Podcasts about Shabbat

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Jewish day of rest; Jewish Sabbath

  • 1,251PODCASTS
  • 14,381EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 5DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
Shabbat

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    Best podcasts about Shabbat

    Show all podcasts related to shabbat

    Latest podcast episodes about Shabbat

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    The Miraculous Preservation of Our Torah Tradition

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 6:41 Very Popular


    Rav Yechiel Michel Epstein (1829-1908), in the introduction to the Hoshen Mishpat section of his Aruch Ha'shulhan, makes an important observation about our millennia-old Halachic tradition (listen to audio recording for precise citation). He notes that although we find in the Talmud many disputes on a wide range of Halachic issues, there are no disagreements regarding the fundamental definitions of the Misvot. The arguments among the Hachamim relate only to the details of the Misvot, but not to their basic definitions. An Am Ha'aretz (individual who is ignorant of Torah) might have the impression that Rabbis argue over every issue about Halacha, and there is no uniformity at all. But this is far from true. There are many disputes relating to the details, but the fundamental aspects of the Misvot are, and always have been, universally accepted.The Aruch Ha'shulhan cites numerous examples to illustrate his point. There is no disagreement, he observes, on the definition of the Torah's requirement to take a "Peri Etz Hadar" on Sukkot; all Sages always followed the assumption that this phrase refers to an Etrog. Likewise, it was universally accepted that when the Torah establishes the liability of "an eye for an eye," it means monetary compensation, and not literally removing an eye. No Talmud scholar or student ever questioned whether the Tefillin Shel Rosh is made with four compartments, or whether there are two sections of the Torah written inside the Mezuza. And all Sages in every generation agreed on the number of Berachot in the Amida prayer (eighteen plus the additional Beracha of Ve'la'minim), the number of Berachot recited before and after Shema, and the basic text of Pesukeh De'zimra. There are, of course, technical differences regarding the details of the text. Sepharadim recite the text of "Ahabat Olam," whereas many Ashkenazim say "Ahaba Rabba." Sepharadim recite "Hodu" before "Baruch She'amar," whereas Ashkenazim recite it after "Baruch She'amar." But there is and always has been uniformity regarding the basic structure of these prayer services. The Aruch Ha'shulhan also notes the uniformity regarding the basic prohibitions of Shabbat and Yom Tob. True, there are many differences of opinion regarding the technical details of how these prohibitions apply, but all accept the basic thirty-nine categories of forbidden activities. And all Jews across the world, from one end of the earth until the other, always begin and end Shabbat at the same time.The Aruch Ha'shulhan emphasizes the point that this observation provides compelling proof to the authenticity of our Halachic tradition. Even though Jews in different countries had no communication with one another for centuries (they did not have telephones or email…), they observed the same traditions, with only minor, technical differences distinguishing the communities from one another. If a Jew from Yemen, for example, would have traveled to a Jewish community in Eastern Europe, he would have observed the same Shabbat and participated in the same basic liturgical service as he did back home. The Jews in Poland and Austria followed the same basic Torah tradition as the Jews in Baghdad, Tripoli and Tunis. As the Aruch Ha'shulhan observes, this was true even before the publication of the Shulhan Aruch some four hundred years ago which unified world Jewry under a single Halachic code.And this is an extraordinary miracle. Normally, traditions are lost and forgotten over time. But God gave us His promise that "Lo Tishachah Mi'pi Zar'o" (Debarim 31:21) – that the Torah will never be forgotten from among the Jewish people. The miracle of the preservation of a uniform Torah tradition – notwithstanding the numerous discrepancies in the fine details – testifies to the fulfillment of this promise, and to the eternal truth of our ancient Halachic tradition.

    Talking Talmud
    Ketubot 35: Building Up a Gezarah Shavah

    Talking Talmud

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 19:14


    Gezarah shavah! Where does the Torah specify all of the people who would deserve lashes as a punishment? From a gezarah shavah - of one or another, which is a puzzle, because a gezarah shavah should be clear and unique. Plus, the Gemara seems hesitant to learn from this gezarah shavah. Also, delving into the details of this gezarah shavah, once it's been established. Specifically, harm to a person vs. animal, harm on weekday vs. on Shabbat, and more.

    Talking Talmud
    Ketubot 34: Two Sins, One Death Penalty

    Talking Talmud

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 19:17 Very Popular


    If one slaughters an animal on Shabbat or Yom Kippur, that's a violation of Shabbat or Yom Kippur, but the animal is kosher for others to eat. Which seems to line up with the view of R. Yochanan HaSandlar. And the Gemara is going to mull his view and why it lines up here better than the opinions of others do. Also, a novel insight regarding a fine that came together with a punishment that deserves the death penalty - now what? Plus, the classic "ba ba-machteret." All of which comes together to teach the sanctity of Shabbat, except for the burglar to one's home. Even in the same moment. With a surprising absence of need for warning about that sin of killing the intruder.

    Torah Thinking
    Weekly Hashkafa Shiur #103 | Shabbat Nachamu: How Hashem Will Console Us

    Torah Thinking

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 80:30 Very Popular


    Given 8/8/2022 by Rabbi Mendel Kessin

    Daily Emunah Podcast - Daily Emunah By Rabbi David Ashear

    Life is filled with tests. It is our job to make the right decisions in the circumstances that Hashem puts us in. The tests can be very hard and, at times, it may appear that by choosing correctly we are losing out, but that is never true. The pasuk guaranteed us שומר מצוה לא ידע דבר רע – nothing negative can ever come out of doing a mitzvah. And if it appears that way, it is only because we aren't seeing the full picture yet. I heard a story of a man who found a wallet with close to 20,000 shekel inside. Initially, he was elated, being that he needed the money so badly. His children were being threatened to be thrown out of school because of his delinquency in paying tuition. His landlord was threatening to evict him because he was so many months behind the rent. He didn't even know how he was going to buy food for the upcoming Shabbat. This money was going to solve all of his problems. But then he saw an identification in the wallet and he knew he had a mitzvah to return it. He was thinking, why would Hashem make him find this wallet, knowing that he needed the money so badly? Maybe he is supposed to keep it? But then, heroically, he called the man and returned it. The man came, thanked him a lot, and then gave him 200 shekel as a reward. Right after the man left, this man was so upset. He went from having 20,000 shekel to just 200. But then he strengthened himself, feeling so happy that he overcame that very difficult test. He did not report afterward of any miracles taking place, but for sure, we know only good will come out of that act and his rewards for doing such a thing will be beyond comprehension. Rav Moshe Aharon Stern, zatzal , told he once traveled to Switzerland to raise money for the Kaminitz Yeshiva where he was the mashgiach ruchani . On one of the days there, he planned to pray Shacharit in a certain shul and was going to make an appeal afterward on behalf of the yeshiva. But then he was told that they pray there after the zeman , so he decided he was going to go somewhere else instead, even though he wouldn't get to make his appeal. Later that day, someone else who went to collect there that morning told the rabbi he missed out on a golden opportunity. There was a wealthy man there from out of town giving every collector 100 francs, which was a substantial amount of money. The rabbi knew he did not lose by choosing to pray on time. That evening, he went to that shul for Mincha and the wealthy man was back. After tefila , the Rabbi approached him, explaining which yeshiva he was from and asked if he wanted to help. At first, this man gave the rabbi the same 100 francs that he gave everyone else, but afterward, he asked someone about the rabbi who looked so distinguished and was told how great his yeshiva was. Then the man went back to him saying, he came to Switzerland specifically to give out tzedaka and he was about to leave but still had over 1000 francs left that he didn't give out yet. He then handed the rabbi all the money he had left and said he would be honored if his yeshiva would accept it. We never lose out by choosing correctly. A businessman once asked Rav Moshe Feinstein, zatzal , if he was allowed to go to a closing on a very large business deal during the Nine Days. Rav Moshe told him, since if he would try to postpone it he may lose out, he was allowed because davar ha'aved . Then the man asked the Rabbi if he was allowed to shave for the meeting as well. Although Sefaradim shave until the shavua shechal bo , the Ashkenazim already start beforehand, so Rav Moshe told him he would not be allowed to shave. On the day of the meeting, this man gave in to his evil inclination and he shaved anyway. At the meeting, the other party asked him how he could know he was trustworthy. He pointed to the kipah on his head and said he was a religious, G-d-fearing Jew, who is trustworthy to always do the right thing. Then the other party asked him if he was so trustworthy, why did he violate the law and shave? The man couldn't believe what he was hearing. In the end, they did not do the deal because the other side wasn't convinced that he was trustworthy enough. We are constantly being tested and although at times it may seem that if we follow Hashem we will lose out, that's never the case. By following the will of Hashem, we always win.

    60 Mindful Minutes
    EP191: The Power of a Weekly Screen-Free Day (REPLAY) with Tiffany Shlain

    60 Mindful Minutes

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 46:44


    There's something powerful that happens when we give up screens one day a week. In her book, 24/6: The Power of Unplugging One Day a Week, author and filmmaker Tiffany Shlain shares how her family have gained more time, productivity, connection, and presence by adopting the ancient ritual of Shabbat. Based on her own experience of taking a tech-free day, she humbly offers a blueprint for how we can become less available to the world and more connected to ourselves and the people we love.     Guest Bio Tiffany Shlain is an Emmy-nominated filmmaker, founder of the Webby Awards, author of national bestselling book 24/6: The Power of Unplugging One Day a Week, winner of the Marshall McLuhan Outstanding Book Award. She hosts a monthly #ZoomChallahBake and writes a newsletter called Breakfast @ Tiffany's. For information on her book, baking, films, and her newsletter, visit tiffanyshlain.com and follow Tiffany on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.       Mentioned in this Episode Guest's website: http://www.tiffanyshlain.com/   24/6: The Power of Unplugging One Day a Week: https://www.amazon.com/24-Power-Unplugging-One-Week/dp/1982116862     Connect with the 60 Mindful Minutes podcast   Web: https://kristenmanieri.com Email: Kristen@kristenmanieri.com   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/60MindfulMinutes Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kristenmanieri_/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/kristenmanieri/    

    Daf Yomi
    Ketubot 31

    Daf Yomi

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:32


    Ketubot 31 : Marc Chipkin: 2022-08-06 The difference between stealing forbidden fat and eating it, and shooting an arrow through a silk. Stealing a purse on Shabbat.

    Text & Context: Daf Yomi by Rabbi Dr. Hidary
    Ketubot 34 - Can You Eat Food that Was Cooked on Shabbat?

    Text & Context: Daf Yomi by Rabbi Dr. Hidary

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 49:52


    Dedicated by Morris and Julie Dweck in Honor of their children.

    The Morning Scroll
    Parashat Va'etchanan, August 8th

    The Morning Scroll

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 3:59


    Listen up, G_d-Wrestlers! The Lord Our G_d is one, and the Lord Our G_d is having none of Moshe's nonsense today.Produced by Mishkan Chicago.  Music composed, produced, and performed by Kalman Strauss. See our upcoming Shabbat services and programs here, and follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook for more updates. Check out Shabbat Replay on Contact Chai for more from Rabbi Deena.Transcript

    Hebrew Nation Online
    Now Is The Time w/Rabbi Steve Berkson | Shabbat – Part 1 “What & Why”

    Hebrew Nation Online

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 68:27


    Do you know and understand Shabbat (Sabbath)? Does Shabbat really apply to the people of today? Is Shabbat just “that Jewish thing?” When the word ‘forever' or ‘perpetual' is attached to Shabbat, does it really mean to the end of time and beyond? Rabbi Steve Berkson wants to start this multi-part teaching about this most critical observance by helping you find your motivation for keeping the Shabbat. Without the proper understanding of why, just knowing the mechanics really won't take you very far. Don't miss out on new teachings every week. For more information about MTOI (Messianic Torah Observant Israel), visit our website, https://mtoi.org. Join us on Social media! Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mtoiworldwide Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mtoiworldwide Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mtoiworldwide We are located in Cleveland TN. If you would like to know more about us, we would love to hear from you! Feel free to visit us on our website, https://mtoi.org, email us at admin@mtoi.org or call us at 423-250-3020. Join us for Shabbat Services & Torah Study LIVE Streamed on our Main YouTube Channel every Saturday at 1:15 pm (EST) and every Tuesday for Torah Study Live Stream at 6:30 pm (EST).

    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine
    Prayer that Moves you Forward - Yom Shabbat / Saturday - Av 9, 5782/ August 6, 2022

    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 38:41 Very Popular


    Parshat Devarim – Words Deuteronomy 1:1–3:22 Haftarah: Isaiah 1:1-27 B'rit haChadasha: Acts 9:1-21; 1 Timothy 3:1-7

    Harlingen Messianic's Teachings
    Shabbat Teaching: Matthew 24

    Harlingen Messianic's Teachings

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 85:02


    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine
    Kadima! Prayer - Erev Shabbat / Friday - Av 9, 5782/ August 6, 2022

    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 36:21 Very Popular


    Parshat Devarim – Words Deuteronomy 1:1–3:22 Haftarah: Isaiah 1:1-27 B'rit haChadasha: Acts 9:1-21; 1 Timothy 3:1-7

    Temple Beth Am Podcasts
    Shabbat Teaching: Bringing ChaBaD Into our Future!

    Temple Beth Am Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 22:30


    Only those with wisdom and clarity of heart will be given the wisdom to walk with God. The rest will only build with knowledge, understanding, and experience. How are you building your/our future? Rabbi Rebecca Schatz's Shabbat Teaching at Temple Beth Am, Los Angeles, August 6, 2022. (Youtube/Zoom)

    Lion & Lamb Podcasts
    Devarim / Erev Shabbat 2021–2022

    Lion & Lamb Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 86:02


    Devarim / Erev Shabbat 2021–2022 by Lion & Lamb Ministries

    Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran
    Ketubot 31 - Shabbat August 6, 9 Av

    Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 30:04 Very Popular


    Today's daf is sponsored by Deborah Aschheim in loving memory of her mother Edith Aschheim A"H. "She left us too young; but she left a lasting and loving legacy, including a love of Yiddishkeit. She was born in Vienna in 1926, went on the Kindertransport to London and was blessed to be reunited with her parents in USA in December 1940. She embraced all that NYC had to offer. Mommy, you are forever in my heart."

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    The Se'uda Mafseket When Tisha B'Ab Begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 2:44


    When Tisha B'Ab is observed on Sunday, as it is this year, when Tisha B'Ab falls on Shabbat and is thus delayed until Sunday, the Se'uda Mafseket (last meal before the fast) is the Se'uda Shelishit meal eaten on Shabbat afternoon. The Bet Yosef (Orah Haim 552) writes that in such a case, one may eat and drink at this meal as much as he likes. He may eat meat and drink wine, and he may even, in the words of the Bet Yosef, partake of a lavish meal "like the meal of King Shelomo in his time." The Mishna Berura (Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933), citing the Tur, adds that one who wishes to indulge at this meal may do so and should not be prevented from eating as much as he likes. The Mishna Berura also notes that those who customarily eat Shabbat meals with a large group of family or friends, such as a congregation that conducts a communal Se'uda Shelishit every week, may do so even for the Se'uda Shelishit before Tisha B'Ab. Although the Se'uda Mafseket is generally eaten alone, when Tisha B'Ab begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat one may conduct a large, festive meal with other people for Se'uda Shelishit.However, one should not explicitly state when he eats Se'uda Shelishit that he is eating in order to help him fast. It is forbidden to make preparations on Shabbat for after Shabbat, and thus although one certainly may eat and drink as he wishes on the Shabbat before the fast, he should not verbally state that this is being done in preparation for Tisha B'Ab. This Halacha is mentioned by the Mishna Berura (290:4) and in Shemirat Shabbat Ke'hilchatah (28:77). Likewise, one may not prepare on Shabbat books that he will need on Tisha B'Ab. For example, one should not remove the Kinot books from the shelf so they are ready for Tisha B'Ab, unless he intends to read them on Shabbat. One should also not prepare his non-leather shoes on Shabbat.Otherwise, the Shabbat in such a case is treated as an ordinary Shabbat, even though it is actually the 9th of Ab.Summary: When Tisha B'Ab begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat, one may eat and drink as much as he wishes on Shabbat, without any restrictions, even for Se'uda Shelishit, and he may also eat this meal with a large group if this is his usual practice. One should not, however, explicitly state that he eats in preparation for the fast, or make any preparations for the fast, on Shabbat.

    Daily Bread for Busy Moms
    6 August 9 Av Shabbat

    Daily Bread for Busy Moms

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 11:47


    6 August 9 Av Shabbat by Busy Moms

    Kol Ramah
    Parsha Talk Devarim 5782 2022

    Kol Ramah

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 36:39


    Parsha Talk Devarim with Rabbis Eliot Malomet, Barry Chesler and Jeremy Kalmanofsky. We begin a new book of the Torah this week, Sefer Devarim, the Book of Deuteronomy, which always comes the Shabbat before Tisha B'Av, the 9th of Av. This year Shabbat is actually the 9th of Av, but we postpone the observance of the fast and the mourning rituals that accompany it until Sunday. A new book of the Torah often begins with great promise, but Rashi notes that the rabbis understand the opening words, “These are the words,” to actually be words of rebuke to B'nai Yisrael. This would make Parashat Devarim [Deuteronomy 1:1–3:22] fitting for the season of national mourning which commenced with the Fast of the 17th of Tammuz [observed this year on July 17th] and culminates with Tisha B'Av. We spend most of our conversation on situating the book in the context of the Torah as a whole and in the context of the life of Moses. The emphasis on mourning this year speaks to me on a personal level as I (BC) mourn the death of my brother, Bruce Evan Chesler, who departed this world for another early Sunday morning [July 31, 2022]. In order to accommodate the needs of a small but far-flung family, the funeral will take place on Friday, August 5, 2022. Speaking words of Torah with my good friends and colleagues provides comfort for my personal loss as well as for the national loss we remember at this time of year. Shabbat Shalom.

    Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

    Today's daf is sponsored by Deborah Aschheim in loving memory of her mother Edith Aschheim A"H. "She left us too young; but she left a lasting and loving legacy, including a love of Yiddishkeit. She was born in Vienna in 1926, went on the Kindertransport to London and was blessed to be reunited with her parents in USA in December 1940. She embraced all that NYC had to offer. Mommy, you are forever in my heart."

    Temple Israel of Boston's Clergy Corner
    "Clean Language" Rabbi Zecher's Shabbat Awakenings, 8/5/22

    Temple Israel of Boston's Clergy Corner

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 4:11


    The Tikvah Podcast
    Micah Goodman on Deuteronomy—Moses's Final Speech (Rebroadcast)

    The Tikvah Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 34:15 Very Popular


    This week, Jews around the world will begin reading from the Book of Deuteronomy each Shabbat. Sefer Devarim, as it is known in Hebrew, is a remarkable work; consisting almost entirely of an address Moses delivered to the Israelites in his final weeks of life, it touches on history, politics, prophecy, and much more. Two years ago, Jonathan Silver sat down with Israeli thinker and scholar Micah Goodman to uncover meaning of Moses's final speech. As we begin again this last book of the Torah, we are pleased to rebroadcast that conversation. -- The book of Deuteronomy, which Jews around the globe read in synagogue in the period leading up to the High Holy Days, consists primarily of Moses's final oration to the people of Israel. With the nation on the cusp of conquering Canaan and establishing its own sovereign government, the prophet presents Israel with a set of laws and regulations surrounding power and kingship—what some scholars call the “Mosaic Constitution.” In his best-selling Hebrew book, ha-N'um ha-Aharon shel Moshe (Moses's Last Speech), the Israeli writer and philosopher Micah Goodman offers a thought-provoking and original interpretation of Deuteronomy, presenting profound insights about the Torah's revolutionary political teachings. Though the book has not yet been translated into English, Dr. Goodman recently taught an eight-episode online course for the Tikvah Fund on “Deuteronomy: The Last Speech of Moses,” in which he explores and expands upon the themes and ideas of his earlier work. In this podcast, he speaks with Mosaic's editor Jonathan Silver about Deuteronomy's laws regarding the monarchy and what political and philosophical wisdom they hold for us today. If you enjoy this podcast, you can enroll in Dr. Goodman's free Tikvah online course at Courses.TikvahFund.org. Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

    The Artscroll Studios' Podcast
    Inside ArtScroll - Season 3 Episode 8: For The Sake of Heaven – Rabbi Meyer Yedid

    The Artscroll Studios' Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 28:31 Very Popular


    Hacham Yom Tob Yedid lived an epic life of courage and devotion through his decades as Chief Rabbi of the glorious Halab (Aleppo) community. As the community's leader during its last days, he courageously faced challenges, torture, and threats. Amidst the confusion and turmoil, Hacham Yom Tob had the enormous responsibility of keeping his community devoted to Torah and tradition. And he accomplished the impossible: Halab remained as it had for centuries, a city where everyone kept Shabbat, prayed in the Bet Knesset, and stayed connected to Torah. How did he do it? How did a young man, thrown into a role with great responsibility, respond so fearlessly, demonstrating wisdom and leadership well beyond his years? The ArtScroll biography For the Sake of Heaven takes us on an epic journey from Halab of old to tree-lined Brooklyn streets. With its fascinating twists and turns, this is a biography that reads almost like a novel, leaving us awed as we see so clearly the impact of one who devotes his life to teaching and studying Torah. In this Inside ArtScroll interview, Rabbi Meyer Yedid, son of Hacham Yom Tob, speaks about his father's incredible story of heroism, courage and the power granted to one who is totally devoted to Torah. [Purchase the new book HERE.]  

    Magen Avot Halacha  & Parasha by Rabbi Lebhar
    Tishea Be'Av that falls on Shabbat: Taking walks & time release pills

    Magen Avot Halacha & Parasha by Rabbi Lebhar

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 3:19


    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    Must Pregnant and Nursing Women Fast When Tisha B'Ab is Delayed From Shabbat to Sunday?

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 3:51


    The fast of Tisha B'Ab is treated more stringently than Shiba Asar Be'Tammuz, Asara Be'Tebet and Som Gedalya with respect to pregnant and nursing women. Whereas on the other three fasts Halacha exempts pregnant and nursing women from fasting, they are obligated to fast on Tisha B'Ab, and this is, in fact, the accepted practice. The question arises, however, as to whether this applies even in years such as this year (5772), when Tisha B'Ab falls on Shabbat and is thus delayed until Sunday. (Fasting is forbidden on Shabbat, except when Yom Kippur falls on Shabbat.) Are pregnant and nursing women required to fast on Sunday, or is the fast treated more leniently in such a case?Hacham Ovadia Yosef addresses this question in Yalkut Yosef – Ta'aniyot (p. 88; listen to audio recording for precise citation), and advances a "Kal Va'homer" rationale to allow pregnant and nursing women to eat on Tisha B'Ab in this situation. He notes that when a Berit is performed on a fast day, the three Ba'aleh Berit (the father, the Sandak and the Mohel) must fast despite the festive occasion; this applies not only on Tisha B'Ab, but even on Shiba Asar Be'Tammuz, Asara Be'Tebet and Som Gedalya. However, when a fast day falls on Shabbat and is observed the next day, and a Berit is performed, the Ba'aleh Berit are permitted to eat. Even on Tisha B'Ab, the Ba'aleh Berit may eat if Tisha B'Ab is observed on the tenth of Ab because the ninth is Shabbat.Hacham Ovadia reasoned that if Ba'aleh Berit are permitted to eat on Tisha B'Ab in such a case, then this should certainly apply to pregnant and nursing women, as well. Halacha treats nursing and pregnant women more leniently with regard to fasting than Ba'aleh Berit, as evidenced by the fact that unlike Ba'aleh Berit, pregnant and nursing women are allowed to eat on Shiba Asar Be'Tammuz, Asara Be'Tebet and Som Gedalya. Thus, if Halacha allows Ba'aleh Berit to eat in the case of a delayed Tisha B'Ab, then certainly pregnant and nursing women may eat in such a case, as well. They may eat already in the morning, and it is possible that they may even eat already on Mosa'eh Shabbat, since they are exempt from the fast. Hacham Ovadia adds, however, that pregnant and nursing women in this case should not indulge in food and drink, and should instead eat and drink only as necessary for the wellbeing of the infant.It should also be noted that a woman in this case must recite Habdala before eating, as Halacha does not allow eating after Shabbat until the recitation of Habdala.Summary: Although nursing and pregnant women are generally required to fast on Tisha B'Ab, when Tisha B'Ab falls on Shabbat and is delayed until Sunday, they are allowed to eat and drink, though they should eat and drink only what is necessary for the infant's wellbeing.

    Sof Pasuk: The Torah Reading Podcast

    Three keves yayin's to enjoy this Shabbat.  Follow along in Devarim 1:11, 2:32 and 3:11. Provide your feedback or join the WhatsApp group by sending an email to torahreadingpodcast@gmail.com.

    Rabbi Lavian
    תשעה באב שחל בשבת Opinion of Rabi when Tisha BeAv coincidence with Shabbat

    Rabbi Lavian

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 44:13


    תשעה באב שחל בשבת Opinion of Rabi when Tisha BeAv coincidence with Shabbat by Rabbi Benjamin Lavian

    Rav Touitou
    Shabbat Hazon - Hachem parle a son peuple bien aimé

    Rav Touitou

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 28:48


    Shabbat Hazon - Hachem parle a son peuple bien aimé by Rav David Touitou

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    Habdala For One Who Needs to Eat When Tisha B'Ab is Observed on Sunday

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 3:14


    When the 9th of Ab falls on Shabbat as it does this year, the observance of Tisha B'Ab is delayed until after Shabbat. As such, Habdala is recited on Sunday night, at the conclusion of Tisha B'Ab, and not on Mosa'eh Shabbat. In this case, one who is required by doctor's orders to eat on Tisha B'Ab must recite Habdala before eating. Since eating is forbidden after Shabbat before one recites Habdala, those who need to eat on Tisha B'Ab which is observed on Sunday must first recite Habdala. According to many Halachic authorities, a person in this situation recites Habdala just before he needs to break the fast. If, for example, a person is able to fast until 9am on Sunday morning, then, according to this view, he recites Habdala at that time, when he needs to break his fast. According to this opinion, since the person does not need to eat on Mosa'eh Shabbat, there is no reason to recite Habdala then, and Habdala should be recited only when he needs to break his fast.Hacham Ovadia Yosef, however, disagreed. He felt that if a person knows for certain when Tisha B'Ab begins that he will not be completing the fast, as his medical condition does not allow him to fast for the entirety of Tisha B'Ab, then he should recite Habdala at its usual time, on Mosa'eh Shabbat. If it is definite that one will need to recite Habdala and eat at some point over the course of Tisha B'Ab, then he should recite Habdala on Mosa'eh Shabbat, as usual. However, if the individual is uncertain whether he will need to break the fast, as this depends on how he feels over the course of Tisha B'Ab, then he should not recite Habdala until he eats. Since there is a chance that he will complete the fast, he should not recite Habdala on Mosa'eh Shabbat, and should instead wait until he realizes he cannot complete the fast, and then recite Habdala when he needs to eat.If a person is able to complete the fast, but needs to drink water at some point during the day (as in the case of patients with kidney disorders), then he does not recite Habdala before drinking. Even on an ordinary Mosa'eh Shabbat, the Shulhan Aruch rules that it is permissible to drink water before Habdala. Accordingly, when Tisha B'Ab is observed on Sunday, those who need to drink on Tisha B'Ab do not need to first recite Habdala. One recites Habdala on Tisha B'Ab in this case only if he needs to eat.When one recites Habdala on Tisha B'Ab, he omits the festive verses which are normally recited as an introduction to Habdala, and also omits the Beracha over the Besamim. He begins with "Kosh Yeshuot Esa," and recites the Beracha over the wine and the Beracha of "Ha'mabdil."Summary: When Tisha B'Ab begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat, Habdala is recited on Sunday night, at the conclusion of Tisha B'Ab. However, one who knows for certain when Tisha B'Ab begins that he will not be able to complete the fast, due to a medical condition, recites Habdala on Mosa'eh Shabbat, even if he will not need to eat until sometime the next day. If one is unsure whether or not he will be able to complete the fast, then he does not recite Habdala on Mosa'eh Shabbat, and if he needs to eat during Tisha B'Ab, he recites Habdala before eating. One who is able to complete the fast but needs to drink water does not recite Habdala before drinking. When one recites Habdala on Tisha B'Ab, he omits the festive verses which are normally recited as an introduction to Habdala, and also omits the Beracha over the Besamim.

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    The Fifth Day of Av: The Yahrzeit of Rabbenu HaAri

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 45:59 Very Popular


    Today, the fifth day of Av, is the Yahrzeit of Rabbenu Ha'ari, Rabbi Yishak Luria (1534-1572, Tsfat). Last night in Tsfat, thousands of people came to his grave to pray and perform Tikunim. Therefore, it is appropriate today to study a teaching of the Ari. When one learns the Torah of the Sadikim on the day they passed away, the lips of that Sadik move in his grave. It is a Zechut to activate the Sadikim from the grave to extend their influence over those who study their teachings. Until the Ari, the teachings of the Kabbala were hidden from most of the world. He was the one who revealed these secrets of the Torah. The Gaon of Vilna said that at the end of time, these secrets will be revealed on an even broader scale. Today, Baruch Hashem, there is a greater awareness of these concepts.Today, we will study one subject that even regular people like ourselves can undertake. It is not only for Kabbalists. We will uncover one of the "Kavanot"(esoteric intents) taught by the Ari. Performing a Misva with these Kavanot adds new "flavor" to the Misva and prevents it from becoming a mechanical act, performed by rote. Even if a person can only achieve one out of ten Kavanot, he should not feel that it is "all or nothing." Every additional Kavana transforms the Misva exponentially. Furthermore, doing so opens the heavenly gates to bring down a Shefa (Heavenly abundance) for our Neshama. The Kavanot unlock hidden treasures, and we are the beneficiaries.In Sha'ar HaKavanot, the Ari discusses the mystical intents of immersing in the Mikveh on Ereb Shabbat. Going to the Mikveh on Ereb Shabbat is a very important and powerful practice. It may sound like a difficult undertaking, however, it is really quite fast and simple. Anyway, we tend to waste time on Friday. We should utilize a few minutes and go to the Mikveh.When a person immerses on Ereb Shabbat, the Kedusha of Shabbat can already be seen on his forehead. While a layman can't detect it, Sadikim like the Baba Sali, could see one thousand lights radiating from him.The Ari reveals the Kavana to be used before immersing, while immersing and after immersing. While standing in the water, before immersing, one should focus on the Divine Name "EHYH," which has the numerical equivalent of 151, the same as the word "Mikveh." This has the Segula to help a person control his anger, as the Hebrew word KaAS (anger) also has the numerical equivalent of 151, the same as Mikveh and the Divine Name.There is a deep connection between this specific Divine name and the Mikveh. The word "EHYH" literally means, "I will become." The Mikveh is the gateway for a person to become a new person by purifying himself of his past transgressions and leaving his old self behind. Also, the name "EHYH" is associated with a certain spiritual realm known as "Ima" (mother). Just as the mother cleans and diapers the soiled baby, while the father generally plays with the child after he is already clean, so too the purifying power of the Mikveh draws on this spiritual force of "Ima."The next step is to spiritually prepare the waters of the Mikveh for immersion. The Ari reveals that one should have Kavana to immerse in the "NaCHaL Elyon" (the supernal river), which refers to the heavenly Mikveh capable of purging the soul of its impurities. The details of the Kavana consist of focusing on the four configurations of the divine name YHVH and the three configurations of the divine name EHYH, in addition to the name YH, which represents the "secret of Shabbat." Through a sequence of combinations and permutations, these names form the numeric equivalent of the word "NaCHaL," (river) which is 88, and the word MaYiM (water), which is 90. This Kavana actually fills the earthly Mikveh with the Heavenly water of the Nachal Elyon. After that, one should have intention that all of this is "L'ChVOD Shabbat", in honor of Shabbat. Each part of this phrase has mystical significance and is connected to the divine names associated with the Mikveh. Upon emerging from the water, the Ari teaches not to dry oneself with a towel. The Mikveh water remaining on the body is "holy water of the Shabbat." Let the body absorb them, and the holiness of the water will remain with him. The Ben Ish Hai says that if this is too difficult, because of the cold or because it is uncomfortable, one may dry his body, but leave one area undried, preferably his arms, to absorb the water. When he leaves the Mikve, he should say the Pasuk "Im Tashiv M'shabbat Raglecha, Asot Hefsecha B'Yom Kadshi etc." It is not proper to recite the Pasuk while still in the dressing room in the presence of undressed men and without a head covering. Therefore, he should wait until he actually exits the Mikveh room.The proper time for using the Mikveh on Ereb Shabbat, according to the Ari, is from the fifth hour of the day, one hour before Hasot, after reading "Shnayim Mikra V'Echad Targum" (The weekly Torah portion twice, with one reading of the translation). Of course, if a person cannot go at this time, it is better to go earlier than not to go at all. One who practices the Kavanot for immersion on Ereb Shabbat experiences a qualitatively different level of immersion than everyone else. It's a different Shabbat.

    The Morning Scroll
    Parashat Devarim, August. 2nd

    The Morning Scroll

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 4:03


    "...Numerous as the stars in the sky"Before reciting the Torah, Moshe echoes G_d's promise to Abraham. But wait, isn't this moment in the Torah, too? Did he recite his own recitation? Or is Moshe only repeating something he wrote down the other day? Or is someone else years later who wrote about Abraham repeating the same line for Moshe? Does it matter? Does anything matter?! Produced by Mishkan Chicago.  Music composed, produced, and performed by Kalman Strauss. See our upcoming Shabbat services and programs here, and follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook for more updates. Check out Shabbat Replay on Contact Chai for more from Rabbi Deena.Transcript

    Daily Jewish Thought
    Parshat Devarim | The Shabbat of Vision

    Daily Jewish Thought

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 9:32


    Contact Rabbi Bernath via http://www.theloverabbi.comDonate and support Rabbi Bernath's work http://www.jewishndg.com/donateSign up for Rabbi Bernath's Relationships Podcast https://anchor.fm/the-love.../episodes/Love-Rabbi-QA-ecpnteSign up for Rabbi Bernath's Kabbalah Podcast  https://anchor.fm/kabbalahforeveryoneFollow Rabbi Bernath's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/ybernathAccess Rabbi Bernath's Articles on Relationships https://medium.com/@loverabbiSupport the show

    Contact Chai with Rabbi Lizzi
    "Moses knew how to manage his boss..."

    Contact Chai with Rabbi Lizzi

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 37:45


    Today's episode is a discussion between Rabbi Lizzi and Russ Linden, author of “Loss and Discovery: What the Torah Can Teach Us about Leading Change.” The interview was conducted with the active participation of our Morning Minyan crew. Every weekday from 8 - 8:30 am, you can join us to start our day with a spiritual check-in with one of the Mishkan rabbis.https://www.mishkanchicago.org/event/summer-2022-morning-minyan/all/For upcoming Shabbat services and programs, check our event calendar, and see our Accessibility & Inclusion page for information about our venues. Follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook for more updates.Produced by Mishkan Chicago. Music composed, produced, and performed by Kalman Strauss.Transcript

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    The Procedure for Habdala When Tisha B'Ab is Observed on Mosa'eh Shabbat and Sunday

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 5:38


    When Tisha B'Ab falls on Shabbat and is thus observed on Mosa'eh Shabbat and Sunday, Habdala is not recited on Mosa'eh Shabbat. Only the Beracha over the candle – "Boreh Me'oreh Ha'esh" – is recited on Mosa'eh Shabbat, because this Beracha is specific to Mosa'eh Shabbat, and is what allows us to benefit from new light after Shabbat. We do not recite the Beracha over the Besamim (spices), because smelling the Besamim is a form of enjoyment, and we are to minimize our enjoyment on Tisha B'Ab.On Sunday night, at the conclusion of Tisha B'Ab, we recite a brief Habdala, which consists of only the Beracha over wine and the Beracha of "Ha'mabdil." We do not recite the Beracha over the Besamim, because the smelling of Besamim was instituted as "compensation" for the loss of the Neshama Yetera ("extra soul") which we receive when Shabbat begins and then leaves after Shabbat. This Beracha is only relevant on Mosa'eh Shabbat, when the Neshama Yetera leaves, and thus when Tisha B'Ab begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat, such that we cannot recite the Beracha of Besamim, there is no reason to then recite it after Tisha B'Ab, on Sunday night. (This is similar to the case when Yom Tob begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat, and we combine Habdala with the Kiddush for Yom Tob – in a sequence known as "Yaknehaz" – and we omit the Beracha of Besamim. Some say this is because we have a Neshama Yetera on Yom Tob, too, and others explain that festive Yom Tob meal suffices to fill the "vacuum" created by the departure of the extra soul. And since Besamim is not necessary on Mosa'eh Shabbat, we do not recite the Beracha the next night, either. The same applies when Tisha B'Ab begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat.)Additionally, when we recite Habdala on Sunday night after the conclusion of Tisha B'Ab, we omit the introductory verses. These verses, which are expressions of our hopes for good fortune, are normally recited as part of Habdala in order to arouse joy and festivity as we begin the new week, and so, like the Besamim, once they are not recited on Mosa'eh Shabbat, there is no purpose in reciting them on Sunday night. And so we begin Habdala after Tisha B'Ab with the words, "Kos Yeshu'ot Esa," and we then lift the cup, recite "Sabri Maranan," followed by the Beracha over the wine and the Beracha of "Ha'mabdil."When Tisha B'Ab begins on Mosa'eh Shabbat, those who are permitted to eat on Tisha B'Ab must recite Habdala before eating. (When Tisha B'Ab falls on Shabbat and is thus delayed until Sunday, there is greater room for leniency when it comes to ill patients, and pregnant and nursing women, as in some cases, those who normally would be required to fast on Tisha B'Ab are allowed to eat on Tisha B'Ab which is observed on the 10th of Ab.) Hacham Ovadia Yosef ruled that they should recite Habdala immediately on Mosa'eh Shabbat, and not wait until they need to eat. They omit the introductory verses and Besamim, and so they recite only the Beracha over wine, the Beracha over the candle, and "Ha'mabdil."Summary: When Tisha B'Ab is observed on Mosa'eh Shabbat and Sunday, the blessing over the candle is recited on Mosa'eh Shabbat, and on Sunday night, at the conclusion of Tisha B'Ab, we recite only the Beracha over the wine and "Ha'mabdil." The rest of Habdala – the introductory verses and Besamim – is not recited at all, neither on Mosa'eh Shabbat nor on Sunday night. An ill patient, or a pregnant or nursing woman, who is allowed to eat on Tisha B'Ab, recites Habdala on Mosa'eh Shabbat, omitting the introductory verses and Besamim.

    The Natsarim
    How to Make Shabbat a Delight (Oneg)

    The Natsarim

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 42:38


    “If you keep your feet from breaking the Shabbat and from doing as you desire [chephets] on My holy day, if you call the Shabbat a delight [oneg] and the Lord's day honorable… then you will find your joy in the Lord.  (Isaiah 58:13–14) Many Believers ask us:  “What am I supposed to do on Shabbat?” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jesus-goyco/message

    Likutei Moharan
    Torah 31: Creating Souls Through Longing, Pt. 5

    Likutei Moharan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 25:26


    Rabeinu delves into the greatness of holy longing and how this has the ability to create and manifest souls. He explains this concept in accordance to the story of Avraham “creating souls” in Charan… Rabeinu also speaks about the greatness of charity and how charity guides all the constellations and celestial spheres. The concepts of Shabbat, emunah/faith, the Brit, traveling, letters and vowel points, livelihood, etc…

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    Tisha B'av- Preparing for Tisha B'av Which Falls Out On Mosa'eh Shabbat

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 3:39 Very Popular


    This year, Tisha B'av falls out on Shabbat. The Gemara states that in such a case the fast is pushed off to Sunday, the tenth of Av. The fast is postponed and not moved forward in accordance with the principle of not hastening tragic event, such as this fast marking the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash. In a regular year, the last meal before the fast is known as the "Seudat Hamafseket," and it is limited to a certain number and types of foods. However, this year, the last meal is a regular Shabbat Seudah Shelishit. One may even eat a meal fit for Shlomo HaMelech, as the Shulhan Aruch states. From sunset, a person is in a state of "limbo." On one hand, it is already prohibited to continue eating and drinking. On the other hand, it is still Shabbat, and therefore one must not make any public display of mourning or preparation for the fast. For example, one should not put on his non-leather Tisha B'av shoes while it is still Shabbat. Rather he must wait 40 minutes after sunset, say "Baruch Hamavdil Ben Kodesh L'Hol," and then he may change his shoes and come to the Bet Knesset.The Halacha prohibits "Hachana," preparing from Shabbat to the next day. The Poskim discuss whether one is allowed to drink excess amounts of fluids throughout Shabbat in order to be properly hydrated for the fast. Is this considered Hachana? They rule that one may do so, as long as he does not verbally express that his intent that it is for the fast. The same applies for eating in preparation for the fast.Since Tisha B'av is on Sunday this year, the usual restrictions of "Shabua Shehal Bo" (the week of the fast) do not apply, as there are no days preceding the fast. Therefore, it is permitted to wear freshly laundered clothes the week before the fast. However, on Tisha B'av itself, it is certainly prohibited to wear freshly laundered clothes. Accordingly, one must be careful that when he changes out of his Shabbat clothes on Saturday night that he dons weekday clothes that have already been worn.

    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine
    When you're at the end - Yom Shabbat / Saturday - Av 2, 5782 / July 30, 2022

    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 53:52 Very Popular


    Parshat Matot / Masei – Tribes / Stages Numbers 30:2(1)-36:13 Haftarah: Jeremiah 2:4-28;3:4 B'rit haChadasha:  Matthew 5:33-37; James 4:1-12

    Temple Beth Am Podcasts
    Shabbat Teaching: Devarim Seudah Sh'lishit July 30 2022 | 5782

    Temple Beth Am Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 32:34


    Rabbi-Cantor Hillary Chorny's Shabbat Teaching at Temple Beth Am, Los Angeles, July 30, 2022. (Youtube/Zoom)

    Likutei Moharan
    Torah 31: Creating Souls Through Longing, Pt. 4

    Likutei Moharan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 25:17


    Rabeinu delves into the greatness of holy longing and how this has the ability to create and manifest souls. He explains this concept in accordance to the story of Avraham “creating souls” in Charan… Rabeinu also speaks about the greatness of charity and how charity guides all the constellations and celestial spheres. The concepts of Shabbat, emunah/faith, the Brit, traveling, letters and vowel points, livelihood, etc…

    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine
    The Lord lifts up the falling - Erev Shabbat / Friday - Av 2, 5782 / July 30, 2022

    Messianic Jewish Teachings: David Levine

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 29:08 Very Popular


    Parshat Matot / Masei – Tribes / Stages Numbers 30:2(1)-36:13 Haftarah: Jeremiah 2:4-28;3:4 B'rit haChadasha:  Matthew 5:33-37; James 4:1-12

    Lion & Lamb Podcasts
    Matot & Masei / Erev Shabbat 2021–2022

    Lion & Lamb Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 111:56


    Matot & Masei / Erev Shabbat 2021–2022 by Lion & Lamb Ministries

    Temple Beth Am Podcasts
    Shabbat Teaching: Shabbat Morning Mattot Masei 5782

    Temple Beth Am Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 19:04


    Rabbi-Cantor Hillary Chorny's Shabbat Teaching at Temple Beth Am, Los Angeles, on July 30, 2022. (Youtube/Zoom)

    From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life
    Shabbat Sermon: Embracing Mudernity

    From the Bimah: Jewish Lessons for Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 15:38


    Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran
    Ketubot 24 - Shabbat July 30, 2 Av

    Daf Yomi for Women - Hadran

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 33:08 Very Popular


    Today's daf is sponsored by Judy Schwartz in loving memory of her beloved mother-in-law Bernice R. Cohen Schwartz, רחל בילא בת ר' שלום חיים ודרייזע גנסה, who celebrated her 99th birthday this year and is being buried today in NY. "She loved learning; always wanted to study Talmud as a girl and wasn't allowed to. May her neshama have an aliyah." Today's daf is sponsored by Jane Shapiro in honor of Nina Black, her in-law and daf yomi friend. "May we be able to celebrate more Smachot together, including Siyum HaShas."

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
    The Status of the Week of Tisha B'Ab When it Falls on Sunday

    Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 3:36


    Several mourning practices are observed during the week of Tisha B'Ab, from Mosa'eh Shabbat before Tisha B'Ab until after the fast. These include haircutting and shaving. The Halachic authorities addressed the question of how these Halachot apply in years such as this year, when Tisha B'Ab falls on Shabbat and is thus observed on Sunday (as fasting is inappropriate on Shabbat), or, for that matter, if Tisha B'Ab actually falls on Sunday. In these situations, Tisha B'Ab begins immediately after Shabbat, and thus there is no "Shabu'a Sh'hal Bo Tisha B'Ab" (week of Tisha B'Ab). Do the restrictions of the week of Tisha B'Ab apply in such a case, and, if so, when?Hacham Ovadia Yosef ZT"L ruled that strictly speaking, the Halachot of "Shabu'a Sh'hal Bo Tisha B'Ab" do not apply in such a case. Since Tisha B'Ab begins immediately after Shabbat, there is no "week of Tisha B'Ab," and one may shave and take a haircut throughout the previous week. However, in Halichot Olam (vol. 2), Hacham Ovadia notes the ruling of the Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909), in Parashat Debarim (12), that in such a case one should preferably abstain from shaving and haircutting the Friday before Tisha B'Ab, so he does not appear perfectly groomed on Tisha B'Ab. This is also the position of Rav Haim Palachi (Turkey, 1788-1869), in his work Mo'ed Le'chol Hai. Hacham Ovadia notes that this is the position of the Kolbo, as well.Elsewhere in his writings, Hacham Ovadia noted the custom observed by some to refrain from haircutting and shaving throughout the entire week before Tisha B'Ab when it falls on Sunday. Rabbi Biton, in Yalkut Yosef, writes that this is the preferred practice.As for the final Halacha, then, it is permissible to shave and take a haircut during the week before Tisha B'Ab when the fast is observed on Sunday, though one who wishes to be stringent should refrain from shaving and haircutting the Friday before Tisha B'Ab, and those who wish to be extra stringent should refrain throughout the previous week.Summary: Strictly speaking, when Tisha B'Ab is observed on Sunday, one is allowed to shave and take a haircut the week before Tisha B'Ab, without any restrictions. However, many have the custom to refrain from shaving and haircutting in such a case on the Friday before Tisha B'Ab, and there are those who refrain throughout the entire week before Tisha B'Ab.

    Daf Yomi for Women – דף יומי לנשים – English

    Today's daf is sponsored by Judy Schwartz in loving memory of her beloved mother-in-law Bernice R. Cohen Schwartz, רחל בילא בת ר' שלום חיים ודרייזע גנסה, who celebrated her 99th birthday this year and is being buried today in NY. "She loved learning; always wanted to study Talmud as a girl and wasn't allowed to. May her neshama have an aliyah." Today's daf is sponsored by Jane Shapiro in honor of Nina Black, her in-law and daf yomi friend. "May we be able to celebrate more Smachot together, including Siyum HaShas."

    Daily Bread for Busy Moms
    30 July 2 Av - Shabbat

    Daily Bread for Busy Moms

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 18:03


    30 July 2 Av - Shabbat by Busy Moms

    The Morning Scroll
    Parashat Matot-Masei

    The Morning Scroll

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 4:22


    This week's parsha was hard to read. And judging by some telling word choice in the Hebrew text, it was hard to write, too.Produced by Mishkan Chicago.  Music composed, produced, and performed by Kalman Strauss. See our upcoming Shabbat services and programs here, and follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook for more updates. Check out Shabbat Replay on Contact Chai for more from Rabbi Deena.Transcript

    Contact Chai with Rabbi Lizzi
    Plantsitting For The Planet

    Contact Chai with Rabbi Lizzi

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 56:51


    High Holidays are just around the corner, and Mishkan Builders will have early access to tickets. Join or renew today before early access tickets go live next week! ****On July 22nd, the rain held off just long enough for us to get through our climate themed outdoor Friday Night Shabbat Service. Could it have been the work of our old friend Honi the Circle Maker? Listen on to Rabbi Deena's drash to hear the deets — it starts at [34:34]. This episode is a lightly abbreviated version of our entire service, filled with singing and inspiration. If you're looking a particular song or message, jump to the time code below. Welcome:[01:30] — “Today I Almost Killed A Friend's Plant…” — (R'Steven)[07:00] — Lechu Neranena L'Adonai — (ft. Davening Team)[10:36] — Shiru L'Adonai — (Davening Team)[12:47] — Mizmor L'David — (Davening Team)Message:[16:21] — Where Is God In This? — (R'Lizzi)[22:05] — Lecha Dodi (Leonard Cohen) — (Davening Team)[27:31] — Psalm 92 / Mah Gad Lu — (Davening Team)[29:55] — Reflections On Our Israel Trip — (ft. R'Lizzi)[32:31] — Hashkiveinu (Steven Chaitman) — (Davening Team)Drash:[34:34] — Honi The Circle-Maker — (R'Deena)[46:13] — We Rise (Batya Levine) — (Davening Team)[49:01] — V'hashevota (Shir Yaakov) — (Davening Team)[50:58] — Thank you, Jane Charney and Mark Achler! [54:14] — Psalm 150 / Kol Haneshamah (Davening Team)****For upcoming Shabbat services and programs, check our event calendar, and see our Accessibility & Inclusion page for information about our venues. Follow us on Instagram and like us on Facebook for more updates.Produced by Mishkan Chicago. Music composed, produced, and performed by Kalman Strauss.Transcript of Drash