I'm not sure if I remember the last name, but it was Philip Lopgate or something. Low paid, I think.Kenneth Jackson 0:14:45Okay.Dwarkesh Patel 0:14:46And he made a good point, which was that the connotation of the word power is very negative, but it's kind of a modern thing really to have this sort of attitude towards power that like somebody who's just seeking it must necessarily have suspicious motivations. If Moses believed, and in fact, he was probably right in believing that he was just much more effective at building public works for the people that live in New York, was it irrational of him or was it selfish of him to just desire to work 14 hour days for 40 years on end in order to accumulate the power by which he could build more public works? So there's a way of looking at it where this pursuit of power is not itself troubling.Kenneth Jackson 0:15:36Well, first of all, I just need to make a point that it's not just New York City. I mean, Jones Beach is on Long Island. A lot of those highways, the Northern State Parkway, the Southern State Parkway are built outside the city and also big projects, the Power Authority in upstate New York. He also was consultant around the world in cities and transportation. So his influence was really felt far beyond New York City. And of course, New York City is so big and so important. I think also that we might want to think about, at least I think so, what do I say, the counterfactual argument. Can you imagine? I can remember when I was in the Air Force, we lived next door to a couple from New York City. We didn't know New York City at the time. And I can't remember whether she or he was from the Bronx or Brooklyn, but they had they made us understand how incredibly much he must have loved her to go to Brooklyn or the Bronx to see her and pick her up for days and stuff like this. You couldn't get there. I mean, it would take you three hours to go from the Rockaways in Brooklyn to somewhere in the Northern Bronx. But the roads that Moses built, you know, I know at rush hour they're jammed, but you know, right this minute on a Sunday, you can whiz around New York City on these expressways that Moses built. It's hard to imagine New York without. The only thing Moses didn't do was the subway, and many people have criticized him because the subways were deteriorated between the time they were built in the early part of the 20th century in 1974 when Carol wrote to Power Broker. But so had public transit systems all over the United States. And the public transit system in New York is now better than it was 50 years ago. So that trajectory has changed. And all these other cities, you know, Pittsburgh used to have 600,000 people. Now it has 300,000. Cleveland used to have 900,000 and something. Now it's below five. Detroit used to have two million. Now it's 600 something thousand. St. Louis used to have 850,000. Now it's three hundreds. I mean, the steep drop in all these other cities in the Midwest and Northeast, even Washington and even Boston and Philadelphia, they all declined except New York City, which even though it was way bigger than any of them in 1950 is bigger now than it was then. More people crammed into this small space. And Moses had something to do with that.0:18:22 Would NYC Have Fallen Without Moses?Dwarkesh Patel 0:18:22Yeah, yeah, yeah. You write in the book and I apologize for quoting you back to yourself, but you write, had the city not undertaken a massive program of public works between 1924 and 1970, had it not built the arterial highway system and had it not relocated 200,000 people from old law tenements to new public housing projects, New York would not have been able to claim in the 1990s that it was a capital of the 20th century. I would like to make this connection more explicit. So what is the reason for thinking that if New York hadn't done urban renewal and hadn't built the more than 600 miles of highways that Moses built there, that New York would have declined like these other cities in the Northeast and the Midwest?Kenneth Jackson 0:19:05Well, I mean, you could argue, first of all, and friends of mine have argued this, that New York is not like other cities. It's a world city and has been and what happens to the rest of the United States is, I accept a little bit of that, but not all of it. You say, well, New York is just New York. And so whatever happens here is not necessarily because of Moses or different from Detroit, but I think it's important to realize its history has been different from other American cities. Most American cities, especially the older cities, have been in relative decline for 75 years. And in some ways New York has too. And it was its relative dominance of the United States is less now than because there's been a shift south and west in the United States. But the prosperity of New York, the desire of people to live in it, and after all, one of its problems is it's so expensive. Well, one reason it's expensive is people want to live there. If they didn't want to live there, it would be like Detroit. It'd be practically free. You know what I mean? So there are answers to these issues. But Moses' ways, I think, were interesting. First of all, he didn't worry about legalities. He would start an expressway through somebody's property and dare a judge to tell him to stop after the construction had already started. And most of the time, Moses, he was kind of like Hitler. It was just, I don't mean to say he was like Hitler. What I mean is, but you have such confidence. You just do things and dare other people to change it. You know what I mean? I'm going to do it. And most people don't have that. I think there's a little bit of that in Trump, but not as much. I mean, I don't think he has nearly the genius or brains of Moses. But there's something to self-confidence. There's something to having a broad vision. Moses liked cities, but he didn't like neighborhoods or people. In other words, I don't think he loved New York City. Here's the person who is more involved. He really thought everybody should live in suburbs and drive cars. And that was the world of the future. And he was going to make that possible. And he thought all those old law tenements in New York, which is really anything built before 1901, were slums. And they didn't have hot and cold water. They often didn't have bathrooms. He thought they should be destroyed. And his vision was public housing, high-rise public housing, was an improvement. Now I think around the United States, we don't think these high-rise public housing projects are so wonderful. But he thought he was doing the right thing. And he was so arrogant, he didn't listen to people like Jane Jacobs, who fought him and said, you're saying Greenwich Village is a slum? Are you kidding me? I mean, he thought it was a slum. Go to Greenwich Village today. Try to buy anything for under a million dollars. I mean, it doesn't exist. You know what I mean? I mean, Greenwich Village, and he saw old things, old neighborhoods, walking, is hopelessly out of date. And he was wrong. He was wrong about a lot of his vision. And now we understand that. And all around the country, we're trying to revitalize downtowns and reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and gasoline and cars. But Moses didn't see the world that way. It's interesting. He never himself drove a car. Can you believe that the man who had more influence on the American car culture, probably even than Henry Ford, himself was always driven. He was chauffeured. In fact, he was so busy that Carol talks about him as having two limousines behind each other. And he would have a secretary in one, and he would be dealing with business and writing letters and things like this. And then she would have all she could do. They would pull off to the side of the road. She would get out of his car. The car that was following would discharge the secretary in that car. They would switch places. And the fresh secretary would get in the backseat, Moses, and they would continue to work. And the first secretary would go to type up whatever she had to do. He worked all the time. He really didn't have much of a private life. There are not many people like Robert Moses. There are people like Robert Moses, but not so many, and he achieved his ideal. I think that there are so many ironies there. Not only did he not drive himself, he didn't appreciate so much the density of New York, which many people now love, and it's getting more dense. They're building tall buildings everywhere. And he didn't really appreciate the diversity, the toleration. He didn't care about that, but it worked. And I just think we have to appreciate the fact that he did what was impossible, really impossible, and nobody else could have done what he did. And if we hadn't done it then, he sure as heck wouldn't be able to do it in the 21st century, when people are even more litigious. You try to change the color of a door in New York City, and there'll be—you try to do something positive, like build a free swimming pool, fix up an old armory and turn it into a public—there'll be people who'll fight you. I'm not kidding this. And Moses didn't care. He says, I'm going to do this. When he built the Cross Bronx Expressway, which in some ways is—it was horrible what he did to these people, but again, Carol mischaracterizes what happened. But it's a dense working class—let's call it Jewish neighborhood—in the early 1950s. And Roses decides we need an interstate highway or a big highway going right through it. Well, he sent masses of people letters that said, get out in 90 days. He didn't mean 91 days. He meant—he didn't mean let's argue about it for four years. Let's go to legit—Moses meant the bulldozers will be bulldozing. And that kind of attitude, we just don't have anymore. And it's kind of funny now to think back on it, but it wasn't funny to the people who got evicted. But again, as I say, it's hard to imagine a New York City without the Cross Bronx Expressway. They tore down five blocks of dense buildings, tore them down, and built this road right through it. You live—and they didn't worry about where they were going to rehouse them. I mean, they did, but it didn't work. And now it's so busy, it's crowded all the time. So what does this prove? That we need more roads? But you can't have more roads in New York because if you build more roads, what are you going to do with the cars? Right now, the problem is there are so many cars in the city, there's nothing to do. It's easy to get around in New York, but what are you going to do with the car? You know, the car culture has the seeds of its own destruction. You know, cars just parking them or putting them in a garage is a problem. And Moses didn't foresee those. He foreseed you're all going to live in the Long Island suburbs or Westchester suburbs or New Jersey suburbs. Park your car in your house and come in the city to work. Now, the city is becoming a place to live more than a place to work. So what they're doing in New York as fast as they can is converting office buildings into residential units. He would never have seen that, that people would want to live in the city, had options that they would reject a single family house and choose high rise and choose the convenience of going outside and walking to a delicatessen over the road, driving to a grocery store. It's a world he never saw.0:27:31 Moses the Startup Founder?Dwarkesh Patel 0:27:31Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Like the thing you pointed out earlier about him having the two limousines and then the enormous work ethic and then the 90 day eviction. I mean, I'm a programmer and I can recognize this trope immediately. Right. Robert Moses was a startup founder, but in government, you know, that attitude is like, yeah, it's like Silicon Valley. That's like we all recognize that.Kenneth Jackson 0:27:54And I think we should we should we should go back to what you said earlier about why was it that governors or mayors couldn't tell him what to do? Because there are many scenes in the power broker where he will go to the mayor who wants to do something else. And Moses would, damn it. He'd say, damn it, throw his pages on the desk and say, sign this. This is my resignation. You know, OK. And I'm out of here because the mayors and governors love to open bridges and highways and and do it efficiently and beautifully. And Moses could do that. Moses could deliver. And the workers loved him because he paid union wages, good wages to his workers. And he got things done and and things like more than 700 playgrounds. And it wasn't just grand things. And even though people criticize the 1964 World's Fair as a failure and financially it was a failure, but still tens of millions of people went there and had a good time. You know, I mean, even some of the things were supposedly were failures. Failures going to home, according to the investment banker, maybe, but not to the people who went there.Dwarkesh Patel 0:29:20Right. Yeah. And I mean, the point about the governors and mayors needing him, it was especially important to have somebody who could like work that fast. If you're going to get reelected in four years or two years, you need somebody who can get public works done faster than they're done today. Right. If you want to be there for the opening. Yeah, exactly.Kenneth Jackson 0:29:36And it's important to realize, to say that Moses did try public office once.Dwarkesh Patel 0:29:41Yeah.Kenneth Jackson 0:29:42And I think it's true that he lost by more than anybody in the history of New York. He was not, you know, he was not an effective public speaker. He was not soft and friendly and warm and cuddly. That's not Robert Moses. The voters rejected him. But the people who had power and also Wall Street, because you had to issue bonds. And one of the ways that Moses had power was he created this thing called the Traverse Bridge and Tunnel Authority to build the Traverse Bridge. Well, now, if in Portland, Oregon, you want to build a bridge or a road, you issue a couple hundred million dollars worth of bonds to the public and assign a value to it. Interest rate is paid off by the revenue that comes in from the bridge or the road or whatever it is. Normally, before, normally you would build a public works and pay for it itself on a user fees. And when the user fees paid it off, it ended. But what Moses, who was called the best bill drafter in Albany, which was a Moses term, he said he was somewhere down in paragraph 13, Section G, say, and the chairman can only be removed for cause. What that meant was when you buy a bond for the Traverse Bridge or something else, you're in a contract, supported by the Supreme Court. This is a financial deal you're making with somebody. And part of the contract was the chairman gets to stay unless he does something wrong. Well, Moses was careful not to do anything wrong. And it also would continue. You would get the bond for the Traverse Bridge, but rather than pay off the Traverse Bridge, he would build another project. It would give him the right to continually build this chain of events. And so he had this massive pot of money from all these initially nickels and dimes. Brazil made up a lot of money, the 30s and 40s and 50s and 60s, to spend more money and build more bridges and build more roads. And that's where he had his power. And the Wall Street, the big business loved him because they're issuing the bonds. The unions loved him because they're paying the investors. Now what Carroll says is that Moses allowed the investors an extra quarter percent, I think a quarter percent or half percent on bonds, but they all sold out. So everybody was happy. And was that crooked? It wasn't really illegal. But it's the way people do that today. If you're issuing a bond, you got to figure out what interest am I going to pay on this that will attract investors now.0:32:34 The Case Against Moses HighwaysDwarkesh Patel 0:32:34And the crucial thing about these tales of graft is that it never was about Moses trying to get rich. It was always him trying to push through a project. And obviously that can be disturbing, but it is a completely different category of thing, especially when you remember that this was like a corrupt time in New York history. It was like after Tammany Hall and so on. So it's a completely different from somebody using their projects to get themselves rich. But I do want to actually talk in more detail about the impact of these roads. So obviously we can't, the current system we have today where we just kind of treat cities as living museums with NIMBYism and historical preservation, that's not optimal. But there are examples, at least of Carroll's, about Moses just throwing out thousands of people carelessly, famously in that chapter on the one mile, how Moses could have diverted the cross Bronx expressway one mile and prevented thousands of people from getting needlessly evicted. So I'm just going to list off a few criticisms of his highway building and then you can respond to them in any order you want. So one of the main criticisms that Carroll makes is that Moses refused to add mass transit to his highways, which would have helped deal with the traffic problem and the car problem and all these other problems at a time when getting the right of way and doing the construction would have been much cheaper. Because of his dislike for mass transit, he just refused to do that. And also the prolific building of highways contributed to urban sprawl, it contributed to congestion, it contributed to neighborhoods getting torn apart if a highway would crossKenneth Jackson 0:34:18them.Dwarkesh Patel 0:34:19So a whole list of criticisms of these highways. I'll let you take it in any order you want.Kenneth Jackson 0:34:27Well first of all, Moses response was, I wasn't in charge of subways. So if you think the subways deteriorated or didn't build enough, find out who was in charge of them and blame that person. I was in charge of highways and I built those. So that's the first thing.Dwarkesh Patel 0:34:41But before you answer that, can I just ask, so on that particular point, it is true that he wasn't in charge of mass transit, but also he wasn't in charge of roads until he made himself responsible for roads, right? So if he chose to, he could have made himself responsible for mass transit and taken careKenneth Jackson 0:34:56of it. Maybe, although I think the other thing about it is putting Moses in a broader historical concept. He was swimming with the tide of history. In other words, history when he was building, was building Ford Motor Company and General Motors and Chrysler Corporation and building cars by the millions. I mean, the automobile industry in the United States was huge. People thought any kind of rail transit was obsolete and on the way out anyway. So let's just build roads. I mean, that's what the public wanted. He built what the public wanted. It's not what I was looking historically. I don't think we did the right thing, but we needed to join the 20th century. New York could have stayed as a quaint, I don't know, quaint is not the right word, but it's a distinctly different kind of place where everybody walks. I just don't think it would have been the same kind of city because there are people who are attached to their cars in New York. And so the sprawl in New York, which is enormous, nobody's saying it wasn't, spreads over 31 counties, an area about as large as the state of Connecticut, about as large as the Netherlands is metropolitan New York. But it's still relatively, I don't want to say compact, but everybody knows where the center is. It's not that anybody grows up in New York at 16 and thinks that the world is in some mall, you know, three miles away. They all know there is a center and that's where it is. It's called Manhattan. And that's New York and Moses didn't change that for all of his roads. There's still in New York a definite center, skyscrapers and everything in the middle. And it's true, public transit did decline. But you know those, and I like Chicago, by the way, and they have a rail transit from O'Hare down to Dan Ryan, not to Dan Ryan, but the JFK Expressway, I think. And it works sort of, but you got to walk a ways to get on. You got to walk blocks to get in the middle of the expressway and catch the train there. It's not like in New York where you just go down some steps. I mean, New York subway is much bigger than Chicago and more widely used and more. And the key thing about New York, and so I think what Carol was trying to explain and your question suggests this, is was Moses responsible for the decline of public transit? Well, he was building cars and roads and bridges. So in that sense, a little bit, yes. But if you look at New York compared to the rest of the United States, it used to be that maybe 20 percent of all the transit riders in the United States were in the New York area. Now it's 40 percent. So if you're looking at the United States, what you have to explain is why is New York different from the rest of the United States? Why is it that when I was chairman or president of the New York Historical Society, we had rich trustees, and I would tell them, well, I got here on a subway or something. They would think, I would say, how do you think I got here? Do you know what I mean? I mean, these are people who are close to billionaires and they're saying they used the subway. If you're in lower Manhattan and you're trying to get to Midtown and it's raining, it's five o'clock, you've got to be a fool to try to get in your own limousine. It isn't going to get you there very quickly. A subway will. So there are reasons for it. And I think Moses didn't destroy public transit. He didn't help it. But his argument was he did. And that's an important distinction, I think. But he was swimming with history. He built what the public wanted. I think if he had built public transit, he would have found it tougher to build. Just for example, Cincinnati built a subway system, a tunnel all through the city. It never has opened. They built it. You can still see the holes in the ground where it's supposed to come out. By the time they built it, people weren't riding trains anymore. And so it's there now and they don't know what to do with it. And that's 80 years ago. So it's a very complicated—I don't mean to make these issues. They're much more complex than I'm speaking of. And I just think it's unfair to blame Moses for the problems of the city. I think he did as much as anybody to try to bring the city into the 21st century, which he didn't live to. But you've got to adopt. You've got to have a hybrid model in the world now. And I think the model that America needs to follow is a model where we reduce our dependence on the cars and somehow ride buses more or use the internet more or whatever it is, but stop using so much fossil fuels so that we destroy our environment. And New York, by far, is the most energy efficient place in the United States. Mainly because you live in tall buildings, you have hot floors. It doesn't really cost much to heat places because you're heating the floor below you and above you. And you don't have outside walls. And you walk. New Yorkers are thinner. Many more people take buses and subways in New York than anywhere else in the United States, not just in absolute terms, in relative terms. So they're helping. It's probably a healthier lifestyle to walk around. And I think we're rediscovering it. For example, if you come to New York between Thanksgiving and Christmas, there's so many tourists in the city. I'm not making this up. That there is gridlock on the sidewalks around. The police have to direct the traffic. And in part, it's because a Detroit grandmother wants to bring her granddaughter to New York to see what Hudson's, which is a great department store in Detroit or in any city. We could be rich as in Atlanta, Fox, G Fox and Hartford. Every city had these giant department and windows where the Santa Claus is and stuff like this. You can still go to New York and see that. You can say, Jane, this is the way it used to be in Detroit. People ringing the bells and looking at the store windows and things like that. A mall can't recapture that. It just can't. You try, but it's not the same thing. And so I think that in a way, Moses didn't not only did he not destroy New York. I think he gets a little bit of credit for saving it because it might have been on the way to Detroit. Again, I'm not saying that it would have been Detroit because Detroit's almost empty. But Baltimore wasn't just Baltimore, it's Cleveland. It's every place. There's nobody there anymore. And even in New York, the department stores have mostly closed, not all of them. And so it's not the same as it was 80 years ago, but it's closer to it than anywhere else.Dwarkesh Patel 0:42:16OK, so yes, I'm actually very curious to get your opinion on the following question. Given the fact that you are an expert on New York history and you know, you've written the encyclopedia, literally written the encyclopedia on New York City.Kenneth Jackson 0:42:30800 people wrote the encyclopedia. I just took all the credit for it.Dwarkesh Patel 0:42:34I was the editor in chief. So I'm actually curious, is Caro actually right that you talked about the importance just earlier about counterfactual history. So I'm curious if Caro is actually right about the claim that the neighborhoods through which Moses built his highways were destroyed in a way that neighborhoods which were in touch by the highways weren't. Sorry for the confusing phrasing there. But basically, was there like a looking back on all these neighborhoods? Is there a clear counterfactual negative impact on the neighborhoods in which Moses built his highways and bridges and so on?Kenneth Jackson 0:43:10Well, Moses, I mean, Caro makes that argument mostly about East Tremont and places like that in the Bronx where the Cross Bronx Expressway passed through. And he says this perfectly wonderful Jewish neighborhood that was not racially prejudiced and everybody was happy and not leaving was destroyed by Moses. Well, first of all, as a historian of New York City, or for that matter, any city, if a student comes to you and says, that's what I found out, you said, well, you know, that runs counter to the experience of every city. So let's do a little more work on that. Well, first of all, if you look at the census tracts or the residential security maps of S.H.A. You know, it's not true. First of all, the Jews were leaving and had nothing to do with the thing. They didn't love blacks. And also, if you look at other Jewish, and the Bronx was called the Jewish borough at the time, those neighborhoods that weren't on the Cross Bronx Expressway all emptied out mostly. So the Bronx itself was a part of New York City that followed the pattern of Detroit and Baltimore and Cleveland. Bronx is now coming back, but it's a different place. So I think it's, well, I've said this in public and I'll pay you for this. Carol wouldn't know those neighborhoods if he landed there by parachute. They're much better than he ever said they were. You know, he acted like if you went outside near the Bronx County Courthouse, you needed a wagon train to go. I mean, I've taken my students there dozens of times and shown them the people, the old ladies eating on the benches and stuff like this. Nobody's mugging them. You know, he just has an outsider's view. He didn't know the places he was writing about. But I think Carol was right about some things. Moses was personally a jerk. You can make it stronger than that, but I mean, he was not your friendly grandfather. He was arrogant. He was self-centered. He thought he knew the truth and you don't. He was vindictive, ruthless, but some of those were good. You know, now his strategies, his strategies in some were good. He made people building a beach or a building feel like you're building a cathedral. You're building something great and I'm going to pay you for it and let's make it good. Let's make it as best as we can. That itself is a real trick. How do you get people to think of their jobs as more than a job, as something else? Even a beach or a wall or something like that to say it's good. He also paid them, so that's important that he does that and he's making improvements. He said he was improving things for the people. I don't know if you want to talk about Jane Jacobs, who was his nemesis. I tend to vote with Jane Jacobs. Jane Jacobs and I agree on a lot of things or did before she died a few years ago. Jane Jacobs saw the city as intricate stores and people living and walking and knowing each other and eyes on the street and all these kinds of things. Moses didn't see that at all. He saw the city as a traffic problem. How do we tear this down and build something big and get people the hell out of here? That was a mistake. Moses made mistakes. What Moses was doing was what everybody in the United States was doing, just not as big and not as ruthless and not as quick. It was not like Moses built a different kind of world that exists in Kansas City. That's exactly what they did in Kansas City or every other city. Blow the damn roads to the black neighborhoods, build the expressway interchanges, my hometown of Memphis crisscrossed with big streets, those neighborhoods gone. They're even more extensive in places like Memphis and Kansas City and New Orleans than they are in New York because New York builds relatively fewer of them. Still huge what he built. You would not know from the power broker that Los Angeles exists. Actually Los Angeles was building freeways too. Or he says that New York had more federal money. Then he said, well, not true. I've had students work on Chicago and Chicago is getting more money per person than New York for some of these projects. Some of the claims, no doubt he got those from Moses' own records. If you're going to write a book like this, you got to know what's going on other places. Anyway, let's go back to your questions.Dwarkesh Patel 0:48:10No, no. That was one of the things I was actually going to ask you about, so I was glad to get your opinion on that. You know, actually, I've been preparing for this interview and trying to learn more about the impact of these different projects. I was trying to find the economic literature on the value of these highways. There was a National Bureau of Economic Research paper by Morgan Foy, or at least a digest by Morgan Foy, where he's talking about the economic gains from highways. He says, the gains tend to be largest in areas where roads connect large economic hubs where few alternative routes exist. He goes on to say, two segments near New York City have welfare benefits exceeding $500 million a year. Expanding the Long Island Expressway had an estimated economic value of $719 million, which I think was Moses. He says, of the top 10 segments with the highest rate of return, seven are in New York City area. It turns out that seven of the top 10 most valuable highway segments in America are in New York. Reading that, it makes me suspect that there must have been... The way Cairo paints Moses' planning process, it's just very impulsive and feelings-based and almost in some cases, out of malice towards poor people. Given that a century later, it seems that many of the most valuable tracks of highways were planned and built exactly how Moses envisioned, it makes you think that there was some sort of actual intelligent deliberation and thought that was put into where they were placed.Kenneth Jackson 0:50:32I think that's true. I'm not saying that the automobile didn't have an economic impact. That's what Moses was building for. He would probably endorse that idea. I think that what we're looking at now in the 21st century is the high value put on places that Moses literally thought were something. He was going to run an expressway from Brooklyn through lower Manhattan to New Jersey and knock down all these buildings in Greenwich Village that people love now. Love. Even movie stars, people crowd into those neighborhoods to live and that he saw it as a slum. Well, Moses was simply wrong and Cairo puts him to task for that. I think that's true.0:51:24 The Rise of NIMBYismDwarkesh Patel 0:51:24Okay. Professor Jackson, now I want to discuss how the process of city planning and building projects has changed since Moses' time. We spent some good amount of time actually discussing what it was like, what Moses actually did in his time. Last year, I believe, you wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal talking about how the 27-story building in Manhattan was put in limbo because the parking lot, which we would replace, was part of a historic district. What is it like to actually build a skyscraper or a highway or a bridge or anything of that sort in today's New York City?Kenneth Jackson 0:52:06Well, I do think in the larger context, it's probably fair to say it's tougher to build in New York City than any other city. I mean, yeah, a little precious suburb, you may not deploy a skyscraper, but I mean, as far as the city is concerned, there'll be more opposition in New York than anywhere else.It's more dense, so just to unload and load stuff to build a building, how do you do that? You know, trucks have to park on the street. Everything is more complicated and thus more expensive. I think a major difference between Robert Moses' time and our own, in Robert Moses' time, historic preservation was as yet little known and little understood and little supported. And the view generally was building is good, roads are good, houses are good, and they're all on the way to a more modern and better world. We don't have the same kind of faith in the future that they did. We kind of like it like it is. Let's just sit on it. So I think we should say that Moses had an easier time of it than he would have had he lived today. It still wasn't an easy time, but easier than today. Yeah.Dwarkesh Patel 0:53:40Well, actually, can you talk more about what that change in, I guess, philosophy has been since then? I feel like that's been one of the themes of this podcast, to see how our cultural attitude towards progress and technology have changed.Kenneth Jackson 0:53:54Well, I think one reason why the power broker, Robert Carroll's famous book, received such popular acclaim is it fits in with book readers' opinions today, which is old is better. I mean, also, you got to think about New York City. If you say it's a pre-war apartment, you mean it's a better apartment. The walls are solid plaster, not fiber or board and stuff like that. So old has a reverence in New York that doesn't have in Japan. In Japan, they tear down houses every 15 years. So it's a whole different thing. We tend to, in this new country, new culture, we tend to value oldness in some places, especially in a place that's old like New York City. I mean, most Americans don't realize that New York is not only the most dense American city and the largest, but also really the oldest. I mean, I know there's St. Augustine, but that's taking the concept of what's a city to a pretty extreme things. And then there's Jamestown and Virginia, but there's nobody there, literally nobody there. And then where the pilgrims landed in Massachusetts, Plymouth plantation, that's totally rebuilt as a kind of a theme park. So for a place that's a city, it's Santa Fe a little bit in New Mexico, but it was a wide place on the road until after World War II. So the places that would be also, if you think cities, New York is really old and it's never valued history, but the historic preservation movement here is very strong.Dwarkesh Patel 0:55:33What is the reason for its resurgence? Is it just that, because I mean, it's had a big impact on many cities, right? Like I'm in San Francisco right now, and obviously like you can't tear down one of these Victorian houses to build the housing that like the city massively needs. Why have we like gained a reverence for anything that was built before like 80 years?Kenneth Jackson 0:55:56Because just think of the two most expensive places in the United States that could change a little bit from year to year, but usually San Francisco and New York. And really if you want to make it more affordable, if you want to drop the price of popsicles on your block, sell more popsicles. Have more people selling popsicles and the price will fall. But somehow they say they're going to build luxury housing when actually if you build any housing, it'll put downward pressure on prices, even at super luxury. But anyway, most Americans don't understand that. So they oppose change and especially so in New York and San Francisco on the basis that change means gentrification. And of course there has been a lot of gentrification. In World War II or right after, San Francisco was a working class city. It really was. And huge numbers of short and longshoremen live there. Now San Francisco has become the headquarters really in Silicon Valley, but a headquarters city is a tech revolution and it's become very expensive and very homeless. It's very complex. Not easy to understand even if you're in the middle of it.Dwarkesh Patel 0:57:08Yeah. Yeah. So if we could get a Robert Moses back again today, what major mega project do you think New York needs today that a Moses like figure could build?Kenneth Jackson 0:57:22Well if you think really broadly and you take climate change seriously, as I think most people do, probably to build some sort of infrastructure to prevent rising water from sinking the city, it's doable. You'd have to, like New Orleans, in order to save New Orleans you had to flood Mississippi and some other places. So usually there is a downside somewhere, but you could, that would be a huge project to maybe build a bridge, not a bridge, a land bridge from Brooklyn to Manhattan to prevent water coming in from the ocean because New York is on the ocean. And to think of something like that's really big. Some of the other big infrastructure projects, like they're talking about another tunnel under the river, Hudson River from New Jersey to New York, the problem with that is there are already too many cars in Manhattan. Anything that makes it easier to bring cars into Manhattan because if you've not been to New York you don't really understand this, but there's no place for anything. And if you bring more cars in, what are you going to do with them? If you build parking garages for all the cars that could come into the city, then you'd be building over the whole city. There'd be no reason to come here because it would all be parking garages or parking lots. So New York City simply won't work if you reduce the density or you get rid of underground transportation because it's all about people moving around underneath the streets and not taking up space as they do it. So it won't work. And of course, it's not the only city. Tokyo wouldn't work either or lots of cities in the world won't work increasingly without not just public transportation but underground public transportation where you can get it out of the way of traffic and stuff like that. Moses probably could have done that. He wouldn't have loved it as much as he loved bridges because he wanted you to see what he built. And there was an argument in the power broker, but he didn't really want the Brooklyn battle very tunnel built because he wanted to build a bridge that everybody could see. So he may not have done it with such enthusiasm. I actually believe that Moses was first and foremost a builder. He really wanted to build things, change things. If you said, we'll pay you to build tunnels, I think he would have built tunnels. Who knows? He never was offered that. That wasn't the time in which he lived. Yeah. Okay.Dwarkesh Patel 1:00:04And I'm curious if you think that today to get rid of, I guess the red tape and then the NIMBYism, would it just be enough for one man to accumulate as much influence as Moses had and then to push through some things or does that need to be some sort of systemic reform? Because when Moses took power, of course there was ours also that Tammany Hall machine that he had to run through, right? Is that just what's needed today to get through the bureaucracy or is something more needed?Kenneth Jackson 1:00:31Well, I don't think Robert Moses with all of his talents and personality, I don't think he could do in the 21st century what he did in the middle of the 20th century. I think he would have done a lot, maybe more than anybody else. But also I think his methods, his really bullying messages, really, really, he bullied people, including powerful people. I don't think that would work quite as easy today, but I do think we need it today. And I think even today, we found even now we have in New York, just the beginnings of leftists. I'm thinking of AOC, the woman who led the campaign against Amazon in New York saying, well, we need some development. If we want to make housing more affordable, somebody has got to build something. It's not that we've got more voter because you say you want affordable housing. You got to build affordable housing and especially you got to build more of it. So we have to allow people, we have to overturn the NIMBYism to say, well, even today for all of our concern about environmental change, we have to work together. I mean, in some ways we have to believe that we're in some ways in the same boat and it won't work if we put more people in the boat, but don't make the boat any bigger. Yeah.Dwarkesh Patel 1:01:59But when people discuss Moses and the power accumulated, they often talk about the fact that he took so much power away from democratically elected officials and the centralized so much power in himself. And obviously the power broker talks a great deal about the harms of that kind of centralization. But I'm curious having studied the history of New York, what are the benefits if there can be one coordinated cohesive plan for the entire city? So if there's one person who's designing all the bridges, all the highways, all the parks, is something more made possible that can be possible if like multiple different branches and people have their own unique visions? I don't know if that question makes sense.Kenneth Jackson 1:02:39That's a big question. And you've got to put a lot of trust into the grand planner, especially if a massive area of 20, 25 million people, bigger than the city, I'm not sure what you're really talking about. I think that in some ways we've gone too far in the ability to obstruct change, to stop it. And we need change. I mean, houses deteriorate and roads deteriorate and sewers deteriorate. We have to build into our system the ability to improve them. And now in New York we respond to emergencies. All of a sudden a water main breaks, the street collapses and then they stop everything, stop the water main break and repair the street and whatever it is. Meanwhile in a hundred other places it's leaking, it's just not leaking enough to make the road collapse. But the problem is there every day, every minute. Right. Yeah, yeah, yeah.1:03:44 Is Progress CyclicalDwarkesh Patel 1:03:44I'm curious, as a professor, I mean you've studied American history. Do you just see this as a cyclical thing where you have periods where maybe one person has too much power to periods where there's dispersed vitocracy and sclerosis and then you're just going to go through these cycles? Or how do you see that in the grand context of things, how do you see where we are, where we were during Moses and where we might be in the future?Kenneth Jackson 1:04:10Well you're right to say that much of life is cyclical. And there is a swing back and forth. But having said that, I think the person like Robert Moses is unusual, partly because he might have gone on to become a hedge fund person or didn't have hedge funds when he was around. But you know, new competitor to Goldman Sachs, I mean he could have done a lot of things, maybe been a general. He wanted to have power and control. And I think that's harder to accumulate now. We have too much power. You can demonstrate and you can stop anything. We love demonstrations in the United States. We respect them. We see it as a visible expression of our democracy, is your ability to get on the streets and block the streets. But you know, still you have to get to work. I mean at some point in the day you've got to do something. And yeah, Hitler could have done a lot of things if he wanted to. He could have made Berlin into a... But you know, if you have all the power, Hitler had a lot of it. If he turned Berlin into a colossal city, he was going to make it like Washington but half-sive. Well Washington has already got its own issues. The buildings are too big. Government buildings don't have life on the street and stuff like this. Like Hitler would destroy it forever because you build a monumental city that's not for people. And I think that was probably one of Moses' weak points is unlike Jane Jacobs who saw people. Moses didn't see people. He saw bridges. He saw highways. He saw tunnels. He saw rivers. He saw the city as a giant traffic problem. Jane Jacobs, who was a person without portfolio most of her life except of her own powers of judgment and persuasion, she thought, well what is the shoe repairman got to do with the grocery store, got to do with the school, got to do with something else? She saw what Moses didn't see. She saw the intricacies of the city. He saw a giant landscape. She saw the block, just the block.Dwarkesh Patel 1:06:45Yeah there's a common trope about socialist and communist which is that they love humanity in the abstract but they hate people as individuals. And it's like I guess one way to describe Robert Moses. It actually kind of reminds me of one of my relatives that's a doctor and he's not exactly a people person. And he says like, you know, I hate like actually having to talk to the patients about like, you know, like ask them questions. I just like the actual detective work of like what is going on, looking at the charts and figuring out doing the diagnosis. Are you optimistic about New York? Do you think that in the continuing towards the end of the 21st century and into the 22nd century, it will still be the capital of the world or what do you think is the future ofKenneth Jackson 1:07:30the city? Well, The Economist, which is a major publication that comes out of England, recently predicted that London and New York would be in 2100 what they are today, which is the capitals of the world. London is not really a major city in terms of population, probably under 10 million, much smaller than New York and way smaller than Tokyo. But London has a cosmopolitan, heterogeneous atmosphere within the rule of law. What London and New York both offer, which Shanghai doesn't or Hong Kong doesn't at the moment is a system so if you disagree, you're not going to disappear. You know what I mean? It's like there's some level of guarantee that personal safety is sacred and you can say what you want. I think that's valuable. It's very valuable. And I think the fact that it's open to newcomers, you can't find a minority, so minority that they don't have a presence in New York and a physical presence. I mean, if you're from Estonia, which has got fewer people than New York suburbs, I mean individual New York suburbs, but there's an Estonian house, there's Estonian restaurants, there's, you know, India, Pakistan, every place has got an ethnic presence. If you want it, you can have it. You want to merge with the larger community, merge with it. That's fine. But if you want to celebrate your special circumstances, it's been said that New York is everybody's second home because you know if you come to New York, you can find people just like yourself and speaking your language and eating your food and going to your religious institution. I think that's going to continue and I think it's not only what makes the United States unusual, there are a few other places like it. Switzerland is like it, but the thing about Switzerland that's different from the United States is there are parts of Switzerland that are most of it's Swiss German and parts of it's French, but they stay in their one places, you know what I mean? So they speak French here and they speak German there. You know, Arizona and Maine are not that different demographically in the United States. Everybody has shuffled the deck several times and so I think that's what makes New York unique. In London too. Paris a little bit. You go to the Paris underground, you don't even know what language you're listening to. I think to be a great city in the 21st century, and by the way, often the Texas cities are very diverse, San Francisco, LA, very diverse. It's not just New York. New York kind of stands out because it's bigger and because the neighborhoods are more distinct. Anybody can see them. I think that's, and that's what Robert Moses didn't spend any time thinking about. He wasn't concerned with who was eating at that restaurant. Wasn't important, or even if there was a restaurant, you know? Whereas now, the move, the slow drift back towards cities, and I'm predicting that the pandemic will not have a permanent influence. I mean, the pandemic is huge and it's affected the way people work and live and shop and have recreation. So I'm not trying to blow it off like something else, but I think in the long run, we are social animals. We want to be with each other. We need each other, especially if you're young, you want to be with potential romantic partners. But even other people are drawn. Just a few days ago, there was a horrible tragedy in Seoul, Korea. That's because 100,000 young people are drawn to each other. They could have had more room to swing their arms, but they wanted to crowd into this one alley because that's where other people were. They wanted to go where other people were. That's a lot about the appeal of cities today. We've been in cars and we've been on interstate highways. At the end of the day, we're almost like cats. We want to get together at night and sleep on each other or with each other. I think that's the ultimate. It's not for everybody. Most people would maybe rather live in a small town or on the top of a mountain, but there's a percentage of people. Let's call it 25% who really want to be part of the tumble in the tide and want to be things mixed up. They will always want to be in a place like New York. There are other places, San Francisco, Boston, Philadelphia a little bit. They're not mainly in the United States, but in Europe, Copenhagen. Copenhagen is not a big city, neither is Prague, but they have urbanity. New York has urbanity. I think we don't celebrate urbanity as much as we might. The pure joy of being with others.1:12:36 Friendship with CaroDwarkesh Patel 1:12:36Yeah. I'm curious if you ever got a chance to talk to Robert Caro himself about Moses at someKenneth Jackson 1:12:45point. Robert Caro and I were friends. In fact, when the power broker received an award, the Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians, it turned out we lived near each other in the Bronx. And I drove him home and we became friends and social friends. And I happened to be with him on the day that Robert Moses died. We were with our wives eating out in a neighborhood called Arthur Avenue. The real Little Italy of New York is in the Bronx. It's also called Be

god united states christmas america love american new york amazon spotify texas history world new york city donald trump thanksgiving chicago europe power los angeles washington england japan americans new york times san francisco french joe biden society arizona government friendship reading philadelphia german transformation new jersey oregon hero berlin detroit brazil jewish portland new orleans supreme court park boss hong kong tokyo massachusetts jews cleveland silicon valley wall street baltimore teachers pittsburgh manhattan queens world war ii wall street journal connecticut mississippi netherlands midwest adolf hitler maine switzerland shakespeare cincinnati kansas city columbia new mexico korea united nations air force new yorker pakistan columbia university expanding santa claus yale bronx long island blow failures economists shanghai victorian alexandria ocasio cortez wasn abraham lincoln compare northeast goldman sachs copenhagen american history prague seoul albany central park staten island santa fe estonia new yorkers franklin delano roosevelt thomas jefferson arguing general motors hartford henry ford plymouth belmont westchester lincoln center ford motor company tyrant caruso jamestown hudson river midtown greenwich village knopf estonian economic research fairs hofstra university startup founders little italy power brokers national bureau in london nimby so moses jane jacobs robert moses swam nimbyism new york harbor dan ryan new york historical society tammany hall american historians robert caro david rockefeller jones beach power authority swiss german rockaways modern city professor jackson 32i if moses 34i chrysler corporation christopher wren arthur avenue francis parkman prize long island expressway verrazano cross bronx expressway kenneth jackson verrazano narrows bridge kenneth t jackson
At the Podium with Patrick Huey
Liz Brunner: Even if Fear is Holding You Back, Still Take the Leap of Faith.

At the Podium with Patrick Huey

Play Episode Play 55 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 50:11


A Mosaic of CourageI remember September 11, 2001, like it was yesterday. I remember exactly where I was when I turned on the television to watch the morning news anchors on ABC7 in Manhattan. They were telling us that we were indeed under a terrorist attack and that we should get out of Manhattan if we could. Things were happening so rapidly that even as the news anchors issued those dire words, their instructions became obsolete as all traffic in and out of The City came to a grinding halt. Not knowing what to do, I joined the thousands of workers being evacuated from high rise office buildings all over the city and got swept up into the teeming masses of people flooding the streets of Midtown, Uptown and Downtown. The East Side and the West Side. From Battery Park to Washington Heights. My friend Cheryl Rogers later told me that she had walked from her office in Chelsea all the way to the Brooklyn Bridge and crossed over on foot to get home to her cat Cookie. In the days that followed, we New Yorkers, like the rest of the world remained inside, glued to the television. I watched the local News One a lot those first few days, and ABC7, because they were giving us the local, inside scoop. And we needed practical information – like where to go to get food and water. And where people could go to get information on the missing and the dead. On that day, Liz Brunner sat at the anchor desk at ABC-TV, WCVB NewsCenter 5 in Boston, MA - that city's top-rated newscast. Liz was the voice of reason, calm and a face that Bostonians all knew they could trust to tell them what was happening. The facts. 12 years later, on April 15, 2013, she would assume the seat at the anchor desk again, as this time terror visited the city of Boston directly with the Boston Marathon Bombing, and the chase for the bombers that ensued in the following days. When she talks about both events, her journalistic resolve melts as her eyes soften. The humanity of the person shines through. It was that tangible humanity that drew viewers to her during her 28-year career in front of the camera. It is that humanity that draws people to her today in her role of executive communications coach for people looking to raise their lives and their careers to the next level of success, or is it greatness?To sit in the anchor desk with integrity and hold the emotions and expectations of a city or a nation is not easy work. It is the work of the courageous. Courage is a word that comes up often in my conversation with Liz because it is a guiding principle of her life and the many lives she has lived: reporter and anchor, teacher, professional singer, and now entrepreneur. That courageousness has come to her from her ancestors, some who crossed over on the Mayflower and some who lived on the distant continent of India. Both meet in her, creating a legacy that is both improbable and at the same time wholly American. Her thoughts on the rich mosaic of her life? They are found in her latest book Dare to Own You. Every leap of faith in your life takes tremendous courage. Every new chapter that you write for yourself requires you not to be afraid. Vulnerability is an earned gift that you bestow to others, not something to be frivolously given away. Liz on IG Patrick's WebsitePatrick on FacebookPatrick on IGAt the Podium on IGPatrick on LinkedInFor more information contact Patrick at patrick@patrickhueyleadership.com

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Bizarre stabbing at a midtown steakhouse... Michael Valva convicted... Hochul and Zeldin keep campaigning as race tightens

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 7:05


This is the All Local morning update for Saturday November 5th, 2022

Nashville Daily
Realtor Reacts to Titans Stadium Renderings | Episode 937

Nashville Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 33:06


Brand new skyscrapers announced down the I-40 line in Downtown Nashville. We've talked a lot about Nashville's East Bank, but what's happening along its West Bank? Plus, local realtor Brad Reynolds gives his thoughts about the new Titans stadium renderings as well as reveals a way that buyers are taking back the housing market.New YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKjWKXfpjtNL0oL2R6MKSxwTake a Tour With Us! Use code NASH for 20% off - https://www.xplrnash.com/toursToday's Sponsors: Brad Reynolds  https://thinkbrad.com/Screened Threads   Use the Code "NashvilleDaily" for 10% off online and in-store   https://screenedthreads.com/Nash NewsRoers Cos. plans two more Midtown towers near Interstate 40 https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/10/28/midtown-towers-roers-cos-interstate-40.htmlNashville Capital Group seeks rezoning for massive riverfront developmenthttps://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/10/28/nashville-capital-group-waterfront-development.htmlNashville Daily Artist of the Day Playlist   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/51eNcUWPg7qtj8KECrbuwx?si=nEfxeOgmTv6rFUyhVUJY9AFollow us @ XPLR NASH   Website -  https://nashvilledailypodcast.com/   YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/xplrnash   Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/xplr.nash/   Twitter - https://twitter.com/xplr_nash   NASHVILLE & XPLR MERCH - https://www.xplrnash.com/shopMedia and other inquiries please email hello@xplr.life

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
Midtown Midweek | Living with the End in Mind

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightFreeway MusicResource SpotlightClick here to volunteer with us at Celebration Sunday!Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Closing song “Be Still” by Midtown Music, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio
Level Craft Construction Announces New Construction Division

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 20:38


Co-Founder and Partner Virginia Van Lear with Level Craft Construction joins the Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio podcast to discuss the story behind the 100% female-owned business, the company's exciting expansion into building new home communities, as well as what's on the books for the new year. Van Lear joins host Carol Morgan on the All About Real Estate segment. As one of Atlanta's favorite female builders and remodelers, Van Lear worked independently in the home building industry for 23 years before starting Level Craft Construction with her partner, Debbie Hollonbeck. Level Craft Construction is an in-town home-building company that develops custom homes and renovates large-scale projects. Prioritizing transparency and a positive environment with homeowners, Van Lear and her team are look forward to the expansion and growth of Level Craft Construction while offering beautiful products across Atlanta. Van Lear said, “We love working with our clients! We love to make the process super seamless.” Beginning in Decatur and Midtown within well-known neighborhoods like Morningside and Virginia Highlands, Level Craft Construction recently expanded to Buckhead, Brookhaven and Sandy Springs. The female-led company is currently building out a 58-home neighborhood in Hapeville and 12 townhomes in Grant Park near Zoo Atlanta. Van Lear said, “We were awarded Best Remodeler in Buckhead Magazine last month!” This is notable because the builder just started building in Buckhead in 2022! Priced from the low $400,000s, the Hapeville neighborhood features detached townhomes ideal for single-family living. Named Stillwood Homes, the community includes impressive amenities such as a pool and cabana. With each group of townhomes showcasing a different exterior elevation including Mediterranean, Southern and Tuscan the community's landscaping and hardscaping will also be themed to give the neighborhood a wide range of stylistic feels. Each group of townhomes will have access to a seating area featuring a fire pit. A community garden with edible plants will be available for all homeowners to enjoy. This Level Craft Construction project is conveniently located just off the Hapeville exit with close proximity to the airport. Just steps away from the BeltLine, Level Craft is working on 12 townhomes located at 816 Berne Street in Grant Park. Pricing isn't finalized yet but will most likely be from the $700,000s to the $800,000s for these four-floor townhomes. These homes will feature modern design elements and panoramic doors on the top roof leading to an expansive deck that overlooks the beautiful city of Atlanta. Tune into the full interview above to learn more about Level Craft Construction, or visit www.LevelCraftAtlanta.com. Never miss an episode of Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio! Subscribe to the podcast here. You can also get a recap of any past episode on the Radio page. Listen to the full interview above! A special thank you to Denim Marketing for sponsoring Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio. A comfortable fit for companies of all shapes and sizes, Denim Marketing understands marketing strategies are not one-size-fits-all. The agency works with your company to create a perfectly tailored marketing strategy that will adhere to your specific needs and niche. Try Denim Marketing on for size by calling 770-383-3360 or by visiting www.DenimMarketing.com. The Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio “All About Real Estate” segment, presented by Denim Marketing, highlights the movers and shakers in the Atlanta real estate industry – the home builders, developers, Realtors and suppliers working to provide the American dream for Atlantans. For more information on how you can be featured as a guest, contact Denim Marketing at 770-383-3360 or fill out the Atlanta Real Estate Forum contact form. Subscribe to the Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio podcast on iTunes, and if you like this week's show, be sure to rate it.

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington
Midtown Midweek | Living with the End in Mind

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightFreeway MusicResource SpotlightClick here to volunteer with us at Celebration Sunday!Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Closing song “Be Still” by Midtown Music, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

The CI Morning Breakdown Houston
Houston's Midtown leads the way on sustainability & a job market update

The CI Morning Breakdown Houston

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 18:14


Community Impact editor Shawn Arrajj discusses how projects geared toward sustainable infrastructure in the Midtown area could serve as pilot projects as the city of Houston focuses on ambitious sustainability goals. Plus, reporter Mikah Boyd discusses how the region's job market has changed since the early pandemic and how it may continue to change in the months to come. The Houston Breakdown is a production of Community Impact. This episode was produced by Olivia Aldridge with assistance from Holly Galvan Posey and editing by Marie Leonard. Weather and allergy reports are sourced from www.weather.com and AccuWeather. ***PATRON PROGRAM SIGN-UP: www.communityimpact.com/patron

Supertalk Eagle Hour
Broadcasting from Southern Bancorp in Midtown for tonight's Golden Eagles/Ragin Cajun game with Marchant Kenney and Harold Shaw plus Daniel Stewart with Southern Bancorp and Luke Johnson joins in from India

Supertalk Eagle Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 41:19


Dedicated to Southern Miss sports! Weekdays 1 - 2 p.m. on select SuperTalk Mississippi stations. This show is a production of SuperTalk Mississippi Media. Learn more at SuperTalk.FM

Restaurant Hoppen
Dan Benigno—Chef Around the Block

Restaurant Hoppen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 58:10


Dan Benigno is passionate about two things: making people happy through food and empowering the next generation of cooks. He accomplishes both at Chef Around the Block, offering cooking classes, catering, private dinners and, most recently, a pop-up space in Midtown to mentor young chefs and cooks as they test their concepts.Also follow up on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, AND at RestaurantHoppen.com!Sponsored by Certified Piedmontese. Visit their website, use Promo Code: HOPPEN, and receive 25% off your order!A Hurrdat Media Production. Hurrdat Media is a digital media and commercial video production company based in Omaha, NE. Find more podcasts on the Hurrdat Media Network and learn more about our other services today on HurrdatMedia.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Midtown Coffee Radio Hour
Episode 14: "Happy Hygge-Ween: We're All Gonna Die!"

Midtown Coffee Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 66:42


Midtown Coffee Radio Hour presents our October 2022 show, "Happy Hygge-Ween: We're All Gonna Die!" This episode was yet again recorded in front of a LIVE audience at The Back Alley on Augustana University's campus in midtown Sioux Falls, South Dakota. In preparation for spooky season, this show features songs about death, spells, and ghosts, a skit about the life and death of a pumpkin, a "Maren's Memes" about trick-or-treating in the McKennen Park neighborhood, Nick's dramatic book reading of a classic Edgar Allan Poe poem, and the dramatic last episode of "Murder in Midtown..." Our special guest with us for this show is Mo Hurley of "Fear Falls Radio Theatre," who reads us an original spooky story. Enjoy this episode in the dark... Oh, and remember, Midtowners, we'll always give you a Grandma Olga Special - all you have to do is ask. Spotify Playlist (Original Artists): https://open.spotify.com/playlist/71JArWZXOMlUjKTDdj3WWP

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington
Midtown Midweek | You've Lost Your First Love

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightClinton Sease Farm - 382 Olde Farm Rd, Lexington, South CarolinaResource SpotlightCheck out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Closing song “Love Still Burns” by Kimberly Walsh, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
Midtown Midweek | You've Lost Your First Love

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightClinton Sease Farm - 382 Olde Farm Rd, Lexington, South CarolinaResource SpotlightCheck out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Closing song “Love Still Burns” by Kimberly Walsh, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Governor Hochul announced guards, cameras, and more police at subway stations... a 13-year-old stabbed last night and three teens are in custody...After their loss last night, Yankees fans are on the edge of their seats for Monday

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 7:08


Midtown Fellowship: Lexington
Midtown Midweek | The Case for Theological Triage

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightSC State Farmer's Market - 3483 Charleston Highway, West Columbia, SC 29172Archer Avenue StudioResource SpotlightFinding the Right Hills to Die On: The Case for Theological Triage by Gavin Ortlund“A Call for Theological Triage and Christian Maturity” by Dr. Albert MohlerCheck out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Closing song “Haven” by Midtown Music, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
Midtown Midweek | The Case for Theological Triage

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Questions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightSC State Farmer's Market - 3483 Charleston Highway, West Columbia, SC 29172Archer Avenue StudioResource SpotlightFinding the Right Hills to Die On: The Case for Theological Triage by Gavin Ortlund“A Call for Theological Triage and Christian Maturity” by Dr. Albert MohlerCheck out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesFollow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Closing song “Haven” by Midtown Music, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Nashville Daily
Nashville's Top New Restaurants for October 2022 | Episode 924

Nashville Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 27:35


The CEO of Ryman Hospitality steps down after 21 years with the company. A local coffee shop aims to take on the national chains near Vanderbilt. Plus, Eater releases their top picks for new restaurants opening in Nashville this month.New YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKjWKXfpjtNL0oL2R6MKSxwTake a Tour With Us! Use code NASH for 20% off - https://www.xplrnash.com/toursToday's Sponsors: Brad Reynolds  https://thinkbrad.com/Bowtie Barber Clubhttps://www.bowtiebarberclub.com/Nash NewsColin Reed to step down as CEO of Ryman Hospitality Properties after 21 yearshttps://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/10/11/colin-reed-steps-down-ceo-ryman-mark-fioravanti.htmlNashville Food News Preds Bridgestone Arena Unveil New Menu Items https://www.nhl.com/predators/news/preds-bridgestone-arena-unveil-new-menu-items-renovations-for-2022-23/c-336260022?fbclid=IwAR1MCaYRBBHlIR5elWxbrDOSEJvptSM5MbgJFO6E0LvcLg6dYS-VCS-iBigLocal cafe chain set for future Midtown building https://www.nashvillepost.com/business/development/local-cafe-chain-set-for-future-midtown-building/article_428b3476-4b2a-11ed-a843-37fffc5b0338.htmlThe Hottest New Restaurants in Nashville, October 2022https://nashville.eater.com/maps/best-new-nashville-restaurants-heatmapNashville Daily Artist of the Day Playlist   https://open.spotify.com/playlist/51eNcUWPg7qtj8KECrbuwx?si=nEfxeOgmTv6rFUyhVUJY9AFollow us @ XPLR NASH   Website -  https://nashvilledailypodcast.com/   YouTube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/c/xplrnash   Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/xplr.nash/   Twitter - https://twitter.com/xplr_nash   NASHVILLE & XPLR MERCH - https://www.xplrnash.com/shopMedia and other inquiries please email hello@xplr.life

The Bitey End of the Dog
Alex and Will Sessa - Living and Working With a Police Dog

The Bitey End of the Dog

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 40:00 Transcription Available


Have you ever wondered what it is like training, working with, and living with a police dog? If so, then this is the episode for you! I have the opportunity to chat with Alex and Will Sessa for this episode of Fresh Bites on The Bitey End of the Dog. Alex is an experienced and successful dog trainer who owns Peach On a Leash, and Will is a an experienced and successful police canine trainer with over 15 years of service. Talk about a dynamic duo! I am sure you will enjoy hearing about what life is like in the Sessa home, living with a blend of working and pet dogs, and two young children as well!For additional resources on helping dogs with aggression, visit:https://aggressivedog.comHere is the special link to The Aggression in Dogs Master Course and Expert Webinar Bundle. Offer expires on 11/1/22.https://aggressivedog.thinkific.com/bundles/the-aggression-in-dogs-master-course-and-expert-webinar-bundleAbout Alex:Peach on a Leash® is a full-service dog training company based in Alpharetta, Georgia and serving Metro Atlanta and its northern suburbs, from Midtown to Cumming.Utilizing the most modern, science-based training techniques, head trainer and pet behavior expert Alex Sessa, CPDT-KA, CDBC and her team of certified, highly experienced trainers will deliver the results you're looking for.We provide your dog with a positive and effective learning experience that provides quick results and dramatically improves behavior while strengthening your bond with your dog.Regardless of your dog's breed or behavior issues, you'll be amazed at how quickly your dog responds to our training.https://peachonaleash.com/Support the show

Daily Detroit
Midtown Target update; Pink Aquavit; Wyandotte's Iron Gate + trying a pizza robot

Daily Detroit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 17:19


Today's fun Friday has Randy Walker in for Devon who will be back next week. - Nordin Aquavit's Pink strawberry is out, and we have a sip. Each year is different, and this has a great flavor. We also talk a bit about what Aquavit is in case you don't know. - Randy went to Wyandotte's Iron Gate for a Tiki cocktail experience - Everyone's talking about the ZaBot Pizza Robot, but few are saying what it's like. We went with our own money and give it a spin with feedback - There's progress on Target coming to Midtown Detroit at Mack and Woodward. It's still a bit away, with construction starting in December as part of a larger development. It'll be a smaller format store, so getting the product mix right will be key. Feedback: https://forms.gle/MnwUf8uJEtpyG9m2A or dailydetroit -at- gmail -dot- com Want to support the show? Buy us a coffee! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dailydetroit  

Help! with Natalie Cuomo
61 - Not Just A Wh*re Ft. Sheba Mason

Help! with Natalie Cuomo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 36:53


This week, I'm joined by comedian Sheba Mason. We discuss her album "Not Just A Wh*re," her speakeasy comedy show Sheba's Speakeasy at Three Monkeys in Midtown, NYC, her musical in NYCF, being the daughter of comedian Jackie Mason, having a close relationship with your mother, being in comedy for a long time, and so much more!   #nataliecuomo #cuomo #natalie #help #help! #podcast #standup #comedy #comedian #tattoos #shebamason #jackiemason  

Kultur heute Beiträge - Deutschlandfunk
Just Above Midtown - Ausstellung im MoMA zur ersten Galerie für People of Colour

Kultur heute Beiträge - Deutschlandfunk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 5:26


Verna, Sachawww.deutschlandfunk.de, Kultur heuteDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Breaking the Curtain
Ep80 - The Murder of Broadway Star Margaret Lawrence

Breaking the Curtain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 17:05


The swanky 10-story Midtown apartment house at 51 St. didn't exactly scream ‘murder' when you strolled by. In fact, it was home to a glamorous celebrity couple of the stage and screen living the high life during the Roaring Twenties. However, on a warm June 9th in 1929 when shrieks were heard coming from the building, the NYPD didn't expect to find a Broadway star laying dead in her bed. This is the tragic murder of Margaret Lawrence.

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Judge rules Donald Trump must sit for deposition in defamation lawsuit... Mayor Adams announced new asylum center in Midtown today...rat sightings are on the rise in NYC to no one's surprise

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 6:58


Renoites
Nettie Oliverio on the Reno Public Market

Renoites

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 64:31


Renoites host Conor grew up here in Reno, and has a lot of memories of the Shoppers Square Mall (and it's gradual decline), as well as of the vacant lot where Park Lane Mall once stood. But things have changed in recent years and the southern end of Midtown is seeing a lot of new development, first with the Reno Experience District on the Park Lane site, and coming soon, the Reno Public Market in the former Shopper's Square building. The Market will be a food hall, artist creation and performance space, and local retail market for independent makers, among other things. Today's guest on the show is Nettie Oliverio, one of the people behind that project, with a focus on the arts and culture elements. Nettie previously served on Reno's arts and culture commission, and is the outgoing president of the board of the Pioneer Theater. On this episode, Conor and Nettie talk about the development of the Reno Public Market, the importance of arts and culture in retail spaces, the goal of creating spontaneous or surprising connections, the growth of local theater in Northern Nevada, and much more! Learn more about Reno Public Market and keep up to date about their opening on their Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/renopublicmarket/ Renoites is a listener-funded project! Please feel free to Venmo a tip to @Renoites or sign up as a recurring donor at http://www.patreon.com/renoites Send you guest suggestions and feedback to Conor at conor@renoites.com This episode was produced by Conor McQuivey and Lynn Lazaro (I'm sorry I forgot to say so on the actual episode recording! Lynn did a lot of work on this one!)

All Of It
'Just Above Midtown' at MoMA

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 20:29


Just Above Midtown (JAM) was an art gallery opened in 1974 on west 57th Street that spotlighted the work of Black artists who had yet to receive mainstream recognition, like David Hammons, Lorraine O'Grady, and Howardena Pindell. The gallery was opened by Linda Goode Bryant and closed in 1986. Now, a new exhibition at MOMA, Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces, showcases some of the work that was once displayed at the original gallery. Head curator Thomas Jean Lax joins to speak to the importance of preserving the memory of JAM. Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces is on view until February 18, 2023.

Midtown Church Podcast
Together – Assorted Scripture

Midtown Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 47:38


A DECLINE IN FORMAL RELIGIONA study from the Pew Research Center found that Christians accounted for about 90% of the population 50 years ago, but as of 2020, that figure has slumped to about 64%.The study found that the number of people who identify as “religiously unaffiliated” is on the rise. Although some of these individuals are atheists, it mostly comprises a population that is agnostic, spiritual, or nothing specific. This percentage is currently projected to overtake the US Christian majority by the year 2070. "Some scholars say that it's just an inevitable consequence of development for societies to secularize. Once there are strong secular institutions, once people's basic needs are met, there's less need for religion… Other people point out that affiliation really started to drop in the '90s. And it may not be a coincidence that this coincides with the rise of the religious right and more associations between Christianity and conservative political ideology." – Stephanie KramerPRIVATIZED RELIGION This is when one believes they should rely on themselves rather than the established or organized religious traditions to answer spiritual questions – “I am into Jesus, but not the Church.” JESUS AND THE CHURCHAs evident in the scriptures, Jesus believed in the church, not just in the Christian community but also in the institutional religion of his day. “For Jesus, the church was never optional. Jesus was not anti-institutional. He regularly led his disciples and himself into the church of the first century which was the synagogue and temple…. [Jesus] immersed himself in the relationships at the temple, he went to the temple for prayer, and he added his own voice to the teaching of that temple.” – Tyler StatonHOW DO WE DO CHURCH TOGETHER IN 5 COMMITMENTSReveal the kingdom of JesusThe kingdom of Jesus or the reign of God, is not simply the rule of God in each believer's heart, but a kingdom that pervades every aspect of our lives- the spiritual and the physical- and looks utterly unlike the kingdoms of this world. It is an upside-down Kingdom, a new world order– under the leadership of Jesus. It is a Kingdom that we were made to be a part of."We are built to live in the kingdom of God. It is our natural habitat." – Dallas Willard“The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and believe in the gospel.”– Mark 1:15Belong to a microchurchMicorchurch, is prayer, scripture, and mission. So just like the disciples, we may be a messy bunch of people with varying beliefs and backgrounds, but we come together time and time again, in the midst of laughter and conflict, to shape one another. So here is my encouragement to you today…If you are not a part of a microchurch, consider joining one or starting one. Sign up for Dinner Party. If you are already in a microchurch, re-evaluate and commit to being part of that community. Regularly attend unless you're out of town, sick, or there is an unforeseen, unavoidable circumstance outside of your control. Give your wonderful mirochurch leader a 24 hours notice for any absence. Actively participate: help with the meal, hosting, and clean up. Add to the conversation, prayer, and discussion. Lead a microchurch. We need more microchurch leaders who are willing to open their homes and hearts to pastoring people. If you are interested in this, talk with your current microchurch leader or one of our pastoral team members. Gather on Sunday We still believe in the value of the Sunday rhythm. There is something about gathering together, letting the voices of those around you carry you, hearing the stories of the people of God, being reminded of the teachings of Jesus, being challenged to commit to a spiritual practice every week, confessing with one another and taking communion with one another that forms us and shapes us to be the sent people of God. ServeJesus' teachings and the depictions of the early church in the New Testament is filled with instruction to us regarding service. To name a few…Mark 10:44-45 says, “And whoever would be first among you must be slave of all. For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”1 Peter 4:10 says, “As each has received a gift, use it to serve one another, as good stewards of God's varied grace.” Galatians 5:13-14 “For you were called to freedom, brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another. For the whole law is fulfilled in one word: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”Jesus and his disciples instructed in and demonstrated service to one another and to those in need. And it is our desire to reclaim the full breadth of the word service including both those two things: serving one another and the community of Kansas City. Serve one another on a Sunday. At Midtown Church, we desire to be a place where many do a few things instead of the few doing many. So, here is my request: please consider serving one another 1-2 times a month, to say I am going to contribute to serving this community of Jesus followers on a regular basis. Serve the community throughout the week. Service should always extend much farther and wider than these four walls to the people of Midtown and to Kansas City. At Midtown Church, we want to shift from a praxis that says only certain people or ministries are called to serve and love the poor, oppressed, and marginalized to a praxis that says all are called. Jesus' teachings are pretty clear that serving the marginalized is a Gospel mandate. This month, our serve day is Trunk or Treat on October 29. Last year we had 500 people in attendance, a vast majority of which are local and from low-income families. Be Generous. We are descendants of an ancient church that has historically practiced a 10% tithe. And as a participant in this community, we ask that you work toward that 10%. “Jesus sat down opposite the place where the offerings were put and watched the crowd putting their money into the temple treasury. Many rich people threw in large amounts. But a poor widow came and put in two very small copper coins, worth only a few cents. Calling his disciples to him, Jesus said, “Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put more into the treasury than all the others. They all gave out of their wealth; but she, out of her poverty, put in everything—all she had to live on.” – Mark 12:41-44This is why we pray our generosity prayer every week as we work to shape our hearts and minds toward the person of Jesus and not the idol of money. As we work to be more like the poor widow than the rich people in this story. Five CommitmentsReveal the Kingdom of JesusBelong to a MicrochurchGather on SundayServeBe Generous

Midtown Coffee Radio Hour
Episode 13: "We Go Together Like Coffee & Cream... And Sugar!"

Midtown Coffee Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 66:52


Midtown Coffee Radio Hour presents our September 2022 show, "We Go Together Like Coffee & Cream...And Sugar!" This episode was recorded in front of a LIVE audience at The Back Alley on Augustana University's campus in midtown Sioux Falls, South Dakota. To kick off the school year and the crisp fall season, this show features songs about friendship, a skit about Sioux Falls Learning Objectives, a "Maren's Memes" about Jesus and His disciples playing fantasy gladiator, a "Murder in Midtown" about sex ed, and Nick's dramatic book reading from his high school yearbook. In this show we welcome back neighbor Wes who shares his wisdom with us. Enjoy this episode while burying your best friends in a pile of leaves. Oh, and remember, Midtowners, we'll always give you a Grandma Olga Special - all you have to do is ask. Spotify Playlist (Original Artists): https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6tFhLYAFZ7ymt1sgGbqCkv

Lifegate Church Podcast
Presbytery 2022 | Words in Season | Midtown Campus

Lifegate Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022


Sunday morning words in season. Midtown 9:15 & 11:00am services.

Think Brazos
Brent Hairston | Candidate for Mayor of Bryan, Texas

Think Brazos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 26:30


Brent Hairston sits down with the Think Brazos Podcast. Hairston is currently a city councilman and is running to be the next mayor of Bryan, Texas. In this episode, he discusses his background, housing affordability, local government transparency, and Downtown and Midtown in Bryan, Texas. Brent Hairston's campaign website Think Brazos website Disclosure and disclaimer: The purpose of the Think Brazos Podcast is to present to the public a deeper sense of who the candidates are who hope to lead this community and to create a space for them to present their ideas, especially about housing and affordability. However, as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Bryan-College Station Habitat for Humanity (which created and sponsors Think Brazos) does not and cannot endorse any particular candidate or political party. The open dialogue we create by doing our utmost to speak to every candidate for a particular political race we decide to cover should in no way be construed as an endorsement of the candidate or his/her political party. Further, the ideas and opinions expressed by the candidates we interview are purely their own and not necessarily those of Habitat for Humanity. Housing affordability is an important issue, so we thank you for following the Think Brazos Podcast.  

General Admission
Rob Hitt of Midtown Interview, Slipknot 'The End, So Far' & Yeah Yeah Yeah's 'Cool It Down' Album Discussions, Hey Remember & More

General Admission

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 109:19


Episode 29 Rob Hitt of Midtown joins us to talk reunion shows, MCR Tour, running a record label, cats & more! (36:35). Before that we start off with a Hey Remember segment on albums that take us back to feeling like kids again (2:30), we discuss the Yeah Yeah Yeah's new album 'Cool It Down' (13:35) and Slipknot's new album 'The End, So Far' (22:05). After our interview with Robb we talk a little Paramore, Gaslight Anthem & other upcoming shows (1:34:20).

Black Canvas
Kansas City Great: DJ Jason HYDAN

Black Canvas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 45:51


HYDAN is an open format turntable DJ based out of Kansas City. HYDAN grew up with a background in music, teaching himself how to play the piano at a very young age. HYDAN went on to play piano professionally at local department stores such as Nordstrom's and Von Maur when he was in high school and early into college until he discovered his passion for DJing while studying at the University of Kansas. As a classically trained pianist, Hydan wanted to base his DJ name around a classical composer. He chose Franz Joseph Haydn as his inspiration. He Changed the spelling of Haydn's name to how it is correctly pronounced...Hydan. You'll notice on his logo the piano keys and the DJ record. 9 years ago In Lawrence, HYDAN got his start DJing at Bullwinkles Bar where he helped build huge followings to what has become one of the most popular bars in the city. To pursue his dream of DJing full-time, Hydan moved back to Kansas City and the rest is history. Currently Hydan is the official DJ for the Kansas City Royals and Sporting Kansas City. Growing up Hydan always dreamed of playing for the Royals, and now he actually gets to live out that dream from behind the turntables. Hydan can be seen in Right Field above Rivals Sports Bar at the Royals in between innings hyping up the crowds at Kauffman Stadium. At Sporting KC, Hydan performs in the bowl during pregame and halftime, and then plays the Post Game Victory Celebration in the Budweiser Brewhouse! Not only Does Hydan do events for The Royals and Sporting KC but he also does various work for the Kansas City Chiefs with Icon Event Group and Steve Serrano. Whether it is The Chiefs Style Lounge, The Chiefs 5K, or spinning at the Season Ticket Members Tent during Pregame at Arrowhead Stadium. Along with the Kansas City sports teams, you can find Hydan performing at many popular bars and clubs in Kansas City. He holds several residencies from bars like Society and Westport Ale House, to Aura Nightclub in Midtown. In addition to being involved in the club scene, HYDAN is heavily involved in the Wedding Scene, Corporate World, and DJing Charitable Events. You can find him performing frequently for Building Hope For Autism, the BMA Foundation, The Victory Project and Noah's Bandage Project Charities. Hydan has received several nominations from the Pitch and Kansas City Magazine as the Best Club DJ and Wedding DJ in Kansas City. Hydan strives to being one of the most versatile DJ's in the metro area. There's never an event he wants to say no to and he has the ability to create the perfect vibe for crowds of all ages, effortlessly moving between genres to ensure everyone has something they can get up and dance to.

Voices: River City
”One more bad law before I leave”

Voices: River City

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 59:01


Though she will no longer be on the Sacramento City Council dais come January, District 1's Angelique Ashby (flanked by District 3's Jeff Harris and the people who led the failed recall against District 4's Katie Valenzuela) held a press conference in wealthy East Sacramento's McKinley Park to champion an ordinance banning homeless camps within 500 feet of schools. Will this have any effect on the homelessness crisis? Of course not. But Ashby--who is lagging badly in her California Senate race--will do whatever she can for a headline these days. Even if that means terrorizing our unhoused neighbors. We also discuss the recent string of shootings in Sacramento, and what is being done to curb gun violence in the city. Remember when America's Landlord Steve Maviglio went on a racist, xenophobic tirade against Councilmember Valenzuela after the Midtown shooting? Why was he so silent in the ensuing days, when gun violence rocked the districts of council members Sean Loloee, Jeff Harris and Jay Schenirer? Sacramento's police have never been more well funded or more heavily armed than they are today. And yet gun violence persists. That's because the police don't actually exist to prevent crime. They just respond to it. Yet our very conservative council members continue to try to defund the social programs that can actually curb violence in the community. Thanks for listening, defund the police and, as always: Twitter: @youknowkempa, @ShanNDSTevens, @Flojaune, @guillotine4you Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/voicesrivercity   Sacramentans can hear us on 103.1 KUTZ Tuesdays at 5 pm and again Wednesdays at 8 am. If you require a transcript of our episodes, please reach out to info@voicesrivercity.com and we'll make it happen. And thank you to Be Brave Bold Robot for the tunes.

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington
Midtown Midweek | More on Prayer

Midtown Fellowship: Lexington

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Follow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesQuestions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightThe Dragon Room - 803 Gervais St, Columbia, SC 29201 (coming soon!)Closing song “Contradictions” by Levvy, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
Midtown Midweek | More on Prayer

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Follow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesQuestions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightThe Dragon Room - 803 Gervais St, Columbia, SC 29201 (coming soon!)Closing song “Contradictions” by Levvy, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Good Noise Podcast
Rob Hitt from Midtown talks about reuniting, playing shows with MCR, and owning I Surrender Records

Good Noise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 56:48


We were very fortunate to have Rob Hitt from Midtown on the podcast to talk about the band's reunion and their upcoming tour. Enjoy! Midtown Socials: Twitter: https://twitter.com/midtown Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/midtownnj/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/midtown TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@midtownrocknj Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/midtown/68737 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/5dePEjHD5QEEKixOHXuRRA Website: https://midtownrock.com/ Good Noise Podcast Socials: Twitter: https://twitter.com/good_noise_cast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/goodnoisepodcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/goodnoisepod Discord: https://discord.gg/nDAQKwT YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFHKPdUxxe1MaGNWoFtjoJA Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/04IMtdIrCIvbIr7g6ttZHi All other streaming platforms: http://hyperurl.co/GoodNoisePodcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/goodnoisepodcast Bandcamp: https://goodnoiserecords.bandcamp.com/

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
Midtown Midweek | "Some of Them"

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Follow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesQuestions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.Columbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightKnowledge Perk - 1527 Gervais Street, Columbia, SC 29201 (coming soon!)Closing song “Yellow Line” by Crawford, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

Cookies: A Basketball Podcast
Poison Darts: Cookies 368

Cookies: A Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 26:06


New eps drop first on Patreon! The incredibly rare zero basketball episode! Inside NYFW, Armory, Collina Strada show, NY Noodletown reopening (2:34), Midtown is over, all hail the Seaport (13:33), the queen is dead, your majesty (26:12), scholastic scandals (39:52), did Russia blow a 3-1 lead in Ukraine? (1:06:33), Dick Wolves and "Law & Order" copaganda (1:20:43). 

How That Happened
79. Ross Ledbetter & Cheryl Reeder - Reeder's Auto & Tire – Tulsa's Original Service Station

How That Happened

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 31:18


Ross Ledbetter & Cheryl Reeder are third-generation owners of Reeder's Auto and Tire in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  They purchased the station nearly 15 years ago and have continued to build the brand Midtown knows today.  Reeder's sets itself apart because of its customer service, fueling options, highly skilled auto repair technicians, and in-house chef. In this episode, Ross and Cheryl discuss how Reeder's is keeping up in a growing market, the division of labor between them, and the possibility of a second station. Additionally, Cheryl shares her experience growing up in the business, and her vision for creating a one-of-a-kind destination for Tulsa. Ledbetter and Reeder also break down their social media presence and how that has influenced visitors to the store. They also shed light on how they partnered with local restaurants to serve gourmet food options. Connect with Cheryl & Ross: Connect with Ross on LinkedIn Connect with Cheryl on LinkedIn Resources Mentioned: Visit Reeder's Website Follow them on Instagram Like Reeder's on Facebook Check out their TikTok This episode is now on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also listen via the podcast player embedded above. Make sure to SUBSCRIBE to “How That Happened” to receive our latest episodes every two weeks, learn more about our guests, and collect resources on how to better run your business.

This Was The Scene Podcast
Ep. 191: The Rocking Horse Winner w/ Jolie Lindholm

This Was The Scene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 77:02


The Rocking Horse Winner was an American indie rock band based in Davie, Florida. They formed in mid-1999 and toured with Dashboard Confessional, Coheed and Cambria, The Format, Bayside, The Blood Brothers, The Weakerthans, Further Seems Forever, Midtown, and a ton. You may remember Jolie's voice in some of the OG Dashboard Songs.  Thank you Casey Iodine for the intro. I got Jolie on the Skype and this is what we chat about: Her new band The Darling Fire Having stage fright How she got connected with Dashboard Being on Equal Vision Hankshaw's antics at Fest Mackrock The Coheed story The Crazy house in Florida story Being in Seventeen magazine Did dating someone in the band cause riffs How scrappy of a band they were And a ton more Check out her new band The Darling Fire's new album "DISTORTIONS” available on Iodine Recordings. The band features members of  The Rocking Horse Winner, Shai Hulud, Further Seems Forever, and As Friends Rust.  Available on several vinyl variants and CD from Iodine Recordings, iodinerecords.com or at Deathwish Inc. along with new merch designs. Check out my new book The Couples' Checklist for my webcomic dailyBred. It's a great gift for Valentine's Day. I also have an Instagram for it. If you market aggressively on Instagram Stories and want custom stickers then go here to get custom stickers or just email mike@drive80.com and I can send you samples. These are great for B2C companies and Realtors. Feel free to support the podcast for as little as $1 a month through Patreon Or go to thiswasthescene.com to possibly buy some merch.

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown
Midtown Midweek | More on Acts 10

Sermons | Midtown Fellowship: Downtown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


A behind-the-scenes look at Sunday's sermons, our church family, and the city we love.Follow us on our IG account for resources, local spotlights, and giveaways! (@midtownmidweek)Check out the Mission Guide from our Acts seriesQuestions? Comments? We'd love to hear from you - fill out this form and say hey.FoC | Women's Prayer and Worship Night - RSVP hereResource Spotlight40 Questions about Christian and Biblical Law by Thomas Schreiner“Covenants” by the Bible ProjectColumbia “You'd Rather Be Here” Local SpotlightAll Good Books - 734 Harden StClosing song “If All We Got is Hope” by Crawford, check out more local music at Weird Tower Collective

The Brian Lehrer Show
Gun-Free Zones and the New Concealed Carry Regulations

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 27:05


As New York's new concealed carry regulations go into effect in response to the Supreme Court ruling that overturned previous policy, Jon Campbell, Albany reporter for WNYC and Gothamist, talks about the designated "gun-free zone" in Midtown and how the new regulations will be enforced.