Podcasts about crafts

Pastime or profession that requires particular skills and knowledge of skilled work

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Latest podcast episodes about crafts

Off The Break Podcast
OTB #173: Will A Potential Strike From The Hollywood Crafts Union Become Costly For Movie Theaters?

Off The Break Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


Will a possible strike from the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) potentially hurt movie theaters in the process? And how will Hollywood handle the strike if one happens? Not only does the group discuss this, but they also discuss other "hard-hitting" topics such as the new title for the...

I am Northwest Arkansas
Special Episode: The Benton County Fair is back in Full Effect for 2021

I am Northwest Arkansas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 32:54


About the Show:  We sat down recently to speak with Susan Koehler and Jackie Griffin from the Benton County Fair to discuss this year's event. https://bentoncountyfairar.org/ (The Benton County Fair) takes place in Bentonville, AR, and runs from September 28th to October 2nd.  This year they are back to mostly normal operations, with measures to ensure COVID-19 safety protocols throughout the event.  There is something for everyone at the Fair, and these guys know what they are doing.  https://bentoncountyfairar.org/ (The Benton County Fair) has been going strong since 1904 in various Benton County locations. Since 2007 they have been settled in their primary 60-acre site right next to Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport.  According to Susan and Jackie, there will be something for everyone with Rides, Games, Livestock, an Exhibit Hall with Arts & Crafts, Homesteading, Food Presentations, and a Pageant. You can register to exhibit https://bentoncountyfairar.org/register/ (HERE). Evening entrance fees are $10 Tuesday through Thursday and $15 on the weekend.  Make plans to bring the whole family.  You won't regret it! Benton County Fair 7640 SW Regional Airport Blvd,  Bentonville, AR 72712    Important Links and Mentions on the Show*: Susan Koehler, Manager, Benton County Fair Email Jackie Griffin, Show Works Manager Email http://www.bentoncountyfairar.org (Benton County Fair Website) https://www.instagram.com/bcfa_insta/ (Benton County Fair Instagram) https://twitter.com/bentoncountyfair (Benton County Fair Twitter) https://www.facebook.com/bentoncofairar/ (Benton County Fair Facebook)   This episode is sponsored by*: https://www.signature.bank/ (Signature Bank of Arkansas) -   https://www.signature.bank/ (Signature Bank) was founded here in Northwest Arkansas in 2005. Their focus is personal and community banking. When you bank with a community bank, you're investing in local businesses, local entrepreneurs, local charities, and the causes close to home. Signature Bank has worked hard to earn its tagline, “Community Banking at its Best.” You may ask why bank at Signature?  Because they focus on the customer instead of having a branch on every corner, this means you can have your questions answered by a real person, whether you're reaching out to the call center or your banker's cell phone. You can access any ATM in the country without fear of a fee.  They will refund all of those fees at the end of every month. Finally, they are constantly improving their digital offerings to ensure you can access the best financial tools from your laptop, phone, or tablet 24 hours a day. Signature Bank of Arkansas is a full-service bank offering traditional checking and savings accounts, investment accounts, business and personal loans, and mortgages. Give the folks at Signature Bank a call (479-684-4700) or visit their websitehttps://www.signature.bank/ ( Signature.Bank) and let them know you heard about them on the I am Northwest Arkansas Podcast.  https://www.signature.bank/ (Signature Bank of Arkansas) is a Member of the FDIC and an Equal Housing Lender.   http://www.iamnorthwestarkansas.com/canva (Canva) -   Are you looking for ways to build a Digital Marketing Strategy from scratch? Whether you need to design things for your family or personal brand or need a versatile design tool to help you with your social media presence. Canva can help.   Need new Business Cards? Canva has you covered.  Need to create and post Social Media images quickly? Canva has you covered. Need to create videos for Social Media and beyond? Canva has you covered. Need to create a sharp-looking resume? Canva has you covered. Need access to more than 3-Million Royalty-Free Images?  Ok, you get the point! Canva covers just about anything you need from a design perspective, and it costs pennies a...

Step Up Your Home with Georgia Ezra
Sustaining Age Old Crafts with Steff Ball

Step Up Your Home with Georgia Ezra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 37:38


On this episode of Step Up Your Home Georgia is interviewing one of her dear friends, local Melbourne Mum of two and founder of the ever-growing online platform Engold, Steffanie Ball. Steff has been in the creative industry for 14 years. She had studied an undergrad in Interior Design at RMIT and what started as an internship position at Georgia's Interior Architecture practice then, blossomed into a long term and very good friendship. Since then Steff has launched her very own platform, Engold alongside her husband Matt Ball. Through Engold Steff aims to adorn homes with timeless pieces that will be cherished for life and provide a space for other creators to do so as well.

Podcast – Seamwork Radio
How to Make More Time for Sewing and Creativity

Podcast – Seamwork Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 27:46


This week on the podcast, Haley and I are sharing some of our own little tricks for making time for the things we enjoy, namely sewing and making. We talk about: Figuring out how much time you want to spend on creativity, Determining which activities bring you joy and which don't, How to make sewing feel more like playtime.

podcasts – Yarns at Yin Hoo

You know how it is: complete one pair of self-striping socks . . . cast on another! In this episode, I provide an update on Rhinebeck sweater progress and share some very special things that happened as I worked on my first felted landscape. Plus, a poem for the season.

The Mother Like a Boss Podcast
Decluttering toys, crafts and kids' artwork

The Mother Like a Boss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 36:04


Feel like your house is bursting at the seams with toys, popsicle crafts and construction paper pictures? Tell me you have kids without telling me you have kids, right? There is a lot of sentimentality that goes into decluttering things like this and it also feels never ending, so today let's talk about simple solutions to getting rid of things so you can make room for the wonderful memories you do want to keep.

Podcast – Seamwork Radio
Escaping the Cult of Efficiency

Podcast – Seamwork Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 41:49


An obsession with goals, productivity, and checking things off can be really unhealthy. In this week's episode of the podcast, we explore how the Cult of Efficiency came to dominate our cultures and share 5 tips to help.

Bewitched Crafts with Tracy Miller
More Time for Stamping

Bewitched Crafts with Tracy Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 8:03


I've got that back to school feeling and it's really lit a fire for organizing and planning.  I'm making sure my calendar reflects my values by carving out time to stamp!  Since I value creative expression and feeling connected, I've got an all day craft session with my scrappy buddy planned this weekend.  Not only will I connect with her, but I'll have cards to share with friends near and far!

Other Voices
Ellen Manning — Preserving a sense of place in McKownville

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 28:30


“We try to protect our little neighborhood,” says Ellen Manning, president of the McKownville Improvement Association. The association, which is almost a century old, is on the brink of achieving a new form of protection — having part of McKownville listed on the state and national registers of historic places. Manning hypothesizes in this week's podcast that what has kept the association active since 1924 is that McKownville is sandwiched between commercial and institutional development. An early Albany suburb, McKownville runs from the city line to the Northway, on both sides of Guilderland's major thoroughfare, Route 20.The historic district will encompass about 106 properties, Manning said, including some on the north side of Western Avenue, most of Waverly Place, and parts of Norwood, Glenwood, Parkwood, and Elmwood streets. The architectural styles are typical of popular home construction in the early 20th Century, ranging from Colonial revival to Arts and Crafts bungalows. The streets are lined with century-old trees and the neighbors know one another, Manning said.She called research conducted by McKownville volunteers “remarkable” as they documented the history and wrote descriptions of individual buildings. Manning noted such work is often done instead by hired consultants. On Sept. 14, residents whose homes would be in the historic district are invited to a public meeting, which will be held virtually. Details are posted to the association's website. Manning herself moved to McKownville in 1998. She had lived in Albany all of her life and was always aware of the neighborhood, having gone to McKown's Grove as a child to swim. She describes her Arts and Crafts style home, built in 1914, as having “a lot of charm, inside and out.” She likes the simple lines, rustic feel, and natural features of the Arts and Crafts style, which replaced the fussiness of the Victorian period. Manning also appreciates the intimacy of the neighborhood with the houses close together and enjoys walking the tree-lined streets. She has noted, since the onset of the pandemic, many more walkers. “It's bringing more people out,” she said. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WWKD
Episode 133 - The Jill of All Trades (or at least fiber crafts)

WWKD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 54:15


We have a guest this week - Cordelia joins us (virtually) all the way from Toronto to share her clothing crafting adventures in all kinds of medium and representing multiple centuries! Rate and review on Apple Podcasts, please and thank you! :) 

Me Reading Stuff
Episode 337: Marie Howe - What the Living Do

Me Reading Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 23:08


“Without devotion any life becomes a stranger's story...told for the body to forget what it once loved.” - Marie Howe“Death is our friend precisely because it brings us into absolute and passionate presence with all that is here, that is natural, that is love… Life always says Yes and No simultaneously. Death (I implore you to believe) is the true Yea-sayer. It stands before eternity and says only: Yes.” - Rainer Maria RilkeLINKS:Buy Marie Howe's What the Living Do: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393318869Buy Rainer Maria Rilke's Duino Elegies & The Sonnets to Orpheus here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/154356/duino-elegies-and-the-sonnets-to-orpheus-by-rainer-maria-rilke-edited-and-translated-by-stephen-mitchell/Check out Tyler Bright Hilton's work here: https://www.tylerbrighthilton.com and here: https://www.instagram.com/tyler_bright_hilton/Caddis Reading Glasses who are PRO AGING - YAY!: https://caddislife.comSunglass Museum: https://www.sunglassmuseum.comPrive Revaux: https://priverevaux.comCheck out my website here: www.robynoneil.comShop my shop here: www.robynoneil.com/shopMe on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robyn_oneil/?hl=en

Sewing For The Weekend

In this weeks episode we talk about silk and some of the most common kinds of silk fabric. For photos and a full list of show notes please visit our website at https://www.sewingfortheweekend.com/e124-show-notes?rq=124 

Podcast – Seamwork Radio
I Healed My Brain Through Sewing, with Nia Kelley

Podcast – Seamwork Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 39:18


In this episode, Sarai speaks to Nia Kelley. At just 36, Nia suffered a stroke that would damage about a third of her brain, making basic tasks like speech and reading difficult. The road to recovery was long. But on that journey, Nia discovered new sources of creativity and hard-won lessons about ambition and just what she is truly capable of.

SBS Polish - SBS po polsku
Going back to the traditional women's crafts - Powracamy do tradycyjnych robót ręcznych kobiet

SBS Polish - SBS po polsku

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 7:01


Kasia Jacquot, a Polish artist from Sydney, places Polish folk patterns on fabrics, allowing women in handicraft workshops to travel back in time to their childhood and youth, when grandmothers knitted and mums mended socks. The fabric handcrafted by Kasia Jacquot is shown in the latest series "9 Perfect Strangers" with Nicole Kidman. - Kasia Jacquot, artystka polskiego pochodzenia z Sydney, zamieszcza polskie wzory ludowe na tkaninach, a także prowadzi warsztaty robót ręcznych, które przenoszą uczestniczące w nich kobiety do lat dzieciństwa i młodości kiedy to babcie robiły na drutach a mamy cerowały skarpetki. Tkaninę P. Kasi możemy podziwiać w serialu filmowym „ 9 perfect strangers “ z Nicole Kidman”.

Bewitched Crafts with Tracy Miller

I reveal a dirty little secret in this episode all about my current obsession with organizing and productivity channels on YouTube.  Check out How to GYST, Bliss Bean, and Muchelle B to learn how you can make more time for the things you love...like stamping!  Don't forget to sign up for my newsletter and free card tutorial.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 128: What It Takes to Become a Master Goldsmith with Master Goldsmith, Kent Raible

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 38:07


What you'll learn in this episode: Why every introverted artist should have a partner or patron to help them promote their work How Kent developed a line of reproduced pieces while maintaining his artistic passion and integrity Why young jewelers must have experience doing handwork and not just designing with CAD Why it's important that jewelers make time to play, even if it won't generate income How Kent has maintained his enthusiasm for the craft for decades About Kent Raible  Master goldsmith and jewelry designer Kent Raible first started working metal in 1973 in a high school jewelry class, and has since become one of the leading studio goldsmiths in the country. Largely self-taught, Kent sought out talented teachers over the years to learn different aspects of jewelry making, and also went abroad in the 1980s for two years of study in Germany. He always worked in his own studio, never apprenticed under a master, and over time developed a unique style of fabrication using eighteen karat gold, fabulous colored gemstones, and the ancient technique of granulation. His work has won many national and international awards, and has been featured in two important national exhibitions. The major neckpiece named Floating City is part of the permanent collection of the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian's American Art Museum, and his object called Pregnant Chalice was included in The Art of Gold, a survey of the work of eighty contemporary American studio goldsmiths that toured the country throughout 2005. Since the 1980s, Kent has also been teaching his craft through workshops at various institutions such as the Penland school of Arts and Crafts in South Carolina and the Revere Academy in San Francisco, California. Kent currently resides in Washington state with his wife and partner, Lynn. Additional Links: Website 1stDibs Instagram Facebook Photos: Captured Universe AJDC Theme project Tension Cosmic Clam Ring 2004 AJDC Theme project Hidden Treasure Floating City 1991 Permanent Collection American Art Museum, Smithsonian Floating City Closeup Crystal Sky City 2020 AJDC Theme project Secret Garden Floating City 2002 From the Deep Side view showing clasp From the Deep 2015 Saul Bell Award 1st place winner Transcript: Kent Raible is living proof of the adage that it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill. He's spent nearly all his life honing his talents as an award-winning goldsmith, favoring ancient techniques and creating jewelry that inspires him rather than jewelry that's trendy. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how he learned his skills, why his wife and business partner Lynn was crucial for the development of his business, and why he encourages young jewelers to keep practicing their craft even when pieces don't turn out as expected. Read the episode transcript below. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is award-winning goldsmith Kent Raible. Kent has been a goldsmith for 50 years. In addition to compiling a roster of awards, he occupies several unique niches. He's a master in the ancient art of granulation and is known throughout the industry for the classes he holds both in person and online. We'll hear more about his jewelry journey today. Kent, welcome to the program. Kent: Well, thank you, Sharon. I am very happy to be here. Sharon: So glad to have you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. Were you creative as a child? Is this something that everybody expected of you, what you're doing today? Kent: Well, it was all kind of serendipitous events that brought me through this journey, but I was raised in a family of artists. Both my parents were painters. My father made his living from teaching art at the junior college level in Marin County, California, which is where I grew up. My mother was also a painter. They met in art school at the California College of Arts and Crafts, at the time, in Oakland, California. They were both Bohemian types, and they were very open-minded and were always supportive of anything creative that I might want do as I was growing up, and the same with my one sister. She went on to become a very successful doctor. Both the kids went on separate paths, but they were very supportive in whatever we chose to do. From an early age, I was very aware that I had abilities that other people didn't have, musically and artistically, and my parents were always open to me becoming a musician or an artist. There was never any question that that was a possibility, because I grew up in a situation where there were successful artists all around me. My dad taught for many years, and some of his students went on to become very successful artists. I got to meet them and see their workshops. Some of them were painters; some of them were sculptors. My dad had a very broad base of experience in crafts and in art. He actually dabbled in jewelry and gave me his first set of jewelry tools, which was a ring mandrel and a soft frame, which I still use today, and some of the basic tools he got while he was doing his class at the College of Arts and Crafts in the 50s or maybe even in the 40s. I took my first jewelry class in high school at the behest of my girlfriend. She said, “Kent, take a class with me.” I said, “Oh, I don't know. Jewelry wearing, you know.” My first jewelry teacher was a former student of my father. He was teaching the high school jewelry class and we hit it off. I was a sophomore; I was 15 when I took my first class. By my senior year, I was taking two periods of jewelry a day as my electives, one before lunch and one after lunch, and I worked through lunch. I was getting three hours a day. I was a lab assistant, so I was in the back room there, and I could do pretty much whatever I wanted. I was having a blast.  Then I went on to the college at Marin, which is where my dad was an art professor. He had just hired a young guy named Glenn Miller. He just passed recently. This was 50 years ago, so this is all ancient history, but Glenn Miller—he wasn't a jeweler himself; he was more of a sculptor. But he was very much involved in getting things right, craftsmanship, design and integration of clasps and things that went into design rather than just as an add-on. These were concepts he was hammering into me early on, and that's how I started. I had many interests as a young person. I wanted to be a rock star. I've been playing guitar longer than I've been making jewelry. I'm pretty good at that, but I didn't devote my life to that as much as I have to making jewelry. At some point in my early twenties, I made the big decision to make that my livelihood. I was maybe 19 or 20 and I decided to go for it, so I started doing craft shows. It was hard to put my work out there; that was really the hardest thing. Making it and designing and having fun making things was easy, but when it came to stepping out into the world, because I was very shy, that was the hard part for me. I struggled with that for a number of years. I won my first national award at the age of 22 with the National Sterling Silversmith's Guild of America Annual Competition for College-Level Silver Design. I made a sculptural piece; I actually have it here, but since this isn't usual, I'm not going to pull it out. Sharon: We'll post a picture if you'd like.  Kent: You can post pictures. It was a silver waterpipe. I was taking hollow ware and bringing it into the 20th century, basically making a silver bong. That won me a national award. At that point, at 21, 22, I thought, “Well, I could actually do this.” I was getting a lot of support from my family and from my teachers. Then I got my first teaching job at the College of Marin, teaching in adult ed. I didn't have a college degree, but I could teach in adult education. I started teaching at the age of about 23, 24, teaching casting and basic jewelry techniques. I hadn't really gotten into granulation at that point, but I was very adept at fabrication, soldering and casting, so that's what I taught my students. That gave me a foothold into the realm of teaching, which I have done my whole career. Not in a big way; I'm teaching more now than I probably ever have, but that's how I got started in the teaching realm. There are a couple of major things that happened in my life that made the biggest differences to my career. The first was in 1982; I went to Germany. My girlfriend broke up with me and I was devastated, so I sold all my possessions to raise money. I took my bicycle and started riding from Frankfurt, Germany. The first place I went, of course, was Idar-Oberstein, which is a good, long, one-day ride from Frankfurt. I went there and looked at all the gem museums; I visited stonecutters and things like that. From there, I rode through the Black Forest down to Pforzheim and went to the Schmuckmuseum, the jewelry museum in Pforzheim. I puttered around for about four or five months, but serendipitously, right before I left from America with my bike, I met a couple of goldsmiths who were visiting from Germany. They said, “Why, don't you come see us when you're here if you're in our area?” When it started to rain and I'd ridden through seven or eight countries, I was in France and the weather just turned bad; it was October. So, I called them and they picked me up. They had a little Volkswagen Bug, and I stuck my bike on the top and they drove me to their place in Stuttgart. They were very kind to me. They let me stay with them for six weeks. In the process of that period, they invited me to come check out the school where they had studied, which is in a little town called Schwäbisch Gmünd of about 60,000 people. Sharon: Would you repeat that? Kent: Yeah, Schwäbisch Gmünd. It's about 50 kilometers east of Stuttgart, a beautiful location in the hills. The hochschule there, which is basically a state-run trade school, had been teaching jewelry there for 250 years or something. They were in the process of phasing out the jewelry program, but they introduced me to the head instructor who could speak English because I had very little German. He introduced me to the goldsmithing teacher who didn't speak any English, and he invited me to stay as a guest. So, it was a free year of education. I had only to buy health insurance. That was it, $30 or month or something. That was my only cost. I didn't have a lot of money at the time, and that is where I learned my granulation technique.  I buckled down. I had six weeks before the semester started, so I learned as much German as I could. I bought a big, thick dictionary and learned every word pertaining to jewelry; I learned how to put sentences together as best as I could, so I could communicate with the goldsmithing teacher. They showed me a list of things I could study, and on the list was granulation. He basically took me through a series of exercises in silver and then we moved into gold. I had some gold that he taught me how to alloy. I started using a rolling mill. I'd do all these basic things that I had never done before in fabrication. The wizard was handing me the key; I just took off from there. I loved the technique he taught me so much that I pretty much designed my whole career around this one technique. It involves—well, I'll go into more detail about that.  I want to go over the one thing that made the most important difference for me in my career, and that is when I met my wife, Lynn. She was a jewelry buyer—this was in 1985, 86. It was a couple of years after I had returned from Germany. I was making beautiful jewelry. I had reached a level of mastery after 20 years. This was about at the 20-year mark. I was in my early to mid-thirties, and I had reached a level of mastery by then and I had my own look; I had a feeling. I was very excited about the complexity of the things I could make. I'd really gotten good at stone setting and other skills, not just granulation. I was still having trouble getting myself out there and presenting my work, but one day, I walked into this store in Big Sur, California, and there was a new jewelry buyer there. I'd gone there before, but the old jewelry buyer did not bite. But Lynn was there, and she bought my work, and not only did she buy it, she was selling it like there was no tomorrow. That's not why I became attracted to her—I mean, it might have had something to do with it—but over the year, we became friends. Then we were both in a situation where we weren't in relationships and I asked her out. That was 32 years ago, and we decided to create a partnership. We both came into the relationship with similar levels of assets and liabilities and those types of stuff, so we came in and said, “Let's share everything and do this as a team, 100%.” And dang, it worked out! We've been doing this for 30 years. Lynn had a natural sense of marketing. She used to run clothing stores; she was into fashion. As a jewelry buyer at the Phoenix Shop in Big Sur, she knew how to deal with galleries, what they were looking for and how we could present ourselves to them in a way that made them more likely to buy. That was hugely important for me as a shy person. I had my heart and soul invested in my work, and I needed somebody who could be removed a little bit from that and help me do what I needed to do to make it work, as far as being able to make a good living from it.  We started doing tradeshows, which I would have never considered doing. I saw my work as art rather than a manufactured item. We did Las Vegas; we did a lot of the biggest shows. The Design Center in Las Vegas was just happening in the 90s, and that's when we started doing shows like this. That enabled us to get our work out to a much wider audience. We were showing in galleries all over the country, and it helped us develop a clientele, some of whom are still buying to this day. That was the other major thing that made the difference for me: having a partner I could totally trust. That's probably the main thing that's helped me actually have a successful career. That aside, of course I have always loved making jewelry. Now I can let you ask me questions. Sharon: So, you and Lynn established Golden Sphere Studios?  Kent: That was more the teaching arm of the online classes. Golden Sphere Studios is the evolution of Kent Raible Jewelry. We sell our work online. We also sell our work through 1stDibs and of course privately.  We don't show a lot in galleries anymore, but we're thinking of doing that again, although I am semiretired now. I'm not producing like I used to. Right now, I'm making pretty much just what I want to make. I'm not designing so much for the marketplace as much as I am for myself.  What Lynn got me to consider more was doing repeated items so I could make things without the labor and time involved. With a one-of-a-kind piece, the time involved is largely in the building of the piece, not even in the granulation. But the time involved in creating a one-of-a-kind piece can be cut down dramatically if you mold a piece, cast duplicates of it and then granulate them, and that's what we did. We came up with a line we could sell at a much lower price point and then presented that to the galleries. Also along with that, we had one or two really nice, one-of-a-kind pieces they could sell to their higher-end clientele. Sharon: Are your one-of-a-kind pieces mostly custom for people who know you already? Do they come to you and say— Kent: I do commissions once in a while, but mostly I prefer to make what my heart's telling me to make. I'll get ideas and go, “Oh, got to make that one.” They all come out of the blue. I never know what's coming next, and now I've got such a wide repertoire of techniques and ideas. Things combine in different ways now that I would have never guessed 10 or 20 years ago. Now I've gotten into stonecutting, which is a whole other ball of wax. Cutting my own stones; that's a lot of fun. Sharon: Is that something where you said, “O.K., I've mastered this aspect, so I'm going to move onto stonecutting”? Kent: That's part of it. This is a field where you can spend three or four lifetimes and there's still more to learn. I like working the old-fashioned way; I'm not really into the new technologies that are coming out. I'm not into CAD. I'm not into laser welding and all that stuff. I'm still the old-fashioned, dinosaur jeweler that does things the very old-fashioned way. What I do is 3,000 years old. You don't get much more old-fashioned than that. I'm doing things that have been done for thousands of years, but I'm trying to do them in a new way. The fun part of cutting stones is working consecutively—I shouldn't say consecutively, but working simultaneously in both metal and stone. I can alter things as I'm working. I wasn't able to do that with gems before or with shapes or forms of stones. I'm only doing very simple cab forms at this point, but I can fine tune a form I probably couldn't buy, or if I need to change it as I'm working, I can do that.  Right now, for our 30th anniversary and her 60th birthday, I'm making her a pair of earrings. I cut some rose quartz bullet tongue shapes, but they're so precise and they're very well matched. On top of them, I'm putting this incredible apricot precious topaz. The combination of the light, translucent pink background with the topaz over the top, it makes the topaz pop out. Then, the translucent background—it's very feminine and lovely. It's her colors, so I can't wait to see them on her. They're about halfway done now, but the cutting of the stone required that I carve out a notch in the back so the culet of the topaz could fit into the stone so that it's compact. It brings it in together. There are things like that I can do now with stonecutting that I would have had to order from a lapidarist, which I have done in the past, but this way I can cut as I'm going. You don't know exactly how deep you need to cut or what the exact shape is going to be. Now, I can do that to a limited degree with stones as I'm working in gold or platinum, whatever I'm working in. That's a big design. It opens up a whole new possibility for me. That's pretty exciting, that I can get that excited about something 50 years into my career. Sharon: I can understand that, because we're in a time where you can't stop learning or you can be left behind, whether it's learning how to use a computer or whatever. But how do you feel that passion for decades? How do you keep it going? Kent: That is a very good question, and I really don't know. There's a part of me that just has to do this. Not so much now; like I said, I'm semiretired. I have other things I'm doing. I'm got a huge vegetable garden, and that takes up a lot of time. I love growing plants. I like doing things that take time. But I also have the most beautiful workshop in the world right now. I love going out there and hanging out, and I have this whole lapidary setup in the back. I have it set up so it's a beautiful space, so that keeps me interested. The other that keeps me going is my students. I like sharing what I know. Watching other people progress is also inspiring to me. When I see what I can make and I go, “Wow, I made that,” that's part of what keeps me going. Sometimes I have a vision in my head that's like, “Wow, I could probably make that.” I'm always trying to challenge myself a little bit as I go, not a lot. It's an evolutionary process, making jewelry. Every time you make a piece you learn something, and then you take what you learn and then you make something else and you add something, like, “This is what I learned. This is what I don't want to do next time. This is what I want to try next time.” Slowly, over the decades, you become adept at a lot of different things. The excitement comes when I'm able to combine things I've never done before or put things together in a way that's unique or new. I recently did a major piece for the American Jewelry Design Counsel. Are you familiar with the AJDC? Sharon: Oh, yes. Kent: Every year we do a theme project. We did one last year that is to be displayed in conjunction with the opening of the new Gem and Mineral Museum in Tucson. It isn't open to the public yet, but it will be opening in—I'm not sure if they have an opening date, but by the next Tucson show I'm pretty sure it will be open. Anyway, I did a floating city. The first floating city I did was in 1991 or 1992, which is now in the Smithsonian at the Renwick Gallery. I've done different versions of this theme over the years. This time, I put it together in a whole different way than I've ever put it together before. I'm not 100% satisfied with how it came out, but I am very excited with the possibilities of what I've learned from putting things together in that way. It's a very complex fabrication, so it was a learning process. I also cut a lot of the stones that are in the piece. It's successful in some ways, and in other ways, I go, “Well, I'm going to do it different next time.” That's how I work. I try different things. Sometimes they're successful; sometimes they're not as successful as what I see in my head, but that's part of the creative process. You have to be willing to try things and have it not be—I'm rarely 100% satisfied with anything I make. Sharon: Would those be some words of wisdom to younger jewelers? Kent: Oh, definitely. You have to give yourself room to play. You have to be willing to fail, and you have to be willing to have a meltdown every once in a while. But the main thing you need to do is always make time. I know money is always an issue if you're trying to make a living from it, but even so, you have to have time to do things that may not make you any money. You have to make things for the sheer joy of doing them and for the exploration involved. That's my number one piece of advice to anybody doing anything creative; you have to have time to play and enjoy the process. Jewelry making is a thousand different processes that you can combine in infinite ways. R&D time is really important for the artistic expression. If you want to do something that's unique, it's imperative. Sharon: You joined forces with Lynn, so did you assign her the external part?  Kent: No, we collaborated. She is the one that got me to move away from one-of-a-kind to move into the marketplace. We had a child together, so we needed to support a family. It was a monetary decision. There was a little bit of a push and pull between my artistic side the wanting to make money side. There was a realty involved. I didn't want to compromise my artistic sensibilities and I did my best to do that. What I came up with, what we call line pieces, the reproduced or the limited-edition series pieces, they're all really beautiful. I'm still adding to that collection every once in a while, but it was a decision on my part that we needed to make money, so let's move into this different type of production. In this way, I could actually hire help, too. I could have eight pieces cast and have people work on the castings rather than fabricate from scratch, which is very difficult to train. Sharon: Yeah, especially if you're trying to— Kent: Although I have trained people that have done very well for me. Sharon: I know so many artistic people face challenges showing their work and selling their work. How would you advise getting past that? Kent: Well, if it's something that's not innate for you, you need to find help. That's what I did. I really had to push myself because, as a very shy person, it was very uncomfortable for me to go out into the public eye. What I did after I got back from Germany and found myself in tears because I wasn't able to get out and sell my work, I started taking personal growth workshops. I took all kinds of different stuff where I had to get into my discomfort zone and put myself out there and be uncomfortable. If I hadn't done that, I probably wouldn't have been able to see what I needed in a partner. It's really hard to make it as an artist on your own. You have to have somebody supporting you, whether it's a gallery owner or a patron, whatever. You need people that believe in you, and you need to believe in yourself first. Your work has to be good, but you need to have help getting you to the marketplace, I think. That is very important if it's not something innate. For some artists it is innate, marketing, and I think it's more the exception rather than the rule. Sharon: From what I've heard you say, yes. I give you a lot of credit. You have a lot of personal work.   Kent: Oh yeah, when you have a dream and it's a big one—the work in itself is very small things, but if you look at my work up close, they're huge. Visually, in scope, they're really big. It's like I try to cram as much hugeness into the smallest space possible. My vision is a lot larger than the actual pieces. That's kind of an interesting part of what I do. Sharon: Yes, your work is so complex and intricate that it takes a big scope, even though it's so small. Kent: As I'm making them, I'm working very close up, but in my mind these things are huge. That's how I can get into so much detail, because I see it as a much bigger thing than it actually is. Sharon: What would your advice be? You've won so many awards, like the American Jewelry Design Counsel. I presume they come to you and say, “We're here. Can you do something for us?” What is your advice? Do you think that's something emerging jewelers should consider, entering contests? Kent: Oh, of course. I started doing that in my early twenties; I started entering or doing shows and I started winning awards. It gave me a lot of self-confidence. If you don't win, it's O.K. You need to see what's winning and ask yourself why. You have to be honest with yourself: “Is my work up to this level, and what do I need to do to get there?” It's mostly about putting in the hours. I put in my first 10,000 hours probably by the time I was in my early twenties because I was so into it. I never had a job—well, that's not true; I worked at a recycling center on weekends and at minimum wage for a number of years, but in those days, you could work minimum wage and pay your rent and buy food. Then my father allowed me to have a workshop in his garage. That's how I started. I didn't own a car. I rode my bike everywhere. I would ride to work and I would just make, make, make, make, make. I would take classes.  I went to the College at Marin for three or four years so I could use their shop, but I also took evening classes with an artist in the East Bay whose work I saw at the Palace of the Legion of Honor. His name was William Clark. He's a sculptor and a jeweler, but what he was able to do with metal so inspired me. I heard he was giving an evening class once for a week for six months. I hopped on that, and I learned things there I never would have learned anywhere else. I don't know. I kind of got off my train of thought there. Time for another question. Sharon: You have a very inspiring story. I'm sure you've inspired, besides teaching, legions of people in the field. What other pieces of advice would you have for people who are on the cusp of saying, “How do I become you?” Kent: Well, you know what I did: I just started learning different techniques. I'd focus on one at a time until I achieved a certain level of mastery. The first thing I learned was casting because you can do so much with casting. Nowadays of course you have CAD, but I highly recommend for people getting into jewelry now not to devote themselves too much to CAD. You need to have actual experience doing handwork, because that's the basis of solid jewelry knowledge and design knowledge. You can't just design on CAD. You can do some beautiful things, but you're not going to have the overarching experience of having handwork behind your belt. I see a lot of CAD stuff being done, but unfortunately it all looks the same. You need to have a broad variety of techniques under your belt.  What I did was study casting. I went into forging, raising, tube forming. I started doing repoussé, learning how the plasticity of metal can be used to create interesting forms, relatively quickly if you're good at it. There's something about working spontaneously in metal that is so different than anything you can do on the computer. It's great to have that broad understanding of what the metals can do, not just with casting, but with forging, forming, learning how to make your own stock; I mean, making your own sheet in wire, tubing. I do a whole class that's just based on tubing online. It's very successful. People love it. If you want to learn how to fabricate or do things that have moving parts or even for stone setting, being able to make a tube is a huge thing. It has unlimited applications in design. I would say there are so many incredible techniques out there. I've only touched the surface myself, but pick the ones that make your heart sing and focus on them. Bring your own flavor, your own heart into it so it's unique.  That's how I did it. I started doing granulation when my father showed me a picture of John Paul Miller's work. If you're not familiar with John Paul Miller, he was one of the first American granulators in the 20th century. He started doing beautiful granulated enamel pieces in the 50s and 60s. It was his work, among others, but mostly his work, that inspired me to learn granulation. His technique is very different than mine, but I made the technique my own just by doing it, playing with it and learning how to fabricate without solder so I could granulate really intricate, fabricated forms. Sharon: It's a very inspiring story. I really appreciate your being here today, Kent. Thank you so much. Kent: Oh yeah, my pleasure. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

Building Sustainability
Vernacular Crafts in Earth Pt2 - Alex Gibbons - BS58

Building Sustainability

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 74:14


Part two of the conversation with earth builder Alex Gibbons.Applications for the SPAB fellowship close on the 14th of September - https://www.spab.org.uk/learning/fellowshipSarah Pugh Just giving link - https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/sarahpugh?utm_term=qGVKkgbAGSPAB craft fellowship - https://www.spab.org.uk/learning/fellowshipWilliam Morris - News from Nowhere book - https://www.worldofbooks.com/en-gb/books/william-morris/news-from-nowhereAlex Gibbons Website - https://www.stickinthemudconservation.com/Work I did with Alex on Priors Lynn Barn - http://jeffreythenaturalbuilder.com/blog/portfolio/cob-repair-clay-dabbin-scotland/Thanks to our sponsor:Beavercraft Wood Tools Beavervcraft wood carving tools are great value and ideal for beginners and hobby carvers. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/buildingsustainability)

Building Sustainability
Vernacular Crafts in Earth Pt1 - Alex Gibbons - BS57

Building Sustainability

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 57:42


Part one of the conversation with earth builder Alex Gibbons in which we discuss his route into mud building, old buildings, the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, Clay Dabbins, and his clay barn Priors Lynn.  Applications for the SPAB fellowship close on the 14th of September - https://www.spab.org.uk/learning/fellowshipSarah Pugh Just giving link - https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/sarahpugh?utm_term=qGVKkgbAGSPAB craft fellowship - https://www.spab.org.uk/learning/fellowshipWilliam Morris - News from Nowhere book - https://www.worldofbooks.com/en-gb/books/william-morris/news-from-nowhereAlex Gibbons Website - https://www.stickinthemudconservation.com/Work I did with Alex on Priors Lynn Barn - http://jeffreythenaturalbuilder.com/blog/portfolio/cob-repair-clay-dabbin-scotland/Thanks to our sponsor:Beavercraft Wood Tools Beavervcraft wood carving tools are great value and ideal for beginners and hobby carvers. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/buildingsustainability)

Sewing For The Weekend
Schitt Fashion

Sewing For The Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 39:07


In this weeks episode Sean comes on the podcast to talk with Nina about the fabulous costumes of the tv series Schitt's Creek. For photos and a full list of show notes please visit our website at https://www.sewingfortheweekend.com/e123-show-notes?rq=123 

Podcast – Seamwork Radio
Create Your Own Personal Sewing Challenge

Podcast – Seamwork Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 33:27


After packing up and moving to a new house, Sarai decided to create a queue of 5 projects that she believes she'll wear for at least 10 years. She's calling it The Decade Project. In this episode, she and Haley talk about this project and how you can create your own personal sewing challenge.

Bewitched Crafts with Tracy Miller

Ya'll I have really needed my craft breaks this week.  From a flat tire to a sunburn and a broken air conditioner, things have been rough.  I'm sharing the yuck in the hope that it inspires you to put more than your highlight reel into your scrapbook pages.  Share your highs and lows, your authentic self!

Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton
Ep.155/Kelly Williams Brown, Easy Crafts For The Insane

Beyond Well with Sheila Hamilton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 36:38


Kelly Williams Brown is the NYTimes bestselling author of Adulting, a charismatic and charming redhead whose manners and signature dresses evoke another kinder century when people's manners were still intact. Kelly is also a person who attempted suicide after the worst 700 days of her life. We can be polar opposite things, whipsmart and suicidal, not doing well and extremely talented, hopeful, and perseverating around all of our failures. Kelly talks openly about how the wrong medicine and a string of failures led her to the very worst thing and how folding small stars into tiny shapes (and other crafts) saved her life. 

podcasts – Yarns at Yin Hoo

It's a catch-up on two recently completed projects, plus the announcement of winners for EZ'S BSJ KAL, and share some thoughts about mending.

Sewing For The Weekend
BrAugust 2021

Sewing For The Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 56:53


In this weeks episode we talk about our 2021 BrAugust sewing! For photos and a full list of show notes please visit our website at https://www.sewingfortheweekend.com/e122-show-notes?rq=122 

Peopling the Past
Seize the Clay: Pottery Workshops in Sagalassos with Elizabeth Murphy

Peopling the Past

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 32:29


You might call ceramics the "plastics" of the ancient world...ubiquitous, indestructible, and incredibly useful! But how do we identify the spaces where ancient potters once made these everyday objects? Dr. Elizabeth Murphy joins the podcast to tell us all about the discovery and excavation of ancient tableware workshops at the site of Sagalassos in modern Turkey. Listen in as artisanal techniques are brought to life and the everyday lives of ancient potters are revealed through archaeological exploration.

Bewitched Crafts with Tracy Miller

I watched Pursuit of Love this weekend and I was struck by the scene with the best friends' scrapbook pages.  Documenting a relationship is evidence of how much it's valued.  I call on my bestie to share just about everything.  She's been there for the good, the bad, and even the ugly.   She means the world to me.  As Linda repeats in the show I'm lost without her.

The LoveCrafts show
S2E7 Lissy & Rudi | Living your soul's purpose

The LoveCrafts show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 59:34


Meet Lissy and Rudi Robinson-Cole,  champions of Māori culture with crochet hooks and neon yarn! These fabulous New Zealand based Māori 3D sculptural crochet artists are on a journey to build a wharanui, a Māori meeting house, made of crochet and they're here to tell Merion and Jamie all about it.  This is one of the most joyous podcasts in The LoveCrafts Show's history - don't miss it!  (Hint - there's even some singing!)Find Lissy and Rudi on Instagram hereLissy's website is www.lissycole.comDon't forget to send us lots of lovely messages, responses and questions to show@lovecrafts.com and check out previous episodes of The LoveCrafts Show by visiting the home page.

Soundcheck
Guitarist, Composer, and Audio Architect Rachika Nayar Crafts Fantastic Layered Works

Soundcheck

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 30:56


Rachika Nayar is a composer and producer who uses her electric guitar as a sound source, creating rich layers of sound in real time. She then "mutilates" and "contorts" these sounds, processing them, arranging them into the finished pieces on her 2021 LP Our Hands Against The Dusk and its companion record, the 2021 EP Fragments, which could be considered as a collection of Etudes; none of the works on Fragments were translated into larger pieces. Nayar's guitar playing is informed by math rock, post rock, jazz, EDM - "the 4AM warehouse rave", and lately – exploring open tunings. She talks us through and demonstrates her process, starting with solo electric guitar loops, which are processed, pulled apart, and rebuilt, shifted, stretched, and arranged with other electronic instruments.  Rachika Nayar improvises guitar loop-based pieces and transforms them for this remote session. - Caryn Havlik

Sewing For The Weekend
Ice Ice Dyeing

Sewing For The Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 63:55


In this weeks episode we talk more about fabric dyeing! We discuss ice dyeing, cochineal, and indigo! For photos and a full list of show notes please visit our website at https://www.sewingfortheweekend.com/e121-show-notes?rq=121 

Balance Redefined Radio
Disciple Thought Leader Podcast 169: Fulfilling Your Divine Purpose Doing DIY Crafts--with Wendy Jones!

Balance Redefined Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 23:40


The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft
A Return to the Original Clay Podcaster | Brian R Jones | Episode 759

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 70:48


Brian R. Jones grew up in Syracuse, NY and is now an artist living and working in Portland, OR. He has been a resident artist at Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts in Newcastle, ME and The Clay Studio in Philadelphia, PA. He has earned degrees from The New York State College of Ceramics (BFA) and Southern Methodist University (MFA). He was a presenter at the Utilitarian Clay VI: Celebrate the Object at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in September 2012. In 2013, Jones was selected as an Emerging Artist by the National Council on the Education in the Ceramic Arts.

Rosana Mod
Episode 166 - Monday Creative - DIY Make Your Own Printing Stamps from Potatoes

Rosana Mod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 9:44


A creative way to print your tees, pants, fabric, bags, gift wrapping paper & more by using potatoes! Fun for the whole family!  See below for the article including photos!Featured Article:https://discover.hubpages.com/art/Arts-and-Crafts-with-PotatoesLove the show?  Click below & thank you for your support!https://www.buymeacoffee.com/rosanamodhttps://paypal.me/RosanaMod?locale.x=en_USMy Books: https://www.amazon.com/Crow-Flies-Midnight-Husbands-Betrayal-ebook/dp/B00J2F8SBWhttps://www.amazon.com/Crucified-Spirit-Collection-Tormented-Poetry/dp/1495923630My Articles:https://hubpages.com/@rosanamodugnoMom's Poetry Book in Spanish:https://www.amazon.com/REFLEJOS-Sonetos-y-Poesias-Spanish/dp/1676003568Follow Me: https://www.instagram.com/rosanamod/  For Vintage Buffs:https://www.ebay.com/usr/rosanamodInstacarthttps://instacart.oloiyb.net/c/2473097/413183/7412Want to be a Podcaster too? Click below:Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREECREDITS:Audience Applause:  ONDROSIK/Applause & Whistle at  FreesoundDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.  Yay! Thank you in advance!  ;)  

Knit Picks' Podcast
Episode 347 - Learning & Teaching Yarn Crafts

Knit Picks' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 42:29


Today on the Knit Picks Podcast we're talking all about our knitting pasts and futures. From learning to knit to taking that knowledge and teaching someone to knit, the Knit Picks Podcast team offers up their experience. First up Lee and Stacey invite friends, co-workers and fellow crafters, Heather and Kate to come on the podcast for a discussion of their knitting and crochet origins. Each starts their craft somewhere but what everyone has in common is that someone else helped them get started. Next Lee and Stacey share tips and tricks for people who want to teach knitting to their friends and family. While Lee has experience teaching knitting classes, Stacey has experience helping people in one-on-one learning sessions. Stacey also shares the old knitting rhyme: “In through the window, run around back, out through the window, off jumps Jack!”   Mentioned in This Episode: WeCrochet Podcast Episode 40 – Crochet Jobs Part 3 – Teaching Crochet To Make Money And Get Confident With Arica Presinal & Pia Thadani  Aloft  Learn to Knit Kits  New Learn to Knit Kits - Learn to Cable Coho Cowl  Learn to Cable Bowline Hat  Knit Picks Learning Center  Straight Needles  Brava  Wool of the Andes  Swish  Craftster Preciosa  Wonderfluff  Needle 101  Yarn 101  Stitch N Bitch The Knitters Handbook by Debbie Stoller  Stitch N Bitch Nation  Dishie  Knitting Rules The Yarn Harlot Unravels the Mysteries of Swatcing Stashing Ribbing & Rolling to Free Your Inner Knitter by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee  Knitting Needles    Timestamps:0:03 Welcome to the Knit Picks Podcast 0:44 Stacey's yarn crafting origin story 2:12 Lee's yarn crafting origin story 3:58 Heather's yarn crafting origin story 7:04 Kate's yarn crafting origin story 14:25 New Knit Picks Learn to Knit Kits! 15:34 Teaching someone to knit tips and tricks 40:33 The Credits

Ash Said It® Daily
Kiddos LOVE Making Memories Box

Ash Said It® Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 11:57


Making Memories Box offers super cool planned and prepped activity kits with themes for all seasons. Created by a dedicated elementary school teacher, and mom of 3, Jessica Vidales knew she could use her creativity to bring joy into more homes. Now you can save time and money while bonding with your family with art, crafts, games, books, and more. The brand believes the best thing about memories is making them. Making Memories Boxes take all the guesswork out of it and leaves you with time to simply enjoy your moments together. Web: https://makingmemoriesbox.com Follow: @makingmemoriesbox About the show: ► Website: http://www.ashsaidit.com ► Need Goli Gummies? https://go.goli.com/1loveash5 ► For $5 in ride credit, download the Lyft app using my referral link: https://www.lyft.com/ici/ASH584216 ► Want the ‘coldest' water? https://thecoldestwater.com/?ref=ashleybrown12 ► Become A Podcast Legend: http://ashsaidit.podcastersmastery.zaxaa.com/s/6543767021305 ► Review Us: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/ash-said-it/id1144197789 ► SUBSCRIBE HERE: http://www.youtube.com/c/AshSaidItSuwanee ► Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/1loveash ► Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ ► Twitter: https://twitter.com/1loveAsh ► Blog: http://www.ashsaidit.com/blog ► Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/1LoveAsh/ ► Newsletter: manage1.com/subscribe?u=2a2ca3b799467f125b53863http://ashsaidit.us11.list-c8&id=a6f43cd472 #atlanta #ashsaidit #ashsaidthat #ashblogsit #ashsaidit® Ash Brown is a gifted American producer, blogger, speaker, media personality and event emcee. The blog on AshSaidit.com showcases exclusive event invites, product reviews and so much more. Her motivational podcast "Ash Said It Daily" is available on major media platforms such as iTunes, iHeart Radio & Google Play. This program has over half a million streams worldwide. She uses these mediums to motivate & encourage her audience in the most powerful way. She keeps it real!

Sewing For The Weekend
2021 Sewing Resolution Check In!

Sewing For The Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 47:48


In this weeks episode we think back to our new years sewing resolutions for 2021 and check in with ourselves to see how well we have kept our resolutions, or how far we have strayed from the goals we set. For photos and a full list of show notes please visit our website at https://www.sewingfortheweekend.com/e120-show-notes?rq=120 

Dank Swamp Rebellion
Get Ya' Craft On with T-Nu Part IV: Cajun Craftastrophe

Dank Swamp Rebellion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 34:38


The time has come for T-Nu to blast back off in Craft Pod 13. In his series finale the Cajun Craftastrophe and DSR explore what it means to unlock your mind and your brain, and where creativity lives. Just follow your North Star and keep on pushing! We will continue to spread good vibes across the airwaves and the Crafyverse! T-Nu, We welcome you; To The Rebellion. Check Out Cajun Craftastrophe Here! Youtube Craft Pod 13 Patreon   Magwire Art Carl Henry Brueggen Music CrafsMan SteadyCraftin   Help Support DSR and our Buds! DSR Distrokid New Orleans' own Elmer's CheeWees  Check Out our Buds: Pickled Pepper Hop Shop Save 20% on your order by using promo code: DSRTALKS See what else DSR is up too! Dank Swamp Rebellion

DCOMedy
Episode 60: The Wild World of 1980s California

DCOMedy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 119:01


Sorry about the delay of game! Luckily, the DCOMedy Crew, along with new guest Spencer, are finally ready to take it to the hoop and talk about what might just be the greatest achievement in basketball cinema ever: Double Teamed. Join us as we journey to the strange and fantastical alternate reality of 1985 California, where rules don't matter and girl's basketball is the height of athletic entertainment. There we can all bear witness to the meteoric rise of two "identical" twins as they dominate the sport with their unique strategies and skills out on the court. Well okay, it's mostly their height. Really it's all about their height.Luke easily loses track of the twins and dives deep into a family's secrets. Emma breaks out a killer impression and awakens her inner teenage girl.Spencer spills the secrets on being a twin.Talking Points: Making Two Distinct Adults Look Like Thirteen-Year-Old Twins, A Title Moratorium, The Basketballing Is Both Good and Bad, A DCOM Period Piece, Larry and Mary: Two Sides of the Same Coin, The Greatest Skill of All: Height, Shady College Man/Personification of Fate, Everything Is Different Now For Some Reason, Hollow Farewells, Look At Those Freaks!, Drama Club Cliches, The Subtle But Amazing Coach, QUEEN NICKY, No Time For More Takes, A Lack of Dribbling, The Enigma Of Galen, The Missing Burge, Nicky's Tenacity, Twin Telepathy, The Most Important Scrimmage In The World, Confidential Arts and Crafts, School District Negotiations, Infected Wounds, A Clunky But Compelling Family Argument, All The Neighbors Hate These Girls, Yachts And Fever Dreams, The Stupidest Loss, Ball Is Life, The Villain Redemption We Deserved, Chekov's H, The Intense Other Basketball Coach, Money Shots And A Hot Hand, The Most Brutal Injury, The Perfect Counter-Strategy, The Longest Seven Seconds In Basketball

Dank Swamp Rebellion
Get Ya' Craft On with T-Nu Part III: Hop Into The Craftyverse

Dank Swamp Rebellion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 27:30


The Rebellion kicks back with T-Nu in Part III, and learns what life was like before the world of Youtube. We get into his production background in audio and video, and the road that brought him to Cajun Craftastrophe. Then take a deep dive into the technical side of production, and some philosophy, along with our love for the Amazing work of Magwire Art. So grab dat space helmet, and Hop Into the Craftyverse with T-Nu & DSR!   Check Out Cajun Craftastrophe Here! Youtube Craft Pod 13 Patreon   Magwire Art Carl Henry Brueggen Music CrafsMan SteadyCraftin   Help Support DSR and our Buds! Come hang with Daniel Merry, Gnarly Barley, & DSR  At the Give It Helles Event DSR Distrokid New Orleans' own Elmer's CheeWees  Check Out our Buds: Pickled Pepper Hop Shop Save 20% on your order by using promo code: DSRTALKS See what else DSR is up too! Dank Swamp Rebellion

podcasts – Yarns at Yin Hoo

It's been a month (almost), and I have lots of making news, including another Amy jumpsuit hack, an upcycled Anthopologie belt, Tour de Fleece yardage, summer recipes I've been loving, and a poem by Teri Ellen Cross Davis.

Podcast – Seamwork Radio
Paperless Sewing Using a Projector (with Fuyo of Projectors for Sewing)

Podcast – Seamwork Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 29:44


Have you ever wished that you could just SEW, without all the hassle of printing and assembling paper patterns? Today, Fuyo from Projectors for Sewing tells us how.

Another F*****g Horror Podcast
Crafts And Spooky Shit

Another F*****g Horror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 120:54


Tick Tock! It's Celebrity Ghost Stories O'clock! Amy starts us off with a bang by recounting one of her favorite Celebrity Ghost Stories: that of actor Kevin Pollak and his possibly possessed girlfriend, Sally. Then Monique covers the heartbreaking and utterly enraging story of Kian Khatibi. If you liked this episode, please rate, review, and subscribe.

Podcast – Seamwork Radio
What We've Learned From a Year of Pandemic Making

Podcast – Seamwork Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 28:15


The last year and a half have been transformative for many of us. In this episode, we explore how the pandemic shaped our thoughts about making, and the lessons we've learned about the importance of craft in our lives.

Rob Morgan Is A Curious Person
Question № 79 | Why Aren't Crafts Considered Fine Art? (feat. Amy Sands)

Rob Morgan Is A Curious Person

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 50:29


This episode is dedicated to the countless beautiful handmade items found in our homes, made by our Mothers and Grandmothers that we as a society call “Crafts” even though we know damn well… We should be calling them “Art”.   https://www.thecuriouspod.com/questions/artsandcrafts

The Mom's Organization Motivation Podcast
Ep 072: Hiring an Organizer

The Mom's Organization Motivation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 22:13


Of course, this month's Hiring Help Series wouldn't be complete without talking about the many reasons to hire a professional organizer for your home!  This just so happens to be my passion. I love using my 3 E's Philosophy to get the organization process done in just 3 simple steps, because who has time for more than that?!?  When you choose to hire a professional organizer, they can take the stress and overwhelm out of getting your home to serve you best, while focusing on your particular style. Having that person or team come into your space and see all your clutter or little secrets (we all have them…even organizers) can feel a little scary!  The transformation, however, is totally worth the investment and can transform so much more than your home. It can be life changing!  Highlights from this episode: {3:16} Hiring a handyman recap {5:04} Hiring a housekeeper recap {6:06} Hiring a sitter recap {8:31} The Container Store is my Disneyland {9:39} The 3 E's Philosophy  {12:02} An organizer does more than just organize {13:43} Manage expectations before hiring {16:37} Working with your decorators & designers {19:12} Additional extras and add-ons   Mentioned on this episode: Ep 60: Ask For Help Ep 69: Hiring a Handyman Ep 70: Hiring a Housekeeper Ep 71: Hiring a Sitter   My Contact to book a virtual or in-home session   Ready to ask someone to help you in your home, but overwhelmed with where to start? Keep it simple with my 3 E's Checklist you can download now to move your projects forward without all the overwhelm and stress! Just fill in your name and email address and the checklist will come straight to your inbox!  Have more than 3 things to accomplish? No problem! Once you've completed your first list of Essentials, Enhancements, and Extras simply start a new one. Instead of having a million things on your list at first, which is a recipe for overwhelm, choose 3 things for your focus. Then move on to the next 3. You've got this! For more resources to organize and style your busy life in 3 simple steps, checkout EverythingWithStyle.com and connect with me on Instagram @everythingwithstylemom for some organization motivation! 

Podcast – Seamwork Radio
6 Tools We Wish We'd Bought Sooner

Podcast – Seamwork Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 27:27


Are there sewing tools you wish you'd bought sooner than you did? In this episode, we discuss the six sewing tools and notions that we love so much, we wish we'd always had them in our lives.

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast
Hearts & Crafts (Recap of Bachelorette Episode from 7/19)

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 46:20


We're getting down to the final guys on Katie's season and Ben and Ashley don't know what to expect! What was going on during the date with Greg? Why did it feel so disconnected? Did you feel ANY chemistry at all? Hear Ben and Ashley's reaction to the very strange art the guys created and why it could have been a beautiful moment.  Plus, Ben and Ashley reveal their expert predictions of which guy is going to leave before the season ends! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Trace Evidence
165 - The Vanishing of Regina Brown

Trace Evidence

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2021 76:23


***Sponsored by: Candid! Visit CandidCO.com/Trace and use code TRACE to save $75 on your starter kit! | Best FIENDS - Download it for FREE from the App Store or Google Play | SimpliSafe! Visit SimpliSafe.com/Trace to receive a FREE camera and a 60 day risk free trial!***In the Winter of 1986 the world was captivated by the disappearance of Danish flight attendant Helle Crafts. Police would eventually arrest and charge her husband, pilot Richard Crafts for her grisly murder in what became known as the "Wood Chipper Murder." However, while all eyes were fixed on the Crafts, an eerily similar case was developing just down the road.Thirty-five year old Regina Brown mysteriously vanished after being seen at New York's LaGuardia airport. Much like Helle Crafts, she too was a flight attendant and mother of three married to a pilot. She lived less than three miles from the Crafts, in Newtown, Connecticut, and vanished just four months after Helle.Yet there were no major headlines for Regina, without the headline stealing aspects of a gruesome crime and an arrest, few articles were dedicated to her disappearance. When the Newtown Police began investigating they never imagined what they'd uncover; a life lived in fear, a woman subjected to brutal domestic violence and an estranged husband with a bizarre list of accusations against his missing wife.Regina had set a plan into motion, one which would allow her to finally escape from the nightmare in which she lived. However, on March 26th, 1987, as she was making her final preparations someone got to her before she could get away. This is her story.FB: https://www.facebook.com/TraceEvidencePod/IG: https://www.instagram.com/traceevidencepod/TW: https://twitter.com/TraceEvPodVisit https://www.trace-evidence.com for more information, case photos, contact information and more.Merch: https://traceevidence.threadless.com/ Music Courtesy of: "Lost Time" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/