Podcasts about gourds

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  • 95PODCASTS
  • 133EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about gourds

Latest podcast episodes about gourds

Real Laughs
Pumpkin Sales

Real Laughs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 44:24


Tuesday 10-19-21 Show #672: The Monsters have spoiled the guys for morning radio when it comes to guest spots and promoting, we talk about the old sales interview question: sell me this pencil, local car sales gimmicks, and gourds. Gourds galore.

Lab Out Loud
Pumpkin Science, Facts and Surprises

Lab Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:11


To answer their questions about pumpkins, the Lab Out Loud podcast connects with a pumpkin expert. From the University of Rhode Island, Dr. Rebecca Brown joins co-hosts Brian Bartel and Dale Basler to talk about growing pumpkins, the surprising results of pumpkin breeding, and the pumpkin industry in the United States. About The Guest: Rebecca Brown is an assistant professor at the University of Rhode Island in the Department of Plant Sciences and Entomology, where she conducts research in the areas of sustainable vegetable production and laser scarecrows. Show notes at: https://laboutloud.com/2021/10/episode-253-pumpkins/

Abby Eats St. Louis
For the love of gourds

Abby Eats St. Louis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:58


Does this time of year have you seeing orange? We got the gourds: this episode is all about pumpkins, punkin'! We'll teach you some fun facts to bring up at your next festive fall gathering and take you to Pumpkin Land, the Thies Farm mainstay that's been doing it big every fall for decades. Then, we have a hearty helping of food news and a weekend planner that gives you everything except an excuse to be bored this autumn in #STL! For a list of fall-related events click here. For a list of Halloween-related events click here. For the list of places participating in St. Louis Taco Week click here. Follow us on Instagram for food news and updates all week: Abby Eats St. Louis Contact us anytime by emailing us podcasts@ksdk.com. Until next time... Seize the plate!

Your Midwest Garden with Mike O'Rourke
ENCORE EPISODE - Pumpkin Farm

Your Midwest Garden with Mike O'Rourke

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 48:57


ENCORE EPISODE: It's time for gourds, squash, corn and pumpkins so the guys chat onsite with Matt from LaVoy's Pumpkin Farm. That's right, the boys hit the road and traveled up North to Temperance, MI. No matter what pumpkin farm you visit in your area, we bet it is going to be a smash!But watch out for those bees around your donuts & cider!Check out the LaVoy's website at:http://lavoypumpkinfarm.weebly.com/or their Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/lavoypumpkinfarm/Black Diamond Garden Centers Welcome to Black Diamond Nursery & Lawn Service. We been a local business in Toledo for 50 years!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/yourmidwestgarden)

The Midday Show
Andy and Randy - Hour 2 (9-23-21)

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 36:47


Andy and Randy go 'No Huddle' discussing the biggest headlines around the NFL before being joined by 92.9 The Game reporter Joe Patrick. Plus, in The Wendy Zone, we discuss Fantasy Football, pumpkin patches and GOURDS... and you don't want to miss Randy's reaction!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mother Earth News and Friends
Ep. 117 Stewarding Heirloom Wheats

Mother Earth News and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 54:06


“Eat to Live, “Live to Love, Love to Eat”. Learn how Eleanor and Scott Hucker have turned their love of heirloom staple seeds into a unique and fascinating small business of growing and selling small batch heirloom staple grain, bean, and squash seeds from their Michigan property. To see more podcasts, visit our “Mother Earth News and Friends” page. Check out the MOTHER EARTH NEWS Bookstore for more resources to help you achieve your health and farming goals. Go to the MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR page for webinar and courses on everything from gardening to livestock management. 

Don't Call It Nothing
Don't Call It Nothing - Episode 10 - 1996 (Alt.Country, Pt 2)

Don't Call It Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 60:51


Don't Call It Nothing Episode 10 now live! The thrilling conclusion of our journey into 1996 alt.country includes Wilco, The V-Roys, Iris DeMent, Bottle Rockets, The Gourds, The Original Bloodstained Five, and Slobberbone.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/pantsfucious)

Wisdom For The Heart
Souls and Gourds

Wisdom For The Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 39:00


Maker Mom Podcast
Episode 181 - Trustina of Gourds by Fafa

Maker Mom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 56:24


Gourd bowls are an integral part of the culture of the people of the Northern region of Ghana, where Trustina comes from. They are used to serve anything from refreshing water to palm wine. In her work, she views each gourd as a face or a body, taking note of its natural shape, blemishes etc. Trustina then assumes the role of a make-up artist, emphasizing the beauty that already exists through techniques like dyeing, highlighting, shadowing, trimming, carving and impressing. Slowly, the design reveals itself. You can find Trustina's work and follow along with her on Instagram and her Website.

The Daily Gardener
June 21, 2021 Jay Sifford's Garden, Leonhard Rauwolf, Donald Culross Peattie, Susan Wiggs, Small Garden Design by Paul Bangay and Ian McEwan

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 32:30


Today we celebrate an old account of Tripoli gardens. We'll remember a botanist, naturalist, and author who believed in the power of walking. We hear an excerpt from a book by author Susan Wiggs. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a wonderful book about small garden design. And then we'll wrap things up with a novelist who found his own garden paradise in the Cotswolds.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Curated News Jay's Garden in the Mountains | Fine Gardening   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Important Events   June 21, 1535 Today is the birthday of the German physician, botanist, and traveler Leonhard Rauwolf. For two years, between 1573 and 1575, he made a trip through the Near east to search for new herbal medicines. When he returned, he published a book with new botanical descriptions for his herbarium, and he later wrote a travel book about his adventures. Here is an excerpt from Rauwolff's description of Tripoli in Lebanon: “The town of Tripoli is pretty large, full of people, and of good account, because of the great deposition of merchandises that are brought thither daily both by sea and land. It is situated in a pleasant country, near the promontory of the high mountain Libanus, in a great plain toward the sea-shore, where you may see an abundance of vineyards, and very fine gardens, enclosed with hedges for the most part, the hedges consisting chiefly of Rhamnus, Paliurus, Oxyacantha, Phillyrea, Lycium, Balaustium, Rubus, and little Palm-trees, that are low, and so sprout and spread themselves. In these gardens, as we came in, we found all sorts of salads and kitchen-herbs, such as Endive, Lettuce, Ruckoli, Asparagus, Celery,... Tarragon..., Cabbages, Cauliflowers, Turnips, Horseradishes, Carrots, of the greater sort of Fennel, Onions, Garlic, etc. And also fruit, as Water-melons, Melons, Gourds, Citruls, Melongena, Sesamum (by the natives called samsaim, the seeds whereof are very much used to strew upon their bread) and many more; but especially the Colocasia, which is very common there, and sold all the year long.... In great plenty there are citrons, lemons and oranges.... At Tripoli they have no want of water, for several rivers flow down from the mountains, and run partly through the town, and partly through the gardens, so that they want no water neither in the gardens nor in their houses.”   June 21, 1898  Today is the birthday of American botanist, naturalist, and author, Donald Culross Peattie. During his lifetime, Donald was regarded as the most read nature writer in America. He wrote about plants and nature. His book, Flowering Earth, was written for the layperson - explaining concepts like chlorophyll and protoplasm and specimens like algae and seaweeds. The Hartford Times said this about Peattie's Flowering Earth: "Peattie makes the story of botany and its pursuit as fascinating to the reader as it is to him, and the reading of it a delight." Over time, Peattie began to focus on trees. His popular books on North American trees include Trees You Want to Know (1934), The Road of a Naturalist (1941), American Heartwood (1949), A Natural History of Trees of Eastern and Central North America (1950), and A Natural History of Western Trees (1953). From his book American Heartwood, Donald wrote, “Wood, if you stop to think of it, has been man's best friend in the world. It held him in his cradle, went to war as the gunstock in his hand, was the frame of the bed he came to rejoicing, the log upon his hearth when he was cold, and will make him his last long home. It was the murmuring bough above his childhood play, and the roof over the first house he called his own. It is the page he is reading at this moment; it is the forest where he seeks sanctuary from a stony world.” Peattie's writing voice is friendly and lyrical. He wrote, "I have often started off on a walk in the state called mad-mad in the sense of sore-headed, or mad with tedium or confusion; I have set forth dull, null and even thoroughly discouraged. But I never came back in such a frame of mind, and I never met a human being whose humor was not the better for a walk." And he wrote, "All the great naturalists have been habitual walkers, for no laboratory, no book, car, train or plane takes the place of honest footwork for this calling, be it amateur's or professional's."   Unearthed Words She pulled up to the curb in front of number 115, a boxy house with a garden so neat that people sometimes slowed down to admire it. A pruned hedge guarded the profusion of roses that bloomed from spring to winter. Each of the roses had a name. Not the proper name of its variety, but Salvatore, Roberto, Rosina- each one planted in honor of their first communion. There were also roses that honored relatives in Italy whom Rosa had never met, and a few for people she didn't know - La Donna, a scarlet beauty, and a coral floribunda whose name she couldn't remember. The sturdy bush by the front step, covered in creamy-white blooms, was the Celesta, of course. A few feet away was the one Rosa, a six-year-old with a passion for Pepto-Bismol pink, had chosen for herself. Mamma had been so proud of her that day, beaming down like an angel from heaven. It was one of those memories Rosa cherished because it was so clear in her heart and mind. ― Susan Wiggs, American author of historical and contemporary romance novels, Summer by the Sea Grow That Garden Library Small Garden Design by Paul Bangay  This book came out in 2019. In this book, the Australian designer Paul Bangay known for large, elegant gardens, is now sharing his top tips for designing gardens in small spaces - for people who want beautiful gardens on balconies, courtyards, lightwells, or rooftops. As with large gardens, garden design fundamentals like — incorporating structure and smart plant selection. Small Garden Design focuses on tips for working with various spaces and is gorgeously illustrated with photos by Simon Griffiths. This book is 272 pages of small garden design loaded with practical tips on plant choices, paving, irrigation, soil, outdoor dining, lighting, and ideas for making small spaces appear larger. You can get a copy of Small Garden Design by Paul Bangay and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $43 Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart June 21, 1948 Today is the birthday of the Scottish novelist Ian McEwan (“Muh-Cue-in”). Ian has written short stories and novels for adults and a children's novel called The Daydreamer, which Anthony Browne illustrated. In 2012, he and his wife, the writer Annalena McAfee, bought a beautiful nine-acre dream property in the Cotswolds. One of their gardens features foxgloves and iris, lady's mantle, allium, and meadow rue. Ian's best-selling 2001 novel Atonement was made into a movie starring James McAvoy and Keira Knightley in 2007. A passage from the book reads, “It made no sense, she knew, arranging flowers before the water was in — but there it was; she couldn't resist moving them around, and not everything people did could be in a correct, logical order, especially when they were alone.”   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Smoky Mountain Air
Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music—E1: Bagpipes, banjos, ngonis, and gourds

Smoky Mountain Air

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 51:13


On this special episode of Smoky Mountain Air, guest hosts Dr. William Turner and Dr. Ted Olson kick off an exciting new mini-series called Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music. Guests Loyal Jones, Sparky Rucker, and James Leva contribute to this lively conversation about the roots of Appalachian music and their own roles in preserving these musical influences.Loyal Jones served as director of the Appalachian Center now named in his honor at Berea College. He established the annual festival of traditional music at Berea and the Appalachian Sound Archive. Jones is the author of numerous books of regional interest.Sparky Rucker grew up in Knoxville, TN, and has become an internationally recognized folk singer, musician, and storyteller. He has been an educator, performer, and social activist and has been involved in the Civil Rights movement since the 1950s.James Leva is a multi-instrumentalist playing the fiddle, guitar, and banjo, and he’s a singer and songwriter. His work with The Lost Tribe of Country Music transcends racial and generational boundaries as well as musical genres.Dr. William Turner is a long-time African American studies scholar who first rose to prominence as co-editor of the groundbreaking Blacks in Appalachia (1985). He was also a research assistant to Roots author Alex Haley. Turner retired as distinguished professor of Appalachian Studies and regional ambassador at Berea College. His memoir called The Harlan Renaissance is forthcoming from West Virginia University Press in 2021.Dr. Ted Olson is a professor of Appalachian Studies at East Tennessee State University and the author of many books, articles, reviews, encyclopedia entries, and oral histories. Olson has produced and compiled a number of documentary albums of traditional Appalachian music including GSMA’s On Top of Old Smoky and Big Bend Killing. He’s received a number of awards in his work as a music historian, including seven Grammy nominations.Music selections in this episode:“John Henry” performed by Amythyst Kiah and Roy Andrade from GSMA's Big Bend Killing (https://www.smokiesinformation.org/big-bend-killing-the-appalachian-ballad-tradition-2-disk-cd)“Careless Love” performed on guitar by Etta Baker, used courtesy of Berea Sound Archive (https://soundarchives.berea.edu/items/show/2455)“Fly Around My Pretty Little Miss” performed by Ali Farka Touré with Lee Sexton and others from an informal gathering at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, used courtesy of Bryan Wright of Rivermont Records“We Shall (We Will) Overcome” from the Highlander Collection of the Southern Folklife Collection, Wilson Special Collections Library, UNC Chapel Hill; used courtesy of the  Septima Clark Learning Center at Highlander Center (https://youtu.be/5YkTUeFViUY)“Come Sit By My Side Little Darlin’” performed by Bill Livers, Berea Sound Archive (https://soundarchives.berea.edu/items/show/6937)“Jola Gambia” performed by Daniel Jatta and the Lost Tribe of Country Music, used courtesy of James Leva (https://soundcloud.com/raisin-music/akonting)“My Home’s Across the Smoky Mountains,” performed by Sparky Rucker at the Berea College Celebration of Traditional Music, 1981, used courtesy of Digital Library of Appalachia’s Berea College collection (https://dla.acaweb.org/digital/collection/berea/id/2625/rec/11)

Curious Kirby CURK Podcast
Don't Stop Learning! Gourds, Vantias/Vanitas, and Lifelong Learning with Jan Downey and Nicolette Maguire Bonnstetter

Curious Kirby CURK Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 30:56


Nicolette Maguire Bonnstetter and Jan Downey join the Curious Kirby team in the Zoom studio to discuss the values and how-tos of lifelong learning programs in community centers such as the Holland Center. Located in Scottsdale, AZ the Holland Center is a unique partnership dedicated to enriching the Desert Foothills community by celebrating arts and culture, treasuring the desert environment, assisting those in need, and encouraging lifelong learning. Engaging their skilled talents for fine arts and instruction, Jan and Nicolette support the Holland Center with educational programs for lifelong learners. Jan Downey is a contemporary gourd artist and anthropologist. Her studio is online at ZolioArts.com and Jan's gourd art may also be found at On the Edge Gallery in Scottsdale. In addition to a career as an art history and art methods instructor, Nicolette Maguire Bonnstetter works in vanitas and wood sculptures. Visit Nicolette's portfolio or schedule a tour of her studio at NicsArt.com. Meet Jan and Nicolette through one of the Holland Center programs such as the monthly Art, Coffee & Conversation (first Fridays) or annual Arizona Sage Market (April 10, 2021, from 10 AM to 4 PM). Also, be sure to join them for Sonoran Arts League's annual Hidden in the Hills (November 19-21; 26-28). Reach out to Jan Downey: zolioarts.com instagram.com/jan.downey ontheedgegallery.com Contact Nicolette Maguire Bonnstetter: nicsart.com instagram.com/nicolettebonnstetter Mentioned in our conversation: hollandcenter.org hiddeninthehills.org sonoranartsleague.org projectwet.org manhattanarts.com/herstory-2020-exhibition Please enjoy the podcast and don't forget to join my art chats on Monday and Friday mornings 8 Pacific/11 Eastern and for Wednesday Happy Hour at 4 Pacific/7 Eastern. Monday chats have a topic, Friday is Zen Art Zoom, and Happy Hour is open to anything. To join, message me on Instagram (@curiouskirby or @kirbyplessasart) or join my Curious Kirby Creatives Facebook Group. Music: Michael Shynes Song: A Sweet Suspicion --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/curiouskirby/message

The Trail Less Traveled
The Art of Ancient Symbolism & Primitive Tupperware.

The Trail Less Traveled

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2021 43:40


Arturo Ramirez is a Southwestern Artist who found his niche painting on Gourds. Growing up on the banks of the Cimmaron River in Northern New Mexico, Arturo is the epitome of the South West. Arturo is inspired by ancient symbolism, especially Mesoamerican symbols. He now focuses his energy on making rattles which incorporate animal, mineral and plant. The rocks inside his rattles come from ant hills near sacred sites in the southwest where he makes an offering for the gifts from inside the earth that the ants bring to the surface. Arturo paints and carves gourds that are one of a kind. There are no two alike. With the help of his family, Arturo actually starts each creation with the planting of the gourd seeds in his backyard. www.gourdsbyarturo.com Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mother Earth News and Friends
Audio Article - Luffa

Mother Earth News and Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2021 10:20


Learn how to grow luffa, sustainable sponge gourds that are nontoxic, and compostable. Process mature sponges for home use or small business. This is the audio version of an article from the May/April 2021 issue of Mother Earth News magazine.

The Message
The Gourds of Life

The Message

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2021 26:58


In this episode, Reverend Mubiana is talking about the temporary things that enrich our lives.  These temporary things are gourds of life like that gourd inJonah's life. Take a listen--- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app--- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/m-mubiana/messageSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/m-mubiana/support

Rosie on the House
1/2/21 - OUTDOOR LIVING HOUR! Farm Fresh Gourds! (Not The Edible Kind)

Rosie on the House

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2021 38:04


Waylon Wuertz of Wuertz Gourd Farm is our guest with Julie Murphree of The Arizona Farm Bureau.  Waylon discusses how he got into gourd farming, his customer base of artists and crafters, the advantages growing gourds and the other facts and things you can find visiting the farm.  (It could be the next 'C' in Arizona's 5 C's)

The Daily Gardener
December 3, 2020 Seed Size, Gourds and Squashes, James Arnold, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Sara Coleridge, Earth to Table by Jeff Crump and Bettina Schormann, and Octavia Hill

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 18:03


Today I'll talk about the difference between gourds and squash. We'll also celebrate the man whose philanthropy made the Arnold Arboretum possible. We’ll recognize the painter who said flowers made him paint freely. We salute the English author who gave us a lovely poem called The Garden Year. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a cookbook from two chefs who teach authentic, seasonal cooking with ingredients from your garden in the most delicious and perfect ways possible. And then we’ll wrap things up with the English naturalist who campaigned and won Green Spaces for England and her work lead to the National Trust.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show and more. Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org.   Curated News The Same Mobile Protein Governs Seed Size And Inflorescence Structure | Botany One | Hugh Dickinson   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and blog posts for yourself, you're in luck because I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community.   So, there’s no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you’d search for a friend… and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Important Events December 3, 1492   On this day, Christopher Columbus noted in his diary: "I climbed a mountain and came to level ground, which was sown with many different crops and gourds." The gourds Columbus was referring to were actually squashes that were turned into utensils. Many people confuse gourds and squash. So here’s a little gourd and squash trivia to keep your knowledge of gourds and squash sharp. Gourds and squash are members of the Cucurbitaceae ("coo-kur-bi-TAY-see-ee") plant family, including over 700 species. Both squash and gourds are fruits because they are part of the flower that contains the seeds, and like grapes, they grow on a vine. The fruits of gourds, squashes, and pumpkins are berries known as a pepo (“pee-poh”). Loofahs are a type of gourd, and they come from the inside of a gourd. Pumpkin is a squash. And while most gourds are not suitable to eat, squash has a mild taste and is delicious. The main difference between summer squash and winter squash is how long they can be stored. Summer squashes are soft-skinned, they're harvested in the summer, and they need to be eaten quickly (i.e., zucchini and yellow crookneck squash). Winter squashes are hard-shelled squashes that can be stored for months (i.e., acorn squash). Here’s a little gourd joke: What vegetable keeps your garden safe? A security gourd. Lastly, if you enjoy puns, gourd puns abound on the internet, and they are truly the worst puns. "You’d butternut forget to grow gourds… because they’re ‘gourd’geous!"   December 3, 1868 Today is the anniversary of the death of the wealthy businessman, philanthropist, and botanist James Arnold. James is the namesake for Harvard's Arnold Arboretum - the very first arboretum in the United States. James was born to a Quaker family in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1807, James married Sarah Rotch. Had James not married Sarah, there would have probably never been an Arnold Arboretum. Sarah's father was part of an exceptionally wealthy whaling family, and James eventually became a partner in his father-in-law's business. James used his wealth to buy an 11-acre estate in New Bedford, Massachusetts. As Quakers, James, and Sarah focused less on making their home ostentatious and more on developing their gardens. Together James and Sarah searched for interesting plants and trees for their home gardens during their many trips to Europe. And history tells us that the Arnold property was so stunning that the gardens were open to the public on Sundays. In 1857, even the writer Herman Melville visited the garden. The Unitarian minister, William Potter, called the Arnold estate, "...the most conspicuous among all our homes for culture, for hospitality, for charity." As both James and Sarah loved gardening and plants, their friends included many naturalists of their time: John James Audubon, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Bronson Alcott (Louisa May Alcott’s father). When James died in 1868, as part of his will, he left $100,000 in the hands of three trustees: Francis Parker, John James Dixwell, and George Emerson. Emerson and Dixwell personally knew Asa Gray at Harvard, and they also knew that Harvard needed a Botanic Garden. James Arnold’s trustees included a bodacious mission for the Arboretum: to collect every kind of tree and shrub that would grow outdoors in Massachusetts. By 1873, Charles Sprague Sargent was hired to be the director of the Arnold Arboretum - a position he would hold for over four decades. And James Arnold’s gift and Charles Sprague Sargent’s leadership created the world-class arboretum we enjoy today.   December 3, 1919 Today is the anniversary of the death of the impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Pierre-Auguste Renoir said, when he was painting flowers, he was able to paint, “freely and boldly without the mental effort, he made with a model.” He also said, “If you paint the leaf on a tree without using a model, your imagination will only supply you with a few leaves… But nature offers you millions, all on the same tree. … The artist who paints only what is in his mind must very soon repeat himself.” It was Renoir who said, “What seems most significant to me about [Impressionism] is that we have freed painting from the importance of the subject. I am at liberty to paint flowers and call them flowers, without their needing to tell a story.” And speaking of stories, there's a little-known story about Renoir. For many years, he hung a sign on his garden gate which read, "No Renoirs sold here. Beware the dog."   Unearthed Words January brings the snow, Makes our feet and fingers glow. February brings the rain, Thaws the frozen lake again. March brings breezes, loud and shrill, To stir the dancing daffodil. April brings the primrose sweet, Scatters daisies at our feet. May brings flocks of pretty lambs Skipping by their fleecy dams. June brings tulips, lilies, roses, Fills the children’s hands with posies. Hot July brings cooling showers, Apricots and gillyflowers. August brings the sheaves of corn, Then the harvest home is borne. Warm September brings the fruit; Sportsmen then begin to shoot. Fresh October brings the pheasant; Then to gather nuts is pleasant. Dull November brings the blast; Then the leaves are whirling fast. Chill December brings the sleet, Blazing fire and Christmas treat. — Sara Coleridge, English author, The Garden Year   Grow That Garden Library Earth to Table by Jeff Crump and Bettina Schormann This book came out in 2018, and the subtitle is Cooking with Good Ingredients Through the Seasons. In this book, Slow Food advocates and accomplished chefs Jeff Crump and Bettina Schormann create approachable everyday recipes with the garden harvest. This book was a 2018 Winner for Excellence in Book Design - which is a feature that readers will notice right away when they get this cookbook. By advocating for a seasonal approach to cooking, Jeff and Bettina show you how to seek out the freshest ingredients for your prep table and dining table. Earth to Table Every Day features 140 wholesome, effortless, everyday recipes. I love Jeff and Bettina’s cookbook because they infuse their book with brilliant stories and gorgeous photography that makes their recipes compelling and memorable. My favorites include Arugula and Fennel Salad, Mushroom Tarts, Creamy Hummus with Fried Chickpeas, Buttermilk Fried Chicken, Apple Bacon Pizza, Rhubarb Upside Down Cake, Chocolate Brownies, and Raspberry Swirl Cheesecake. This book is 288 pages of authentic, seasonal cooking from two chefs dedicated to making and using ingredients from the garden in the most delicious and perfect ways possible. You can get a copy of Earth to Table by Jeff Crump and Bettina Schormann and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $18   Today’s Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart December 3, 1838 Today is the birthday of the English activist, conservationist, and naturalist Octavia Hill. From the time she was 13 years old, Octavia worked to make life better for the working class. As Octavia matured, she crystalized her advocacy. And one of Octavia’s most passionate causes was getting access to nature for all of the folks living in large cities like London. Historical records tell us that Octavia was a small woman, she didn’t care a lick for fashion, and she had beautiful brown eyes. She was also an exceptional speaker and persuasive advocate, as is evident by a comment the Bishop of London made after meeting with Octavia, "She spoke for half an hour … I never had such a beating in all my life." In 1884, Octavia's sister and fellow activist Miranda Hill remarked, “It has come to the point when two peers and a cabinet minister call and consult her in one week.” Octavia’s work to save green spaces throughout England led to the establishment of the National Trust. It was Octavia Hill who said, “The need of quiet, the need of air, the need of exercise, and, I believe, the sight of sky and of things growing, are human needs, common to all…” And finally, gardeners will chuckle at this little passage from a letter Octavia wrote to her sister, Gertrude, on October 22, 1852: “Oh, Gertrude! I am so happy, so very very happy. I wish you were with me. You would so love all my beautiful things... I have a little room, all to myself. When anything is wrong or unjust downstairs, I have only to come up into my own little room, and it is so still... I usually have some flowers, for the ladies are very kind in bringing me them. I have a few poor little plants that I am fond of. Then I have eleven dear little snails. They are such darlings.”   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Union Grove Primitive Baptist Church
Elisha and The Wild Gourds

Union Grove Primitive Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2020 40:41


Message from Elder Ronnie Loudermilk on November 22, 2020

Glamazons and Leprechauns Podcast
Episode 18: Out of our Gourds

Glamazons and Leprechauns Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2020 63:44


Episode 18: Out of our Gourds Today, the gals are talking pumpkins, squashes, and other holiday staples, both sweet and savory. They also discuss the risks involved in being a guest at someone's Thanksgiving dinner.

Guy's Geek Podcast
Guy's Geek Podcast Episode 13: Gourds Gone Wild - Election Day, Hangovers, Gaming, and Suckin Ds

Guy's Geek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2020 86:11


This episode, the guys talk about Halloween, hangovers, puking, Cyberpunk 2077, AC Valhalla, oral sex, and some sports Thanks for watching and supporting the channel! Check out Guy's Geek on Twitch and Instagram and also check out our MERCH!Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/guysgeekInsta: https://www.instagram.com/guysgeek/Merch: https://guysgeekchannel.live/merch

Your Wino Friends Talk Shit
Episode 14: There's Some Gourds In This House

Your Wino Friends Talk Shit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2020 28:07


Kayti and Laura get spooky, talking about Halloween traditions, failures, and pumpkin patch etiquette.

Your Midwest Garden with Mike O'Rourke
It was a smash, The Great Pumpkin Smash!

Your Midwest Garden with Mike O'Rourke

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2020 48:19


It's time for gourds, squash, corn and pumpkins so the guys chat onsite with Matt from LaVoy's Pumpkin Farm. That's right, the boys hit the road and traveled up North to Temperance, MI. No matter what pumpkin farm you visit in your area, we bet it is going to be a smash!But watch out for those bees around your donuts & cider!Check out the LaVoy's website at:http://lavoypumpkinfarm.weebly.com/or their Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/lavoypumpkinfarm/________________Like to check out our Facebook Page? Please "LIKE" it, follow along and even post, not only your garden pictures, but message us with questions. Plant, bug IDs, etc. Mike loves to help out!https://www.facebook.com/Your-Midwest-Garden-Podcast-104823994541594________________If you happen to be in the Toledo or Perrysburg, Ohio area, please stop in at our sponsor's garden centers or visit them online at:https://www.blackdiamondgrows.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/yourmidwestgarden)Black Diamond Garden Centers Welcome to Black Diamond Nursery & Lawn Service. We been a local business in Toledo for 50 years!

Is That Something?
"Pumpkin spice" but using different squashes/gourds?

Is That Something?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2020 19:09


Courtney has a notion to reinvigorate your beverages this season.

AboutBeverages.com - Podcast
Give It A Shot - Trader Joe's Howling Gourds Pumpkin Ale and O'Fallon Pumpkin Beer

AboutBeverages.com - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2020


In our part of the country it certainly doesn’t feel like it, but when we look at the calendar we are reminded that it is fall. Leaves are beginning to change, the days are getting shorter, and of course, pumpkins are everywhere. In the beverage world that means pumpkin beer is everywhere. Over the years we have tried several of these seasonally inspired offerings, even dedicating entire shows to our pursuit of crowning a favorite for that particular year. While we haven't done that for a few years, pumpkin beer is still very much a part of our show during the fall. Over the next two episodes we will share four pumpkin beers with you. We kick things off with the Howling Gourds Pumpkin Ale from Trader Joe’s and O’Fallon Pumpkin Beer. What did we think? What do you think? Let us know in the comments below or join us live on Thursday nights to give us your feedback while we are live streaming on Twitch.

Nat Chat
Medley 229: Tropical Storms, Dreaming, Investors, Bicycles, Gourds, Sleep Tech, Supersonic Jets...

Nat Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2020 8:29


On this week's episode of Nat Chat, I'm talking about a wide range of topics featured in my Monday Medley. From supersonic speed to a good night's sleep, join me in recapping my best finds from across the Internet this week.  Make sure to subscribe to the newsletter here if you prefer a readable copy of this podcast! And don't forget to subscribe to my Youtube channel. Resources Mentioned: My YouTube channel (0:23) Helping David Perell migrate from Evernote into Roam (0:30) Highlighting important notes in podcasts.(0:35) A marathon 2+ hour interview of me (0:44) Nick Maggiulli (1:10) Retire in Progress (1:12) Sovereignty (1:17) Dream (1:24) Medley 210 (1:50) Boom Supersonic (1:53) The first XB-1 Supersonic Jet (1:58) Article by Patrick Collison (2:16) Fear caused by bicycles (4:31) Lost opportunity to lead Airbnb's seed round (5:40) What makes Y Combinator so special (6:28) My favorite sleep tech this week (6:48) BluBLOX (6:56) Blue Light Filtering Test (7:00) Fascinating Visualization (7:16) It's Decorative Gourd Season (7:40) If you want to support the Medley and my other writing, there are many ways you can do that here And should you come across anything interesting this week, tweet me @nateliason. I'd love to hear your thoughts and neat things you may come across. Thanks for tuning in, I'll see you next Monday!  

Austin Music Minute – KUTX
Saturday Rib Fry

Austin Music Minute – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2020 2:28


A reunion, you say? Kind of. Shinyribs' Kevin Russell and former Gourds bandmate Claude Bernard do a livestream set at 8 p.m. Central tonight, Saturday, September 19, on Facebook, YouTube and Twitch...

Bone Patrol Podcast
Episode 21: Melon Heads

Bone Patrol Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2020 74:25


What do Michigan, Ohio, and Connecticut have in common? Gourds. Enter the Crypt with us and find out if you have what it takes to survive a night with the Melon Heads. Follow us on Instagram and Youtube and share with us your personal experiences with the supernatural! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Collateral Damage: A DnD Podcast
Episode 12: Gourd Tips

Collateral Damage: A DnD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2020 208:12


Tunret learns a few things about Gourds...

Gourd TV by Welburn Gourd Farm
50: Ornament Gourds are Back!

Gourd TV by Welburn Gourd Farm

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2020 3:35


They are back! Our very popular Craft-Ready Ornament Gourds are here! Every year we sell out of these gourds because, well, they are just so much fun to craft and decorate! Here, Phoebe Welburn shows you the various sizes available and some gourd art samples too!

Gourd TV by Welburn Gourd Farm
50: Ornament Gourds are Back!

Gourd TV by Welburn Gourd Farm

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2020


They are back! Our very popular Craft-Ready Ornament Gourds are here! Every year we sell out of these gourds because, well, they are just so much fun to craft and decorate! Here, Phoebe Welburn shows you the various sizes available and some gourd art samples too!

Cultivating Place
Summer Garden Gems: The Melon, With Amy Goldman

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2020 56:03


Amy Goldman is a gardener, author-artist, and longtime advocate for seed saving, plant breeding, and heirloom fruits and vegetables. Her mission has for many years been to celebrate and catalog the magnificent diversity of standard, open-pollinated, heirloom varieties, and their conservation. Her books include The Compleat Squash – A Passionate Growers Guide to Pumpkins, Squashes, and Gourds, and most recently The Melon, which will entice and educate, whether you are a passionate gardener, a locavore, or simply delight in the inherent beauty and evanescence of the fruits of the vine. Illustrated by Victor Schrager, and many years in the making, The Melon is a comprehensive and definitive work that includes portraits in words and photographs of 125 extraordinary varieties, expert advice on cultivation and seed saving, and delicious melon recipes. Amy Goldman’s mission is to celebrate, catalog, and conserve standard, open-pollinated fruit, and vegetable varieties. As we come back she shares more on how her newest book The Melon encourages everyone to grow, enjoy, save seed from and share forward the great diversity of melons and watermelons, plants whose ancient wild progenitors hail from Africa, India, and Persian regions and whose histories are intertwined with the people of these places and their diasporas across time and space. Listen In. Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Play and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit cultivatingplace.com.

Seedy Business
Seedy Shorts: Gourds from Kitazawa Seed Company 2020

Seedy Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2020 6:11


Seedy Shorts, brief episodes of straight readings of beautifully composed seed descriptions with no additional commentary. Because we recognize we're insufferable and should just get out of the way sometimes. Released on off-Fridays, in between episodes of Seedy Business. Instagram: SeedyBusinessPod Twitter: SeedyBusiness Email: SeedyBusinessPod@gmail.com

Talkin' Songs
90 | What We're Listening To: June 19, 2020

Talkin' Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2020 39:19


Happy 78th Birthday Sir Paul McCartney! Hope you enjoy this week's episode of WWLT, we're Talkin':  The Gourds, "Gin and Juice" Son Little, "hey rose" Arlo McKinley, "Walking Shoes" Sean W Spellman, "Baby Blue" Neil Young, "Vacancy" PLUS a bonus McCartney track

The CoverUp
127 - Ziggy Stardust - The CoverUp

The CoverUp

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2020 25:11


You know what this show needs more of? Androgynous bisexual rock stars communing with alien intelligences. I mean, what else could it have been? Ziggy Stardust, originally by David Bowie, covered by Bauhaus, and by The Gourds. Outro music is Animal by Def Leppard.

Muziek voor Volwassenen (40UP Radio)
Muziek voor Volwassenen 621

Muziek voor Volwassenen (40UP Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 59:24


Om 22:00 Muziek voor Volwassenen met Johan Derksen op 40UP Radio. Vanavond is het Album van de Week "The Song of Mickey Newbury" van Gretchen Peters. Verder hebben we in de uitzending muziek van onder andere Will Hoge, The Gourds en The Byrds..

Muziek voor Volwassenen (40UP Radio)
Muziek voor Volwassenen 620

Muziek voor Volwassenen (40UP Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 57:31


Om 22:00 Muziek voor Volwassenen met Johan Derksen op 40UP Radio. Vanavond is het Album van de Week "The Song of Mickey Newbury" van Gretchen Peters. Verder hebben we in de uitzending muziek van onder andere Will Hoge, The Gourds en The Byrds..

Muziek voor Volwassenen (40UP Radio)
Muziek voor Volwassenen 619

Muziek voor Volwassenen (40UP Radio)

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2020 58:15


Om 22:00 Muziek voor Volwassenen met Johan Derksen op 40UP Radio. Vanavond is het Album van de Week "The Song of Mickey Newbury" van Gretchen Peters. Verder hebben we in de uitzending muziek van onder andere Will Hoge, The Gourds en The Byrds..

Making It Grow Minutes
The History of Gourds as Containers

Making It Grow Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2020 1:00


Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Gourds were human’s earliest containers. Their diversity in size and shape let early peoples select them for a variety of purposes. Some were cut in half and filled with food, hot rocks were added to cook those contents. Others with flat bottoms and long necks held and easily dispensed liquids. Early on they were decorated as we humans want to add beauty to our homes, be they caves, teepees, or fiber covered structures. In Kenya, where gourds were essential to life for ten thousand years, the proliferation of plastics led to a decline in their use. With the help of the International Plant Genetic Resources Institute, a museum there preserves the most diverse germ plasma for bottle gourds in the world and teaches woman decorating and marketing practices. I wonder if art galleries in the future display lovingly decorated Tupperware?

Making It Grow Minutes
Bottle Gourds

Making It Grow Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2020 1:00


Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Bottle gourds have been used by ancient and modern peoples for over ten thousand years now. For religious rites, they’ve been crafted into masks, musical instruments, or sounding devices. From a utilitarian standpoint, bottle gourd uses are incredible diversity -- a container, a dipper, wheels, even flotation devices. When dried, they are especially light weight and have undeniably made contributions towards improvements in the lives of humans. The eventual shape can be manipulated when the fruits are young by tying vines or twine around them to achieve a certain shape, or hung for a straight neck, or sat straight up on its base for an upright vessel. In some Papua New Guinea cultures, they are used as unusual body protection devices, called kotekas, which we might consider primitive but are not so different from equipment worn by football players.

The Dale Wiley Show
DWS Shinyribs

The Dale Wiley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2020 19:17


I sit down with Shinyribs and talk about him and The Gourds. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dale613/support

Making It Grow Minutes
Instruments Made from Plants

Making It Grow Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2020 1:00


Hello Gardeners, I’m Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . . In many cities these evenings, people go outside at seven and make noises to communicate their appreciation for front line workers in the covid 19 pandemic. My daughter and her boyfriend in Los Angeles have been participating. Casey, a trained saxophone player, has alternated between blowing two flutes at one time (a common ancient practice) and a digeridoo. Eliza Frezil shakes a tambourine. All three instruments have ancient origins – the digeridoo most probably eucalyptus trunks hollowed out by termites. The flutes from plant stems and bamboo, and the tambourine originally a dried gourd whose seeds made the shaking sound. Gourds are the source of more nature-based musical or sound-making implements than any other natural object. Lagenaria sicenaria , the ancient bottle gourd, still grown today, probably originated in Africa but 10,000 years ago was already in the New World and Asia.

Gift Biz Unwrapped | Women Entrepreneurs | Bakers, Crafters, Makers | StartUp
258 – Lots to Learn from this “Gourd-geous” Biz with Ben Bear of Meadowbrooke Gourds

Gift Biz Unwrapped | Women Entrepreneurs | Bakers, Crafters, Makers | StartUp

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 54:28


Ben has spent the last thirty years helping to start and grow a company called Meadowbrooke Gourds. They now have twenty full-time employees dedicated to growing, designing, crafting and marketing gourd decor designs, each one intended to create smiles and make homes a little bit warmer. They sell about half their gourds wholesale to customers located in every state. The other half are sold online, at their store, and through the many classes and community events that they host at their farm. Ben attributes their success to many things, but none more important than constantly trying to be just a little bit better every year and in every area of the business. At this point, Ben is starting to step back and let the next generation of leaders take them forward. Ben believes it will be beyond anything he could have even dreamed when he crafted that first gourd in his garage many years ago. BUSINESS BUILDING INSIGHTSPay attention and acknowledge all your success - big and small. Watch the reactions of your customers. Find people who can tell you whether what you've created is good or bad. Create something that people haven’t seen before. That's the way to have products that sell themselves. Focus on one thing when you’re starting a business. Don’t try to do everything. Bring on employees so you can focus on the things only you can do. Get people to "experience" your product and also create meaningful experiences and connections with customers. Don't try to mimic somebody else but compete with yourself instead. Focus on what you can adjust and improve. Watch people’s smiles and enjoyment more than the monetary gain. In the craft market, people want to be surprised each time they come to your store. You can be really good but if you aren’t different and better the next time they visit, you will lose customers. CONTACT LINKS Website (https://mbgourds.com/) Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/mbgourds) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/mbgourds/) Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/mbgourds/) YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt1S4gWChqKv2DrJywrOK5w) Join Our FREE Gift Biz Breeze Facebook Community Become a Member of Gift Biz Breeze (https://www.facebook.com/groups/GiftBizBreeze) If you found value in this podcast, make sure to subscribe so you automatically get the next episode downloaded for your convenience. Also, if you'd like to do me a huge favor, please leave a review. That helps other creators like you find the show and build their businesses too. Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/gift-biz-unwrapped/id986323267) Google Podcasts (https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5naWZ0Yml6dW53cmFwcGVkLmNvbS9mZWVkL3BvZGNhc3Q=&inf_contact_key=f00b9b282a6156da6dc2e642eb167c2f680f8914173f9191b1c0223e68310bb1) Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/380HmeoVquMHRzOepaoF0s) Thank so much! Sue

Rádio Etiópia
HEROES

Rádio Etiópia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2020 79:42


HEROES............................... by tony justerini http://www.filefactory.com/file/1zykihgdighb/New%20project.mp3 01. Francesco Berta – The Golden Years, The Golden Years, 2019 02. Elbow – This World Blue, The Take Off and Landing of Everything, 2014 03. Francesco Berta – Étude No. 5, Étude No. 5 (The Passage Of Time), 2020 04. Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark - Almost, Electricity, 1979 05. The End of The Ocean – Docks, Calm Seas Don´t Male Sailors, 2009 06. Gary Numan –A Prayer For The Unborn, Pure, 2000 07. Dustin O'Halloran – Opus 23, Piano Solos Vol. 2, 2004 08. Bob Dylan –Blowin' In The Wind, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, 1963 09. Iggy Pop – Lust for Life (The Prodigy Remix), Trainspotting, 1977 10. Dakota Suite – Morning Heavy, Signal Hill, 2000 11. Dakota Suite– Signal Hill, Signal Hill, 2000 12. Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark – Messages, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, 2000 13. Gary Numan – Walking With Shadows, Pure, 2000 14. Max Richter – Sarajevo, Memoryhouse, 2002 15. Man'olo – Heroes, Single, 2017 16. Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark – Red Frame/White Light, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, 2000 17. The Gourds – Ziggy Stardust, Gogitchyershinebox, 1998 18. Olafur Arnalds - Lokaou Augunum, Variations of Static, 2008 19. Azure Ray – November, November, 2002 20. Azure Ray - I Will Do These Things, November, 2002 total time: 01:19:41 http://radioetiopia.phase108.net/ https://instagram.com/radioetiopia/ https://radiolisboa.pt/ www.radioetiopia.com

Americana Podcast
Shinyribs | Soul, Surrealism and Santa Claus

Americana Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2019 71:54


On today's episode of Americana podcast: the 51st state- Kevin Russell. Also known as Shinyribs Kevin Russell, or as we've been calling him "the physical embodiment of sound"- was born in the late 60's in Beaumont, Texas. In his formative years- Russell's family relocated to Shreveport Louisiana, where he was exposed to one of the richest hotbeds for roots-based music. At 17 he began to play in various bars and venues across the state and in the early 90's he relocated to Austin, TX. In 1994 he became a member of the cult-classic band "The Gourds" which lasted until 2013.  Since then Russell has been performing as Shinyribs- a musical Hoge podge of anything from gritty swamp rock, to smooth soul, to just flat-out groovy songs. Also the purveyor of one of the most fun and entertaining live shows, ever.   Russell's timeline exemplifies not only a part of where Americana music started "officially" but hopefully where its going as well.  Shinyribs is also joining our host Robert Earl Keen, not only on the podcast but on Keen's annual Christmas tour this year!

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week
Blood Gourds, Tiny Taffeta Frog Pants, Dying for Weather Data

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2019 33:12


The New York Times' Kendra Pierre-Louis—a former PopSci Editor!—joins us this week as a guest host! The weirdest things we learned ranged from gourds full of royal blood to frogs wearing tiny taffeta pants. Whose story will be voted "The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week"? The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science. Share your weirdest facts and stories with us in our Facebook group or tweet at us! Click here to learn more about all of our stories! Click here to buy tickets for Weirdest Thing Live on October 31st! Follow our team on Twitter Rachel Feltman: www.twitter.com/RachelFeltman Eleanor Cummins: www.twitter.com/elliepses Popular Science: www.twitter.com/PopSci Theme music by Billy Cadden: www.twitter.com/billycadden Edited by Jess Boddy: www.twitter.com/JessicaBoddy --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/support

Drinking Socially - The Official Untappd Podcast
Drinking Socially - Ep. 61: Out of our Gourds

Drinking Socially - The Official Untappd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2019 84:55


## **What We’re Drinking**Beer #1 - Pumpkin Latte Blonde by Sycamore Brewing- Blonde Ale- 5.5% ABV- Beach Shack Coffee is infused in Sycamore’s Pumpkin Latte Blonde (made with pumpkin spices, sweet vanilla and cold-brewed Beach Shack Coffee)Beer #2 - Pumpkin Pie Porter by Deep River Brewing Company- Pumpkin / Yam Beer- 5.9% ABV- Porter style beer brewed with real pumpkin and your favorite pumpkin pie spices.Beer #3 - Pumking by Southern Tier Brewing Company- Pumpkin / Yam Beer- 8.6% ABV- Pumpkin puree and pie spices, malty, bready; cinnamon dominates with nutmeg and vanilla in the background.## Brewing with PumpkinHarrison begins by talking about some of his experiences in a brewhouse during pumpkin season and ends by instructing you on building your first Pumpkin beer — inside a pumpkin. We can't wait to hear about it. Recipe Link Here!## **Sponsor**Show off your love of Untappd. Check out our online store and pick up Untappd branded glassware, shirts, sweatshirts, hats, and more! Go to store.untappd.com and enter the coupon code “**PODCAST**” at checkout to get 20% off all orders## Next Episode:Untappd Ratings — what's your scale? criteria? How do you use Untappd to rate and find your next beet? Harrison and Jon are going to talk about their thoughts on the subject but as always — send yours to us on the Facebook Group!## **Connect**Jon On UntappdHarrison On UntappdTwitterFacebookInstagramFacebook GroupOut of Our Gourds Pumpkin Home Brew Recipe

Ologies
Cucurbitology (PUMPKINS) with Anne Copeland

Ologies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2019 60:36


PUMPKIN PUMPKIN! Not only a thing to scream while passing a patch, but also the name of author and human delight Anne Copeland's gourd opus. Yes, she's so charmed by pumpkins that she dedicated a whole book to exploring their folklore, history, planting protocol, care, and cooking. On a lark, Alie stops by her house in the rural hamlet of Yucaipa, California to chat about everything from creation myths surrounding pumpkins to Anne's favorite recipes, how to make a pumpkin last longer on your porch, the secret medicinal properties of pipitas, why humans might need to go bananas on Halloween, how to propose via pumpkin, and the big flimflam Anne needs the world to know about the pumpkin origin story. Also: who is Jack and why does he have a lantern? Anne Copeland's book "Pumpkin, Pumpkin: Folklore, History, Planting Hints and Good Eating" is available via Amazon And here: https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Folklore-History-Planting-Eating-ebook/dp/B07YLFR119/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=pumpkin+pumpkin+copeland&qid=1570549807&sr=8-1 A donation went to Shriners Hospitals for Children Sponsor links: withcove.com/ologies; periodbetter.com, code OLOGIES; betterhelp.com/ologies; HelixSleep.com/OLOGIES; Stitch Fix.com/OLOGIES More links up at alieward.com/ologies/cucurbitology Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Support the show.

Major Spoilers Comic Book Podcast
Critical Hit #511: The Order Eater Gourds (VS06-063)

Major Spoilers Comic Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2019 55:25


Critical Hit: A Major Spoilers RPG Podcast
Critical Hit #511: The Order Eater Gourds (VS06-063)

Critical Hit: A Major Spoilers RPG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2019 55:29


In this installment of Critical Hit - A Major Spoilers Podcast: The party meets and new old friend and we learn a little about the Order Eater Gourds. Visit the Major Spoilers store for Critical Hit and Major Spoilers merchandise! Character sheets for characters at level 24 are available at members.majorspoilers.com Show your thanks to Major Spoilers for this episode by becoming a Major Spoilers Patron at Patreon.com/MajorSpoilers. It will help ensure Critical Hit continues far into the future! Join our Discord Server and hang out with other Critical Hit fans! Contact us at podcast@majorspoilers.com A big Thank You goes out to everyone who downloads, subscribes, listens, and supports this show. We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to our ramblings each week. Tell your friends about the podcast, get them to subscribe and, be sure to visit the Major Spoilers site for more.