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Line of portable media players by Apple

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Best podcasts about ipods

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Latest podcast episodes about ipods

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
The Wrath of God and the Love of God

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 58:01


God's wrath, and God's love are two sides of the same nature.  The wrath of God can be seen past, present and future.  God is slow to anger and His wrath is always provoked after providing abundant opportunities to recognize Him.  God can distinguish between hearts that loves Him imperfectly, versus a heart that rejects Him wholeheartedly. Romans 1:16-32  VF-2237 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Sanctified Wholly by the God of Peace

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 57:48


Writing to the Thessalonians, Paul prayed that the God of peace may wholly sanctify us upon Christ's return, and until then that He would watch over us and preserve us. We are not sinless; the flesh is at war with the Spirit, and there is the possibility we will succumb to temptation, but when we take a step back to God, He is quick to meet us. The finishing process will not be completed in our lifetimes, but those who come to know God and His ways and who keep faithing in Him are being transformed and preserved. 1Thessalonians 5:23 VF-2206 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

For Mac Eyes Only
For Mac Eyes Only – Private Relay Reporting for Duty!

For Mac Eyes Only

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


On this episode of For Mac Eyes Only: Mike is joined by Eric to answer a listener question about Apple's new Private Relay service compared to VPNs. Mike and Eric also discuss the security of Internet traffic in general as well as a privacy focused web browser that Mike thinks everyone should be using.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

When we're walking around saying, why is this happening? Why do the wicked prosper and those who love the Lord suffer so much? Psalm 37 reminds us how to make it through the tough times. Our suffering doesn't go unnoticed. God sees, He knows, and He upholds those who love Him. Fourteen years of ministry and the wisdom of David in his old age show us that God takes care of His own.   VF-2174   Psalm 37 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Podtrash
Podtrash 587 – Would You Rather

Podtrash

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021


Horror! Medo! Desespero! Pânico! Escolhas! Jogatina! No episódio desta semana nos reunimos para falar sobre o Would You Rather lançado em 2012 que no elenco tem a Sasha Grey, e Jeffrey Combs fazendo cosplay de Jogos Mortais Então aumentem seus iPods porque mais um Podtrash está no ar! Duração: 1h 50minMédia TD1P: 3,1 ELENCO Almighty, o Estagiário de Chinelos! Bruno "Gunfree" Gunter Demétrius "Anjo Negro" Santos  Douglas Fricke, o Exumador Edson Oliveira Shin Koheo, o Maratonista nu! ARTE DO BANNER Shin Koheo EXTRAS DESTE PODTRASH IMDb do Filme Trailer do Filme Escute esta playlist no Spotify! FEEDS E LINKS DO PODTRASH Podtrash na iTunes StorePodtrash no SpotifyFeed completo do PodtrashFeed sem os Lado BFeed do Lado BCanal do Podtrash no YoutunerParticipe do Grupo “Esse Merece um Podtrash” lá no Facebook!Participe do grupo do Telegram dos Ouvintes do PodtrashConheça a Loja de Camisetas As Baratas! CONTATOS DO PODTRASH podtrash@td1p.com@podtrashFacebook do Podtrash CAPA DESTE PODTRASH

EasyApple
#537: Stupecitato

EasyApple

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 52:17


Si parla di cosa abbiamo acquistato durante il Black Friday, di come Time Machine si è rivelata utile a Federico, di come usiamo l'Apple Watch, di Apple Maps e dell'app Traduci, della 2FA di Whatsapp e dell'Apple self repair program.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Christ's work at the cross is not just one-dimensional. Its effects are continuous, encompassing the whole sum total of what is needed for us to be whole in His presence: both salvation from our sins past, present and future, and healing of our sicknesses and diseases. 1 Peter 2:24-25 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

The History of Computing
Buying All The Things On Black Friday and Cyber Monday

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:55


The Friday after Thanksgiving to the Monday afterwards is a bonanza of shopping in the United States, where capitalism runs wild with reckless abandon. It's almost a symbol of a society whose identity is as intertwined with with rampant consumerism as it is with freedom and democracy. We are free to spend all our gold pieces. And once upon a time, we went back to work on Monday and looked for a raise or bonus to help replenish the coffers. But since fast internet connections started to show up in offices in the late 90s the commodification of holiday shopping, the very digitization of materialism. But how did it come to be? The term Black Friday goes back to a financial crisis in 1869 after Jay Gould and Jim Fisk tried to corner the market on Gold. That backfired and led to a Wall Street crash in September of that year. As the decades rolled by, Americans in the suburbs of urban centers had more and more disposable income and flocked to city centers the day after Thanksgiving. Finally, by 1961, the term showed up in Philadelphia where turmoil over the holiday shopping extravaganza inside. And so as economic downturns throughout the 60s and 70s gave way to the 1980s, the term spread slowly across the country until marketers, decided to use it to their advantage and run sales just on that day. Especially the big chains that were by now in cities where the term was common. And many retailers spent the rest of the year in the red and made back all of their money over the holidays - thus they got in the black. The term went from a negative to a positive. Stores opened earlier and earlier on Friday. Some even unlocking the doors at midnight after shoppers got a nice nap in following stuffing their faces with turkey the earlier in the day. As the Internet exploded in the 90s and buying products online picked up steam, marketers of online e-commerce platforms wanted in on the action. See, they considered brick and mortar to be mortal competition. Most of them should have been looking over their shoulder at Amazon rising, but that's another episode. And so Cyber Monday was born in 2005 when the National Retail Federation launched the term to the world in a press release. And who wanted to be standing in line outside a retail store at midnight on Friday? Especially when the first Wii was released by Nintendo that year and was sold out everywhere early Friday morning. But come Cyber Monday it was all over the internet. Not only that, but one of Amazon's top products that year was the iPod. And the DS Lite. And World of Warcraft. Oh and that was the same year Tickle Me Elmo was sold out everywhere. But available on the Internets. The online world closed the holiday out at just shy of half a billion dollars in sales. But they were just getting started. And I've always thought it was kitschy. And yet I joined in with the rest of them when I started getting all those emails. Because opt-in campaigns were exploding as e-tailers honed those skills at appealing to not wanting to be the worst parent in the world. And Cyber Monday grew year over year. Even as the Great Recession came and has since grown first to a billion dollar shopping day in 2010 and as brick and mortar companies jumped in on the action, $4 billion by 2017, $6 billion in 2018, and nearly $8 billion in 2019. As Covid-19 spread and people stayed home during the 2020 holiday shopping season, revenues from Cyber Monday grew 15% over the previous year, hitting $10.8 billion. But it came at the cost of brick and mortar sales, which fell nearly 24% over the same time a year prior. I guess it kinda' did, but we'll get to that in a bit. Seeing the success of the Cyber Monday marketers, American Express launched Small Business Saturday in 2010, hoping to lure shoppers into small businesses that accepted their cards. And who doesn't love small businesses? Politicians flocked into malls in support, including President Obama in 2011. And by 2012, spending was over $5 billion on Small Business Saturday, and grew to just shy of $20 billion in 2020. To put that into perspective, Georgia, Zimbabwe, Afghanistan, Jamaica, Niger, Armenia, Haiti, Mongolia, and dozens of other countries have smaller GDPs than just one shopping day in the US. Brick and mortar stores are increasingly part of online shopping. Buy online, pick up curb-side. But that trend goes back to the early 2000s when Walmart was a bigger player on Cyber Monday than Amazon. That changed in 2008 and Walmart fought back with Cyber Week, stretching the field in 2009. Target said “us too” in 2010. And everyone in between hopped in. The sales start at least a week early and spread from online to retail in person with hundreds of emails flooding my inbox at this point. This year, Americans are expected to spend over $36 billion during the weekend from Black Friday to Cyber Monday. And the split between all the sales is pretty much indistinguishable. Who knows or to some degrees cares what bucket each gets placed in at this point. Something else was happening in the decades as Black Friday spread to consume the other days around the Thanksgiving holiday: intensifying globalization. Products flooding into the US from all over the world. Some cheap, some better than what is made locally. Some awesome. Some completely unnecessary. It's a land of plenty. And yet, does it make us happy? My kid enjoyed playing with an empty toilet paper roll just as much as a Furby. And loved the original Xbox just as much as the Switch. I personally need less and to be honest want less as I get older. And yet I still find myself getting roped into spending too much on people at the holidays. Maybe we should create “experience Sunday” where instead of buying material goods, we facilitate free experiences for our loved ones. Because I'm pretty sure they'd rather have that than another ugly pair of holiday socks. Actually, that reminds me: I have some of those in my cart on Amazon so I should wrap this up as they can deliver it tonight if I hurry up. So this Thanksgiving I'm thankful that I and my family are healthy and happy. I'm thankful to be able to do things I love. I'm thankful for my friends. And I'm thankful to all of you for staying with us as we turn another page into the 2022 year. I hope you have a lovely holiday season and have plenty to be thankful for as well. Because you deserve it.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

The book of Jude is a wake-up call to those on the brink of apostasy or exposed abundantly to it.  Don't let the opportunities of God be treated with complacency.  The saints of God are kept ones in Christ; He is able to keep us and present us faultless.  Even if you are on the brink, keep yourself in the love of God.  Don't let another day pass without thanking God for His grace, His mercy, and His love. Jude 1:1-25 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Zero Percent
9 - The F Word

Zero Percent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 18:01


Continuing our discussion of the acronym "Be Free" we talk about the F word. Failure.Episode Transcript: Hey, everybody. Welcome back to Zero Percent. I'm Menachem Lehrfield. We've been discussing the topic of the growth mindset. Last time we talked about the idea of enjoying the journey. And today we move on to a crucial and important topic, which is the understanding and awareness that failure is not a permanent condition. So we've gone through the B and now we're up to the F in FREE, which is again, failure is not a permanent condition. A wise man once said, "Trying is the first step to failure." That was of course, Homer Jay Simpson. But the truth is, he is absolutely right. Trying is the first step to failure. You can't really fail if you never try. The thing is, it turns out failure isn't really so bad after all. In fact, studies show that we are actually more likely to learn something better when we're given the opportunity to fail and get it wrong.If you have a test and you're asked a question that you know nothing about, if you actually try to come up with an answer, even if your answer is completely wrong, you are more likely to understand, know and retain the information once you learn the correct answer. This goes against a hundred years of education where we try to drill our children with these math drills. We try to have our children memorize these words and these definitions and these multiplication tables. All of those things were there because scientists believed, which was wrong, but they believed that if you teach someone something wrong, it would be so much more difficult to unteach the wrong information.What we know now is, is exactly the opposite, that when you give a child or a person the opportunity to get the answer wrong, to fail, to make a mistake, they're more likely to retain the information. So instead of saying, memorize all these things that you never get anything wrong, now let's try to figure out how we go through the process of understanding, how we go through the process of learning. In Judaism, not only as a mistake or a failure not bad, it's actually good. It's actually the process that brings us to success.In the book of Micah, in Micah, chapter seven, verse eight, the verse reads, "Do not rejoice over me, my enemy, [foreign language 00:02:37]. Because I fell, I will arise." And I've seen people translate this as despite the fact that I fallen or although I have fallen, I get up. But that's not what it means. The word [foreign language 00:02:49] does not mean despite, it means because of. [foreign language 00:02:55]. The falling is what leads to me getting up. We find a similar source in the book of Proverbs 24:16, where the verse says, [foreign language 00:03:07], because the righteous one falls seven times, he will arise." Again, not despite the fact that he falls, he gets up. The falling is what leads to getting up. The darkness is the source of the light. The failures are what lead to the success.I don't know if you remember, but Michael Jordan did an ad for Nike. It was a print ad. And in it, it says, and this is a quote from Michael Jordan. He says, "I've missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I've lost almost 300 games. 26 times I've been trusted to take the game-winning shot and missed. I failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed."Thomas Edison said the same thing when they asked them about the light bulb. It took him 10,000 tries to produce the light bulb. And someone said to him, "How did you have the ability to keep on going after failing so many times?" And he said, "I didn't fail 10,000 times. I learned 10,000 ways that it doesn't work. I discovered 10,000 ways not to make a light bulb." When that's our approach to failure, everything changes. You see, we're obsessed with this concept of the overnight success. But the reality is, Albert Einstein said that somebody who's never made a mistake has never tried anything in their life.You see, the world tries to sell us the story of the overnight success, the person who just like that turned their whole life around and became world famous and successful. And the reality is it does not exist. If it was overnight, it was not success. And more likely than not, if it's success, it wasn't overnight. See, we just see the end result. We see the Michael Jordan. We don't see the fact that he was cut from his high school basketball team. People look at that story and they say... And I've heard people say this. "Michael Jordan's coach must feel like an idiot." Can you imagine being the coach that cut Michael Jordan from your basketball team? But he didn't feel stupid. Do you know why he was cut from the basketball team? Because he wasn't good enough.And when he came home from school and he told his mother that he got cut from the team, his mother didn't say, "Oh, you poor thing. I'm going to go down to the coach and yell at him," which many parents would do today. But you know what she said to him? "You weren't good enough. Now here's a basketball, go outside and try harder." And that's what made him into Michael Jordan.You look at so many people who have succeeded and you think, oh, they had it so easy. Look at Oprah. Nobody's more famous than Oprah. She was told she wasn't fit for TV. Walt Disney was told he wasn't creative enough. Thomas Edison, we said, failed over and over and over again. Steve Jobs was fired from his own company, the company that he started himself. He went from literally nothing, a college dropout, created a company in his parents' garage that had 0% chance of success. He built it up from two people to over 2000 employees, made this huge company, and then they fired him.If you would've asked somebody 30 years ago, "What would be the world's most valuable company?" and I understand it's not currently, but it will be, give it a couple of months and it was for a decade, "What's going to be the world's most valuable company?" They never would have told you to it'd be a computer company. That that's unfathomable. He completely revolutionized the world's technology. But what's amazing, and the point I want to focus on it, yes, it doesn't mean he was a nice person. Walt Disney was not a nice person either. And it doesn't change the fact that he completely created an industry that didn't exist before, and he was an extremely successful person. And we can learn from a person's success without necessarily idolizing that person as a good human being.But the point I want to focus on is that you can look at that experience. I know if it was me, if I was in my 30s and I was a... I don't know if he's a billionaire at that point. He's probably a billionaire at that point. Either way, he was set for the rest of his life. He suffers a public firing where it's on the front page of almost every single newspaper or magazine that he is fired from his own company. If it was me and I had enough money to live easily comfortably for the rest of my life, I would retire and be done. What did he do? He started two companies, Pixar next. And he says that getting fired from Apple was the greatest thing that ever happened to him. Because while he got fired and he was working on all this other stuff, that's what led to the renaissance of Apple.I don't know if you remember. I remember growing up. Apple computers were like these dorky old... You couldn't do anything cool or fun with them. Do you remember the big floppy disks? You'd stick them in with two hands and like crank the thing, the drawer, to close it. What changed and revolutionized Apple was when Steve Jobs came back to the company. And that's what produced the iPod and the iPhone and the iPad and those cool iMacs that have that all in one funky colorful machine. And all of the things we have today never would have existed had not got fired. It was specifically that failure, that challenge, that created that impetus for him to pivot and pivot and pivot, to eventually create all the things we see today.So if you asked him... I mean, we can't ask him anymore, but he said this publicly many times. Getting fired from Apple was the best thing that ever happened to him. Michael Jordan not making his high school team was the best thing that ever happened to him. Oprah, being told she wasn't fit for TV was the best thing that ever happened to her. It's those failures that allow us and propel us to that next level. It's not despite the falling it's as a result of the falling. Because if I can get up, I've got it made.On Rosh Hashanah we blow the shofar, and there's three different types of shofar blasts. There's what's known as a tekiah, which is a strong blast. It's a triumphant blast. Then there's the shevarim and the teruah, which are broken blasts that are supposed to represent crying, weeping. We never blow a shevarim and a teruah by itself. It's always sandwiched between two tekiahs. So we'll do a tekiah, shevarim, takiya, takiya, teruah, tekiah. And the idea that we're giving across is that all's good in the end. If it's not good, it's not the end. Failure is not a permanent condition. I might be down right now, but that's not the way it's always going to be. I have the ability to rise up. I have the ability to change. And if it is truly bad right now, I know it's not the end. And therefore, whenever we have that blasts that are represented by the shevarim and the teruah, the blast of crying, the blast of weeping, the blast of sadness, it is always followed by that strong tekiah, that triumphant blast.For full transcript, visit: www.joidenver.com/zeropercent/9---the-f-word

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
The Freedom That Comes Through Forgiveness

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 47:13


Jesus instructs us to forgive and gives the roadmap to follow. It is a process of letting go of the garbage of hurts against you that block the pathway of communication between you and God. When the love of God is in us, we find ourselves asking Him to have mercy on those who have wronged us. Cleaning the pathway of communication through prayer and faith brings the freedom that makes us overcomers instead of victims. Matthew 16:11-15, Matthew 18:21-35 VF-2210 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

MoneyBall Medicine
Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 58:48


Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place. The big goal guiding Seqster, he says, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare. Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.If you've ever gotten a copy of your medical files from your doctor or hospital, you probably know these records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. They aren't designed to be clear or user-friendly for patients. In fact, it's usually just the opposite.The data itself is highly technical. And on top of that, there's the inscrutable formatting, which is dictated by whatever electronic medical record or “EMR” system your provider happens to use. But the problem isn't just that EMR data is incomprehensible.It's also that different EMRs are often incompatible with each other.So if you're being treated by multiple providers, it can be really tricky to share your data across institutional boundaries. That's why medicine is one of the last industries that still uses old-fashioned fax machines. Because sometimes a fax is the only way to send the data back and forth.But my guest today is trying to fix all that.His name is Ardy Arianpour, and he's the co-founder and CEO of Seqster.It's a company in San Diego that's spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.The way Ardy explains it, Seqster quote-unquote “smashes the data siloes.” Meaning, the company can combine EMR data, gene sequence data, wearable device data, pharmacy data, and insurance claims data all in one place.The big goal guiding Seqster, according to Ardy, is to put the patient back at the center of healthcare.At the moment, however, consumers can't sign up for the service directly. Seqster's actual customers are players from inside the healthcare industry. For example, a life science companies might hire Seqster to help them make the experience of participating in a clinical trial more user friendly for patients.Or a health plan might use a Seqster dashboard to get patients more involved in their own care.Seqster did let me do a test run on my own medical data as part of my research for this interview. And I was impressed by how quickly it pulled in data that normally lives in a bunch of separate places. I'm hoping Seqster and other companies in this space will continue to make progress.Because, frankly, I think poor patient access to health data and the lack of interoperability between EMRs are two of the biggest factors holding back improvements in healthcare quality.If we can finally get those two things right, I think it can help unlock the data-driven healthcare revolution that I describe in my new book, The Future You. Which, by the way, is out now in paperback and ebook format at Barnes & Noble and Amazon.When we spoke back in September, Ardy and I talked about better EMRs and many other things. And now here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, welcome to the show. So, it's good to have you here, and you know, for everybody who doesn't know your story and the story of the company, I'd love to, you know, start covering some basics like, you know, the when, the what, the how, the why. What's the founding story of Seqster and what was the problems that you were really trying to go out there and solve when you started the company in 2016?Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry. Always been a fan. I think we've known each other for quite some time, but it's been a long time since we've ran into each other since the genomic and precision medicine days. So great to see you. I hope you and your family are well and yeah, look, Seqster is super special and there's a secret story, I guess, that never has been told. It really starts way beyond 2016 when I founded the company. So I spent 15 plus years in DNA sequencing, next gen sequencing genomic market. And during that time in the 2000s to early 2010s, I was fortunate enough of being part of some amazing endeavors and organizations that allowed my team and I to take some risk. And when you take risk, when you're in biotech, pharma, precision medicine, genomics, bioinformatics, you learn new things that most people don't learn because you're you're you're, you know, trailblazing, I guess you could say. And we were able to do that back with one of my old companies where we were able to launch the first clinical exome test, launch the first BRCA cancer panels, launch the first next gen sequencing panels in a CLIA lab. Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it wasn't about the testing. It was all about the data, and we didn't realize that till later and we kept on seeing that wow genome data is really only one set of all the other data pieces, right? I think the genomics folks, me being a genomics guy, I guess you could say, for a decade and a half, we're so forward thinking that we forget about the simple things within science, and we never really thought, Oh, collect your medical data and pair it with your genomic data. We never really thought there would be a wearable out there. That data was going to be siloed, too. We never thought there was going to be, you know, many different medical devices and instruments that would be Bluetooth and sensor enabled, where there would be data that would be siloed. Claims data, pharmacy data. Never even crossed our minds. So, you know, when you put this all together, my inspiration with Seqster was actually really simple. And when I founded the company, I wanted to combine the genomic data with your EMR medical data as well as your wearable data, because in 2016, the tailwinds of those other, you know, services was really taken off.Harry Glorikian: Right. Totally understand it. And you know, as we were talking about before I hit record, it's like it was funny because I was just talking to another company that's working on NLP and they're able to look at, you know, papers and see drugs being used in different, you know, medical conditions. And then they figured out, well, they needed to tap into the unstructured data of a medical record to really, like, add the next layer of value to it. So, you know, there's a lot of activity going on about there. But how do you guys, how do you, how do your co-founders, you know, Zhang and Dana play into like the science, the technology and what's the sort of angle that you guys have taken to solve this problem? Or what's your idea on how to fix it? I'm not saying it's been solved yet, because that would be a Herculean task in and of itself. But how are you guys approaching it that? Is a little different than the. You know, maybe any any of your other you would you would consider anybody else out there, the working on this?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, look for us we spent a lot of time understanding the power of data. But how what makes Seqster different is no one knows the power of the patient better than us. We've spent time with our platform with, you know, tens of thousands of patients: rare disease patients, oncology patients, parents, autoimmune disease patients, patients that have that are seeing functional medicine folks. Patients that were having issues sharing data through telemedicine, clinical trial patients. All these sorts of patients are very different. At Seqster we focused on putting the patient at the center of health care in order to smash all the data silos from their medical institutions to their wearable technology that they wear to the DNA testing that they get and even maybe a COVID test or a vaccine. How do you bring a 360-degree patient view? And you know, you tried the system, so I think you got a small teaser of how we can do that and we've really cracked this large problem. It is Herculean, I believe, and a lot of people believe because it's interoperability, it is the number one problem in all of health care.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I had the pleasure of trying it and imported my data and was able to see, you know, individual pieces. I mean, I made some suggestions on what might make it easier for me to hone in in different areas, right, and have the system highlighting different things. But I guess each data stream is being brought in separately and then at some point you're going to create a master dashboard above it, because now each one is separate from when I go into each record, right, When I go into my medical record, it gives me one set of data with my lab results and everything else and the notes, and then it pulls in my wearable data separately that I have to look at, right? So you've got to look at it separately. It doesn't. Then I guess the next step would be creating a master sort of view of how everything would look in a sort of I don't want to say integrated, but at least a timeline view of the world. But. You know, following up on the the sort of the what question, you know, how do you sort of combine data from different EMRs, tests, apps, devices in a sort of scalable, repeatable way? I mean, it seems like to date, that's been a hugely manual process, and I can imagine you could figure out every provider's ontology and then create a table that shows what's equivalent to. And but you know, there's got to be sort of a translation scheme that would be required that that provides some constant readjustment as the main providers tweak and evolve their own systems, right? Because if the provider is tweaking their system, your system has then got to adapt to changes that are happening in that end. So how are you guys managing all that craziness?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. So I think it all and you hit on so many points, I'll try and cover them if I remember them all. Look, the number one thing for us is we can connect to any data source. It doesn't matter. And you saw it. And just before I continue, just tell the audience how fast, how fast, how long did it take for your data to be populated after you connected it?Harry Glorikian: Oh, it was. I mean, yeah, as soon as I created it, I could see that it was, you know, it was digesting and then populating. And, you know, I was just I was watching it as a matter of fact, when I was on the phone with your person, that was helping me. Yeah. At first I said, Oh, it's not there. And then a couple of seconds later, I'm like, Oh no, it's showing up, right? So it was happening in, I don't want to say real time, but it was happening as as we were watching it evolve, right? It was sort of it was. It was almost like watching time lapse.Ardy Arianpour: And that's actually a great way. That's a great way to actually describe it. We created the time lapse of all your health data. Now let's get to the what and the how. So we connect to any health data source. The patient is fully in control. You own your data, you control it. It's all consented by you. We don't own your data and we connect to every single medical record. And that's huge that we've achieved nationwide coverage. We didn't know what data you have, but we're you're able to connect to it. Why? Because our team, which our engineering team gets all the credit for six years now, almost since founding of the company we have written, I don't know, seven million lines of code, that standardizes and harmonizes all of the ICD 9, ICD 10, SNOMED codes and every single lab result to every single wearable terminology, from biking to cycling to, you know, you name it, VitaminDB, you know, characterized in 40 different ways. You know, we're harnessing data to improve patient lives at scale. We built it for scale because you can't do it by the traditional method of just faxes and PDFs. Now, you know, being able to do that is not a bad thing.Ardy Arianpour: We can bring that service into our platform as well. It's already integrated, but that type of service takes 30 to 60 days and it's static data. It's not real time right now. If Harry goes, I don't know, you go on a bike ride and you fall and you go to the E.R. and you had whatever data connected automatically in your sister portal, it'll be populated without you even touching Seqster. That's how our real time data works and another way that we're totally differentiated than anything else in the marketplace. I was never a fan of API businesses because they're just data in data out. I truly wanted us to create a patient engagement platform, a PEP right, or a patient relationship management system, what I call a PRM instead of a CRM. And that's what we created with Seqster. So that is beyond an API, beyond just data. We're visualizing the data, as you saw. We really nailed the longitudinal health record or the individualized health record. And I think it's, I always say this, health data is medicine. The reason why it's medicine is because our platform has saved patient lives.Harry Glorikian: Ardy, how do you, how are you handling the free form notes, right, because I noticed that I could look at all my notes, but they weren't necessarily, it wasn't pulling from the note and sort of making sense of it. I mean, I could look at all of it and it was all in one place. But the the system wasn't necessarily processing it, sort of. I was talking to Jeff Felton from ConcertAI and they do a lot of sort of, their big thing is the NLP that sort of tries to choose chew through that, which is not trivial, you know, yesterday today, context matters in health care.Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. Look, if we created the the the Tesla of health care, let's just say, right, we're we're changing the game. From static data to real time data. Ok. Well, you're talking about is, are you going to create a helicopter as well? Right, OK. And all right. So, no, we're not going to go create the helicopter. Is there going to be an electric helicopter by Tesla? There's no market for that, right? So that's why they're not doing it now. I'm not saying there's not a market for NLP. It's just the fact that we'll go ahead and partner with a third party NLP provider. And we already have we have like four of them and they all have their strengths and weaknesses because it's not a one size fits all thing. And you know, we can already run OCR, you know, over the free text and pull certain ontology information out. And then, you know, when you partner with an NLP company, once you have a system that can capture data, you could do anything. So people always ask me, Are you going to get into AI? It's just the buzzword. There's a million A.I. companies. What have they really done right in health care? It's not really there. Maybe for imaging they've done some things, but it's more of a buzzword. AI only becomes valuable if you have a system, Harry, that can instantly populate data, then you can run some great artificial intelligence things on it. So NLP, AI, OCR, all those things are just many tools that can add. Now, in your experience, you only got to see about 5 percent of the power of Seqster, and that probably blew you away, even though it was five percent of the power. Because you probably never -- I don't know, you tell me, have you ever been able to collect your data that quickly? It took, what, less than a minute or two?Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, thank God, I don't have a lot of data. So, you know, just when I tap into my my health care provider, you know, my data is there and it's funny, I always tell people, being a not exciting patient is a really good thing in one way, and it's a really bad thing because you can't play with all the data. But you know, like even when I did my genome, it's an extremely boring genome.Ardy Arianpour: My question is it's not about it being exciting or not, because thankfully you're not a chronically ill patients. But imagine if you were and how this helps, but take a step back. I'm just asking the speed, yes, and the quality of the presentation of the data that seeks to you. It was less than what hundred seconds?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Well, it was very quick. And I've already it's funny because I texted my doctor and I was like, I need to talk to you about a couple of these lab results that look out of out of norm, right? And they weren't anything crazy. But I'm just curious like, you know, how do I get them in norm? I'm just I'm always trying to be in in the normal band, if I can be.Ardy Arianpour: So it's interesting you say that because as a healthy individual. You know, and even a chronically ill patient, it doesn't matter. The best way to actually QC data is through visualization, and this is what this is. That's foundational to interoperability. So we hit on semantic and structural interoperability with our, you know, backend engine that we've created to harmonize and standardize the data. We built many different types of retrievers and then we parse that data and then it's standardized and harmonizes it. But that visualization, which some people call the Tableau of health data, you know that we've created when they see it, is really, we got to give the credit to the patients. We had so many patients, healthy ones and unhealthy ones that told us exactly how they want it to look. We did this on the genomic data, we did this on the wearable data. We did this on the medical device data and we have some great new features that can superimpose your clinical data with your fitness data on our integrated view and timeline.Harry Glorikian: Oh, that? See, now that would be, you know, another level of value, even for a healthy patient, right to be able to see that in an integrated way. I made a suggestion, I think that when a panel shows up is. You know, highlight the ones that are out of Norm very quickly, as opposed to having to look at, you know, the panel of 20 to find the one that's out of whack, just either color them differently or reorient them so that they're easier to find. But those are simple changes just from a UI perspective. But so. How would you describe that that Seqster creates value and say translates that into revenue, right? I'm just trying to figure out like, what's the revenue model for you guys? I know that you're I can actually, I'm not even sure if I can sign up for it myself. I would probably have to do it through a system if I remember your revenue model correctly. But how do you guys generate revenue from what you're doing?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah, I'll share another secret on your show here from the founding of Seqster. My dream was to empower seven billion people on our little mothership here called Earth to have all their health data in one place. And I had a direct to consumer model in 2016. The market wasn't really ready for it, number one. Number two, it was going to cost $500 million worth of marketing to just get the message out for people to know that it exists. So long story short, in 2016, you know, when I founded the company, not that many people wanted to talk to us. They thought we were just like nuts to go after this problem. 2017, we got some calls from some investors, we raised some great seed funding after I personally put in some money in in 2016 to get the company going. And then in 2018, I got a call from Bill Gates and that was when everything changed. Bill called and wanted to meet in person, I was supposed to get 30 minutes with him. And the reason why he called is because our first beachhead was with Alzheimer's patients. My grandmother, both my grandmothers, passed away due to Alzheimer's disease. Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers and being a caregiver for my mom's mom and being very close to her since she raised me, I learned a lot about a multigenerational health record, so I actually filed patents in 2016 on a multigenerational health record because I wanted to have my grandma's data, my mom's data, my data, and be able to pass it on to research as well as to generations down my family.Ardy Arianpour: Long story short there, Bill gets all the credit for telling me after I showed him our platform, "You got to take this enterprise. You guys built something that Google Health failed at and Microsoft Vault Health Vault failed at." And it's funny we're talking about this. Look, Google just dismantled their health division again. Why? Because tech companies just don't get it. They have a lot of money. They have a lot of power. They've got a lot of smart people. But they they they don't know where, I'll give you an example. It's like a tourist with a lot of money coming into a city. You don't know where the really good local bar is, right? Why is that? You don't know where the really good, you know, slice of pizza is. You're going to go to the regular joints that everyone finds on TripAdvisor and whatever. You know your friends told you, but if you're a local, you know where to get the authentic cocktails and the authentic, you know, drinks and food. Why? Because you've lived and breathed it in the city. So we've lived and breathed it right. And so we know what not to do. It's not about knowing what to do in health care or in genomics or in biotech. It's actually knowing what you shouldn't be doing. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And knowing I got to tell you, there's some problems where I'm like, OK, I know exactly who to call for that problem, because there aren't, you know, they're not falling off trees in that particular problem. There's a small handful of people that understand that problem well enough that they can come in and sort of surgically help you solve that problem. And you can have all the money in the world and have all the smart people you want. Doesn't mean they're going to be able to solve that particular problem, especially in health care, because it's so arcane.Ardy Arianpour: And it's getting, you know, this is a problem that is growing like cancer, interoperability. Just on this 20 minute conversation with you it has grown by hundreds of millions of dollars. Do you know why? Because data is being siloed.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. And I think, look, I've always I've said this on, you know, whatever show or and I've actually I've written letters to Congress. You know, I think this this needs to be mandated because expecting the large EMR companies to do anything is a waste of time. They're not going to do it on their own if their feet are not put to the fire and it changes. And honestly, I believe that if anything will stop the innovation of health care or slow it down is the EMR systems. You know, if you don't have the data, you can't do the work.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. But you know what people don't understand. And not to go off that tangent, but I'll get back to the business model in a second to answer that question because I just recalled in my mind here that I didn't answer that. Look, people don't understand that at least the EMR companies, even though they're like Darth Vader, you know, they needed. They've put some foundation there at least. If that wasn't there, we would be in a much worse situation here, right?Harry Glorikian: Correct, but if Satya Nadella hadn't really changed Microsoft, really redone it right, it wouldn't be the company it is now, and I think they [the EMR companies] are just back in the dark ages.Ardy Arianpour: Of course, I totally agree. I'm surprised, actually. Microsoft, as an example, didn't come up with their own EMR system and launch it to the hospitals to go, compete with the servers and all scripts and Epics of the world. If I was Microsoft, that's what I would do. I would have enough money in power, know exactly what to do. I would take a system like Seqster and I would explode it in a good way and be the good guys and have it completely open source and open network. But that's a whole cocktail conversation if anyone's listening on the on the podcast that wants to talk about that. Give me a call or shoot me an email or find me on LinkedIn.Ardy Arianpour: Let me go back to the business model real quick so people understand. So direct to consumer was what I wanted to do. We built it for the consumer, for the patients. It was the smartest and dumbest thing I ever did. Let's go to why it was the dumbest thing first, because it was really, really hard. It was the smartest because we would not be where we are today. You wouldn't have called me to talk on your podcast and all these other great, you know, amazing people that want to hear about how we're, you know, cracking the code on interoperability now and changing the health care system, changing clinical trials, changing decentralized trials with our system.Ardy Arianpour: Why? Well, it's because our system was built by patients. Right, and so it's a patient centric, real time, real world data platform that layers in engagements for both the providers, the payers, the pharma companies and any other enterprise that white labels our platform. We have both iOS and Android SDK and Web available. It gets fully branded. We're the Intel Inside with the Salesforce.com business model. It's a Software as a Service service that we offer to enterprises. Patients never pay for the service. And we do give VIP codes to chronically ill patients and VIPs, you know, journalists, podcasters and to be honest, anyone who emails me that wants to try it. I've been always giving on that. That costs us time and money, and I'm happy to do it because it's my way of giving back to the community and health care because I know our team and I have built a system that have saved lives. It's been covered by the news multiple times.Harry Glorikian: So, so in essence, a large provider comes, buys the access to the system and then offers it to its patient population to utilize to aggregate all this information, right? How can the platform stay patient centric if the patients aren't directly paying for it?Ardy Arianpour: Ok, very simple. All of these enterprises in health care, whether that's Big Pharma, right, or Big Oayer from Pfizer to Cigna, to United Healthcare group to Humana to even Amazon, right, to other tech companies, they all want to go down a patient centric way. It's just what's happening. You know, I've been talking about this since 2016 because we pioneered patient centric interoperability. That's what we did. That's what Seqster did. That's that's what we set out to do. And we did it. Some, you know, a lot of people say they can do it. Very few actually. Do we fit in that model now, right? And you had the experience yourself. And I think the first time I saw patient centric ads was. 2020. No, sorry. Yeah, 2020, JP Morgan Health Care Conference in January, just three months before the lockdowns and the pandemic started. It was the first time I went to Johnson & Johnson's afterparty in downtown San Francisco. And saw a huge banner saying, you know, blah blah blah, patient centricity. It's the 22nd century, you know, whatever. So they add a bunch of ads that were all patient centric, and I looked to my co-founder, Dana, and I'm like, Look at this, these guys finally caught on. I wonder if they've been, because we've been in discussions with a lot of these folks, long story short, it's not because of Seqster, I think it's just the market was headed that way. We were so far ahead of the market and there was no tailwinds. Now it is all there. And the pandemic afterwards accelerated digital health, as I say, by 7 to 10 years.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you enjoy hearing from the kinds of innovators and entrepreneurs I talk to on the show, I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is out in print and ebook format from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Just go to either site and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian. Thanks. And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So the platform combines EHR, genetic, and fitness data, so. Why did you start with those three?Ardy Arianpour: So we started with those three, and I'll get to that, but we also do pharmacy, social determinants of health, and claims data as well. So we've added three other very large pillars. We can connect to any data source. We've created a universal interoperability platform that's patient centric that brings real time, real world data. And we're just super excited about all the business opportunities and the big pain points that we're solving for enterprise as well as for the patient. Why did we start with genomics, EMR, fitness. Ok. Here's the story. So I named the company Seqster after actually going on a five or six mile run in downtown San Diego, coming back and watching The Italian Job. And in the movie The Italian Job, it's one of my favorite movies, actually. I love that movie. I could just keep watching it over again, the real Napster was in the movie, and I used to be a Napster user where, you know, it was the way of actually pulling all your music and having it kind of in one place. Not really exactly Seqster's model, Seqster's model is is much more legal because it's patient centric. Yes, Napster was kind of stealing the data, right? So long story short, I was trying to think of a company name and I'm like, Oh my God. I don't know what hit me. I'll remember that moment like it was yesterday, Harry. Sequster came up because I had dived into DNA sequencing. We are doing everything that you can on next gen sequencing. And so I was like, Wow! Seqster. S-E-Q-S-T-E-R.Ardy Arianpour: And I went on GoDaddy.com. I bought it for $9.99. And the story started from right then. It was just me and the website. No co-founders, no onee else. I was just thinking, this is a great name. Now, you fast forward to why it's medical data plus genomic data, plus fitness data, to begin with. Well, the genomic data was an easy one because, right, I have 15 years underneath my belt on genomic sequencing technologies and clinical diagnostics and doing a lot of great things for patients in that arena. And I knew that it couldn't just be the genome, right? That's where the medical data came in because we knew and I never knew that we would be able to actually build something that would be able to pull it on together. I knew it was going to be really tough. I didn't think it was going to be this tough. We would have never done it if I knew that it was this tough. It's so great that we did because we solved it. But if you go back and say, "Ardy, would you do it again if you knew it was going to be this tough?" I wouldn't, because it's really, it's not the number two problem, it's the number one problem. And we're just, you know, I'm a peon. I'm a very small dot. I'm not anyone special. I'm just very passionate about solving this problem. That's it. And so is my team, and we got a great team and we've execute on. So great.Ardy Arianpour: And then, you know, it was my idea. I was forcing the wearable and fitness data because I was interested in that. And when the Apple Series One Watch came out, it was very limited, but I saw how it was going to change, you know, just connection of data. And my team being bioinformaticians and from the genomics world were so against bringing it in, I mean, I could show you emails of fights about me saying, get fitness data in here. They were not interested. I forced it on them. And then next thing you knew, clinical trials. One of the biggest things was how do you bring sleeping data and wearable data to x y z data? And that market started taking off. Decentralized trials. You can't even do it if you don't have wearable data. And so everyone started saying, you know, OK, you were right. That was one. I get one big pat on the back. And then we realized we can't be limited to just those three pillars. So what are the next three that we can work on? And that was claims data so we can marry it with the EMR and medical data for payers. And then we ran into pharmacy data. We just signed our first digital pharmacy deal three weeks ago with Paragon Health. And if we didn't have those capabilities, we wouldn't have the business opportunities. And the social determinants of health data being our last integrations comes in very handy for various different use cases.Harry Glorikian: So, three sort of things, right? You know, you combine all this data. What can you learn that wasn't obvious before? How do you translate into better health outcomes for consumers or, say, smarter decision making by consumers, right, so those are two potentially different ways to look at it.Ardy Arianpour: Absolutely. So one word for you: Seqster's longitudinal health record drives health economics, outcomes, research. It drives it.Harry Glorikian: Is that your clients doing that, you doing that, a third party group coming in?Ardy Arianpour: Yeah. We don't do that. We're just the patient engagement and data aggregation operating system that gets implemented for enterprise. And then the enterprise can run the analytics on top of it. They can, you know, take all of the raw data. So we're the only 21 CFR Part 11 compliant platform too. We're fully FDA compliant, Harry. It took us 19 months working with the FDA in order to get our compliance letter in September, October of last year, 2020. So about a year ago. And not only are we HIPAA compliance, not only are we High Trust certified and 256 bit encrypted on all the data that comes in, but having that FDA compliance sets us apart number one. Number two, because we're not an API, we have FHIR fully integrated. We have an API for sharing data, but we're not an API business. We're a SaaS business in health care, in digital health. We can make any company a digital health company. Let's say it's Coca-Cola, and they want to empower their 200,000 employees. They could launch a Coca-Cola Seqster white label in 72 hours to 200,000 employees. That's what we've created. Now, take that and imagine that now within pharma, within precision medicine, within clinical trials, within the payer network, which we're the only platform that's CMS ONC interoperability compliance from the Twenty First Century CURES Act as well.Harry Glorikian: So let me let me see if I... I'm trying to figure out like the angle, right? So I mean, ideally for interoperability, if we talk about the highest level right, you really want to get Epic, Cerner, Kaiser, et cetera, all in a room right? And get them to agree to something. Which is like an act of God.Ardy Arianpour: Some people say, we're doing, you know, it's not my words, but again, a figure of speech, people say, we're doing God's work.Harry Glorikian: But stepping back here for a second, what I see you guys doing is actually giving a platform to the patient and the patient is then connecting the record, not necessarily the systems themselves allowing for interoperability to take place.Ardy Arianpour: So yes, but you're speaking of it because of the direct to consumer experience that you had. The experience we gave you is much different than the experience from the enterprise side. We have a full BI platform built for enterprise as well. Right. And then we have the white label for the enterprise where they launch it to a million patients.Harry Glorikian: That's what, I'm trying to think about that, right? So. Coca-cola says, like, going down your example, Coca-Cola says, "Love to do this. Want to offer it to all of our employees." We make it available to them. But it's the employee that has to push the start button and say, yes, I want my electronic medical record to be integrated into this single platform, right?Ardy Arianpour: But that's that's an example with Coca-Cola. If we're doing something with Big Pharma, they're running a clinical trial for 500,000 COVID patients, as an example. They're getting data collection within one day versus two months, and guess what, we're going to be driving a new possible vaccine. Why? Because of the time it takes for data collection at scale. We empower patients to do that and they get something back. They get to track and monitor all their family health.Harry Glorikian: Right. So so it's sort of, you know, maybe I'm being dense, but sort of the same thing, right? Big Pharma makes it available to the patient. The patient then clicks, Yes, I want to do this and pull in my medical records to make it all everything to be in one place. Yes.Ardy Arianpour: Yes. And I think it's about the fact that we've created a unique data sharing environments. So that's, you know, Harry and Stacey and John and Jennifer and whoever, you know, with whatever use case can share their data and also consent is built with E-consent and digital consent is built within that process. You don't share anything you don't want to share.Harry Glorikian: Right. So let me see if I got this correct. So Seqster is providing a translation and aggregation between systems through a new layer of technology. Not creating true interoperability between systems, right?Ardy Arianpour: Yes. There's a spider web. And. We have untangled the spider beb in the United States of America. We've done all the plumbing and piping to every single health institution, doctor's office clinic, wearable sensor, medical device pharmacy, the list goes on and on, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So let's... Another question. So how does the 21st Century CURES Act of 2016 relate to your business? I think you know you've said something like Seqster has become law, but I'm trying to. I'm trying to understand, what do you mean when you say that?Ardy Arianpour: So when we founded Seqster, we didn't know there was going to be a Twenty First Century CURES Act. We didn't know there was going to be GDPR. We are GDPR compliance before GDPR even came out. Right? Because of our the way that we've structured our business, number one. Number two, how we built the platform by patients for CMS ONC interoperability, you know, final rulings and the Twenty First Century CURES Act, which is, they're synonymous. We worked hand in hand with Don Rucker's team and Seema Verma on the last administration that was doing a lot of the work. Now a wonderful gentleman, Mickey Tripathy has taken the role of ONC, and he understands, you know, the value of Seqster's technology at scale because of his background in interoperability. But what was interesting in the two years that we worked with HHS and CMS was the fact that they used Seqster as the model to build the rules. I was personally part of that, my team was personally part of that, you know, and so we were in private meetings with these folks showing our platform and they were trying to draft certain rules.Ardy Arianpour: We didn't know that they were going to be coming out with rules until they did. And then that's when high level folks in the government told us specifically on calls and also even at Datapalooza when I gave a keynote talk on on Seqster, when Don Rucker did as well right before me. You know, we're sitting in the speaker room and folks are like, "You're going to become law in a month." And this was in February of 2020. March 9th, those rules dropped. I was supposed to give a keynote talk at HL7,  at HIMMS. HIMMS got cancelled in 2020. I just got back from HIMMS 2021 in Vegas just a week and a half ago. It was fantastic. Everyone was masked up. There was only three cases of COVID with 10,000 people there. They did a great job, you know, regulating it. You had to show your vaccine card and all that good stuff. But you know, I would have never thought Seqster becomes law when we were founding the company. And so this is really special now.Harry Glorikian: So what does success look like for Seqster?Ardy Arianpour: It depends how you measure it. So we're in the Olympics. It's a great question. Here's my answer to you. We're in the Olympics just finished, right? So we started out in track and field. We were really good at running the 400 Meters and then somehow we got a use case on the 4x1 and the 4x4. And then we did really well there, too. And then because of our speed, you know, we got some strength and then they wanted us to get into the shot put and the javelin throw and then we started winning there, too. And then somehow, now people are calling us saying, "Are you interested in trying to swim?" We got the 100 meter butterfly. Well, we've never done that. So success for us is based off of use cases. And every use case that we deal with, within clinical trials and pharma, we've define 24 distinct use cases that we're generating business on. Within the payer community now, because of the CMS ONC Twenty First Century Cures Act, there's a major tailwind. Within life insurance for real time underwriting, there's, you know, a plethora of folks that are calling us for our system because of the patient engagement. So this patient centricity for us has been a central pillar, and I've never allowed anyone in our company, whether it's the board or our investors or employees, you know, get sidetracked from that. We've been laser focused on the patients and success at impacting patient lives at scale.Harry Glorikian: So as a venture guide, though, right, like I'm going to, there's only so much money on so much time to tackle, so many different opportunities, right? So it's there is a how do we create a recurring revenue stream and keep plugging along and then generate either enough revenue or raise enough money to do more? And so just trying to think through that for what you guys are trying to do, I get the 4x100 and the swimming. But all of that takes money and resources right to be able to prove out, of course.Ardy Arianpour: And here's another thing we're in a different state. Look, my team and I had a major exit before. We built a billion dollar company out of $3 million. And even though we weren't founders of that company, you know, I was the senior vice president and we we did really well. So, you know, that allowed us to not take salaries that allowed us to take our money and put it into doing something good. And we did that in 2016 to seed it. And then afterwards, I raised, you know, millions of dollars from folks that were interested in, you know, this problem and saw that our team had a track record. And I actually was not interested, Harry, in raising a Series A because of our experience, but we kept on getting calls. And then just six months ago, we announced, you know, our series a funding. Well, we actually announced it in March, I think it was, but we closed our Series A in January of this year and it was led by Takeda Pharma, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe and United Healthcare Group's Equian folks that created Omniclaim and sold to UnitedHealth Group Omni Health Holdings.Ardy Arianpour: So check this out. Imagine my vision in 2016 of having medical data, genomic data fitness data. Well, if you look at the investors that backed us, it's pretty interesting. What I reflect on is I didn't plan that either. We got amazing genomic investors. I mean, it doesn't get better than getting Anne Wojcicki and 23andMe. Amazing female entrepreneur and, you know, just the just the force. Secondly, Takeda Pharma, a top 10 pharma company. How many digital health startups do you know within Series A that got a top 10 pharma? And then also getting some payer investors from UnitedHealth Group's Omniclaim folks and Equian OmniHealth Holdings. So this is to me, very interesting. But going to focus our focus has been pharma and clinical trials. And so Takeda has been phenomenal for us because of, you know, they they built out the platform and they built it out better for us and they knew exactly what to do with things that we didn't know. And with things that patients didn't know on the enterprise, you know, Takeda did a phenomenal job. And now other pharma companies are utilizing our platform, not just Takeda.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, they want their data aggregation. They want as much data on the patient aggregated in one place to make sense of it.Ardy Arianpour: So not necessarily that they actually want to empower patients with a patient centric engagement tool. That's pharma's number one thing right now, the data part, obviously is important, but empowering patient lives at scale is the key, and that's that's our mission. And so, yeah, that's that's a whole 'nother cocktail conversation when I see you soon hopefully in a couple of weeks.Harry Glorikian: Hopefully as life gets, or if it gets back to normal, depending on the variants, you know, we'll hopefully get to meet him in person and have a glass of wine or a cocktail together. So it was great to speak to you. Glad we had this time, and I look forward to, you know, hearing updates on the company and, you know, continually seeing the progress going forward.Ardy Arianpour: Thanks so much, Harry, for having me. Big fan of Moneyball, so thank you to you and your organizers for having me and Seqster on. If anyone wants to get in touch with me personally, you can find me on LinkedIn or you can follow Seqster at @Seqster. And again, thank you so much for. For having a great discussion around, you know, the the insights behind Seqster.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode.  You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview. 

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Humility: Christ Speaks to the Lowly in Heart

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 53:31


Humility is not self-abasing, it is not an act that feeds the self, it is lowliness and takes service as the highest incentive to action.  Saul lost his humility as a leader and became unusable to God because of his attitude, whereas David had a heart open to receive correction when he was confronted with his sin.  A humble perspective puts things in proper order; even the lowly things have a place in God's order.  VF-2133 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling
Gee, Your Hair Smells Terrific (with Margaret Cho)

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 110:51


Legendary standup Margaret Cho joins Tom and Julie to rank bread baskets, talk shampoo bottle aesthetics, and watch GWAR on Joan Rivers. Plus a certified legendary segment in which Tom and Julie teach you how to successfully pitch a TV show. Also Julie's review of Clifford the Big Red Dog, can presidents drive, Uber Scooch, I'm Surrounded By Morons, ROFL, Todd Phillips' iPod, Woody Allen's Subterranean Homesick Blues, microwave popcorn tips, The 100 Laugh Guarantee, basic bitches, relatable references, Yellowstone, Yogi Bear, Geordi La Forge and Abraham Lincoln, Rogan the Rocky Snowman, James Hetfield's hair vs Dave Mustaine's hair, and Word-A-Day desktop calendars.SEE MARGARET CHO LIVE:https://margaretcho.comLISTEN TO DOUBLE THREAT AD-FREE ON FOREVER DOG PLUS:http://foreverdogpodcasts.com/plusDOUBLE THREAT MERCH:https://www.teepublic.com/stores/double-threatSEND SUBMISSIONS TO:DoubleThreatPod@gmail.comFOLLOW DOUBLE THREAT:https://twitter.com/doublethreatpodhttps://www.instagram.com/doublethreatpodDOUBLE THREAT IS A FOREVER DOG PODCAST:https://foreverdogpodcasts.com/podcasts/double-threatTheme song by Mike KrolArtwork by Michael KuppermanSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
The Help of The Holy Spirit: You Are Not Alone

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 57:31


The Holy Spirit helps us in our human condition of weakness when we don't even know "the what" we need and should ask for in prayer.  When we face a circumstance, we cannot even find the words for, the Spirit understands our groanings.  He helps us lift the load and carry our prayer to the Father, who knows our hearts, and Christ, who advocates for us. Romans 8:26-27  VF-2114 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Gilbert House Fellowship
Gilbert House Fellowship #326: Deuteronomy 30–32

Gilbert House Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 76:06


MOSES' LAST message was a warning—not just to the Israelites, but to the lesser elohim who had rebelled against the authority of God. We discuss Moses' warning to the people against disobeying the commandments of God, the commissioning of Joshua, and the Song of Moses, which lays out the consequences of following other gods. Deuteronomy 32 makes it clear that these small-G “gods” are real and that not all of them are faithful. We explain why Deuteronomy 32:8 should read “sons of God” and not “sons of Israel” and share some background of the “demons” (Hebrew shedim) in Deut. 32:17. Interestingly, Deut. 32:24 suggests that two entities known as deities in ancient Canaan may have been agents of God's judgment for disobedience—Qeteb (“pestilence”) and Resheph (“plague”), who was later known to the Greeks and Romans as Apollo. For more on the “sons of God” in Deut. 32:8, see Dr. Mike Heiser's article “‘Sons of God' or ‘Sons of Israel' in Deuteronomy 32:8?” The Bible's Greatest Mysteries is on the air! For more information, log on to www.BiblesGreatestMysteries.tv. And subscribe to the new YouTube channel for The Bible's Greatest Mysteries! Our book Giants, Gods and Dragons is available now in Kindle and paperback! Get it as part of a great package with more than 27 hours of our video teachings at the SkyWatchTV Store, or by itself at Amazon.com. And Derek's novels The God Conspiracy and Iron Dragons are available now in paperback and Kindle! See the official trailers and learn more at the website for Rose Avenue Fiction. Download these studies directly to your phone, tablet, or iPod! Get our free mobile app for iOS and Android. Links to the App Store and Google Play are on the main page at www.GilbertHouse.org. Click here for the complete archive of our New Testament Bible studies to date, and click here for the Old Testament studies to date. Or go to www.spreaker.com/show/gilbert-house-fellowship for all of the audio.

Podtrash
Podtrash 586 – MPTrash: Músicas de Corno Vol.1

Podtrash

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 109:15


Galhada! Corno Manso! Corno Inconformado! Guampudo! Antena! Tremyen! Viking! No episódio desta semana nos reunimos para mais um MPTrash aqui no Podtrash! E nesta playlist tocamos uma coletânea de músicas de corno! Então aumentem seus iPods porque mais um Podtrash está no ar! Duração: 1h49min ELENCO Almighty, o Estagiário de Chinelos!Bruno "Gunfree" GunterDemétrius "Anjo Negro" Santos Douglas Fricke, o ExumadorEdson OliveiraManoel "Tremyen" NetoShin Koheo, o Maratonista nu! ARTE DO BANNER Shin Koheo PLAYLIST DESTE MPTRASH MISTER MU E TIÃO MACALÉ - MELÔ DO RICARDÃODJ HARLEI - RAP DO CORNO 2RUPERT HOLMES - ESCAPE (PIÑA COLADA SONG)MAMONAS ASSASSINA - BOIS DON'T CRYALANIS MORISSETE - YOU OUGHTA KNOWDESTINY'S CHILD - SAY MY NAME NAZARETH LOVE HURTS ZE RAMALHO - VILA DO SOSSEGO PHIL COLLINS - AGAINST ALL ODDS CASSETA E PLANETA - DIGA ALEXANDRE PIRES - DEPOIS DE PRAZER FALCAO - TODO CASTIGO PARA CORNO É POUCO JUPITER MAÇÃ - ELA SABE O QUE FAZ ROCK ROCKET - O BABACA E A MERETRIZ Playlist no youtube Escute esta playlist no Spotify! FEEDS E LINKS DO PODTRASH Podtrash na iTunes StorePodtrash no SpotifyFeed completo do PodtrashFeed sem os Lado BFeed do Lado BCanal do Podtrash no YoutunerParticipe do Grupo “Esse Merece um Podtrash” lá no Facebook!Participe do grupo do Telegram dos Ouvintes do PodtrashConheça a Loja de Camisetas As Baratas! CONTATOS DO PODTRASH podtrash@td1p.com@podtrashFacebook do Podtrash CAPA DESTE PODTRASH

EasyApple
#536: Telegram, Phishing e 2FA

EasyApple

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 53:59


Si parla di Homekit, di Phishing su Telegram e 2FA (autenticazione a 2 fattori), di Airpods che parlano anche se non vogliamo, di come trovare il font perfetto per programmare e di reti wifi.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Agape: The Expression of the Holy Spirit

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 57:57


Paul makes four categories of mankind: the natural man, babes in Christ, carnal believers, and spiritual Christians.  The natural man cannot hear the message; the babe in Christ grows, feeding on the sincere milk of the Word; carnal believers are never confronted with facing themselves, leaving them in a state of arrested spiritual development; and spiritual Christians constantly feed on the Word, both milk and meat.  Some marks of carnality are envying, strife, and divisions, which are in stark contrast with the marks of spirituality: the radiating of God's love in us, hand in hand with faith.  1Corinthians 2:14-3:4 Romans 5:5  VF-2108 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Love and Unity in the Diversity of Spiritual Gifts

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 57:07


Like those in Corinth, many churches today have elevated spiritual gifts, especially speaking in tongues, as the mark of salvation causing contention and disunity in the body.  Paul corrects this by clarifying that there are diversities of gifts, distributed by the Holy Spirit for the edifying of the church. Some, not all, have particular gifts, including speaking in tongues. All His children have some gift for the building up of the body.  The greatest gift is the love He poured out on our hearts and without that we have nothing. VF-2106 1 Corinthians 12-14 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
The Pursuit of Peace and the Holiness of God

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:04


Part of understanding the holiness of God is being aware that He has placed a deposit of His peace in our hearts, which gives us the capacity to pursue peace with all. This awareness allows us to get real with God and keeps us from falling away from the faith. Hebrews 12:12-17  VF-2208 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

TechTimeRadio
TechTime's first look at Twitter Blue, and why YouTube suddenly dislikes the thumbs-down. Elon Musk Sells about 930,000 Tesla Shares Worth $1.1 Billion. Next, a rare, original Apple-1 computer just sold for 500K. Air Date: 11/13 - 11/19/21

TechTimeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 111:21


Join us on TechTime with Nathan Mumm this week on the show; we give you the first look at "Twitter Blue," and with this, does a new paradigm open to free social media services? Then YouTube suddenly dislikes the thumbs-down, while Elon Musk Sells about 930,000 Tesla Shares Worth $1.1 Billion. Next, a rare, original Apple-1 computer just sold, for how much? Gwen Way joins the show with a new Gadgets and Gear segment. Finally, we have our Pick of the Day Whiskey Tastings and Mike's Mesmerizing Moment brought to us by Stori-Coffee®.  On the Second Hour, From NASA's Perseverance rover to what is happening on the International Space station. Grab a pencil to keep track of our Technology Steals and Deals. Then what is happening in the Cyberworld with our scary segment, we call "Protect Yourself Today" Plus, you will not want to miss "This Week in Technology History" as we explore some Apple flair. "Welcome to TechTime Radio with Nathan Mumm, the show that makes you go "Hummmm" Technology news of the week for November 13th through the 19th, 2021.Episode 74: Hour 1--- [Now on Today's Show]: Starts at 9:15--- [Top Stories in 5 Minutes]: Starts at 11:39Elon Musk Sells About 930,000 Tesla Shares Worth $1.1 Billion - https://tinyurl.com/4nzzhjxc YouTube gives dislikes the thumbs-down, hides public counts - https://tinyurl.com/chzyvkke A rare, original Apple-1 computer just sold at auction for an astounding $500,000 - https://tinyurl.com/4skn6ykf MoviePass may return in 2022 -  https://tinyurl.com/59mp57bn Steam Deck delayed to 2022 due to ongoing supply-chain disruptions - https://tinyurl.com/47xhrzwv --- [Pick of the Day - Whiskey Tasting Review]: Starts at 25:56Riff Distilling Kentucky Straight | 100 Proof | $45.00 --- [Gadgets and Gear]: Starts at 28:18Marvel Dice Throne review by Gwen Way--- [Technology Insider]: Starts at 40:53"Twitter Blue" options that people have been asking for now a “Premium Service” - https://tinyurl.com/4744s52w--- [Mike's Mesmerizing Moment brought to us by StoriCoffee®]: Starts at 50:20--- [Pick of the Day]: Starts at 53:43Riff Distilling Kentucky Straight | 100 Proof | $45.00 Nathan: Thumbs Up  Mike: Thumbs UpEpisode 74: Hour 2 --- [Now on Today's Show]: Starts at 1:05:48--- [Steals and Deals]: Starts at 1:09:53Mike and Nathan share this week's best prices on technology items for the week. --- [Protect Yourself Today]: Starts at 1:20:28Breached Aruba Central using a stolen access key. FBI warns of Iranian hackers looking to buy US orgs' stolen data - https://tinyurl.com/mdryjhtv Telnyx is the latest VoIP provider hit with DDoS attacks - https://tinyurl.com/22v7pynd --- [What We Found on the Web]: Starts at 1:38:24Latest Astronaut Crew of Four Welcomed Aboard International Space StationNASA Mars rover roughs up a rock, peers at 'something no one's ever seen' --- [This Week in Technology]: Starts at 1:47:30November 10, 2001 - Apple ships the first iPod, the device that changed the course of both the music and technology industries. Podcorn: Podcast influencer marketplace The leading podcast marketplace. Connecting unique voices to unique brands for native advertising.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
God's Perfect Love Conquers Fear

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 52:00


God's love toward us comes before we can love Him. When we do love Him, it is impossible to not simultaneously love our brethren. This agapao love, in being completed, makes us bold and drives out fear. With God's love in us, we will get tested to bring us closer to God and His care, but we will not receive punishment from God. Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Comfort from Christ: The Motherly Love of God

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:13


God's motherly love shines through in a bleak passage directed against the hypocritical scribes and Pharisees. Knowing what the word of God said, they were unable to apply it to themselves or hear the call of God. God is still calling, as a mother hen, to bring comfort to the comfortless that will run to the voice of the sayer.   VF-2080  Matthew 23:37 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

A Thing or Two with Claire and Erica
Gift Guide Round 3: Siblings, Teens, Co-Workers, Friends, and Grandparents!

A Thing or Two with Claire and Erica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:15


Gift Guide Round 3: Siblings, Teens, Co-Workers, Friends, and Grandparents!   Our third gift guide ep already?! We know. There's so much ahead—and behind if you missed part 1 and part 2—but if you're still on the present hunt, subscribe to Secret Menu for many more holiday-shopping thoughts ‘n feelings.   Kids and Teens!   Almost 14 year old girl Brooklyn kid Art! Ideal Bookshelf 974: Feminists by Jane Mount, The Ten Largest, No. 2, Childhood, Group IV by Hilma af Klint, Krista Marie Young painting, and Amber Vittoria prints The start of a charm bracelet, maybe with this Catbird Holy Cannoli charm Studs e-gift card Lizzie Fortunato Little Candy DIY Kit (for a younger kid: Super Smalls or Susan Alexandra) Olive & June mani system Dye Kween Sleep mask or socks Kule T-shirt This Is What I Know About Art by Kimberly Drew Macmillan Visual Dictionary D C-T! by Joana Avillez and Molly Young Donation to Girl Up Monogrammed tech accessories from Leatherology   Angsty teenage nephews who already have everything Art! Eye Test Chart by George Mayerle, Every Outdoor Basketball Court in Manhattan by Jenny Odell (paired with How to Do Nothing?), or something from Top Posters & Prints Via the Public Announcement newsletter: Procure an iPod, load the iPod with music you love, give the iPod to the kid. Snacks: Bokksu, Patagonia Provisions, Lani Halliday pop-tarts, Blondery Blondies, or Oreo ID Audm subscription Courier magazine subscription Black Futures by Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham Youth to Power: Your Voice and How to Use it by Jamie Margolin Donation to Canines for Disabled Kids   10 year old niece who is obsessed with Japan (Japan trip isn't in the budget) Pen pal through Pen Friend Clubs of Japan (PFC) Sanrio! Gudetama bank, Hello Kitty happy lunch box set, and all the stickers, pens, notebooks Punilabo scissors Paperi Design Shop Hiragana chart  Bokksu Japanese snack subscription Tatsuya Tanaka Miniature Life calendar Maruchan Ramen Noodle planter from Happy Plants Mochidoki Kawaii Pen Shop gift card Kizuna gift box   Nephews/Godsons who already have so much stuff. They are 6 months (read: only interested in food but not really able to eat it) and 4.  The 4 year old loves trucks, singing, Toy Story, and learning about everything. but he has all of the things! While I think donations are cool, I'm not really interested in that for a four year old who won't understand that i didn't forget to give him a gift.  National Diaper Bank Network donation Kitpas bath crayons Raddish Foodstirs DIY cookie kit Haus playhouse Parchie watch Pedersen + Lennard balance bike Twee planet chalk  Storytime Chess Areaware Blockitecture set WayToPlay car track   Brothers and Brothers-in-Law!   My 35 yo brother who exclusively wears shirts from regattas, has horrible taste in women A feature in the Hot Singles newsletters Hama Hama oysters The Rope Co. nautical rope doormat Games: Wolfum checkers/chess set or Molkky Grailed vintage regatta gear Vaer Field Watch Blackbird Spyplane paid subscription Sirene Journal  Ocean Conservancy donation   Brother who's living #vanlife Fancy tinned fish: Big Night if you're in NYC, Conserva Culture, and Fishwife Opinel No. 8 beechwood handle knife Westerlind for clothes Alice Waters egg spoon or one from Eggspoon.com Human Race rice powder cleanser or routine pack Libro.fm subscription for audiobooks Feeding America donation   Sisters and Sisters-in-Law!   Sister - has main character energy. Runs an apple cider vin business. Into funky style. Leanne Ford x Crate & Barrel measuring cups Krista Marie Young oven mitts Jacques Benoît vinegar pot Custom perfume from Nova Vintage blown-glass apples on Etsy James Shaw candleholders Isabel Halley wine cups or dessert plates Novel Mart boquerones baseball cap Edas earrings Carleen quilted vest Custom hand-painted sign from Cevallos Brothers or Olive Panter Oui the People rose gold razor The Missoni Family Cookbook Black Farmer Fund donation   My sister: hyper-intellectual, single, gay, social justice dr., autoimmune issues so stuck home. Dusen Dusen PJs Royal Jelly PJs Mizar and Alcor robe Clare Salvo Cards Against Malarkey Hollie Velten Big Sur cushion Horti plant subscription People's Pottery Project ceramics RIP Medical Debt donation Mary Roach books: Fuzz: When Nature Breaks the Law, Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void, and Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War   Sister in law who is mostly great and has very good taste but veryyy self absorbed, always has long term relationships but then doesn't commit because she doesn't believe in compromise, likes good food wine coffee, and also clothes (everlane/& other stories), likes to be luxe but in a slightly (not completely) subdued way. Ceramic coffee set-up, like Anna Lebrija french press or Zizi Ceramics dripper set Gjusta Goods coffee gift box Big Macs & Burgundy by Vanessa Price and Adam Laukuf Eater Wine Club subscription Aqua de Vida balm bars Susanne Kaufman bath oil or bath oil trio The Gentlewoman Modern Manners  Jamie Beck Pinot Noir series poster Ripped Bodice Read, Romance, Repeat subscription box Esther Perel Where Should We Begin - A Game of Stories Inclusive Therapists donation   My fiance's family does a gift exchange with the extended family with the idea that you can get a bigger/better gift for the one person instead of having to buy something smaller for everyone. I got assigned his cool cousin who lives in NYC.  She's in her late 30's, got married 2 years ago, no kids, and she's a really successful lawyer.  We only see her so often and she's usually on her computer keeping up with work when we do see her, so I don't have a great idea of her interests...besides they have a tiny dog that they love.  I always love an experience gift for people, def something there with NYC?  One other possibility is my fiance got her older sister in the gift exchange, so there's a possibility that we could do something that the both of them could enjoy together?  Her sister lives in a Philly suburb and has a family with 2 kids so different point of life. Little Beast dog sweater Katie Kimmel custom vase Laylo Pets x Altuzarra dog bed Susan Alexandra dog leash and collar Card holder: OAD wallet or Bottega Veneta credit card holder Flower Flash by Lewis Miller Museum or botanical garden membership Tickets to Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show (deadline is 11/29!)   Aunts, Uncles, Grandparents, and Other Adults You Know!   Next door neighbor, 94 year old Italian woman who loves the Pope and New England sports Go up for Glory by Bill Russell  Novel Mart Italiano collection—a bolognese sweatshirt, a ravioli hat! Chefanie farfalle barrettes Grossy Pelosi pasta water mug (with homemade Italian Holiday cookies!) Issimo soup box or Eataly gift box From Roy panettone Felt Pope Christmas ornament   Older curmudgeonly uncle with lots of stories and jokes. Cooks but scorns fancy equipment.  Miami Fruit Pickle Guys Degen YUCK sweater America's Test Kitchen membership  Made In cookware Small Victories by Julia Turshen Save Room for Pie by Roy Blount Jr. Local food bank donation   My smart feminist ex-social worker grandma who likes G&Ts and is a hoarder Six Barrel Soda Co. tonic bundle or Sunwink tonic variety pack subscription Chefanie cocktail napkins Made by DWC gift set Woman Made: Great Women Designers by Jane Hall Plan C or National Network of Abortion Funds donation   Friends!   29 y/o BFF who just got dumped and fired, she loves Rebecca Solnit, POOG, and yoga Private yoga class with one of her fave instructors Sky Ting TV gift card One of Rebecca Solnit's atlases Collective Wisdom by Grace Bonney Start Where You Are or When Things Fall Apart by Pema Chödrön Esker gift set Something creativity-focused: Gondola Pastels, POJ Studio waza kits, The F Series paint sticks, Studio Sundays art supplies, Art Life practice kits, and Unwind Studio needlepoint kits Dipsea gift certificate   Best friend! loves old furniture and travel and old churches and beauty, less than $100 The Furniture Bible: Everything You Need to Know to Identify, Restore & Care for Furniture by Christophe Pourny Stained glass or glass-blowing workshop: Pressed Flowers Stained Glass at Urban Glass in NYC on 12/9 Miniature stained glass churches—so many good ones on Etsy, like this Trendy-ish beauty service, like brow laminating Sania's Brow Bar pencil, tweezers, and scissors  Partners for Sacred Places donation   Co-Workers and Bosses!   My boss who is a die hard AKA sorority sister (same as Kamala Harris), v much part of the Bey-hive, and wears all of the hats (boss, mentor, counselor, mom, wife). EXAU olive oil Justice of the Pies pie Cult Pens advent calendar Vintage AKA tee—here, here, and here Drop the Ball by Tiffany Dufu Kamala and Maya's Big Idea Un|bound five-year journal Black Girls Code donation   People I work with - design studio so they all already have access to nice things. Our team is small enough that the vibe is to give everyone something? Under $40 Bonilla a la vista patatas fritas Custom Marmite or Sour Patch Kids Cute food! Opopop, Omsom, Soul Chai, Cornbread26 madeleines, The Chai Box gift set, Gjusta marinated olive oil, and Batchworthy Que water bottles Moglea playing cards Vintage interior design book that you pick out for each Ali Forney Center donation   For last year's gift guides, head here and here.   What are your last-minute gifting go-tos? We wanna know at 833-632-5463 and @athingortwohq!   Download the Zocdoc app—it's free!—and book that doctor's appointment you've been putting off. Explore all of our favorite gift picks at MoMA Design Store—so much amazing stuff, and it's 10% of now through November 24 with the code ATHINGORTWO online or in store. Try professional counseling with BetterHelp—10% off your first month with our link. Gift the coffee- and tea-drinkers in your life Ember. It's 10% off for first-time purchasers with our link. YAY.   Produced by Dear Media

Gilbert House Fellowship
Gilbert House Fellowship #325: Deuteronomy 28–29

Gilbert House Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 71:45


GOD'S COVENANT with Israel was conditional, with blessings for obedience to His commandments and curses for disobedience. Disobedience can be summarized as serving other elohim. The promises of harsh punishment for worshiping other gods may seem extreme to us, but the consequences of following those entities are actually worse than the awful things that God warned would befall Israel if the people failed to heed His warning—because those consequences are eternal. Here's the link to the article Derek mentioned at the end of the study: Scientist calculates precise date of final Aliyah of Jews to Israel based on Tribal borders The Bible's Greatest Mysteries is on the air! For more information, log on to www.BiblesGreatestMysteries.tv. And subscribe to the new YouTube channel for The Bible's Greatest Mysteries! Our book Giants, Gods and Dragons is available now in Kindle and paperback! Get it as part of a great package with more than 27 hours of our video teachings at the SkyWatchTV Store, or by itself at Amazon.com. And Derek's novels The God Conspiracy and Iron Dragons are available now in paperback and Kindle! See the official trailers and learn more at the website for Rose Avenue Fiction. Download these studies directly to your phone, tablet, or iPod! Get our free mobile app for iOS and Android. Links to the App Store and Google Play are on the main page at www.GilbertHouse.org. Click here for the complete archive of our New Testament Bible studies to date, and click here for the Old Testament studies to date. Or go to www.spreaker.com/show/gilbert-house-fellowship for all of the audio.

RetroMacCast
RMC Episode 590: Workgroup Server 4822

RetroMacCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 38:17


James and John discuss eBay Finds: Apple banner, original iPod, and Say hello to iPod banner. John shows us his recapped compact Macs, and news includes the iPod 20th birthday and recent Apple announcements. Join our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter, watch us on YouTube, and visit us at RetroMacCast.

Podtrash
Podtrash 585 – Why Don’t You Play in Hell?

Podtrash

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021


Horror! Medo! Desespero! Bukake! Pânico! Pasta de dente! No episódio desta semana nos reunimos com o CineMasmorra para falar sobre o Why Don't You Play In Hell? Lançado em 2013 pelo Sion Sono. E além de nossa resenha habitual você ouvirá sobre curiosidades do Japão e porque o Exumador perdeu seu cabelo. Então aumentem seus iPods porque mais um Podtrash está no ar! Duração: 2h20minMédia TD1P: 5 ELENCO Bruno "Gunfree" GunterDemétrius "Anjo Negro" Santos Douglas Fricke, o ExumadorEdson OliveiraShin Koheo, o Maratonista nu! CONVIDADOS ESPECIAIS Angélica HellishMarcos NoriegaAssine as paradas megalovaxfodas do Masmorra: Youtube, Anchor, Ok.ru! ARTE DO BANNER Shin Koheo EXTRAS DESTE PODTRASH IMDb do filmeTrailer no YoutuburoAssista o Why Don't You Play in Hell? no Ok.ru do Massmorra o/ Escute esta playlist no Spotify! FEEDS E LINKS DO PODTRASH Podtrash na iTunes StorePodtrash no SpotifyFeed completo do PodtrashFeed sem os Lado BFeed do Lado BCanal do Podtrash no YoutunerParticipe do Grupo “Esse Merece um Podtrash” lá no Facebook!Participe do grupo do Telegram dos Ouvintes do PodtrashConheça a Loja de Camisetas As Baratas! CONTATOS DO PODTRASH podtrash@td1p.com@podtrashFacebook do Podtrash CAPA DESTE PODTRASH

Money 4 Nothing
How the iPod Changed Everything with Eamonn Forde

Money 4 Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 53:25


It's been 20 years since Apple launched the iPod and a lot has changed in the music industry…as in everything. The mp3, iTunes, Spotify, penny fractions for streams, UMG's recent IPO, music catalogs as attractive asset class, 360 deals and the list goes on. The launch of the iPod doesn't explain everything in how we got here, but it's undeniably a major watershed moment for a deeper understanding of this history. Saxon interviews award-winning journalist Eamonn Forde about his recent piece in The Guardian on the iPod's 20th anniversary to grapple with all of this, leading to a sprawling and insightful interview examining the current state of the music business and technology. Also, Saxon and Sam discuss briefly the tragic events around Travis Scott's Astroworld concert and challenge popular media narratives by asking about the responsibility of Live Nation in this horrifying incident.    Read Forde's piece in The Guardian

EasyApple
#535: Il bello della domotica

EasyApple

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 62:53


Si parla di domotica con Cristian

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Chosen, Set Apart, and Loved

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 56:53


Christ has broken down the barriers of the old dispensation, so now we have to learn to function as a society, in Christ. We are chosen, separated, and loved by God, so we must act like it. Paul tells us to clothe ourselves in the attributes that come from God: compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and longsuffering. Only then can we put up with one another and be a cohesive body of believers in Christ. VF-2301 Colossians 3:12-13 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2021 Part 8: MilCog and Nexus Game Fair

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Join the Gutter Geeks as they chat with Jamie about MilCog and Nexus Game Fair which will be Thursday, June 23, through Sunday, June 26, 2022, at the Brookfield Conference Center FB MilCog: https://www.facebook.com/MilwaukeeCompanyofGamers/FB Nexus: https://www.facebook.com/nexusgamefairWEB MilCog: https://milcogcom.wordpress.comWEB Nexus: http://www.nexusgamefair.comMilCog Info: We curate one of the largest game libraries in the hobby which is available at regional gaming conventions and local events we host. Depending on the event we're attending the library usually contains 1000 – 2000 games for check-out. Our professional, uniformed staff is friendly and knowledgeable and can recommend just the right games for your group and the library is fully automated getting you to your table and playing quickly.Audio Only Version Below

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Why on Earth Does God Forgive?

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 57:49


Through Nehemiah 9:26-31 and Psalm 106 we have a mirror to show us the wickedness of fallen man and our own sinning ways. Why then, if God knows and sees all this, does He forgive? For His name's sake. He is still saving people today for simple faith in the name of Jesus Christ.   VF-2013  Nehemiah 9:26-31  Psalm 106 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2021 Part 7: Beer Court With Hinterland Brewery

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Join the Gutter Geeks for Beer Court with Special Guest Brian from Hinterland Brewery located in Green Bay WisconsinWEB: https://hinterlandbeer.com/brewery/FB: https://www.facebook.com/HinterlandBreweryTwitter:  https://twitter.com/hinterlandbeerAll the tasty beers we reviewed this evening.Blueberry Wheat   https://hinterlandbeer.com/beers/blueberry-wheat/Octoberfest  https://hinterlandbeer.com/beers/oktoberfest/Jamaican Haze I.P.A.  https://hinterlandbeer.com/beers/jamaican-haze-ipa/Audio Only Version Below

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

"The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand." First, a look at what the all things are, and then into three vignettes of God's love as seen in Christ: to the woman at the well, the woman taken in adultery and the post-betrayal Apostle Peter. With this we learn: the all things in Christ's hand funnel into the love of God and we have access to both by reaching for His hand by faith.  VF-1877  John 3:35, Matthew 11:27 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
A Right Understanding of Love

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:39


Love is the most abused four-letter word, especially in today's church world.    The focus in this teaching is that the love of God is a gift to us for our faith as we abide in His word.  We cannot manufacture that love, only God can place it within us. VF-1819   1 Corinthians 13 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved

MoneyBall Medicine
Why AI-based computational pathology detects more cancers

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:36


Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky, it was negative and there was no cancer. But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps? Until recently, it's been a meticulous but imperfect manual process where a pathologist would put a thin slice of tissue under a high-powered microscope and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But now the process is going digital—and growing more accurate.Harry's guest this week is Leo Grady, CEO of, Paige AI, which makes an AI-driven test called Paige Prostate. Grady says that in a clinical study, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed prostate cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool. That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives—nice odds if your own health is on the line. This week on the show, Grady explains explain how the Paige test works, how the company trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how it won FDA approval for the test, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky it was negative and there was no cancer.But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps?Well, until recently, it's been an extremely meticulous manual process. A pathologist would create a very thin slice of your tissue, put it under a high-powered microscope, and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But recently the process has started to go digital. For one thing, the technology to make a digital scan of a pathology slide has been getting cheaper. That's a no-brainer, since it makes it way easier for a pathologist to share an image if they want a second opinion.But once the data is available digitally, it opens up a bunch of additional possibilities. Including letting computers try their hand at pathology. That's what's happening at a company called Paige AI, which makes a newly FDA-approved test for prostate cancer called Paige Prostate.The test uses computer vision and machine learning to find spots on prostate biopsy slides that look suspicious, so a human pathologist can take a closer look.So why should you care?Well, in a clinical study that Paige submitted to the FDA, pathologists who had help from the Paige system accurately diagnosed cancer almost 97 percent of the time, up from 90 percent without the tool.That translates into a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. At the same time there was a 24 percent reduction in false positives. I gotta tell you, if I were getting a prostate biopsy, I'd really like those improved odds. And it's a great example of the kinds of AI-driven medical technologies that I write about in The Future You, which is now available from Amazon in Kindle ebook format.So I asked Paige's CEO, Leo Grady, to come on the show to explain how the test works, how Paige trained its software to be more accurate than a human pathologist, how the company got the FDA to give its first ever approval for an AI-based pathology product, and what it could all mean for the future of cancer diagnosis and treatment.Here's our conversation.Harry Glorikian: Leo, welcome to the show.Leo Grady: Hi, Harry. Glad to be here.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. You know, I've been watching the company for some time now, and the big story here seems to be that we're really entering the area of digital pathology, also known as sort of computational pathology, and it's funny because I've been talking about digital pathology since I think I started my career back when I was 25, which seems like a long time ago at this point. But for a lot of laboratory tests that we use, like it's usually done by eye, and now we can get a lot from sort of AI being assistive in this way. So keeping in mind that some of the listeners are professionals, but we have a bunch of sort of non-experts, could you start off explaining the term maybe computational pathology and summarize where the state of the art is, which I assume you guys are right at the cutting edge of it?Leo Grady: Yeah, so I think it actually might help just to jump back a level and talk about what is pathology and how is it done today? So today, so pathology is the branch of medicine where a doctor is taking tissue out of a patient through a biopsy, through surgery and making glass slides out of that tissue, looking at it under a microscope in order to make a diagnosis. And today, all of that process of taking the tissue out, cutting it, staining it, mounting it on slides. Then gets looked at under a microscope by a pathologist to make a diagnosis, and that diagnosis the pathologist makes is the definitive diagnosis that then drives all of the rest of the downstream management and care of that patient. When pathologists are looking through a microscope, sometimes they see something that they're not quite sure what it is. And so they may want to do another test. They may want to do another stain. They may want to cut more out of the tissue, make a second slide. Sometimes they want to ask a colleague for their opinion, or if they really feel like they need an expert opinion, they may want to send that case out for a consultation, in which case the glass slides or are put in a, you know, FedEx and basically shipped out to another lab somewhere. All of those different scenarios can be improved with digital pathology and particularly computational pathology and the sort of technology that we build at Paige. So in a digital world, what happens instead is that the slides don't go to the pathologist as glass. They go into a digital slide scanner, and those slide scanners produce a very high resolution picture of these slides.Leo Grady: So these are quarter-micron resolution images that get produced of each slide. And then the pathologist has a work list on their monitor. They look through those those cases, they open them up and then that digital workflow, they can see the sides digitally. When they have those slides digitally, if they want to send them out to a second opinion or or show them to a colleague, it's much easier to then send those cases electronically than it is to actually ship the glass from one location to another. Once those slides are digital it, it opens up a whole other set of possibilities for how information can come to the pathologist. So if they want additional information about something they see in those slides, rather than doing another stain, doing another cut, sending for a second opinion, what we can do and what we do at Paige is we we identify all the tissue patterns in that piece of tissue, match those against a large database where we have known diagnoses and say, OK, this case, this pattern here has a high match toward to something that's in this database. And by providing that information to the pathologists on request that pathologists can then leverage that information, integrate it and use it in their diagnostic process. And this is the product that the FDA just approved. It's the first ever AI based product in pathology that is specifically aimed at prostate cancer and providing this additional information in the context of a prostate needle biopsy.Harry Glorikian: Well, congratulations on that. That's, you know, that's amazing. And I'm. You know, the fact that the FDA is being more aggressive than I remember them being in the past is also a great thing to see. But, you know, we've been talking and quote digitizing things in pathology for for quite some time, let's say, separate from the AI based analytics part of it moving in that direction. What was the kind of technology advance or prerequisite that you guys came up with when you started Paige that that took this to that next level.Leo Grady: Well, as you're pointing out, Harry, most slides are not digitized today, single digits of slides in a clinical setting get digitized. And the reason for that has been you need to buy scanners, you need to change your workflow, you need to digitize these slides. They're enormously large from a file size and data complexity. So then you have to store them somehow and you make all of that investment and then you get to look at the same slide on a monitor that you look at under a microscope. And so pathologists for years have said, why? Why would we make this investment? Why would we go through all of that expense? And that trouble and that change and learn a new instrument when we don't really get a lot of value out of doing so? And furthermore, there was even a question for a long time, do you get the same information on a digital side that you get on glass through a microscope? Yep. There have been a number of things that have been changing that over time. So one is the maturity of the high capacity digital side scanners. There are now a number of hardware vendors that produce these. Storage costs have come down. And one thing that we offer at Paige is is cloud storage, which is really low cost because we're able to effectively pool costs with the cloud providers from multiple different labs and hospitals, so we can really drive those prices down as far as possible.Leo Grady: So that lowers that barrier. And then back in 2017, the first digital side scanner got approved, which demonstrated there was equivalency in the diagnosis between looking at the slide on a monitor and looking at it under a microscope. And that is something that that we also replicated with our digital side viewer, demonstrated that equivalency between digital and glass. But all of those barriers were barriers just to going digital in the first place. And now, really, for the first time, because of the maturity of the scanners, because of the FDA clearance of just the viewer, because of lower cost storage, many of those barriers have come down. Now what has not happened is still a major clinical benefit for going digital in the first place. Yes, you can share slides easier. Yes, you can retrieve slides easier. Yes, you can do education easier. It's still a lot of cost and a lot of changed your workflow, so I really think that that the introduction of the kinds of technologies that that the FDA approved, which we built with Paige Prostate, that actually adds additional information into the diagnostic workflow that can help pathologists use that information help them. You get to a better diagnosis, reduce false positives, reduce false negatives, which is what we showed in the study that for the first time is is going above and beyond just going digital and some of these conveniences of a digital workflow to providing true clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, whenever I look at this from an investment perspective, like if you take apart something and break it into its first principles, you know, levels, you have to have certain milestones hit. Otherwise, it's not going to come together, right? And I've, you know, looking at digital pathology, it's the same thing. You have to have certain pieces in place for the next evolution to be possible, because it's got to be built on top of these foundational pieces. But, you know, once you get there, the exponential nature of of how things change, once it's digitized and once you're utilizing it and prove that it works is sort of where you see the, you know, large leaps of benefit for the pathologist as well as, you know, ultimately we're doing this for better patient care. But you know, your product was I think the FDA called it the first ever FDA approval for an AI product in pathology, which is a big deal, at least as far as I'm concerned, because I've been doing it for a long time. But because it was first, it must have been a one hell of a learning process for you and the FDA to figure out how to evaluate a test like this. Can you sort of explain maybe a little bit about the process? You know, how did you win approval? What novel questions did you have to answer?Leo Grady: It was a long process. You know, as you point out, this is this is the first ever technology approved in this space. And I think you saw from the FDA's own press release their enthusiasm for what this technology can bring to patient benefits. Fortunately, we applied for breakthrough designation back in early 2019, received that breakthrough designation in February of 2019. And as a result, one of the benefits of breakthrough designation is the FDA commits to working closely with the company to try to iterate on the study protocol, iterate on the the validation that's going to be required in order to bring the the technology to market. And so because of that breakthrough designation, we had the opportunity to work with the the FDA in a much tighter iterative loop. And I think that they are they were concerned, I mean, primarily about the impact of a misdiagnosis and pathology, right? Which is really understandable, right? Their view is that, yes, maybe in radiology, you see something and maybe aren't totally sure. But then there's always pathology as a safety net, you know, in case you ever really need to resolve a ground truth. You can always take the tissue out and look at it under a microscope. But when you're dealing with a product for pathology, that's the end of the road. I mean, that is where the diagnostic buck stops. And so anything there that that was perhaps going to misinform a pathologist, mislead them, you know, ultimately lead to a negative conclusion for the patients could have more severe consequences.Speaker2: The flip side, of course, though, is that if you get it right, the benefits are much greater because you can really positively impact the care of those patients. So I think they they, you know, appropriately, we're concerned with the exacting rigor of the study to really ensure that that this technology was providing benefit and also because it was the first I think they wanted to be able to set a standard for future technologies that would have to live up to the same bar. So there were a lot of meetings, you know, a lot of trips down to Silver Spring. But I have to say that that the FDA, you know, I think in technology, there are a lot of companies that are are quick to, you know, malign regulators and rules. I frankly both at Paige and my previous experience at HeartFlow, at Siemens, I think the FDA brings a very consistent and important standard of clinical trial design of of, you know, technology proving that is safe and effective. And I found them to be great partners to work with in order to really identify what that protocol looks like to be able to produce the validation and then to, you know, ask some tough questions. But that's their job. And I think, you know, at the end of the day, the products that get produced that go through that process really have met the standard of of not only clinical validation, but even things like security and quality management and other really important factors of a clinical product.Harry Glorikian: Oh no, I'm in total agreement. I mean, whenever I'm talking to a company and they're like, Well, I don't know when I'm going to go to the agency, I'm like, go to the agency, like, don't wait till the end. Like there, actually, you need to look at them as a partner, not as an adversary.Leo Grady: Yeah. And a pre-submission meeting is is easy to do. It's an opportunity to make a proposal to the FDA and to understand how they think about it and whether that's that's going to be a strategy that's going to be effective and workable for them. So I always think that that pre subs are the place to start before you do too much work because you generally know whether you're on the right path or not.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I agree. And it's funny because you said, like, you know, they're concerned about the product, but it's interesting. Like from all the College of American Pathology studies where you send slides to different people, you don't always get the exact same answer, depending on who's looking at it. So I can see how a product can bring some level of standardization to the process that that helps make the call so uniform, even across institutions when you send the slides. So I think that's moving the whole field in a really positive direction.Leo Grady: Well, only if that uniform call is correct, right? Or better? Great. I mean, if you bring everybody down to the lowest common denominator that that standardization, but it's not moving the field forward. So. Correct. One of the curses of of bringing that level of standardization is that you have to really meet the highest bar of the highest pathologists and not not just the average. That said, you know, we're fortunate to come from Memorial Sloan-Kettering and to have the opportunity to work with some of the the leading pathologists in the world to really build in that level of rigor and excellence into the technology.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So that brings me to like, you know. The algorithms are built on a fairly large training set would be my assumption and of pre labeled sort of images, where do you guys source that from? Is it you have like a thousand people in the background sort of making sure that everything is labeled correctly before it's fed to the to the algorithm itself?Leo Grady: Well, what you're describing is very common where you have pathologists or in radiology radiologists or other experts really marking up images and saying this is the important part to pay attention to. This part is cancer. That part's benign. Our technology actually works differently. Our founder, Thomas Fuchs, and his team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering actually really made a breakthrough not only in the the quality of some of the the AI systems that were building, but also in the technology itself. And what what they did, this was all published in Nature Medicine a couple of years ago, is basically find a way to just show the computer a slide and the final diagnosis without having a pathologist, you know, mark up the slide, but just show them the final diagnosis. And when you show the computer enough examples of the slide and the final diagnosis, the computer starts to learn to say, OK, this pattern is common to all grade threes. This pattern is common to all grade fours. Or whatever it is. And the computer learns to identify those patterns without anybody going through and marking those up. Well, this technology is important for a few reasons.Leo Grady: One, it means we can train systems at enormous scale. We can not just do thousands of cases, but tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of cases. Second, it means that we can really build out a portfolio of technologies quickly that are very robust and not have to spend years annotating slides. And third, it allows us to start looking for patterns that no pathologists would necessarily know how to mark up. You know, can we identify which tumors are going to respond to certain drugs or certain therapies? You know, no pathologists are going to be able to say, OK, it's this part of the the tumor that you need to look at because they don't really know. But with this technology where we we know these tumors responded, these tumors didn't it actually helps us try to ferret out those patterns. So that that's one of the real key benefits that differentiates Paige from from other companies in this space is just the difference in the technology itself.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, it's funny because I must admit, like when we talk about stuff like this, I get super excited because I can see where things can go. It's. It's always difficult to explain it where somebody else can envision what you've been thinking about because you've been thinking about it so long, but it's super exciting. So let's jump to like the most important benefits, like if you had to rank the benefits of the technology, I mean, I've I read on your website that in the clinical study you guys submitted to the FDA, pathologist used using the Paige Prostate were seven percent more likely to correctly diagnose the cancer. Is that the major innovation? Would that by itself be enough to justify an investment in the technology? I mean, I'm trying to. You know, if you were to say God, this is the most important thing and then go down the list, what would they be?Leo Grady: Yeah, that's right. So so the study that we did was like this. We had 16 pathologists. They diagnosed about six hundred prostate needle core biopsy patients and they they did their diagnosis. They recorded it and then they did it a second time using Paige so they could see the benefit of all this pattern matching that that Paige had done for them. And what we did is we compared the diagnosis. They got the first time and the second time with the ground truth, consensus diagnosis that we had from Memorial. And what we found is that when the pathologists were using Paige, they had a 70 percent reduction in false negatives. They had a 24 percent reduction in false positives, and their interest in obtaining additional information went down because they had more confidence in the diagnosis that they were able to provide. And what was interesting about that group of 16 pathologists is it it included pathologists that were experienced, that were less experienced, some that were specialists in prostate cancer, some that were not so specialized in prostate cancer. And among that entire group of pathologists, they all got better. They all benefited from using this technology. And what's more, is that the gap between the less experienced, less specialized pathologists and more experienced, more specialized pathologists actually decreased as they all used the technology. So it allowed them to, like we were talking about before, actually come up to the level of of the better pathologists and even the better pathologists could leverage the information to get even better.Harry Glorikian: So as a male who you know who's going to age at some point and potentially have to deal with, hopefully not, a prostate issue, we want them to make an accurate diagnosis because you don't want the inaccurate diagnosis, especially in in that sort of an issue. But what about the speed? I mean, you've you talk about that, you know, it helps streamline the process and reduce reduce turnaround time for for patients. What does that do to workload and and how quickly you're able to turn that around compared to, say, a traditional method.Leo Grady: Our study was really focused on clinical benefit and patient benefit. We were not aiming to measure speed and the way in which the study was designed and the device is intended to be used is that the pathologist would look at the case, decide what they they think the result is, and then pull up the Paige results and see if it changes their thinking or calls their attention to something that they may have missed. So the focus of the the product was really on the the benefit to the the clinical diagnosis and the clinical benefit to patients by providing more information to the doctors. And the result of that information was, you know, clearly demonstrated benefit. Now if they can get to that result by looking at the Paige results and they don't need another cut, they don't need another stain, they don't need another consultation, then that's going to get the results back to the urologists faster, back to the patient faster and will ultimately enable them to start acting on that diagnosis more quickly. But the intention of the study, the intended use of the device is not around making pathologists faster. It's really around providing them this additional information so that they can use that in the course of their diagnosis and get the better results from patients.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So I asked this out of naivete because I didn't I didn't go looking for it. But have you guys done a health economic analysis of the system?Leo Grady: We have one. It certainly it's, as you know, it's really key to be able to look at that we have a model that we've built. We're still refining it with additional data. There was a study that was announced in the U.K. a couple of weeks ago where the NHS is actually funding a prospective multicenter trial that includes Oxford, Warwick, Coventry, Bristol to be able to evaluate the the health, economics and clinical benefits of using this technology in clinical practice prospectively. So that's something that we engaged with NICE [the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence] on in order to try to get the design correct that will help feed in real world data into the model. But we have a model that we've been using internally and are continuing to build and refine.Harry Glorikian: So. Again, incredible that you guys got FDA approval, I think the company was founded in 2017, if I'm correct. Can you talk about, you know, the founders and yow you guys, you know, built this so quickly, I mean time scale wise, it's a pretty compressed time scale, relatively speaking.Leo Grady: Well, yeah, it isn't, it isn't, ...so the company started in 2017, our first employee was actually middle of 2018 and we had our first venture round and in early 2018. However, the work that went into the company that spun out of Memorial Sloan-Kettering started earlier. So there is a group of really visionary individuals at MSK that back, I want to say, 2014, 2015, actually had started this push toward digital pathology, computational pathology, really seeing where the puck was going and building this technology. They formed something called the Warren Alpert Center, and the Warren Alpert Center provided some initial funding to really get this going and to hire some of the founders and to really move this technology in the right direction. And it was really because that technology started to show such promise that MSK made the decision that that was at a point where it could be better, you know, more impactful to actually go outside of MSK into a company where where we could industrialize the technology and really bring it to hospitals and labs around the world. So the technology started earlier, 2014, 2015. Paige was really launched in, I would say, 2018, although technically it was incorporated earlier and and then from that point I personally joined in 2019. And so I'm not I'm not a founder, but when I joined in 2019, you know, we we really spun up a significant team and and brought to bear some of my own experience and industrializing AI technology and bringing it out to clinical benefit.Harry Glorikian: Well, you know, most founders don't take the company all the way. It's a rare breed that's able to get it that far. So you know this a great story, but let's step back here and talk about like now you have to like, get people to accept this technology right, which is the human factor which I always find much more confounding than the the the the computational factor. So you've got to get, you know, somebody inside a hospital or pathology lab. Do you run into resistance or pushback from the technology, I mean, are they skeptical about the algorithm? How do you get a human to sort of buy off on this? I remember when we were presenting this, oh God, again, 25 years ago, they hated it. I mean, just hated it. And as time has gone by, you've seen that that digitization is slowly taking effect and where you know, it's assistive as opposed to something, I remember when we first launched this, it was, "This is going to be better than" or "take your job," which is a great way to make an enemy on the other side. And I see that the two actually being better than one or the other per se on on its own. So how are you guys approaching this? And do you have any anecdotal stories that you might be able to share?Leo Grady: Yeah, and so I think there are two elements are one is, you know. Are people resistant by the nature of the technology because they feel threatened by it, and then the other is how does market adoption start with this sort of technology to just the first point? You know, I tend to be very careful about the term AI. I feel like it know it often introduces this concept of, you know, people think of a robot doctor that's going to run in and start doing things. And it's just it's not. I mean, AI is a technology that's been in development for four decades. I did my PhD in AI, in computer vision, 20 years ago, and it's just a technology, right? It's like a transistor. It can be used to build many different things. At its core, it's just complex pattern matching, which is what we how we leverage that technology. In the case of Paige Prostate was to help provide that information. I think, you know, the better frame to think about this technology is as a diagnostic. This is just like a diagnostic test. You validate it with a standalone sensitivity and specificity. The information gets provided the doctor. You have to do a clinical trial that samples the space effectively of the patient population and the intended use.Leo Grady: And you have to make sure the doctors understand the information and know how to use it effectively. It's before my time, but I heard that when immunohistochemistry was first really introduced in pathology, that there is a discussion that this was going to take all the pathologists' jobs. And who needs a pathologist if you can just stain with IHG and get get a diagnostic result out of it? Well, you know, 20 years, IHT is an essential component of of pathology, and it's a key element of of the diagnostic workflow for pathologists. So, far from replacing any pathologists, it's empowered them. It's made there the benefit that they can provide to the clinicians, even more valuable and even more important. And I think we're going to see a similar trajectory with this computational technology. Now your first question about market adoption, how people adopting this, I would say that, you know, last week I went to the College of American Pathology meeting, which was in person in Chicago. It's my first in-person meeting since COVID, so a year and a half ago. And I noticed--and this was this was right after the announcement by the FDA of of the approval for Paige Prostate--I noticed there was a market shift in the conversations I was having with pathologists.Leo Grady: It was a shift away from "Does this technology work? Is it ready for prime time? What does it really do?" Toward, "Ok, how do we operationalize this? How do we bring it in house, how do we integrate this into a workflow and how do we how do we pay for it?" You know, those are the conversations that we were having in Chicago at CAP. Not does this work? Is it ready for prime time? So I do think that there is a market understanding that the technology is real, that it works, that it can provide benefit. Now it's just a question of how do we operationalize and how do we get it paid for? Because today there's no additional reimbursement for it. But you know, again, with market adoption, you're got your Moore adoption curve for anything. You get them and you get your innovators and early adopters, your early majority, late majority and your laggards. And you know where I think we're at a stage where we've got innovators and early adopters that are excited to jump in and start leveraging this technology. And I think, you know, we're going to get to your early majority and the late majority over time. It's always going to be a process.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no. I mean, you know, reflecting on your IHC [immunohistochemistry], that's where I started my career. Like, I think I taught like two hundred and fifty IHC courses over the first, say, three or four years that I was in the in the business. Three or four years. And you know, I agree with you. There's no way that any one of these technologies takes the place of [a pathologist]. They're additive, right? It's just a tool that helps. Make the circle much more complete than it would be in any one component, all by itself.Leo Grady: Could you ever hear when you were teaching these classes? Did anyone ever say that like, are we even going to need pathologists anymore?Harry Glorikian: No, it was when the is is when imaging systems came out that said the imaging system would then replace the pathologists. The IHC was was really the cusp of precision medicine, where I remember when I first started because we were working with ER and PR and, you know, when I first learned, you know about like, you know, the find and grind method, I would always be like, OK, it's x number of femtomoles. Like, What does that really telling you, right? Compared to this stain over here where I can see, you know, the anatomy, I can see where the cells are. I can see. I mean, there's so much more information that's coming from this that lets me make a better call. I will tell you selling it was not that hard to a lot of people, they they could see the benefit and you could you could really sort of get them to adopt it because they saw it as a tool.Leo Grady: Was that post-reimbursement?Harry Glorikian: Uh, even pre-reimbursement.Leo Grady: Really interesting. Yeah, there's there's a lot we can learn from you then.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, it was. It was. It was an interesting ride back then. I mean, I remember my first day at work. My boss comes to me and says. By the way, you're going to give a talk in Arizona in two weeks, and I was like, What do you mean I'm going to go? Who am I going to give a talk to you? He goes, Oh, you got to give a talk on the technology and how to use it. And I said, who's in the audience? And he said histo techs, and there'll be some pathologists. And I was like, Are you kidding me? And he goes, You got two weeks to get ready. Oh my God, I was cramming like crazy. I was in the lab. I was doing all the different types of assays that we had available. And you know, it was you went out there and I learned very quickly like, the show must go on, like you got to get out there and you got to do your thing. But it was it was a great time in my career to be on that on that bleeding edge of what was happening. So quickly, like, why did you guys start with prostate cancer, though like? It's not the most common cancer, although it's high on the list, so. Or maybe it's the second most type of cancer, but why did you guys start with that and where do you guys see it going from there, I guess, is next.Leo Grady: Well, the the decision of how to rank the different opportunities for, you know, ultimately we believe this technology can benefit really the entire diagnostic process, no matter what the question is in pathology. However, we did have to prioritize right and elements of of where to start, right. The elements of prioritization had a few factors. So one factor was how how prevalent is the disease? I mean, as you know, prostate cancer is one of the big four. Second, is there are a lot of benefit that we can provide today with prostate cancer. You know, man of a certain age goes in, gets a PSA test. It's high, they go and they get 12 cores, 14 cores, 20 cores out of their prostate and that produces. You know, it can be 30 slides, it can be 50 slides, I mean, it really depends, and this can take the pathologist a long time to look through. Most of those cores are negative. In fact, most of those patients are negative, but the consequence of missing something is really significant. And so we felt that this was a situation where there was a big need. There's a lot of there's a lot of screening that goes on with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is prevalent and the consequence of missing something is really significant. So that's where we felt like we could provide maximum benefit, both in terms of the patient, in terms of the doctor, and also that it was a significant need across the space.Leo Grady: We also had the data and the technology that we could go after that one well. But that said, you know, we announced that we have a breast cancer product that is got a CE mark in an enabling clinical use in Europe. We're doing a number of investigational studies with that product in the US right now and and working toward bringing that one to market. You know, after our our recent funding round, we spun up a number of teams and a number of of verticals that were we're going after in other cancer types and ultimately even beyond cancer. So there's more to come. We wanted we really take seriously the quality, the regulatory confirmation as well as the deployment channel. I mean, we built the whole workflow to be able to leverage this technology throughout the workflow in a way that is meaningful to the pathologist. So the development is is maybe a little bit more heavy and validation than some other companies where you have a PhD student that says, Oh, you know, I won some challenge and I went to go bring this to market building real clinical products, validating them, deploying them, supporting them is a real endeavor. But prostate was just the first, breast is second, and we have a whole pipeline coming out. So stay tuned.Harry Glorikian: So before we end here, I want to just tilt the lens a little bit towards the consumer and say, like, you know. Why would consumers show interest or at least be aware that these things are coming? Because I always feel like they're almost the last to know, or they just don't know at all. But, you know, in the future, you know, with technologies like this, do you see it identifying tumors sooner, faster, more accurately? Or, you know, will it will it help increase survival or help us find better drugs? I mean that that's I think, what people are really... If you went down one level from us of the people that are affected by this. Those are the sorts of things they'd want to know.Leo Grady: Well, I think, you know, a useful analogy is what happened with the da Vinci robot. You know, when it was necessary for a patient to get prostate cancer surgery, they often chose centers that had the da Vinci robot. Why? Because they believed that they were able to get better care at those centers. And it's not because the surgeons at the other centers were no good. It's because the the da Vinci added elements of precision and standardization and accuracy that could be demonstrated that would enable the the patient to feel more confident they're getting the best treatment at those centers. So as I think about Paige Prostate and and ultimately the other technologies that we're bringing to market behind that, I would imagine that from the standpoint of the patient, they would want the diagnosis done at a lab where they had access to all of the available information, all the latest technology that could inform the pathologists to get the right answer, right? So would you want to go to a lab where the pathologists had no access to IHC? Would you want to send it to a lab where the pathologist had no ability to do a consultation? Do you want to send your your sample to a lab where the pathologist doesn't have access to Paige? I think in the future the answer is going to be no.Leo Grady: And I think that we're going to see ultimately, insurance companies and Medicare recognize that those labs are able to provide better care to patients and are going to encourage them and incentivize them to adopt these technologies. So, you know, ultimately from a patient standpoint, they they want to choose centers where they're going to get the best care, they're going to get the best diagnosis. I think one of the exciting elements of digital technology is that not everybody is able to go to Memorial Sloan-Kettering, not everyone's able to go to MD Anderson or Mayo Clinic. I think the opportunity with digital technology is to really increase the accessibility and increase the availability of these diagnostic tools that can really empower and enable pathologists in many parts of America, as well as beyond to really get to better results for their patients. And ultimately, you know, every patient cares about getting those those results accurately for themselves and for their loved ones.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm always explaining, you know, to different people like once you digitize it, there's so many opportunities that may open up to make things better, faster, easier, more accurate and even start to shift the business model itself of what can be done and where it can be done. So it's it's a super exciting space, and thanks for taking the time. It was great to talk to you. I mean, I don't get to talk to people in pathology all the time anymore. I'm sort of all over the place, but it's it's near and dear to my heart, that's for sure.Leo Grady: Well, thank you so much, Harry. We're so excited by these recent developments with the first ever FDA approved technology in this space and, you know, really excited to help roll this out to labs and hospitals around the country and around the world to really benefit those doctors and patients.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, I look forward to hearing about the next FDA approval.Leo Grady: Working on it. Look forward to telling you.Harry Glorikian: Thanks.Leo Grady: All right. Thanks so much, Harry.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show.You can find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
The Love that Tethers Us to God

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:47


The unconditional agape love that comes from God is not like human love; it is the fruit of the Spirit of God in us, not something we can do in the flesh. This kind of love links us to God, and from it flows patience, kindness, generosity, and compassion.  VF-2303 Colossians 3:14 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Gilbert House Fellowship
Gilbert House Fellowship #324: Deuteronomy 24–27

Gilbert House Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 73:16


GOD'S INSTRUCTIONS to the Israelites were surprisingly progressive for the time, prohibiting His people from engaging in predatory lending practices and providing for the poor, widows, and orphans (without a government agency to collect and redistribute wealth!). We discuss God's command that oxen not be muzzled while they're treading out grain and its interesting connection to the war of Gog and Magog in Ezekiel 38 and 39. And we talk about God's command to build an altar on Mount Ebal, overlooking Shechem, when the Israelites came into the land. We'll have more on the significance of Shechem when we get to the Book of Joshua. We also explain why Deut. 26:14 includes a command not to take any of the firstfruits and tithes of the produce of the land as offerings to the dead. It's another clue that the pagan cult of the dead (i.e., the Rephaim/Nephilim) was a powerful influence on the ancient Canaanites. Take advantage of Aaron Lipkin's online seminars about the altar of Joshua at www.AltarofJoshua.com. The Bible's Greatest Mysteries is on the air! For more information, log on to www.BiblesGreatestMysteries.tv. And subscribe to the new YouTube channel for The Bible's Greatest Mysteries! NEW DATES FOR THE SKYWATCH TV TOUR OF ISRAEL! We will lead our next tour through the Holy Land March 20 - April 4, 2022, with an optional three-day extension to Jordan, with visits to Mount Nebo, Wadi Rum, and Petra. For more information, log on to www.SkyWatchinIsrael.com. Our book Giants, Gods and Dragons is available now in Kindle and paperback! Get it as part of a great package with more than 27 hours of our video teachings at the SkyWatchTV Store, or by itself at Amazon.com. And Derek's novels The God Conspiracy and Iron Dragons are available now in paperback and Kindle! See the official trailers and learn more at the website for Rose Avenue Fiction. Download these studies directly to your phone, tablet, or iPod! Get our free mobile app for iOS and Android. Links to the App Store and Google Play are on the main page at www.GilbertHouse.org. Click here for the complete archive of our New Testament Bible studies to date, and click here for the Old Testament studies to date. Or go to www.spreaker.com/show/gilbert-house-fellowship for all of the audio.

Podtrash
Podtrash 584 – The Black Tavern

Podtrash

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 98:54


Uhhhhhhh-Horror! Aiaaaa-Medo! Desespeeeruóóó´ó! Splashhh-Sofrimento! Uóóóó-Pânico! No episódio desta semana nos reunimos para falar sobre o The Black Tavern filme da Shaw Brothers lançado em 1972. E além de nossa resenha habitual você ouvirá descobrirá de onde o Tarantino tirou suas ideias para fazer o Os Oito Odiados. Então aumentem seus iPods porque mais um Podtrash está no ar! Duração: 99minMédia TD1P: 4,8 ELENCO Bruno "Gunfree" GunterDemétrius "Anjo Negro" Santos Douglas Fricke, o ExumadorEdson OliveiraShin Koheo, o Maratonista nu! ARTE DO BANNER Pablo CarranzaConfira o trabalho do Pablo no TumblrOu no InstagramFicou curioso sobre o Podrão Aniquilação? Veja como ter o seu acessando o site do Mau Gosto Corp! Podrão aniquilação entrando no VHS EXTRAS DESTE PODTRASH IMDb do filmeHKMDb do filmeFilme completo com Legendas em Inglês no Youtube Escute esta playlist no Spotify! FEEDS E LINKS DO PODTRASH Podtrash na iTunes StorePodtrash no SpotifyFeed completo do PodtrashFeed sem os Lado BFeed do Lado BCanal do Podtrash no YoutunerParticipe do Grupo “Esse Merece um Podtrash” lá no Facebook!Participe do grupo do Telegram dos Ouvintes do PodtrashConheça a Loja de Camisetas As Baratas! CONTATOS DO PODTRASH podtrash@td1p.com@podtrashFacebook do Podtrash CAPA DESTE PODTRASH

The History of Computing
Getting Fit With Fitbit

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 16:18


Fitbit was founded in 2007, originally as Healthy Metrics Research, Inc, by James Park and Eric Friedman. They had a goal to bring fitness trackers to market. They didn't invent the pedometer and in fact wanted to go far further. That prize goes to Abraham-Louis Perrelet of Switzerland in 1780 or possibly back to da Vinci. And there are stories of calculating the distance armies moved using various mechanisms that used automations based on steps or the spinning of wagon wheels. The era of wearables arguably began in 1953 when the transistor radio showed up and Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka started Sony. People started to get accustomed to carrying around technology. 1961 and Claude Shannon and Edward Thorp build a small computer to time when balls would land in roulette. Which they put in a shoe. Meanwhile sensors that could detect motion and the other chips to essentially create a small computer in a watch-sized package were coming down in price. Apple had already released the Nike+iPod Sports Kit the year before, with a little sensor that went in my running shoes. And Fitbit capitalized on an exploding market for tracking fitness. Apple effectively proved the concept was ready for higher end customers. But remember that while the iPod was incredibly popular at the time, what about everyone else? Park and Friedman raised $400,000 on the idea in a pre-seed round and built a prototype. No, it wasn't actually a wearable, it was a bunch of sensors in a wooden box. That enabled them to shop around for more investors to actually finish a marketable device. By 2008 they were ready to take the idea to TechCrunch 50 and Tim O'Reilly and other panelists from TechCrunch loved it. And they picked up a whopping 2,000 pre-release orders. Only problem is they weren't exactly ready to take that kind of volume. So they toured suppliers around Asia for months and worked overtime in hotel rooms fixing design and architecture issues. And in 2009 they were finally ready and took 25,000 orders, shipping about one fifth of them. That device was called the Fitbit Tracker and took on a goal of 10,000 steps that became a popular goal in Japan in the 1960s. It's a little money-clip sized device with just one button that shows the status towards that 10,000 step goal. And once synchronized we could not only see tons of information about how many calories we burned and other statistics but we could also see Those first orders were sold directly through the web site. The next batch would be much different, going through Best Buy. The margins selling directly were much better and so they needed to tune those production lines. They went to four stores, then ten times that, then 15 times that. They announced the Fitbit Ultra in 2011. Here we got a screen that showed a clock but also came with a stopwatch. That would evolve into the Fitbit One in 2012. Bluetooth now allowed us to sync with our phones. That original device would over time evolve to the Zip and then the Inspire Clip. They grew fast in those first few years and enjoyed a large swathe of the market initially, but any time one vendor proves a market others are quick to fast-follow. The Nike Fuelband came along in 2012. There were also dozens of cheap $15 knock-offs in stores like Fry's. But those didn't have nearly as awesome an experience. A simple experience was the Fitbit Flex, released in 2013. The Fitbit could now be worn on the wrist. It looked more like the original tracker but a little smaller so it could slide in and out of a wristband. It could vibrate so could wake us up and remind us to get up and move. And the Fitbit Force came out that year, which could scroll through information on the screen, like our current step count. But that got some bad press for the nickel used on the device so the Charge came out the next year, doing much of the same stuff. And here we see the price slowly going up from below a hundred dollars to $130 as new models with better accelerometers came along. In 2014 they released a mobile app for all the major mobile platforms that allowed us to track devices through Bluetooth and opened up a ton of options to show other people our information. Chuck Schumer was concerned about privacy but the options for fitness tracking were about to explode in the other direction, becoming even less private. That's the same year the LG G Watch came out, sporting a Qualcomm Snapdragon chip. The ocean was getting redder and devices were becoming more like miniature computers that happened to do tracking as well. After Android Wear was released in 2014, now called Wear OS, the ocean was bound to get much, much redder. And yet, they continued to grow and thrive. They did an IPO, or Initial Public Offering, in 2015 on the back of selling over 21 million devices. They were ready to reach a larger market. Devices were now in stores like Walmart and Target, and they had badges. It was an era of gamification and they were one of the best in the market at that. Walk enough steps to have circumnavigated the sun? There's a badge for that. Walk the distance of the Nile? There's a badge for that. Do a round trip to the moon and back? Yup, there's a badge for that as well. And we could add friends in the app. Now we could compete to see who got more steps on the day. And of course some people cheated. Once I was wearing a Fitbit on my wrist I got 60,000 steps one day as I painted the kitchen. So we sometimes didn't even mean to cheat. And an ecosystem had sprung up around Fitbit. Like Fitstar, a personal training coach, which got acquired by Fitbit and rebranded as Fitbit Coach. 2015 was also when the Apple Watch was released. The Apple Watch added many of the same features like badges and similar statistics. By then there were models of the Fitbit that could show who was calling our phone or display a text message we got. And that was certainly part of the Wear OS for of Android. But those other devices were more expensive and Fitbit was still able to own the less expensive part of the market and spend on R&D to still compete at the higher end. They were flush with cash by 2016 so while selling 22 million more devices, they bought Coin and Pebble that year, taking in technology developed through crowdfunding sources and helping mass market it. That's the same year we got the Fitbit Alta, effectively merging the Charge and Alta and we got HR models of some devices, which stands for Heart Rate. Yup, they could now track that too. They bought Vector Watch SRL in 2017, the same year they released the Ionic smartwatch, based somewhat on the technology acquired from Pebble. But the stock took a nosedive, and the market capitalization was cut in half. They added weather to the Ionic and merged that tech with that from the Blaze, released the year before. Here, we see technology changing quickly - Pebble was merged with Blaze but Wear OS from Google and Watch OS from Apple were forcing changes all the faster. The apps on other platforms were a clear gap as were the sensors baked into so many different integrated circuit packages. But Fitbit could still compete. In 2018 they released a cheaper version of the smartwatch called the Versa. They also released an API that allowed for a considerable amount of third party development, as well as Fitbit OS 3. They also bought Twine Health in 2018 Partnered with Adidas in 2018 for the ionic. Partnered with Blue Cross Blue Shield to reduce insurance rates 2018 released the Charge 3 with oxygen saturation sensors and a 40% larger screen than the Charge 2. From there the products got even more difficult to keep track of, as they poked at every different corner of the market. The Inspire, Inspire HR, Versa 2, Versa Lite, Charge 4, Versa 3, Sense, Inspire 2, Luxe. I wasn't sure if they were going to figure out the killer device or not when Fitbit was acquired by Google in 2021. And that's where their story ends and the story of the ubiquitous ecosystem of Google begins. Maybe they continue with their own kernels or maybe they're moving all of their devices to WearOS. Maybe Google figures out how to pull together all of their home automation and personal tracking devices into one compelling offer. Now they get to compete with Amazon who now has the Halo to help attack the bottom of the market. Or maybe Google leaves the Fitbit team alone to do what they do. Fitbit has sold over 100 million devices and sports well over 25 million active users. The Apple Watch surpassed that number and blew right past it. WearOS lives in a much more distributed environment where companies like Asus, Samsung, and LG sell products but it appears to have a similar installation base. And it's a market still growing and likely looking for a leader, as it's easy to imagine a day when most people have a smart watch. But the world has certainly changed since Mark Weiser was the Chief Technologist at the famed Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, or Xerox Parc in 1988 when he coined the term "ubiquitous computing.” Technology hadn't entered every aspect of our lives at the time like it has now. The team at Fitbit didn't invent wearables. George Atwood invented them in 1783. That was mostly pulleys and mechanics. Per V. Brüel first commercialized the piezoelectric accelerometer in 1943. It certainly took a long time to get packaged into an integrated circuit and from there it took plenty of time to end up on my belt loop. But from there it took less than a few years to go on my wrist and then once there were apps for all the things true innovation came way faster. Because it turns out that once we open up a bunch of APIs, we have no idea the amazing things people use with what then go from devices to platforms. But none of that would have happened had Fitbit not helped prove the market was ready for Weiser's ubiquitous computing. And now we get to wrestle with the fallout while innovation is moving even faster. Because telemetry is the opposite of privacy. And if we forget to protect just one of those API endpoints, like not implementing rate throttling or messing up the permissions, or leaving a micro-service open to all the things, we can certainly end up telling the world all about things. Because the world is watching, whether we think we're important enough to watch or not.

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Christian Unity: Knit Together in God's Love

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 57:32


The body of Christ is supposed to be knit together in love, not ripped apart. Without being knit together in Christ's love, the church cannot survive. Paul addressed the Colossians with pastoral concern, reminding them to focus back on Christ and to be knit together in the agape love of God. When the problems come, this love of God through Christ should be our common bond. Christ is the unifying force. Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Holy and Blameless Before Him in Love

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 55:04


We don't find God; He chose us form among those He didn't choose before the world was formed. The purpose of the choice is that we could be holy and without blame when we finally come before Him in love. Becoming holy and blameless before Him is not a change we make in ourselves. He makes that change in us for our faith.  VF-2204   Ephesians 1:4 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Understand the Bible?  Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.
Commitment: God's Work in You Produces the Ability to Respond

Understand the Bible? Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 57:58


Commitment begins first and foremost with the activity of God in prevenient Grace. Our Act is then one of presenting ourselves on the Basis of the mercies of God. The Character of commitment is all hinged on our understanding of what the Lord has done in making us new creatures in Christ. The Demands of commitment are that we are not to be conformed to (taking the imprint of) the world, but transformed (metamorphosed) by the renewing of our minds. Our minds are renewed by reading and meditating on the Word, hearing God's Word, rightly divided, and communicating with God through our prayer life. The Effects that result from commitment are enduring changes from the inside that give our personalities a more complete expression.  VF-2087  Romans 12:1-2 Watch, Listen and Learn 24x7 at PastorMelissaScott.com Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from Faith Center in Glendale. Call 1-800-338-3030 24x7 to leave a message for Pastor Scott. You may make reservations to attend a live service, leave a prayer request or make a commitment. Pastor Scott appreciates messages and reads them often during live broadcasts. Follow @Pastor_Scott on Twitter and visit her official Facebook page @Pastor.M.Scott. Download Pastor Scott's "Understand the Bible" app for iPhone, iPad and iPod at the Apple App Store and for Android devices in the Google Store. Pastor Scott can also be seen 24x7 on Roku and Amazon Fire on the "Understand the Bible?" channel. ©2021 Pastor Melissa Scott, Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

Succotash, The Comedy Soundcast Soundcast
Succotash Epi277: Two Nights & A Bite

Succotash, The Comedy Soundcast Soundcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 30:25


Saluton, estas mi Tyson Saner. I am your host for this first Succotash episode of November. It's number 277, welcome to it. How was your Halloween? Mine hasn't happened yet technically but it will have had by the time you hear this so…Who knows? Will I remember to follow up on it to let you know how it went? Will I tweet about it? How far into the future are you? Does Twitter still exist? Does the internet still exist? How about the iPod, did it make a comeback?…Well, even if it does I imagine this show will still refer to podcasts as "soundcasts" and that's fine by me. Last week on Epi276, show creator and executive producer Marc Hershon brought you a quartet of clips from the likes of Mike and Tom Eat Snacks, O'Brien & Bolt: the Podcasts, The Dana Gould Hour, and The Projection Booth/Kulturecast crossover. It's an episode full of entertainment and I urge you to check it out at your earliest convenience. This week, I've selected 3 clips for your listening pleasure. They are from the soundcasts known as Half Hour Happy Hour: Ladies Night with Alison and Maude (& Tom), Saturday Night Live Afterparty, and Anxiety Bites. There's also a classic Henderson's Pants advert from 2014 - Henderson's Pedestrian Pants - for you to enjoy…or process however you choose to, really. It's a fun ad from our longtime fake sponsor. Can you believe this show has survived for 10 years without actual sponsorship? Well,…it has. CLIPS Half Hour Happy Hour: Ladies Night with Alison and Maude (& Tom) Each week Alison Haislip and Maude Garrett (w/Tom Rajewski) sit down for a half hour of happy hour. Drinks are drank and conversations are had covering stories both important and useless. Sit, relax, and knock back a glass of your favorite adult beverage while you laugh with (or at) them for the next 30ish minutes. Our featured clips is from their October 7th show of this year, entitled "VHS Clamshells from The Vault", where the gang issues back together for more libations and to catch up! Anxiety Bites Comedian Jen Kirkman, who has had life-long Panic and Generalized Anxiety Disorder, brings her life-lessons, humor, and hope to a show that's about normalizing having anxiety so that we go from whispering dramatically, “I have anxiety” to saying out loud with a shrug, “Yeah, I have anxiety.” Jen interviews experts with anxiety — be they PhD's, creatives, or spiritual gurus — for advice on how to self-diagnose, begin to treat, and how to live easily with everyday anxiety and panic and, at the very least, giving an interesting, relatable, calming listen. We clip the show called "Anxiety is Old Habit!" from just this past month, where Jen talked to NY Times Bestselling Author, MD, PhD, Dr. Jud Brewer and finds out how our fingers can help us during a panic attack, sometimes neuroscience puts out the fire of anxiety better than therapy, and why the hell haven't our brains evolved beyond thinking we're in danger when we're not? Saturday Night Live (SNL) Afterparty A Peabody Award-coveting podcast review of NBC's storied late night show SNL, featuring intimate, probing, aggressive—yet tender—conversations with fresh, young, supple voices from across the comedy landscape. Hosted by John Murray of the Spry Agency, and including Katherine Coleman and Steve Finn. Our clip is from the episode looking at Owen Wilson's hosting on October 2nd of this year, as well as musical guest Kacey Musgraves. And that's what's in store in our first show of November, the first show after Halloween…and we march steadily on towards December and the end of the year that was 2021…Or rather, still IS 2021. How is it that 2021 has been actually somewhat more frustrating than 2020 was? I suppose that's a subjective observation but I'd be willing to bet that I am not alone in that estimation. Thank you for listening, I do hope you got something out of this brief moment in time and that it was positive. I do hope 2022 is better but I'm in no hurry to get there lately. Time moves too fast for my taste lately. Perspective is what it is. Next show up in a week is Epi278 and Marc Hershon is at the wheel and then, presumably, I will be back for Epi279. Until then, be decent to each other, try not to spread disease or bad ideas, and if anyone asks you if you have heard anything interesting lately and it happens to be us that fills in that particular blank for you, won't you do us the utmost of favors and please pass the Succotash? — Tyson Saner

How I Built This with Guy Raz
Audible: Don Katz

How I Built This with Guy Raz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 77:22


Before mp3 players came along in the mid 1990's, listening to audiobooks was a pain. The number of titles was tiny, narration was dull, and if you wanted to listen on the go, you had to juggle a bunch of clunky cassettes. Don Katz faced these frustrations every day while jogging. He was an accomplished writer who thought there was something special and intimate about hearing an author's words spoken aloud. He wondered: what if audiobooks could be purchased online and downloaded onto a dedicated player? At the time, the concept was so new that few people knew what he was talking about. But in 1997, with no direct experience in tech, Don and his partners launched the first digital player for audiobooks. Audible was slow to gain traction and took a beating during the dot-com bust; but its luck changed with the release of the iPod and a timely partnership with Apple. In 2008, Amazon purchased Audible for $300 million, and today Audible has the largest audiobook catalog in the world, with over 600,000 titles.

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with Bluhauz

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 34:37


We had the pleasure of interviewing Bluhauz over Zoom video!  Throughout his life, singer/guitarist Bluhauz has experienced a truly unpredictable and unprecedented journey. From his native Argentina to living in Miami, from admiring Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page to being mentored by him, from attending Berklee College of Music to playing some of the most famed festivals in the world - Bluhauz has done all of these things. Now, with his debut solo album, BLUHAUZ, he's setting off on his biggest adventure yet - musically, spiritually, and personally. Bluhauz began his musical journey while growing up in Argentina. A pivotal moment came when he was thirteen years old, when his musical horizons were greatly expanded after his Uncle Martin uploaded songs onto his iPod, giving him his first introduction to Led Zeppelin, Frank Zappa and Pink Floyd. But he wasn't content to simply listen to this type of music: he wanted to create it, too, so he soon learned to play the guitar. As a teenager, he joined his first band who rehearsed in a blue house, which later inspired his “Bluhauz” artist moniker. When he was seventeen years old, he started playing shows - and immediately knew this is what he needed to do with his lifeMoving to the U.S. when he was twenty years old (though he'd been visiting family in America his whole life), Bluhauz enrolled at the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston - where he promptly made his mark by remaining true to rock, instead of the school's typical jazz focus. In 2013, he formed the hard rock band Stone Giant with like-minded classmates. With his clear musical vision and trusted team backing him, Bluhauz is ready release this debut solo album and fully launch this latest phase in his career. Things already look promising: the three singles have all been well-received, leading to his much-praised appearance at the Billboard AR virtual festival last July. Given all the unexpected twists and turns his life has already taken, it will undoubtedly be interesting to watch - and hear - what Bluhauz does next. We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com. www.BringinitBackwards.com #podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #Bluhauz #zoom  Listen & Subscribe to BiB Follow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! 

Grumpy Old Geeks
528: Stay Grump Ye

Grumpy Old Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 59:50


Jason pivots; health care tech perks; Tesla beta pulled back; Blue Origin space station; Facebook's milk money math; Facebook, we got 'em this time!... er, no; Snap shares plunge with Apple privacy; TRUTH Social hacked pre-launch; WeWork goes public; Invasion; Star Trek: Lower Decks; Foundation; Another Life; ID10T, Curious Creatures podcasts; 20 years since the iPod; Ask Delphi; Facebook data scraping; eyeball scanning for crypto; the splinter net; you won't believe what Dave did this time!Show notes at https://gog.show/528FOLLOW UPThe PivoteerWhat you need to know about egg-freezing, the hot new perk at Google, Apple, and FacebookForget Kanye West. He's now officially just YeTesla pulled its latest ‘Full Self Driving' beta after testers complained about false crash warnings and other bugsElon Musk says 'issues' have forced Tesla to pull its latest full self-driving betaLyft report reveals more than 4K sexual assaults, 10 fatal physical assaults during 3-year spanIN THE NEWSBlue Origin announces plans for a commercial space stationFacebook fined a record £50m by UK competition watchdogInternal Facebook documents highlight its moderation and misinformation issuesFacebook agrees to pay French publishers for news reuseFacebook's oversight board faults its policy on preferential treatment.Snap shares plunge 25% as Apple privacy changes hit ads businessTrump to launch his own social media platform, calling it TRUTH SocialPranksters have already defaced Trump's new social networkTwitter's own research shows that it's a megaphone for the right. But it's complicated.A Changed WeWork Goes Public via SPACWarmer welcome for WeWork 2 years later on Wall StreetMEDIA CANDYInvasionStar Trek: Lower Decks Season 2 Episode 2 Easter Eggs and ReferencesFoundationAnother Life Season 2ID10T Episode #1138 – Danny ElfmanCurious CreaturesAPPS & DOODADS20 years ago today iPod changed the world, here's what it means to usThe AI oracle of Delphi uses the problems of Reddit to offer dubious moral adviceAsk DelphiYouTube will begin demonetizing 'low-quality' kids videos next monthSECURITY HAH!The CyberWireDave BittnerHacking HumansCaveatRecorded FutureIn a fit of frustration I made a thingHere's the YouTube video that put me over the topFacebook sues programmer who allegedly scraped data for 178 million usersSilicon Valley entrepreneur Sam Altman wants to scan your eyes in exchange for free cryptocurrencyYou Can Get This Free Crypto—If the ‘Orb' Scans Your EyeWorldcoin would like you to gaze upon this orb and receive free cryptoRussia Is Censoring the Internet, With Coercion and Black BoxesSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)
MBW 789: The Knitters of Newfoundland - macOS Monterey, iOS 15.1, iPod's 20th Anniversary

MacBreak Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 139:04


iOS 15.1 brings delayed SharePlay feature to iPhones and iPads iOS 15.1 Features: Everything New in iOS 15.1 Apple's M1 Pro, M1 Max SoCs Investigated: New Performance and Efficiency Heights New 16-Inch MacBook Pro With M1 Max to Feature High Power Mode for Intensive Workloads macOS Monterey is now available Picks of the Week Andy's pick: Rectangle for Mac Rene's pick: AirPods Beanies Leo's pick: Brew Bundle Alex's pick: Screen to Layers Hosts: Leo Laporte, Alex Lindsay, Rene Ritchie, and Andy Ihnatko Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/macbreak-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Melissa.com/twit att.com/activearmor twit.cachefly.com

This Week in Tech (MP3)
TWiT 846: I Love You Zune Much - New Mac chips, new Pixel 6, Proton Mail's big win, Squid Game rakes it in

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 138:56


I Love You Zune Much - New Mac chips, new Pixel 6, Proton Mail's big win, Squid Game rakes it in Samsung now lets you customize your own Galaxy Z Flip 3. Pixel 6: Everything to know about Google's newest phone. Google's Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro finally bring new camera hardware in addition to software. Intel slipped—and its future now depends on making everyone else's chips. If The Arm Deal Fails, NVIDIA Is Fine, But Arm May Struggle. Apple announces 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro: new design, display notch, 120Hz, M1 Pro chip, HDMI, MagSafe, more. Apple announces third-generation AirPods for $179. @PatrickMcGee_: "An *enormous thread* on alleged @Google @Facebook collusion based on the just-released *unredacted* complaint from the Texas AG." @fasterthanlime: "google has a secret deal with facebook called "Jedi Blue" that they knew was so illegal that it has a whole section describing how they'll cover for each other if anyone finds out" Why Facebook is rebranding. What it was like to watch Steve Jobs introduce the iPod 20 years ago. Proton wins appeal in Swiss court over surveillance laws. Squid Game Season 2? Series Worth $900 Million to Netflix So Far. YouTube is about to pull its apps from Roku, and the fight is going all the way to Congress. John Carmack pushes out unlocked OS for defunct Oculus Go headset. Microsoft now lets you test Android apps on Windows 11. A&W Turns its 'Worst Marketing Fail' Into a New Burger. Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Connie Guglielmo, Louis Maresca, and Owen JJ Stone Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CrowdStrike.com/twit wwt.com/twit Stamps.com promo code TWiT podium.com/twit