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The Bike Shed
368: Sustainable Web Development

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 36:03


Stephanie talks about hosting a "Soup Group"! Joël got nerd-sniped during the last episode and dove deeper into Maggie Appleton's "Tools for Thought." Stephanie has been thinking a lot about Sustainable Web Development. What is sustainability? How does it relate to tech and what we do? This episode is brought to you by Airbrake (https://airbrake.io/?utm_campaign=Q3_2022%3A%20Bike%20Shed%20Podcast%20Ad&utm_source=Bike%20Shed&utm_medium=website). Visit Frictionless error monitoring and performance insight for your app stack. Maggie Appleton's Tools for Thought (https://maggieappleton.com/tools-for-thought) Tangrams (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tangram) Tessellation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tessellation) Hexagons are the Bestagons (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thOifuHs6eY) Sustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails (https://sustainable-rails.com/) Transcript: AD: thoughtbot is thrilled to announce our own incubator launching this year. If you are a non-technical founding team with a business idea that involves a web or mobile app, we encourage you to apply for our eight-week program. We'll help you move forward with confidence in your team, your product vision, and a roadmap for getting you there. Learn more and apply at tbot.io/incubator. JOËL: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Joël Quenneville. STEPHANIE: And I'm Stephanie Minn. And together, we're here to share a bit of what we've learned along the way. JOËL: So, Stephanie, what's new in your world? STEPHANIE: I'm excited to share a winter survival idea for folks out there who are, like me, in a very cold place where all your friends don't want to hang out [laughs] and bear the cold temperatures of deep winter in January. Because tonight, I'm hosting my first soup group where I'm basically just going to make a really big batch of soup and have my friends come over with bread, and we're going to eat soup and bread and be cozy. And I'm really excited because I was trying to figure out a way to combat the winter blues a little bit. And, yeah, I think this time of year can be really tough after the holidays to get people together again. At least for me, I was feeling like I haven't seen my friends in so long. And I was like, well, I could just be the person to take the initiative [laughs] and be like, "Come over to our place." And the goal is to eventually do this regularly and just have this low-stakes open invitation for anyone to come and show up however they want to. It doesn't have to be, like, big pressure or anything. And if they can't make it at any one time, then there will hopefully be one in the future where they can make it, so I'm excited. After this, I am going to make soup for ten people, and it's going to be great. [laughs] JOËL: I love this idea. Soup on a cold day is just the coziest thing. STEPHANIE: Yeah, exactly. I definitely wanted to just make people feel warm and cozy. And that's what I want, so I'm really doing this for myself. [laughs] JOËL: And you know the advantage of hosting is you don't have to go outside. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's the real thing is I'm probably going to kick everyone out at like 11:00 p.m. and then go straight to bed, and it's going to be great. [laughs] JOËL: Have you been experimenting with a particular kind of soup recently? Are you going to bring out an old favorite? STEPHANIE: Yeah, I'm excited to make ribollita today, so kind of like a Tuscan style of veggie hearty soup. And I've just been bookmarking soup recipes left and right. [laughs] And I've outsourced the bread situation. So I'm excited to see what kind of bread people bring. And yeah, it'll be very fun and kind of surprising in a comforting way. JOËL: I'm not familiar with this soup. It's ribollita you said? STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's it. JOËL: You said it's a vegetable soup. STEPHANIE: Yeah, mostly veggies and beans. So I have this giant cabbage, a lot of kale, multiple cans of Great Northern white beans, and they're all going to get mixed together. And we'll see how it turns out. I'll update the podcast on how the soup group goes. It is the inaugural one. So I can't think of a time that I made that much soup before. So, hopefully, it goes well. We'll find out. So, Joël, what about you? What's new in your world? JOËL: So, in the previous episode, we talked a little bit about some of the things you had learned about note-taking. And you'd mentioned an article by, I think, Maggie Applebon -- STEPHANIE: Maggie Appleton. JOËL: Appleton...on tools for thought. It was linked in the show notes of that episode. And I went back and read that article, and it was so good, particularly the section, I think, on historical tools for thought and how they, over time, were sort of groundbreaking in helping us to either remember things or to think about problems or ideas in a different way, or to sort of interrogate those ideas and see if we think they're true or helpful. And these were things like writing or the number system but even some more fancy things like the scientific method for the Cartesian coordinate system. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I was really excited to share this with you because I think it was the intersection of a lot of your different interests, including note-taking, diagrams, history, and human cognition, so I'm glad that you found it interesting. JOËL: I definitely got nerd-sniped there. STEPHANIE: [laughs] JOËL: I think one thing that really struck me was the power of having multiple different representations for ideas. And one that jumped out at me was the Cartesian coordinate system, which, among other things, a really powerful tool that gave people...when this was invented, it allowed you to convert algebra problems into geometry problems. And so now, something that used to be an equation you can draw as a triangle or something. And we know how to find the area of a triangle. That's been known since the ancient Greeks and even earlier. And so now a problem that sounded hard is now easy, or at least we have a different way to think about that problem. Because if this equation is equivalent to a triangle, what does that mean? And vice versa, you can use this to convert geometry problems into algebra problems. And so sometimes the power of a new tool for thought might be in that it allows you to sort of convert between two other existing ways of representing things. And making those connections, all of a sudden gives you a whole new way of thinking about things. That blew my mind. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I agree. I think the other really cool thing is that a lot of these ideas that humans are discovering also already existed in the natural world. So when you are talking about math, you can see representations of math in plants and nature, and I was reminded of how honeycomb from bees is one of the strongest shapes. And yeah, it's really neat to draw inspiration from a lot of places and learn from things that, like, figured it out before we did. JOËL: Have you seen the video on YouTube called "Hexagons are the Bestagons?" STEPHANIE: No, I have not. Tell me more. JOËL: It's a video on YouTube. We can link it in the show notes. Basically, the hexagon shows up everywhere in nature in part because it has a lot of really fun mathematical properties. It's one of the few shapes that you can use to completely cover a surface. So if you want to subdivide a two-dimensional surface into smaller shapes without leaving any empty spaces between them, you really don't have that many options. I want to say it's like squares and triangles and hexagons are the only shapes that can do that. And hexagons have these really fun properties around strength. They also are one of the best balances between volume versus the amount of material that it takes to give you that volume and for strength and things like that. So it's good for honeycombs because you can store a lot of honey for very little amount of wax. But it's also good for all sorts of structural engineering because you can build things that are very strong yet light because they require very little metal or other material to create them. STEPHANIE: When you're saying hexagons filling a lot of space, I also thought about how they've become kind of popular in tiles or interior design in kitchens, and bathrooms, and stuff. [laughs] I've definitely seen that trend a bit. [laughs] So that's really cool just to see, like, yeah, this thing in the natural world that we have adopted for other uses. It's really fun. JOËL: I want to say this idea of taking a 2D space and being able to completely cover it without spaces with a shape is called tessellating a plane. It's a fancy term for it. And if you want to do it with just a single shape, I think there are only like three or four shapes that can do it. STEPHANIE: That's really interesting because it reminds me of those tessellation puzzles that I used to play with as a kid. Do you know what I'm talking about? JOËL: You're thinking like a tangram or something different. STEPHANIE: Yeah, yeah, tangram, that was...oh my gosh, those were fun. Wow, I was learning math as a young child, [laughs] just didn't even know it. JOËL: Another random fun fact: the logo for the Elm programming language is a tangram. STEPHANIE: [Gasps] JOËL: And the community is sort of encouraged to then remix it because the tangram is just a square tessellated out of a bunch of these shapes. But then, if you're building a library or you've got an event or something, the community will take those shapes and remix them into some other shapes that might fit your event. STEPHANIE: That's really cool. Is it a metaphor for how Elm can be used in different ways? [laughs] JOËL: I'm not sure about the story behind the logo. We'd have to look that up. STEPHANIE: That'll be a good adventure for later. [laughs] JOËL: In...I want to say Moroccan art, but I think it might be broader than just Moroccan. It might be more broadly North African or Moorish or whatever you want to call that. There's a long history of building these tessellations, I think, out of tiles, but maybe other things as well where you're doing it with a variety of shapes. So you might start...a classic one, I think is an eight-pointed...is it eight, or? I think it's an eight-pointed star, and then you sort of add other shapes around it. And those can create patterns that take a long time to repeat. And there are these beautiful geometric patterns that just keep on going and expanding without necessarily repeating over a lot of space. STEPHANIE: Whoa. That kind of blows my mind a little bit. It seems so counterintuitive, but then I feel like there are a lot of things in math that are like that as well. JOËL: So, yeah, I think a classic pattern you might start with something like an eight-pointed star. And then maybe to fill in the spaces around that central star, you might put some squares, and then maybe you put some triangles around that, and you sort of keep trying to fill in. And maybe eventually you get to another eight-pointed star, but it's not always perfectly symmetric. STEPHANIE: Someone should make a board game or something out of this idea. [laughs] JOËL: Oooh. STEPHANIE: I bet there's one that exists. But I'm just thinking about people who like jigsaw puzzles and that being the next level challenge of, like, can you figure out how things fit together without the confines of a little jigsaw shape? [laughs] JOËL: Right, right. You have a rectangle shape that you have to perfectly fill in with all of these other smaller shapes, and there is a single solution that will work. You have to figure it out. STEPHANIE: I personally would be very overwhelmed, [laughs] but it sounds fun at the same time. JOËL: So those are a lot of thoughts that I've been having inspiration reading that article that you shared on a previous episode. Have you been reading anything interesting recently? STEPHANIE: I have. I'm really excited to talk about this topic because during my investment time this past week, I've been thinking a lot about it, taking a lot of notes in Obsidian, which is a callback to the last episode, and yeah, I'm excited to kind of get into it. So what I've been reading is Sustainable Web Development with Ruby on Rails by ‎David Bryant Copeland. And I think a lot of fellow thoughtboters have referenced this book or talked a little bit about ideas from this book; at least, I've seen discussion about it in Slack, so that's kind of why I wanted to pick it up. But what really blew my mind was honestly the first chapter where he talks about why he wrote this book and basically what sustainable web development is because it is a little bit, maybe, like a buzzy word. It's like, what is sustainability? How does it relate to tech and what we do? And he basically gets down to it by saying that the software that we write is sustainable if it continues to meet our needs years into the future or has longevity and continues to be something we can iterate and work on and not feel that pain or friction, and we feel like we want to, and we feel joyful working on this codebase. So that was kind of my interpretation of his definition about sustainability. JOËL: I love that definition of sustainability about code that can grow and live for a long time. And I feel like that's not a universal value in the tech industry. And on the extreme end of that, you'll have teams that promote the idea that maybe every few years, you should throw out your old codebase and rewrite. I want to say some teams at Google may have done that as a practice for a while, and, of course, then people quote that as a best practice. To a certain extent, I want to say that's kind of what happens with Basecamp in that there are multiple versions of Basecamp. And I want to say each of those is a fresh Rails app. So there's a sense in which those or that style of development is not sustainable in the definition that you were just giving there. How do you feel about that? STEPHANIE: I definitely think the industry has a bias towards newness and change. And a lot of people want to pick up the hot, new technology and, like you said, rewrite code, especially when it's become hard to work with. And honestly, I think that could be its whole own episode, rewrites because I think you and I have pretty strong opinions about it. But I genuinely think that most of our work is, at least, you and I on the Boost team, in particular here at thoughtbot, where we embed on existing client teams, and usually, that means legacy code as well, but I think that the work of development is mostly extending existing code and trying to sustain applications that have users and are working for users. And I think that that's certainly a value that I wish were highlighted more or were invested in more because sometimes that change or wanting to hop on to do something different or do something new has a lot of consequences that I'm not sure we talk about enough as an industry. 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Finally, Airbrake Deploy Tracking helps developers track trends, fix bad deploys, and improve code quality. Since 2008, Airbrake has been a staple in the Ruby community and has grown to cover all major programming languages. Airbrake seamlessly integrates with your favorite apps to include modern features like single sign-on and SDK-based installation. From testing to production, Airbrake notifiers have your back. Your time is valuable, so why waste it combing through logs, waiting for user reports, or retrofitting other tools to monitor your application? You literally have nothing to lose. Head on over to airbrake.io/try/bikeshed to create your FREE developer account today! JOËL: It's interesting you mentioned the types of projects that we tend to be on. I feel like there are a lot of projects that I've been brought on where my goal, specifically coming onto this project, was to make the software more sustainable for the team. It's very easy to sort of start moving very fast in the beginning with a greenfield app, and then eventually, a lot of your choices catch up to you. And then, as your team grows and your product grows, it becomes less and less sustainable. And that's often the point in the lifecycle of the product where I might join the team and try to help make things better for them. I love the keyword sustainable. I don't think that's one that I've used a lot, but it's a great label to put on that kind of work. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I agree. I think what you mentioned earlier, too, about values that, really stuck out to me in this book because it basically says, "This book is for you if you value these three things: sustainability, consistency, and quality." And all of the recommendations and techniques that he then presents in the rest of the book, using Rails, those decisions are recommended with those three values in mind. And I think, one, those values are personally important to me as a developer. But it also helped me develop some guiding principles around decision-making and provided a lot of clarity around times that I've been on teams where we were doing things that didn't quite align with my values, and I didn't enjoy it. And I couldn't really figure out why. But now I'm able to see that, oh, perhaps this team or organization was valuing something like speed, or profit, or change, or something like that that I just fundamentally value differently. And that was kind of where my internal friction or contentment or discontentment was coming from when working on these teams. So, yeah, that was really clarifying for me. JOËL: Would you say, for you, when you talk about these values, that these are fundamental or ultimate values for you when you write code? Or are they values that are a good way to sort of be a means to some other end? You know, for example, sustainability, do you care about sustainability just for its own sake? Or do you care about it because you want a product to be able to live for a long time? You're building for ten years or 20 years or however long you want this project to last. STEPHANIE: I think the thing with values is that they are really fundamental to a person's identity or belief system. In fact, the definition that I'm kind of working off of here is that values are those fundamental beliefs that drive our actions. And so when you say, like, are values driving how you write code? I think they drive everything. [laughs] But the point that he makes in this book is like, here's how they drive code and technical decisions. So the book is actually quite specific about technical recommendations that he has in the context of Rails. And it's funny because we're talking pretty abstractly and big picture about values and things like that. But then I think it's because he sets the stage to be like, everything I recommend here is what I believe to be sustainable, and good quality, and consistent. And just for an example, one of the recommendations he makes is to, when you're kind of setting up a greenfield application, is to use a SQL schema instead of the default ActiveRecord DSL, so using a structure .SQL file. Because, in his eyes, having the flexibility to write SQL and use the most you can with those tools when it comes to database work is more sustainable in the long term than using the DSL that might not have all the tools available to you that SQL does. And so he kind of gives his reasoning about, like, this is what I recommend, and here's why it contributes to sustainability, in my opinion. And so I have found myself, while I'm reading along, either agreeing, like, oh yeah, I can see his reasoning here, or maybe even disagreeing because I might think about things differently or have other considerations in mind that are more important to me and what sustainability means to me. But what I hopefully want to take away from the framework or understanding of values is evaluating technical decisions that I make based on my values as an individual but, more importantly, the values of the team or organization. JOËL: I love mental frameworks like that that give you clarity into your own thought processes or how you make decisions moving forward. Sometimes you can look at something that's very concrete. Somebody gives you some advice on maybe structuring your database schema, and that might be helpful in and of itself. But if you came away with a larger thought process, I think that's doubly valuable. As an aside here, I love this approach to writing where he sort of lays down almost like preconditions for this book. If you don't agree on these values, this book is not going to be very helpful for you. And then also, here are situations where this advice is not going to apply. Now that I've put down all these edge cases for the rest of this book, I'm going to be speaking very decisively; these are the things I recommend and not have to caveat myself all the time. It's like, yes, I know there are some edge cases where you might not want to do this if it's a one-off script or whatever it is. We've already dealt with all of those upfront. And now, I can be very confident and very direct for the whole rest of the book. And I feel like that's something I struggle with in some of my work sometimes is. I care a lot about nuance, and my audience probably cares about edge cases even more than I do. They probably care too much. Because I say something that's generally true most of the time, and I know somebody's already thinking about the one edge case where that's not true. And that doesn't matter for the main point I'm trying to make. So it's always a struggle to know when to caveat a statement that I'm making. But if you caveat too much, then you undermine your whole point. And so I like this idea of putting some caveats up front and then just saying, like, now we're in the 80% case. Within the 80% case, these are things I think are true. STEPHANIE: Yeah, that's a really good point. I agree he is very clear about the intended audience. And so when you read this book, you are either on board because you value the same things he does, or you're not because you are focused and your goals are things that are different from him. So I think it was really helpful to get on the same page, even in a piece of content or in a piece of writing. Because I want to use my time well as a reader, so I want to make sure that what I am consuming makes sense for me, and I will find it worthwhile. David takes a really strong stance on what quality means. And even though that is a pretty subjective value, he describes it as doing things right the first time and acknowledging the reality that we likely won't have the time to go back and clean things up after they've been shipped. So, on this client project, I found myself wanting to refactor things as part of my process, suggesting different implementations to do things the quote, unquote, "right way," or the best way we could, and not everyone shared that sentiment. I sometimes got pushback, and that was challenging for me to figure out how I wanted to navigate that situation and what I was willing to let go and what I wasn't. And so I'm curious if you've ever been in a consulting position like that where maybe the team and organization's values were a little bit different from your understanding, or if they just weren't clear at all, and you were driving towards something that seemed very nebulous. JOËL: I think I've been on both sides of that, both sometimes saying, "Look, we need to maybe slow down," or "Here's a thing that we need to do otherwise that's going to cost us on the longer term. Here's an area where we need to invest in quality today." And sort of on the other side where I'll feel like someone is really pushing an overengineered solution claiming it's going to make life a whole lot better, "If we invest three months upfront today, and maybe in three or four years, it'll pay off if certain things happen," that don't really necessarily line up with the immediate goals. A lot of this, I think, comes down to understanding the client, and their business, and their goals. Sometimes there is a really important deadline for something that has to happen based on an event in the real world. If you were building software for something that had to do with, let's say, the World Cup, you don't want it shipping in January 2023. That's just pointless. And so you've got to prioritize shipping things. And sometimes you say, "Okay, well, do we ship a few broken things? Or do we prefer to ship something that's a little bit smaller, more tightly scoped, but that holds well together?" That again, you have to really understand the client, their business, their needs. So I think for me those values of sustainability, quality...I forget what the third one was that you'd mentioned. STEPHANIE: Consistency. JOËL: Consistency, yes. They all sort of inform how it's going to mesh with the product I'm working on, the goals of that product. Where's it going in the next three months, six months, 12 months? Where's it coming from? Who's the team that I'm working with? Am I with a team of 300 people that are just committing to the main branch all the time with no tests, and we're constantly fighting regressions? Then sustainability looks very different there than a one other-person team, and we're trying to ship something for the World Cup. STEPHANIE: Oh yeah, I have a lot of thoughts there too. Because I do agree that it can look different and sometimes shift a little bit depending on the situation. What you were just describing about team makeup that is really interesting to me because, yeah, sustainability can look different for different teams. If you have, let's say, a lot of earlier career developers on your team, maybe you really want to focus on readability and making sure that they're able to navigate the codebase and figure things out over something like more advanced patterns and skills that will just cause them friction. But maybe you have a team where you all agree that that's what sustainability means to you is choosing those more advanced technical patterns and committing to them and figuring out how to maintain that because it's important to you. And the other thing that you brought up that is also mentioned in this book is that the more information developers have about the future and direction of the business, the better code we can write. For some reason, I've found myself in situations where I don't know all too much about what we are working towards or what the goals of the business are both in the short term and the long term. And I try to make the best guess I can. But I think in those scenarios, at least moving forward, I would really like to be better about pushing product folks or leadership to explain to me why we're doing what we're doing, kind of share the information that they have so that we can build the best product that we can. I think sometimes that information doesn't get shared for some reason. They kind of think that engineers are going to go do their engineer thing, and we'll focus on long-term strategy over here. But yeah, I truly believe that the more information we have, the better quality work we can produce. JOËL: I 100% agree. And I think that's what we see in a lot of classic agile literature talking about things like cross-functional teams or even the client or the product team should be integrated with the development team. You're all one team working together rather than someone has an idea, and then the technical team executes on it. We see that also in some of the domain-driven design literature as well, where oftentimes projects start, and you sit down with a subject matter expert, and they just walk you through all of the business aspects. And particularly for the purpose of domain-driven design, you talk about a lot of the terms that make sense for the business. You build up a glossary of terms. I think they call it a ubiquitous language of things that are specific to your business and how does that work on a day-to-day basis. STEPHANIE: Do you have any strategies for getting more clarity around the work and why you're building it if it's not yet available to you? JOËL: I think there are sort of two scenarios where you have to do that; one of them that comes up maybe more often for us as consultants is onboarding onto a new client. There's a whole new business that we may know nothing about, and we have to learn a lot of that. And so, as part of the onboarding process, I think it's really valuable to have conversations with people who are not part of the dev team to learn about the business side of things. On a per-feature basis, if you've already been onboarded on a project, you've been there for a while, it's often good to go back to the person who maybe created a ticket, a product person who's asking for a feature, and ask, "Why? Why do you want this?" Ideally, maybe that's even part of the ticket-creating process because the two teams are more integrated, and product team is like, here's a problem we're trying to solve. Here's what we think would be a solution. Or maybe even just "Here's a business problem. We need a technical solution. Can you do that for us?" But I've often followed up with people outside of the engineering team to ask follow-up questions. And why are we doing this? And sometimes it's even you have to do like five Whys where it's like, "Oh, we're doing this because we need to do this thing for this customer. They asked for it." And it's like, "Okay, well, why are they asking for that?" "Oh, it's because they have this problem." And why are they having this problem?" And eventually, like, "Oh, I see. Okay." The real solution has nothing to do with what was asked, and you come up with something that's maybe much tighter scoped or will better solve, and everybody's a winner in that case. But it does require following up. So I guess the short and boring answer is talk to people outside the engineering team. STEPHANIE: That's a great point. I think the questions that we as engineers ask can drive more clarity to product people as well if we continue to ask those five levels of why in ways that they maybe didn't think about either. We have the opportunity to do that if we want to do our work well, too. That's kind of exciting to me that it isn't just okay, we're handed some work to do, and they've done all of that strategic thinking separately. And having to implement those details, we can kind of start to chip away at what are we really doing here? And you mentioned talking to people outside of the engineering team. I just was thinking that pairing with non-developers would also be a really great task to do, especially when you get a ticket that's a bit ambiguous and you have questions. And you can always comment on the ticket or whatever and ask your questions. But perhaps there's also a good opportunity to work things through synchronously. In some ways, I think that is a more natural opportunity for that conversation to evolve rather than it being like, okay, I answered these questions, and now I'm going to move on to whatever else I have to do. JOËL: So you mentioned pairing. It's often good to have someone maybe outside the development team pair with you on a technical thing, but sometimes it's good to flip the script. If you're building especially software for an internal team, it can be really valuable to just shadow one of them for a couple of hours or a day. I did a project where we were building a tool for an internal sales team. And I had the privilege to shadow a couple of the sales members for a few hours as they're just doing their job. And I'm just asking all the questions like, "Oh, why do you do it that way? And what is the purpose behind this?" And I learned so much about the business by doing that. STEPHANIE: I love that we took this idea of sustainable development and went beyond just technical design decisions or aspects of how we do our jobs. Because there is so much more that we can do to foster the value of sustainability or whatever other values that you might have, and yeah, I feel really excited to try both these technical strategies from the book and also the collaborative aspects as well. JOËL: I'm really excited about some of these ideas that are coming up from the book. I think today we basically just talked about the introduction, the idea of sustainability. But I think as maybe you read more in the book, maybe we can do another episode later on talking about some of the more specific technical recommendations, how they relate to sustainability and maybe share some of our thoughts on that. STEPHANIE: Yeah, I definitely am excited to keep y'all updated on this journey. [laughs] JOËL: On that note, shall we wrap up? STEPHANIE: Let's wrap up. JOËL: Show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. This show has been produced and edited by Mandy Moore. If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes. It really helps other folks find the show. If you have any feedback, you can reach us at @_bikeshed or reach me at @joelquen on Twitter. Or at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. Thank you so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. Byeeeeeeee!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot, your expert strategy, design, development, and product management partner. We bring digital products from idea to success and teach you how because we care. Learn more at thoughtbot.com.

The Nintendo Switch NXpress Podcast
NXpress Nintendo Podcast 317: Tales from the Backlog 2023 Edition + Vengeful Guardian: Moonrider Review

The Nintendo Switch NXpress Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 82:28


A new year means new adventures in the backlog. This week on the NXpress Nintendo Podcast, Cameron Daxon, Marc Kaliroff, and Campbell Gill return from a brief podcasting hiatus to revisit their favorite New Year's topic: exploring their backlogs. The gang had plenty of time to delve into their ever-present backlogs over the break, and now they're ready to share their impressions and hot takes. This simple recap soon grows into a bigger discussion altogether: was the original Portal actually any good? Is Skyward Sword a better Zelda than Link's Awakening? What does the ending of Limbo actually mean? All this and so much more in this surprisingly in-depth tour-de-force discussion! As the main event draws to a close, the indie spotlight begins. While Cameron shares a few disappointed thoughts about Lone Ruin, a Hades-esque roguelike that failed to meet expectations, Campbell has much more enthusiasm for Vengeful Guardian: Moonrider, a nonsensically named 2D action game giving us what we all really need: a robot ninja adventure. Inspired by Shinobi, Strider, and Mega Man X, Vengeful Guardian: Moonrider is an intensely demanding adventure that tempers its retro difficulty with some incredibly creative items, quality-of-life improvements, and some brilliantly creative level designs. Don't forget: If you want to suggest a discussion topic, share your thoughts on a recent episode, or simply chat with the NXpress crew, feel free to email us at videogameseditor@goombastomp.com! You can listen to our show on YouTube |  Stitcher | iTunes |  Podbean | Spotify | Listen Notes | iHeartRadio | Player FM | Amazon Audible Playlist: LFXIV – NXpress Intro 0:39 – Main Event: Tales From the Backlog: What We Played Recently “File Select” – The Legends of Zelda: Link's Awakening 1:00:30 – Indie Spotlight: Lone Ruin & Vengeful Guardian: Moonrider “Title” – The Legends of Zelda: Link's Awakening

Tha Storm Podcast
Too Much Fan Service (Episode 201)

Tha Storm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 237:08


(1:00) British People have the best Lingo (29:45) What anime has the craziest Fan Service (1:19:12) 2D vs 3D anime: What's better (1:43:46) Trigun Stampede Episode 2: Let the Special People handle it (2:18:45) Tokyo Revengers Season 2 Episode 2: How is Kisuke winning? (2:40:01) Vinland Saga Season 2 Episode 2: Is Thorfinn coming back (2:49:28) Blue Lock Episode 14 Review: Will Isagi turn 0 to 1 (3:32:11) My Hero Academia Season 6 Episode 15: Jailbreak If you want to support our growth and get extra content check out our patreon link! https://www.patreon.com/Thastormpod JOIN THE CONVERSATIONS: Come talk to us and the rest of our podcast family as we have fun conversations relating to the podcast topics https://discord.gg/wMPxCBK34H Social Media Tha Storm Podcast: https://linktr.ee/thastormpod Malcolm: https://linktr.ee/malcolmcrawford C2: https://linktr.ee/C2d2 Eman: https://linktr.ee/Itseman700 #anime #podcast #bluelock #tokyorevengersedit

Vidjagame Apocalypse
Games From Old-School Animators - Vidjagame Apocalypse 507

Vidjagame Apocalypse

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 137:59


There's a lot of overlap between the videogame and animation industries, but it's always a big deal when a big name in 2D cel animation decides to apply their talents to something interactive. This week, we'll look at five standout collaborations between game developers and old-school animators, after which we'll touch on Colossal Cave, Persona 3 and 4 coming to Game Pass, the demise of Stadia, and the games you'd like to see "enhanced" by voiceovers and/or FMV.

Nice Games Club
"Maximum Whooo!" Learning to Use Tools; Co-Op Games [Nice Replay]

Nice Games Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023


#244 "Maximum Whooo!"Roundtable 2021.11.25 As the podcast approaches its fifth anniversary, your hosts get a little (more) frivolous. Mark shares some industry news about hardware releases. Ellen prompts everyone to share their experiences of learning development tools and examine their process of learning through the lens of Maximum Whooo. Stephen explores the difference between cooperative and collaborative gameplay, and invents something called a Feedborm. Dang!Steamworks Virtual Conference: Steam Deck - SteamSteam Deck launch delayed by two months - Jay Peters, The VergeIndie handheld Playdate delayed to 2022 - Michael McWhertor, PolygonHow Long to Beat: Metroid Dread - HowLongToBeat Learning to Use Tools 14:05 Ellen Burns-JohnsonMisc.ToolsArticulate Storyline 360, an e-learning development toolGodot, an open-source 2D & 3D game engineGodot: Getting Started >> Step by step - Juan Linietsky, Ariel Manzur and the Godot community, GodotTuckman's stages of group development - WikipediaCoDecks: Playful PlanningSonder (a story) - Ludum Dare 48Proactive and Retroactive Interference (re: learning interference) - Dr. Saul McLeod, Simply Psychology Co-Op Games 53:10.0 Stephen McGregorGame DesignOvercooked Co-Op Review: Five-star co-op gaming - Jason Love, Co-OptimusThere's a Difference Between Cooperation and Collaboration - Ron Ashkenas, Harvard Business Review

The Next Byte
105. Artificial Plants For Renewable Energy

The Next Byte

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 24:33


(3:45) - Cheap, Sustainable Hydrogen Through Solar PowerThis episode was brought to you by Mouser, our favorite place to get electronic components for any project. Click HERE to read the 2D materials for water energy harvesting article that was discussed in this episode!

Learn French with daily podcasts
Dans 50 ans (In 50 years' time)

Learn French with daily podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 4:08


Si nous nous projetons dans 50 ans, il est très probable que l'Internet en 2D que nous connaissons tous aujourd'hui semblera risiblement archaïque. Traduction : When we look in 50 years' time, it is likely that the 2D internet we now all use will seem laughably archaic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Topic Lords
169. Topicless

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 72:04


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * John * robohunkx on Twitter, robohunk on most social media platforms * Tim * Jamestown+ * The Pathless * https://github.com/westquote/squidtasks Topics: * America's self-denying culture of compartmentalization * Deus Ex: Revision is a mod for Deus Ex that changes maps just enough that it feels like a new game without losing what made the original special. * Napster pranks and more generally, fun with the early internet's poor security * The Last Titan * https://topiclords.com/articles/the-last-titan * Topic Lords update: A review of the Gros Michel (aka "Big Mike") banana * If AI can tell better stories than you, is it still worth telling them (and why)? Microtopics: * Planning around time zone differences. * What bots are left after the bot purge. * Text parsers that make it sound like you have silly accents. * C++ Coroutines for Everyone! * Playing the Frog Fractions soundtrack on mandolin at Jim's wedding reception. * Seeing friends catch up. * Waiting until the weekend to celebrate your birthday because weekdays are not for fun things. * Topicless Topic Peasants. * Planning to do things all week so you have things to look forward to all week. * How to schedule a movie night. * How to hang out with your friends on weekends. * Hanging out with your friends once a week because your internet audience demands it. * Setting traps for yourself so that you involuntarily have fun. * How you felt in the Fall of 2014. * Embracing making bad things. * Making bad art and dropping it in the company Slack. * April cameos. * What to do when Jim makes a mistake. * Watching a 3D film on a 2D viewing apparatus. * New super duper secret places to sneak around in. * Lay D Denton. * Let me tell you about my Napster pranks. * A very specific example of Napster interactions. * Authorless messages. * Renaming your band's music to have the same name as popular songs so people will download it on Napster. * A very benign internet security prank. * Telling your friend that you've made an AI chatbot but actually it's you typing the replies and she falls in love with the AI and wants to talk to it all the time. * Philly Boys. * Taking bets on whether any given domain name leads to porn. * Writing a cease and desist letter to the owner of a domain name that you want, claiming that you need it for your nonexistent porn company. * Getting out of legal jeopardy by constructing a gay porn web site. * An old god, his glory lost to memory. * A computer named Roboticus that you can't bear to decommission. * Looking on a diorama of dusty objects that represent your lost past. * Banana history. * A banana that you've never tasted. * Buying fruit from the Miami Fruit Organization. * The shocking flavor of electrolytes. * Fat Mike vs. Big Mike. * Quantifying 45 apple varietals without realizing that there is also wide variance within varietals. * Having to eat 10,000 bananas before you can safely say you know what they taste like. * Eating a bunch of types of bananas and realizing that they all pretty much taste the same. * Cotton candy flavored grapes. * Strawberries the size (and flavor) of a human heart. * Grapples vs. grapples. * A banana that is certainly a banana that you can eat. * The time Deep Blue glitched out and made a random chess move and Garry Kasparov couldn't figure it out and resigned the match. * Teaching a computer how to get flummoxed. * The purpose of making art. * What about Mario coins? * K-Mart music. * Smarty Pants, Brain Quest and Booty Blocks.

SEIYUU LOUNGE
EP.128 - 12 Male Seiyuu that Impressed in 2022

SEIYUU LOUNGE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 26:44


2022 is already well behind us. But who were the male seiyuu that stood out the most last year? Who were the seiyuu that made sure to impress with outstanding performances in various 2D groups, some even in their solo artist activities? It's time to check the 12 seiyuu that impressed in 2022. To create this episode, I have into consideration several things about the seiyuu in question: How active they were in 2022 How much the seiyuu improved as singers Their technique and voice tone Variety, and the versatility of their music Quality of the music released Performances outside of their solo careers Check my picks in: 2020: https://open.spotify.com/episode/4RshXI0ITSyTBwtFPnL93D?si=9e09b18bf7b64cc8 2021: https://open.spotify.com/episode/2sAyUIWr2VmviJDDJrWGip?si=d8fd5178279a4541 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thtfhqseiyuulounge/message

Too Different
024: "8/10+4/10=2022"

Too Different

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 56:43


2022 comes to a close so let's ring in 2023 with an episode of 2D. Thank you guys for listening - you have made this past year really incredible for us. Please stay tuned in for some exciting new updates this next year. We love you all. - Joncy and Roshan https://www.toodifferentpodcast.com/ Listen to the Too Different Podcast on: ·Apple: https://apple.co/3IvX2y8 ·Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3PjiYyD _ Email: hello@toodifferentpodcast.com _ Rate and Review us on Apple Podcast and Spotify _ Follow 2DP: ·https://www.instagram.com/toodifferentpodcast/ ·https://www.tiktok.com/@toodifferentpodcast Follow Joncy: ·https://instagram.com/stuffjoncysays ·https://twitter.com/stuffjoncysays Follow Roshan: ·https://instagram.com/rosh045/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/toodifferentpodcast/support

Skwigly Podcasts
Animation One-To-Ones 19 - Richard Linklater & Tommy Pallotta

Skwigly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 24:33


Skwigly.com presents Animation One-To-Ones featuring Ben Mitchell in conversation with Academy Award®-nominee Richard Linklater, director, writer and producer of the Netflix film 'Apollo 10½: A Space Age Childhood' as well as co-producer and Head of Animation Tommy Pallotta. The film, presented in a uniquely elaborate 2D animation style that combines rotoscoping with traditional processes (brought to life by the talents of Submarine and Minnow Mountain), stars Jack Black as a man fondly narrating memories of his youth in Houston, Texas during the summer of 1969 in the lead-up to the moon landing, interweaving the enormity of mankind's great leap and the fantasies it conjures in his young mind with comparatively mundane yet equally entertaining snapshots that celebrate the simple joys of family life and Americana. The story draws upon the personal memories of Richard himself, whose films include Slacker, Dazed and Confused, the decades-spanning Before trilogy and Boyhood as well as Waking Life and A Scanner Darkly, both of which implemented their own variations on the rotoscoping technique, owed to his ongoing collaboration with Tommy and their shared passion for implementing animation as a valid and powerful storytelling method. Having dropped on Netflix last Spring to much enthusiasm and positive reviews, the film is presently in contention for the 2023 Best Animated Feature Academy Award, following an initial struggle to be deemed eligible, a battle won that will hopefully set a new precedent for future editions of the ceremony and the industry at large. Produced and presented by Ben Mitchell

Two Designers & A Builder Walk Into A Bar
#65 See It Before You Build It!

Two Designers & A Builder Walk Into A Bar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 65:41


Yep, that's right! Want to avoid change orders, the costs that go along with those and a delay in building your beautiful custom home? Enter Authenticus! Their 3,600 sq. ft. studio allows you to see your plan displayed in 2D, to scale, including elevations! How about seeing it in 3D and color? Need more to help you visualize a particular space? Put on the VR glasses and try not to reach out to open the front door or climb the staircase.  Joining us on this episode are Jay and Lindsey Schimpf, creators and owners of Authenticus Services. Their goal is to provide homeowners, builders and designers the ability to authenticate your plans before moving an ounce of dirt! Authenticus: www.authenticusservices.com   Steve Rudin: steve@loydrusselhomes.com Steve Iltis: steve@steveshannondesign.com Shannon Vestal: shannon@steveshannondesign.com  

Moments of Grace
INTERVIEW WITH BRIMSTONE: PRO-WRESTLER

Moments of Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 38:07


INTERVIEW WITH BRIMSTONE: PRO-WRESTLER Interview with Brimstone Pro-Wrestler | Actor | Voice Actor | Author | Comic Hero | Entrepreneur | Host of Grindhouse Radio Brimstone has had a successful and rewarding career spanning well over four decades; participating in numerous entertainment fields boasting a list of titles including professional wrestler, radio host/professional podcaster, actor, voice actor, author, musician, philanthropist, food critic, horror model, and comic book/animated/children's book/video game hero. He's been called a Renaissance man by many, but more accurately described as a well-seasoned entertainer, celebrity personality and serial entertainment entrepreneur. Brimstone has been SAG-AFTRA since 1980. As a child actor, he made appearances on iconic pop culture shows such as Sesame Street and Romper Room. Under his given name, he was a touring musician as the drummer for bands like Who's Laughing Now and Bugsy. He later became best known for his career in professional wrestling where he has made countless appearances worldwide for the leaders in sports entertainment and throughout the Independents. Brimstone has had a long history appearing in various films, television programming, short films, documentaries, video game voice acting, and cameos in music videos. Notable nationally televised appearances include WWF Superstars, MTV's TRL, 106 and Park and The Ricki Lake Show as well as countless appearances on national and local affiliates including NBC, CBS, ABC and The CW. He's been featured in documentaries including Wrestling Then & Now and Standing in the Stars: The Peter Mayhew Story as well as music videos like, Touch & Go by rapper Joe Budden, Dawn Monroe's Get it Poppin, Bethany Davis' Lose Control and multiple videos by Frank Lucas, Jr. (Street Star and Let's Go). He's also been credited with background vocals on guitarist Bumblefoot's 2015 release, Little Brother is Watching. Video game voice-over credits include, Seduce Me 2: The Demon War, Sorim Story: Race World (Brimstone is a playable character, available skin and voice of multiple characters), Viking Vengeance as the character Wotan, Triagat as the character Idium, Brimstone's own Forza Infernis (on Android, Apple & XBox One), Wasteland Wars & GHR: The Great Airspace Chase; is voicing the character Wrath in the game, Rose & Locket and was announced as voicing the lead character, Terror T in the upcoming 2D video game (and animated series) Cereal Killaz. In VR - Brim voices the lead character, Wyatt in the Western based shooting game Finger Gun for the Oculus Quest 2; as well as the character Skalakron in the game, The Search for the Lost Weld (releasing 2023 on Steam, Nintendo Switch and other platforms). Brim's voice can also be heard in a variety of Q&E Productions' animated shorts, as Game Day in The Weeklings animated series, Santa Claws for viral YouTube channel, eLL Cartoons, as well as a surprise character in the viral, God's School. He will be voicing characters including Commander Frosting in Donut Baby for Noise Nest Animation Network (Viacom) and the lovable Beezal in Brush Brigade. Brim has a cameo on a celebrity stacked, narrative fantasy podcast, Children of Sperea where he voices the role of Private Carla. He can be heard on the Kikkoman Corporation's national radio ads that he not only voiced; but collaborated in the conception and production thereof. Read his complete Bio @ https://www.therealbrimstone.com/brimstone Contact information: www.therealbrimstone.com Host Contact Information @: www.drajrbutler.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/momentsofgrace/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/momentsofgrace/support

Animation Industry Podcast
Episode 191: How Robert-Jonathan Koeyers Made An Oscar-Shortlisted Film Right Out Of School

Animation Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 47:45


This chat features Dutch multidisciplinary artist and filmmaker, Robert-Jonathan Koeyers, who shares the ins and outs of creating his recent 2D animated film, “It's Nice in Here.” Koyeres studied animation at Rotterdam and this is his first film out of school which premiered at Cannes and has since been Oscar shortlisted. Tune in to Ibele and Koeyers to hear: *How Koeyers received funding to hire a full animation team *The secret behind Koeyer's super-captivating storytelling *What the animation industry is like in the Netherlands Social Links: *Follow the film on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/niceinhere/ *Follow Koeyers on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rjkoeyers/

Binge Media
BingeCast: Avatar 2 Review

Binge Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 148:45


This week, we review James Cameron's Avatar 2: The Way of Water. One of us saw it in 3D. One of us saw it in 2D. And one of us didn't see it. Our featured TV show review this week is the UK series The Traitors. It's safe to say we're pretty obsessed with it. We end the show with an unofficial game of Who Said It? This is a game where we read a quote from a past show and the contestants have to determine Who Said It. It's groundbreaking stuff. If you like The BingeCast and what we do at Binge Media, please consider subscribing and supporting us at Patreon.com/BingeMedia to sign up for The Full Binge! On this week's Full Binge, Law, Alyx and Pete play The Brad Pitt Tournament! Binge Media Reviews Avatar 2: The Way of Water Happy New Year and thanks for subscribing to The Full Binge!  0:00 - The Free Binge - It's the first BingeCast of 2023! Ring in the New Year by going to ParkScents.com and using the code Binge20  at checkout for 20% off your entire order. 10:58 - Google Voice - We get caught up on voicemails so strap in. Reviews of This Place Rules, The Menu, Avatar 2 and more. All from Jack. What is this Jack Attack Tuesday? Fuck off. Give us a call at 708-406-9546. 46:50 - TV Round Up - This week's featured TV show is the UK series The Traitors. We're obsessed with this goddamn thing. Hat tip to Nathaniel John Jr Peterson from the British Isles for the recommendation. 1:28:27 - Pee Break - Mr. Big 1:30:29 - What Did You Watch - Our biggie this week is Avatar 2: The Way of Water.  2:08:41 - It's a surprise edition of The Who Said It Game! Support Binge Media! Leave a voicemail for The BingeCast at 708-406-9546 Subscribe to The Full Binge on Patreon Follow Binge Media on Facebook Join the Binge Media Facebook Group Follow Binge Media on Instagram Go to ParkScents.com and use the discount code BINGE20 at checkout for 20% off your entire order Additional music by Karl Casey @ White Bat Audio

AJR Podcast Series
Fetal Opioid-Exposure: Are The Brain Changes Detectable on Fetal MRI?

AJR Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 10:46


Full article: https://www.ajronline.org/doi/10.2214/AJR.22.28357  Eymen Ucisik, MD discusses an AJR article comparing opioid-exposed and unexposed fetuses in terms of 2D biometric measurements of the brain and additional pregnancy-related assessments on fetal MRI.

SEIYUU LOUNGE
EP.127 - 7 Albums that Went Under the Radar in 2022

SEIYUU LOUNGE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 18:40


After talking about the best songs and albums by male seiyuu and 2D music projects released last year, it's time to cover the albums that I feel were completely overlooked yet, they are awesome and deserve all your love and attention. From insanely technical performances to laidback ones, from pitch-black songs to aggressive rock anthems, emotional ballads, and passionate tunes. There was a little bit of everything, catering to fans of the widest variety of music genres, voices, singing styles, and overall group vibes. These are just some, of the various CDs I loved in 2022 that, unfortunately, due to how the projects they are from are not that popular, never got to be in the spotlight as they deserved. Please do check them out if you can: EROSION “OneThing” https://www.handthatfeedshq.com/review-erosion-with-you-from-carnelian-blood-vol-4-yoru/ TOBARI “In - Black with High Purity” https://www.handthatfeedshq.com/review-tobari-in-black-with-high-purity/ Loulou*di “Pensée” https://www.handthatfeedshq.com/review-louloudi-incomplica-it-pensee/ KAGARIBI “Noroshi” https://www.handthatfeedshq.com/review-kagaribi-noroshi/ Gakuto Kajiwara “Road Movie” https://www.handthatfeedshq.com/review-gakuto-kajiwara-road-movie/ Sir Vanity “Ray” https://www.handthatfeedshq.com/review-sir-vanity-ray/ Makoto Furukawa “Ibara Rinbukyoku" https://www.handthatfeedshq.com/review-makoto-furukawa-ibara-rinbukyoku/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thtfhqseiyuulounge/message

Cutting For Sign with Ron Cecil and Daniel Penner Cline
85 Alexis "Bust" Stephens - Artist and Dancer

Cutting For Sign with Ron Cecil and Daniel Penner Cline

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 107:16


Alexis Stephens aka Bust, has dedicated much of his life to dance in the Parisian hip hop scene, and has evolved into a painter, having asked himself, “How can I transfer multi-dimentional dance energy into a 2D image?” He represents the body as a sum of organized waves, and dynamic roiling gestures. Inspired by abstract expressionism and graffiti, he manages to successfully transcribe intense movement into single images. His works combine acrylic with oil pastel and are extreme, surreal, instinctual and jarring, yet also articulate and objective. His work has been described as “Profound yet subtle, vibrations that animate the form, and the representation of successive states of the self diving into landscape. Alexis believes in freedom, discovery, reflection, hope, global balance, humanity's old dream of flying like Icarus, not outwards, but inwards, and exploring the 'I' for a better 'We'. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cutting-for-sign/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cutting-for-sign/support

Bright Side Home Theater
Theater Experience: Avatar: The Way of Water in 3D, 2D & HFR

Bright Side Home Theater

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 183:07


HAPPY NEW YEAR!The Boys are Back! And what a Jam Packed Show!THANK YOU for PUSHING PLAYThis week we have…TONS of Listener Experiences, a furniture Tweak from DJ and a dancing subwoofer issue from John, a few NEW 4K releases coming Tuesday and then THREE WEEKS WORHT of Home Theater Experiences!So, let's get started!Chapters14:38 -Tweaks of the Week26:27 - The boys dive into a bunch of Listeners Experiences1:25:05 - New 4K Releases Coming Dec 6thHome Theater Experiences of the Week1:27:11 -   The Northman Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:31:07 - Wind River Disc 1080P/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.11:34:51 - Die Hard Kaleidescape 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.11:36:34 - Jack Ryan S3 Amazon Prime 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:41:33 -Emancipation Apple TV+ 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:44:31 - Glass Onion Netflix 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:48:29 - Snake Eyes GI Joe Origin Story Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:56:04 - Polar Express Kaleidescape 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.11:59:49 -   Pinocchio Netflix 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:04:38 - Amistad Disc 1080P/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.12:10:04 - Lord of the Rings & The Hobbit Trilogies Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:14:40 - Chip & Dales Rescue Rangers Disney+ 4K HDR/Atmos2:17:05 - Avatar: The Way of Water Theater                  DJ- Showcase XPlus 3D HFR/Atmos                        Jordan's Furniture IMAX 3D HFR/Atmos                Steve- 2D with variable Frame Rate/Atmos2:34:47 - Violent Night Disc & Kaleidescape HDR/Dolby Atmos2:39:08 - Game of Thrones Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:46:09 - How to Train Your Dragan Kaleidescape 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.12:49:45 - Tropic Thunder Disc 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.12:51:18 - Smile Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:56:26 - Highlander Disc 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1All that and so much more!“If you can't laugh while talking Home Theater, you're doing something wrong.”Right?Push Play and hear for yourself.And if you'd like to contribute to the show…

BackTable Podcast
Ep. 279 Dissecting Wire Senses with Dr. Hady Lichaa

BackTable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 48:31


In this episode, host Ally Baheti interviews interventional cardiologist Dr. Hady Lichaa of Ascension St. Thomas Heart about wire senses, including ways to build tactile and visual skills, selection of workhorse and specialty wires, and the do's and don'ts of crossing lesions. --- CHECK OUT OUR SPONSORS Surmodics Pounce Thrombectomy https://pouncesystem.com/ Reflow Medical https://www.reflowmedical.com/ --- SHOW NOTES Dr. Lichaa starts by outlining four different components of wire senses: visual sense, tactile sense, IVUS, and the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) roadmap. First, visual aspects are a combination of 2D wire sliding and looping, 3D rotation, and the course of the wire relative to the vessel architecture. By combining these visual cues, the operator can determine if the wire is inside the true lumen, within the vessel wall, or entirely outside of the vessel. The next factor is tactile sense. Each type of wire strikes a balance between resistance to rotation / advancement and torque transmission. This balance is determined by wire characteristics such as core material, tapers, tip design, and coating. Dr. Lichaa encourages operators to test out different wires and focus on mastering their favorite workhorse wires. Additionally, there are specialty wires that can be employed in certain cases, such as CTO wires with heavy tip, tapered tip wires to enter microchannels, and supportive wires for the use of other equipment. Additionally, we discuss how intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) leads to safer outcomes because it allows the operator to confirm that they are in the true lumen and measure vessel size before deploying stents or balloons. DSA can also help determine location and help map out different strategies if a first option fails. Finally, Dr. Lichaa lists some helpful tips for new operators. We highlight the importance of mastering your favorite wires, having backup plans, communicating with staff, and keeping calm in the angio suite. --- RESOURCES Abbott Command Wire: https://www.cardiovascular.abbott/us/en/hcp/products/peripheral-intervention/guide-wires/workhorse/hi-torque-command.html ASAHI Gladius Wire: https://asahi-inteccusa-medical.com/product/asahi-gladius-014/ ASAHI CONFIANZA Pro: https://asahi-inteccusa-medical.com/product/confianza-pro-series/ Terumo NAVICROSS Support Catheter: https://www.terumois.com/products/catheters/navicross.html Teleplex Turnpike Catheter: https://www.teleflex.com/usa/en/product-areas/interventional/coronary-interventions/turnpike-catheters/index.html ACT ONE Technology: https://medical.asahi-intecc.com/en/technologies Philips Pioneer Reentry Catheter: https://www.usa.philips.com/healthcare/product/HCIGTDPPLUS/pioneer-plus-ivus-guided-re-entry-catheter Cordis OUTBACK Reentry Catheter: https://cordis.com/na/products/cross/endovascular/outback-elite-re-entry-catheter

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network
BRIGHT SIDE HOME THEATER: THEATER EXPERIENCE: AVATAR: THE WAY OF WATER IN 3D, 2D & HFR

Nerdy Legion Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 183:07


HAPPY NEW YEAR!The Boys are Back! And what a Jam Packed Show!THANK YOU for PUSHING PLAYThis week we have…TONS of Listener Experiences, a furniture Tweak from DJ and a dancing subwoofer issue from John, a few NEW 4K releases coming Tuesday and then THREE WEEKS WORHT of Home Theater Experiences!So, let's get started!Chapters14:38 -Tweaks of the Week26:27 - The boys dive into a bunch of Listeners Experiences1:25:05 - New 4K Releases Coming Dec 6thHome Theater Experiences of the Week1:27:11 -   The Northman Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:31:07 - Wind River Disc 1080P/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.11:34:51 - Die Hard Kaleidescape 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.11:36:34 - Jack Ryan S3 Amazon Prime 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:41:33 -Emancipation Apple TV+ 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:44:31 - Glass Onion Netflix 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:48:29 - Snake Eyes GI Joe Origin Story Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos1:56:04 - Polar Express Kaleidescape 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.11:59:49 -   Pinocchio Netflix 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:04:38 - Amistad Disc 1080P/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.12:10:04 - Lord of the Rings & The Hobbit Trilogies Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:14:40 - Chip & Dales Rescue Rangers Disney+ 4K HDR/Atmos2:17:05 - Avatar: The Way of Water Theater                  DJ- Showcase XPlus 3D HFR/Atmos                        Jordan's Furniture IMAX 3D HFR/Atmos                Steve- 2D with variable Frame Rate/Atmos2:34:47 - Violent Night Disc & Kaleidescape HDR/Dolby Atmos2:39:08 - Game of Thrones Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:46:09 - How to Train Your Dragan Kaleidescape 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.12:49:45 - Tropic Thunder Disc 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.12:51:18 - Smile Disc 4K HDR/Dolby Atmos2:56:26 - Highlander Disc 4K HDR/DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1All that and so much more!“If you can't laugh while talking Home Theater, you're doing something wrong.”Right?Push Play and hear for yourself.And if you'd like to contribute to the show…

1 Hour 1 Decision (1H1D)
1H1D #103: Tinykin

1 Hour 1 Decision (1H1D)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 22:01


Chris is excited and Tom has never heard of this one. The Xbox Game Pass has led our hosts to a number of games published by tinyBuild, but this is the first time they are tackling a game crafted by the French indie developer Splashteam. In this action-adventure platformer, players take on the role of Milo as he collects hundreds of cute little critters and uses their powers to solve puzzles and ultimately return home. Will the game's 2D characters traversing a 3D environment end up being a blessing or a curse? Will the game loop prove to be different enough from Pikmin to debunk the surface level comparison? Most importantly, will Chris feel justified in his excitement or be left disappointed? Both he and Tom have done their time and now it's time for them to make their final decision… tune in and discover if this cartoon adventure has a happy ending! What do you think? Let us know! Hit us up on Twitter at https://twitter.com/tc1h1d Drop us an email at tc.1h1d(at)outlook[dot]com Follow us on Goodpods @1h1d Check out our fancy site: https://quitthebuild.com/1h1d Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/c/1hour1decision1h1d Thanks for taking this ride with us :-) And thanks to our sponsor, Winner Winner! Play REAL claw machines right on your smartphone and win prizes anywhere, anytime! Download now: https://winnerwinner.onelink.me/Y7st/WWHQ Reload your tokens here with promo code WHATITDO and get 30% more for FREE: https://pay.app.winnerwinner.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/1-hour-1-decision/message

Tha Storm Podcast
Easy Revenge (Episode 198)

Tha Storm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 212:25


(1:00) Weekly updates: How our Christmases were, Malcolm breaks his phone, etc. (24:00) The guys talk about how phones should improve (41:00) Tory Lanez gets convicted (1:12:28) YSL snitched on Young Thug (1:27:40) Blue Lock Season Finale Review (1:58:38) 3D vs 2D animation (2:18:25) Chainsawman Season Finale Review (2:52:38) My Hero Academia Season 6 Episode 12 Review (3:18:31) Best Characters of 2022 Draft If you want to support our growth and get extra content check out our patreon link! https://www.patreon.com/Thastormpod JOIN THE CONVERSATIONS: Come talk to us and the rest of our podcast family as we have fun conversations relating to the podcast topics https://discord.gg/wMPxCBK34H Social Media Tha Storm Podcast: https://linktr.ee/thastormpod Malcolm: https://linktr.ee/malcolmcrawford C2: https://linktr.ee/C2d2 Eman: https://linktr.ee/Itseman700

SEIYUU LOUNGE
EP.126 - 10 Best Albums released by Male Seiyuu Artists and 2D groups in 2022

SEIYUU LOUNGE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 30:50


From complex concepts spawning several songs, to simple concepts that create cozy, intimate experiences that feel like getting a warm hug after work to perfect nods to 80s and 90s music, not to mention the hours of outstanding performances, there was no shortage of quality coming from seiyuu artists and 2D groups. And it's the time to celebrate the best albums by 2D groups and seiyuu artists released in 2022 and decide which is the album of the year. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thtfhqseiyuulounge/message

Level with Emily Reese
Level 206: Curtis Schweitzer (Starbound)

Level with Emily Reese

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 58:21


Composer Curtis Schweitzer talks about his hypnotic, largely orchestral music for the indie 2D space explorer, Starbound. I loved how many of the tracks stretch out almost indefinitely, giving the listener time in that musical place. And there's quite a bit of music too - more than 6 hours of it. It's worth your time, I promise. You can find a playlist and support Level with Emily on Patreon. Join us on Discord for free. Find us on YouTube and Twitter. Patrons have access to special Discord events and special guest playlists.

Radio Free Mormon
Mormonism LIVE: 108: Is The Book of Mormon Unique?

Radio Free Mormon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 139:09


RFM and Bill take a deeper look at the “Book of Mormon” and compare what we know about it with what we know about other books to see if it is as un unique as believers claim it to be and we even get Mormon Scholar, Brian Hales opinion on the matter. RESOURCES:https://archive.org/details/sorrytaleastory01currgoog/page/78/mode/2up https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1542&context=jbms#:~:text=Some%20critics%20of%20the%20Book,claimed%20communi%2D%20cations%20with%20spirits https://www.urantia.org/urantia-book/read-urantia-book-online… Read More »Mormonism LIVE: 108: Is The Book of Mormon Unique?

Mormon Discussions Podcasts – Full Lineup
Mormonism LIVE: 108: Is The Book of Mormon Unique?

Mormon Discussions Podcasts – Full Lineup

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 139:09


RFM and Bill take a deeper look at the “Book of Mormon” and compare what we know about it with what we know about other books to see if it is as un unique as believers claim it to be and we even get Mormon Scholar, Brian Hales opinion on the matter. RESOURCES: https://archive.org/details/sorrytaleastory01currgoog/page/78/mode/2up https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1542&context=jbms#:~:text=Some%20critics%20of%20the%20Book,claimed%20communi%2D%20cations%20with%20spirits… Read More »Mormonism LIVE: 108: Is The Book of Mormon Unique? The post Mormonism LIVE: 108: Is The Book of Mormon Unique? appeared first on Mormon Discussions Podcasts - Full Lineup.

The Bargain Den
2DON2D 15: Balto

The Bargain Den

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 52:22


This month we watched Balto! If you see a movie coming up and would like to add to our conversation, please do! WE WANT YOU TO! And there's a ton of ways you can do that. You can leave us a voice message by finding us on Anchor.FM, or you can send us an email at 2dornot2dcast@gmail.com. On all of our social media, we are 2DorNot2Dcast, so find us where we are. Here's more on Balto! IMDB Check our Social Media to see our 2023 schedule! Our intro/music is "2D or Not 2D" by P-Model. https://susumuhirasawa.com/discography/p-model/album/index_en.html --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-bargain-den/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-bargain-den/support

Castle Super Beast
CSB 199: BmC: Scroteguard The Baton Pass feat. TheSphereHunter

Castle Super Beast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 242:54 Very Popular


Download for Mobile | Podcast Preview | Full Timestamps The Big Bayo 3 Spoilercast, Unabridged A Wi-Fi PhD Responds To Our Wi-Fi 6 Talk A Quick Sell on Evil West The Death Stranding Movie Shouldn't Be About Sam Delete Your Netflix Account After Completing The NieR Anime Can Achievement Hunting Ruin Your Experience? You can watch us record the podcast live on twitch.tv/castlesuperbeast NieR: Automata Ver1.1a TV anime to begin airing January 7, 2023; ‘Promotion File 008' trailer "Yoshi-P was too good with Zangief they had to tone him down" Hideo Kojima taking an "arthouse approach" with Death Stranding movie "Making money isn't something I'm focused on at all." Ubusuna – first key visual, prologue, and player aircraft details and artwork I can't believe that another Duke Nukem Forever leak happened. This time the cancelled 1996 2D platformer version of Duke Nukem Forever fucking leaked Rayman 4 leaks along with original source code

超级游文化
超播报 | 免费游戏X会员价值X严重跑题

超级游文化

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 41:52


主播:恶霸波、金花、野人、小朱后期:恶霸波文案:醒醒视觉:西森游戏资讯端游作为圣诞节真正的圣诞老人,Epic圣诞每日喜加一迎来了重磅大作——《死亡搁浅》。#Epic免费送死亡搁浅#的话题也在短时间内冲上了微博热搜。但让人没想到的是,活动于凌晨开放,当时玩家们领取的是《死亡搁浅:导演剪辑版》,而不熬夜的玩家一觉醒来,导剪版成了普通版。这也让不少玩家在微博热评中“叫苦”。目前《死亡搁浅导演剪辑版》已被Epic收回。而目前Epic官方对此事进行了回应。Epic表示,是工作人员在配置免费游戏时误操作将《死亡搁浅》基础版配置成为了导演剪辑版,而原本要赠送的就是普通版。主机1.2022年即将结束,XGP.pl统计了今年进入XGP游戏的总价值。价格是按照美区Xbox商店的常规价格计算,新增游戏包括Xbox、PC和云游戏版。统计显示,2022年XGP总共送了220款游戏,总价值为7173.84美元,约合人民币50119元。价值最高的是9月份,最低的是12月份。相比之下,2021年的XGP游戏总价值约为6317美元,约合人民币44133元。2.在本月的TGA 2022上,制作人吉田直树为我们带来了《最终幻想16》的全新预告,这支预告展示的内容非常多,画质也相当不错。因此,也有玩家想知道视频中的游戏画面是否全是实机,还是说也包含部分CG画面。近日,吉田直树在一次官方直播节目中回答了这个问题,他表示《FF16》最新预告片中的画面全是实时渲染,它变成了游戏,也将展现出PS5的强大机能。《最终幻想16》将于明年6月22日正式发售,目前已开启预购,数字标准版售价568港币,约合人民币507元;数字豪华版售价698港币,约合人民币623元;实体豪华版售价798港币,约合人民币712元;实体典藏版售价2798港币,约合人民币2499元。手游对于喜欢国漫的玩家而言,《镇魂街》系列并不会感到陌生,一句“末将于禁,愿为曹家世代赴汤蹈火”的经典台词就能点燃无数人的热血。现在,基于镇魂街世界观而诞生的的横版2D热血格斗动作手游《镇魂街:武神觉醒》,由同名动漫《镇魂街》IP正版授权,原班动漫声优演员为游戏人物配声

Retro Spectives
Episode 99: Metroid Prime

Retro Spectives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 93:21


The Metroid games are certified classics for a reason.  Super Metroid, in particular, is responsible for inventing an entire genre, with a shockingly tight design that puts all other games of its era to shame.  The 90s came and went without seeing a 3D metroid game, but in 2002 we finally saw the release of Metroid Prime.  Could it possibly capture the magic of what made the 2D games great?Well, according to the reviews of the time, it did that, and more.  Metroid Prime received close to universal acclaim, with everything from its graphical presentation to its enemy design to its power ups being declared worthy of its predecessor; a resoundingly successful conversion and evolution of the concept of a Metroidvania.But 20 years have passed since the release of Metroid Prime.  And while the genre of 3D metroidvanias remains mostly barren, there have been other fantastic games to come in its wake - Supraland, Antichamber and Outerwilds, Prey and of course, Dark Souls.  Does Metroid Prime, with its focus on exploration and platforming, still hold up today?  Or are its mechanics and world outdated, primitive and undercooked?On this episode, we discuss:Metroid Prime tells its minimalist story entirely through text you read while scanning logs and objects in the environment.  Not a single line of dialogue is spoken throughout the entire game.  Does this constant breaking of action to scan and read lines of text immersion-breaking, or does it suck you into its world even deeper?Metroid Prime, as an “action-adventure” title, touches on many types of gameplay - combat, puzzles, platforming and exploration.  Is this a balanced package, or does it do some of these things better than others?What did we think of Metroid Prime's level design, both on a micro and macro level?  How well does this level design facilitate both the moment to moment gameplay and the broader cohesive worldbuilding?We answer these questions and many more on the 99th episode of the Retro Spectives Podcast!

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword
Saturday, December 24, 2022 - A NEATO Saturday!

Jean & Mike Do The New York Times Crossword

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 15:33


A challenging but fair Christmas Eve crossword, with 2 full width, and 2 full height answers that were reasonably familiar, although the clues that led to those answers suitably cryptic (e.g., 57A, Symphony originally dedicated to Napoleon Bonaparte, BEETHOVENSTHIRD, and 2D, Revenue source for a Girl Scout troop, DOORTODOORSALES). Jean tore through the grid in under 1/3 the time it took Mike, who ran into a morass in the bottom center. All the sordid details, as well as our choice for JAMCOTWA are in today's episode, so between wrapping and unwrapping presents (for whatever holiday you celebrate - Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanza or none of the above), take some time out to have a listen!Note that we will not be publishing a podcast tomorrow, but we will be back, rested and ready for action, on Monday!Contact Info:We love listener mail! Drop us a line, crosswordpodcast@icloud.com.Also, we're on FaceBook, so feel free to drop by there and strike up a conversation!

SEIYUU LOUNGE
EP.125 - 20 Best Songs Released by Male Seiyuu Artists and 2D groups in 2022

SEIYUU LOUNGE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 32:18


2022 was filled with astounding performances by both male seiyuu artists and 2D groups. The production quality has risen a whole lot to the point that almost all songs you come across will sound near perfect. Seiyuu are taking singing incredibly seriously, some of them being insanely innovative doing things no other seiyuu artist has done. Some 2D groups have a defined, robust identity that they are proud of and we, as fans, are seeing them grow before our eyes (and ears). In this episode, let's celebrate the best songs released by 2D groups and male seiyuu artists in 2022. You can find the songs in this episode and many more on this Spotify playlist I curated for you: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/6mJ7JpHnkSikAie1BEHgtG?si=b1e11458b1d14914 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thtfhqseiyuulounge/message

Voices of VR Podcast – Designing for Virtual Reality
#1161: The Many Immersive Documentary Innovations of “In Pursuit of Repetitive Beats:” Winner of IDFA DocLab Award for Immersive Non-Fiction

Voices of VR Podcast – Designing for Virtual Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 75:08


In Pursuit of Repetitive Beats is a landmark immersive documentary that seamlessly integrates so many different immersive storytelling techniques and XR modalities earning it the IDFA DocLab Award for Immersive Non-Fiction. You're transported back into the 1989 Underground Acid Rave Scene in Coventry and West Midlands where you go on an epic journey retracing the convoluted steps to avoid detection by the police in order to make it to a warehouse of dancing bodies. Director Darren Emerson from East City Films gives us a masterclass of techniques including impeccable set design of filled with media artifacts of that era, hybrid drone shots, projection mapping, 6DoF interactions, Haptic suit design, volumetric capture, wind effects, a well-considered 4m x 6m location-based entertainment design space with streamlined onboarding and offboarding, multi-modal media integration from diegetic archival video footage, fliers, and photos, a climatic psychedelic and vaporwave dance scene, and innovative integration of interviews that projected as silkscreen projections on fliers. Not only were they able to cover everything you'd want and expect within a 2D documentary covering the topic, but this piece managed to recreate the key components of the visceral an embodied experience of going on a musical adventure. All while using the medium of VR to provide additional historical context every step of the way.

深焦DeepFocus Radio
133 十三年的时间,阿凡达失去了什么? | 视差之见

深焦DeepFocus Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 64:43


《阿凡达:水之道》于12月16日在中国内地上映,目前上映6天票房即将突破5亿。受疫情影响,本片在预售票房上佳的情况下,上映后的票房没能达到预期,但依然算是给跌入谷底的国内院线打了一针温和的强心针。我们本期播客来聊一聊今年最重要的院线电影之一《阿凡达:水之道》,请到了两位嘉宾同时也是深焦作者:斯大凌和木头人。2009年上映的《阿凡达》开启了3D电影时代,颠覆性的电影技术革新让电影走进新时代,《阿凡达》也成为了国内院线第一部票房过10亿的影片。蛰伏13年后,詹姆斯·卡梅隆终于为我们带来了这部续作。在3D技术走过辉煌逐步落入窠臼的当下,《阿凡达:水之道》让我们有了重新戴上3D眼镜的动力,但影片老套的剧情设置成为大家批评的焦点。“we are family”的口号让人怀疑卡梅隆拿错了范·迪塞尔的《速激》剧本,而片名“阿凡达”的概念似乎也在渐行渐远。本期播客,我们从《阿凡达:水之道》的剧情失望之处聊起,逐渐延伸到本片及当下电影的特效技术形式,从发行及票房层面讨论本片票房不足预期的原因,最后展望了阿凡达系列接下来可期待的点。本期嘉宾:斯大凌投笔从业进行中豆瓣 @斯大凌43期2021春节档专题播客嘉宾木头人普通影迷,第三届深焦影评大赛冠军豆瓣 @woodhead116期2022北影节专题播客嘉宾电车深焦DeepFocus编辑豆瓣 @电车126期《金发梦露》专题、123期陈可辛泛亚洲制作专题、129期沟口健儿与田中绢代专题等9期播客嘉宾 时间轴 本期总时长:64:43 「03:08」《阿凡达:水之道》的观看版本「04:08」《阿凡达:水之道》的第一观影感受「07:04」对于电影的失望之处最好的方式就是把自己当作游戏玩家。卡梅隆在做剧本的时候考虑的是技术逻辑,而不是情节逻辑。太像纪录片,而不是故事片。主线故事甚至不能说是他的软肋,简直就是累赘。「11:53」反派复活情节是唯一扣“阿凡达”主题的点阿凡达的化身在讨论古典的科幻甚至哲学的命题,身体和意识谁能更代表主体,分离开后需要如何看待。「14:39」卡梅隆的创作是否会受制作发行公司影响?「15:11」关于影片的角色塑造卡梅隆太专注于技术特效,人物的情感和行为逻辑的合理性构建上没有花太多功夫。「22:30」影片的奇观性不足,以及3D效果的感受3D特效越来越像主题乐园性质。很像打到一半钱不够了,所以改成一个相对小成本的制作。第一部人类的无聊戏份很多,第二部纳威人占比大增,所以特效成本也在增加,每一帧都在燃烧经费。「28:40」13年的创作周期,创作上过时的地方最过时的就是“we are family”,而且这个family是非常父权的。爹味很重,萨利夫人真的只叫萨利夫人,没有真的名字,完全变成了一个符号。「32:13」电影的3D形式是否还有必要继续存在?特定影片需要沉浸感或技术方面能帮助叙事的情况,才会使用这种模式。2D的表现力已经足够,3D的技术已经很难突破。「37:40」高帧率对电影的影响如果拍大远景或者壮阔的景色,高帧率肯定是最好选择,但如果是快速运动,高帧率会带来电影质感的削减。高帧率让人感觉电视感很强烈,太过清晰会丧失电影感。「41:44」《阿凡达:水之道》的优点《阿凡达:水之道》依旧是一个cinema,值得你去影院观看的影片。它的优点是它是《阿凡达》,这就够了,足够你去买票,去享受这个世界。整个制作规模和特效的展现,毋庸置疑是现在电影的领头羊。「45:29」阿凡达是否有可能用AR/VR拍摄AR/VR天然会造成的晕眩感,是很难解决的问题。AR/VR是为了增加沉浸感和第一人称体验感,很多长镜头影片已经基本做到了这种感受。「47:52」对《阿凡达:水之道》的票房预测对于大部分的中国观众来说,还有比看电影更重要的事情,关注点还没有转移过来。观众的观影习惯被破坏了,电影院已经不在娱乐规划里。「54:23」《阿凡达:水之道》与《复仇者联盟4》的对比阿凡达没有复联的能量,复联中间铺了很多电影,阿凡达。「57:02」较短的宣传周期对院线发行的影响宣传需要足够时间去发酵、传播、吸引受众。发行也很痛苦,这次很多点映事故,一方面原因是定档时间不宽裕,另一方面是疫情让工作受到了耽误和干扰。「59:23」对于阿凡达接下来的续作,期待点是什么?第二部挖了很多坑,要怎么填上,进一步挖掘主题,包括潘多拉还有更多面能够挖掘。有消息说阿凡达在考虑裸眼3D,强烈怀疑卡神把狠活留在后面了。素材库《阿凡达》(詹姆斯·卡梅隆,2009) 《泰坦尼克号》(詹姆斯·卡梅隆,1997) 《沙丘》(丹尼斯·维伦纽瓦,2021) 《复仇者联盟4:终局之战》(安东尼·罗素 / 乔·罗素,2019) 《地球最后的夜晚》(毕赣,2018) 《1917》(萨姆·门德斯,2019) 《荒野猎人》(亚历杭德罗·冈萨雷斯·伊纳里图,2015)《星球大战》(乔治·卢卡斯,1977) 《谍影重重5》(保罗·格林格拉斯,2016)《比利·林恩的中场战事》(李安,2016) 《双子杀手》(李安,2019) 《电锯人》(中山龙 / 吉原达矢,2022) 《人生大事》(刘江江,2022) 《万里归途‎》(饶晓志,2022)歌单开头 �Zoe Saldana - The Songcord (From "Avatar:The Way of Water"/Soundtrack Version) 结尾 � The Weeknd - Nothing Is Lost (You Give Me Strength) (From "Avatar:The Way of Water"/Soundtrack Version) 制作团队监制:Peter Cat 统筹:电车 策划:电车 剪辑:电车 编辑:电车

The Relatable Voice Podcast
Carpooling with The RV - Karen and Bill Drastal on animation and creativity

The Relatable Voice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:03


Welcome back to the Relatable Voice podcast! For this episode, the RV is headed to Los Angeles to speak with Karen and Bill Drastal. Karen and Bill are the co-founders of Chubby Beagle Productions, an animation studio that specialize in 2D animation and graphics. They are currently working on their newest project Maxxie LaWoww which comes out in 2024.  Find more at: chubbybeagle.com https://www.facebook.com/ChubbyBeagle Instagram; https://www.instagram.com/chubby_beagle/ and LinkedIn; https://www.linkedin.com/company/chubby-beagle-productions  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

BAKED in Science
EP71: Possibilities in 3D Food Printing

BAKED in Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 29:01


Creativity has always been a fundamental part of food. The industry is constantly looking for ways to build something groundbreaking and eye-catching from simple ingredients. What's interesting is when new technology comes into the mix. Say for instance, 3D printing customized strawberries filled with chocolate ganache. In this BAKED in Science episode, Mark Floerke sits down with Meagan Bozeman, Co-Founder at CURRANT™ 3D and Sugar Lab. With a degree in mechanical engineering and 2 decades in the 2D printing industry, Meagan began focusing on 3D printing technology and how to take it into new spaces. She connected with Kyle von Hasseln, who during graduate school for architecture, had started using sugar instead of plastic to 3D print more affordable building models. This innovation led to 3D-printed cake toppers, an acquisition of Sugar Lab, and Meghan developing CURRANT™, the printer their company is now based around. Now a few years and many R&D hours later, food possibilities abound. Meagan shares all the creative ways that 3D printing can fit into the baking and food industry. Meagan and Mark discuss: - The background and future of SugarLabs and 3D food printing - Storytelling through food - Healthy and non-sweet food printing - Most interesting projects - Biggest challenges facing 3D food printing - Using technology to save time and money Check out Sugar Lab here: https://sugarlab3d.com/ This podcast is brought to you by J&K Ingredients. Their clean label mold inhibitor, SOR-Mate, will keep your cakes and other sweet goods mold-free without the need for artificial preservatives! To learn more, go to https://www.jkingredients.com/ today!

The Relatable Voice Podcast
Carpooling with The RV - Karen and Bill Drastal on animation and creativity

The Relatable Voice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 35:03


Welcome back to the Relatable Voice podcast! For this episode, the RV is headed to Los Angeles to speak with Karen and Bill Drastal. Karen and Bill are the co-founders of Chubby Beagle Productions, an animation studio that specialize in 2D animation and graphics. They are currently working on their newest project Maxxie LaWoww which comes out in 2024.  Find more at: chubbybeagle.com https://www.facebook.com/ChubbyBeagle Instagram; https://www.instagram.com/chubby_beagle/ and LinkedIn; https://www.linkedin.com/company/chubby-beagle-productions  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AggroChat: Tales of the Aggronaut Podcast
AggroChat #416 - Talky Gunfriends

AggroChat: Tales of the Aggronaut Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 82:47


Featuring: Ammosart, Ashgar, Belghast, Grace, Kodra, Tamrielo, and Thalen   Hey Folks!  The gang is all back at the same time…  just in time to take a break effectively until after the new year.  Because of how the holidays fall this year, we will not be recording shows for the next few weeks and returning after that with our usually two-part Games of the Year show. This week we talk about more Twitter Madness and the time when a journalist misread the now-banned JoinMastodon account and created a fictitious person named John Mastodon that runs Mastodon.  From there we talk about Tam's epic journey in trying to find some way to comfortably use a push-to-talk key while playing games on a controller.  We talk a bit about a few 2D games on the Steam Deck specifically Ghost Song and Salt and Sanctuary.  After that, we talk about our progress in the Path of Exile Forbidden Sanctum league and just how much madness is associated with learning that game in general.  Finally, we talk about playing Justin Roiland's High On Life, a game about talky gunfriends. Topics Discussed: John Mastodon 5 Year Epic Search for a Foot Pedal Ghost Song Salt and Sanctuary Path of Exile Forbidden Sanctuary Progress The Madness of this Game High on Life

SEIYUU LOUNGE
EP.124 - 2022 in Review: Big Live shows, unexpected comebacks, the biggest albums and more

SEIYUU LOUNGE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 24:09


2022 is wrapping up and when you look back, so much has happened in this year for fans of 2D music projects and seiyuu artists. Between big live shows and tours, unexpected comebacks, and albums that arrived to shake everyone to the core, there was no shortage of interesting things happening this year. And in this episode, you and I are going to revisit some of those things and notice how this year was, despite what it may seem like, quite an awesome year if you're a fan of seiyuu artists and 2D groups. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thtfhqseiyuulounge/message

Not the First Telugu Podcast
Graphics | NTFTP Ep 101

Not the First Telugu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 60:15


Not the First Telugu Podcast (NTFTP) is a YouTube first podcast so we highly recommend consuming our content on Youtube but if you're a student with bandwidth constraints or only driving ato work appude vintaru ilantivemanna unte ee audio mee kosame! This is the audio-only release of our otherwise video podcast - memu emantunnamo maake telidu just go with the flow ======================================= Join our Discord server to stay connected with our community - we have a wide variety of topic-based channels and even randomly hang out on video and voice chats with the TLV fam (if you're new to Discord it's like Reddit x Twitch x Whatsapp) - Click Here to Join TLV's Discord ======================================= Please follow/subscribe to stay up to date with all our releases and if the platform you're on allows you to rate us we would really appreciate a 5-star rating so others like you can discover the podcast. Click Here to go to our YouTube Channel - Subscribe cheseyandi new episodes every Friday, All Chill Live Streams every Sunday at 8 pm! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Episode 101 of Not the First Telugu Podcast - boys get together for their usual sitting Ee episode lo topics: (i) Graphics used in movies (ii) 2D, 3D scenes (iii) Desi vs Foreign (iv) Graphics in advertising (v) Graphics is gaming (vi) VFX, CGI, Animation endhi ivanni - asalu evadikaina farak telsa? Come chill with TLV in this episode ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Please don't forget to hit "LIKE" or leave us a rating on the platform you're on, it would mean a lot to us and "SHARE" this with your friends if you enjoyed the conversation Follow us at: Discord Instagram Twitter

Nguyễn Phi Vân's Podcast
AI có đe doạ công việc của em?

Nguyễn Phi Vân's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 10:25


Đây là câu hỏi của một bạn trẻ đang theo ngành vẽ 2D. Câu hỏi thật ra là mối quan tâm của tất cả các thế hệ trẻ trên thế giới khi họ đang phải học cách cộng tác với công nghệ và làm việc khác đi trong tương lai. Trong podcast này, Phi Vân sẽ chia sẻ quan điểm cá nhân của mình, mong giúp bạn hiểu và tìm ra lựa chọn cho bản thân.

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert December 2022

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 47:01


On Episode 23 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the December 2022 issue of Stroke: “Direct, Indirect, and Combined Extracranial-to-Intracranial Bypass for Adult Moyamoya Disease” and “Contemporary Incidence and Burden of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Children of the United States.” She also interviews Drs. Koji Tanaka and Andrew Demchuk about article “Significance of Baseline Ischemic Core Volume on Stroke Outcome After EVT in Patients Age ≥75 Years.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Let's start with some questions. 1) Is direct bypass better than indirect bypass in preventing the future risk of vascular events in adult patients with moyamoya disease? 2) What is the contemporary incidence of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in the pediatric population? 3) And finally, is endovascular therapy beneficial for patients presenting with a large ischemic core? We have the answers and much more in today's podcast. You're listening to the Stroke Alert Podcast, and this is the best in Stroke. Stay with us. Welcome back to another issue of the Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. In our final podcast for the year, I'm thrilled to announce that Drs. Nastajjia Krementz and Eric Goldstein have joined our podcast as assistant editors to help us cover the latest and the best in the field of cerebrovascular disorder. And together, here's our article selection to close the year. As part of our Advances in Stroke, in the article titled "Focus on Anticoagulation for Valvular Heart Disease With and Without Atrial Fibrillation," we get an update on current evidence from randomized controlled trials on the use of direct oral anticoagulants or vitamin K antagonists in patients with valvular heart disease that are mechanical valves, moderate to severe mitral stenosis, or bioprosthetic valves from the perspective of stroke physicians. What that means is that data from randomized trials was analyzed based on whether the patient had a prior history of stroke or TIA. In this review, we learned that direct oral anticoagulants may be used in patients with bioprosthetic valves who have atrial fibrillation, although DOACs have never been shown to be superior over vitamin K antagonists. We also learned that vitamin K antagonists should be used in patients with rheumatic moderate to severe mitral valve stenosis or patients with mechanical valves with or without atrial fibrillation and, of course, sometimes during the first few months after either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients without atrial fibrillation. And finally, patients with bioprosthetic valves without AFib don't have any other indications to be treated with anticoagulants should be treated with antiplatelet monotherapy in the long run. In a separate article in this issue of the journal, from Dr. Yang and colleagues from China, we learn about the pathophysiology of radiation-induced brain injury with special attention to radiation-induced vasculopathy. These investigators show that hyperactivity of notch signaling pathway that in normal state is essential in vascular morphogenesis and maintenance of arterial identity actually results in abnormal accumulation and disturbance of vascular smooth muscle cells, resulting in arterial muscularization and arterial dysfunction seen in radiation-induced vasculopathy. What's interesting is that inhibition of the notch signaling pathway in their study resulted not only in a measurable reduction in radiation induced vasculopathy, but also an overall improvement in radiation-induced brain injury as measured by the cognitive function of the mice exposed to radiation in their study. This study takes us a step closer to possible therapeutic options for radiation-induced vasculopathy and radiation-induced brain injury using compounds that can potentially inhibit the notch signaling pathway. As always, I encourage you to review these articles in detail in addition to listening to our podcast. For our interview today, I have a special guest who's not only a prominent researcher and a pioneer in the field of acute stroke therapies, but also, he's an experienced educator who has trained many of the current leaders in the field of vascular neurology and has been influential in shaping the careers of many vascular neurology fellows over the years. Take a listen. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   I've had the privilege of training fellows. I've been the director since 2004, and we've trained close to 100 fellows in Calgary over 20-some years now. Really, it's frankly an honor and privilege to be able to do that. These individuals come from all over the world. They're here to dedicate themselves to learning a subspecialty really, really well, and it's just a fantastic experience to interact with them all and all their cultures to help them learn those things, and doing it in a fun, enjoyable, comprehensive way. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And those are the words of Dr. Andrew Demchuk, who's incidentally my own vascular fellowship director as well. Andrew joins me all the way from Canada to talk about his latest paper on the very hot topic of outcomes of endovascular therapy in patients presenting with a large ischemic core. And true to form, he's accompanied by one of his current vascular fellows. The interview is definitely worth the wait after we review these two articles. Most of us have heard of the term "moyamoya." First described in Japan in 1950s, the term refers to occlusion or stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and is associated with dilated collateral vessels of the proximal middle cerebral artery. These collaterals have a hazy appearance on angiography resembling the puff of smoke, which is Japanese for "moyamoya." Moyamoya is categorized into two broad categories of moyamoya syndrome and moyamoya disease. Syndrome refers to the situations where the occlusion occurs due to another condition. Conditions such as Down syndrome, sickle cell disease, neurofibromatosis type one have all been recognized as associated with moyamoya syndrome. Of course, moyamoya syndrome can occur due to a secondary insult to the blood vessels, anything from radiation vasculopathy, as we reviewed earlier in the podcast, to autoimmune vasculitis, or even good old advanced intracranial atherosclerosis involving the distal ICA region can cause moyamoya syndrome. Now, in contrast to moyamoya syndrome, the term "moyamoya disease" is reserved for individuals with no vascular risk factors or known moyamoya predisposing conditions other than, of course, some potential genetic factors. The most recognized genetic association for moyamoya disease is polymorphism in the ring finger protein 213, or RNF213, gene on chromosome 17. But we also have to keep in mind that the majority of moyamoya disease patients have no identified genetic abnormalities. So, moyamoya is truly a complex condition, and the physicians have to navigate the many possible etiologies that may cause or be associated with this condition. But when it comes to treatment options, we're really limited here. Antiplatelets are generally used and have been shown to reduce mortality in both moyamoya disease and syndrome, and especially cilostazol, which is the favorite antiplatelet therapy of our own assistant editor, Eric, has been shown to be significantly associated with increased survival rate in patients with moyamoya disease. Eric really wanted me to talk about a recently published study out of Korea, which included over 9,000 patients, and that showed that patients treated with cilostazol had a better survival rate than any other antiplatelet therapies. Apart from antiplatelet therapies, medical treatment includes optimizing all other vascular risk factors, which, as we mentioned, are rarely present in this population. So, it all comes down to most cases, at some point, needing surgical treatment, with bypass surgery being the most commonly surgical intervention for this population. Three flavors of bypass are used: indirect, direct, or combination of the two. Indirect bypasses are kind of like long-term investments where the surgeon moves vascular tissue to the surface of the brain in hopes of promoting angiogenesis. Several procedures, such as performing multiple burr holes, pial synangiosis, dural inversion, or omental transposition, among other methods, are used. And broadly speaking, we can think of indirect procedures as angiogenesis-dependent methods, the effect of which takes months to recognize and, in general, are thought to be more efficacious in the pediatric population than the adult population. The direct bypass, in contrast, commonly referred to as extracranial-to-intracranial, or ECIC, bypass, is more of an immediate reward where the surgeon stitches a vessel directly from a donor extracranial branch, typically the superficial temporal artery, to a recipient artery, typically the middle cerebral artery, to provide a direct anastomosis between the two vessels. There are technical variations, of course, especially with regards to the number of donors and recipient arteries used, but essentially this method is an angiogenesis-independent method that results in a quicker revascularization, but it's unclear if this strategy is long lasting. A combination of direct and indirect bypass can also be used. So, the question is, which method is better, especially in the adult population? In this issue of the journal, in the study titled "Direct, Indirect, and Combined ECIC Bypass for Adult Moyamoya Disease," Dr. Nickalus Khan and colleagues report on a meta-analysis and systematic review of those with adult moyamoya disease who underwent either direct, indirect, or a combination bypass. The main study question was whether there's a difference in the rates of early ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes, defined as strokes occurring within 30 days of bypass, or late strokes, defined as strokes occurring after 30 days of bypass, in this population when comparing the different surgical techniques. They also compared the "favorable" outcome rate; however, this outcome was defined in each study between the various broad techniques of direct, indirect, and combined bypass. So, with that, let's take a very quick look at their methodology. They screened more than 4,000 articles and identified 143 articles for their pooled analysis, the majority of articles being from Eastern Asian-based regions, and they had close to 4,000 combined, 4,000 direct, and 4,000 indirect bypass procedures for this analysis. And they had an average follow-up of over three and a half years. So, this is a great sample size for this large, pooled analysis. But they also performed a smaller meta-analysis where they were much more stringent with article selection, excluding pediatric papers, excluding articles containing only one surgical modality, or articles with insufficient outcome data. So, for that meta-analysis, they only had 43 articles qualified and were included in that meta-analysis. So, what did they find? In the larger pooled analysis, a significant benefit in favor of both direct and combined bypass techniques were noted in reduction of early and late ischemic strokes and late intracerebral hemorrhage. Also, a higher rate of that sort of vague favorable outcome was noted with both the direct or combined methods as compared to when indirect bypass techniques were used alone. So, everything in the large, pooled analysis pointed towards the direct bypass or combined technique performing better than all indirect bypass techniques, with only one exception, which was a lower incidence of early intracerebral hemorrhage rate in indirect bypass cases. So, that's one point to keep in mind. The second point was when they compared combined techniques to direct bypass. Overall, these procedures had more or less the same outcomes with the exception that the rate of late ischemic stroke was lower in the combined group than the direct bypass group. So, this is sort of the overall summary of what they found in that large, pooled analysis. When they were much more stringent with their selection criteria, focusing on the smaller meta-analysis portion of the study, what they found was that in the short term, there were no differences in outcomes of any type of stroke between any of these methods. So, basically, people, regardless of the type of bypasses they received, did the same with regards to the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke recurrence within the first 30 days after the bypass. But for the late stroke outcomes, whether ischemic or hemorrhagic, those with indirect bypass were nearly twofold more likely to develop late stroke after 30 days compared to those who've undergone the direct bypass. A similar pattern was found comparing combined bypass versus indirect bypass, in general, beyond the 30 days, with combined bypass doing better. Comparing direct versus combined bypass showed no difference regardless of timeframe. So, in summary, overall, it appears that combined or direct bypasses may be the best surgical strategies for treatment of adult patients with moyamoya disease. This study, of course, has many limitations, as does any meta-analysis, but most importantly, the authors focused on moyamoya disease in their analysis. It is presumed, but really unclear if patients with moyamoya syndrome would respond similarly to these different techniques. So, the question is, what surgical procedure are you using at your institution for treatment of adult moyamoya disease patients? And, of course, Eric wanted me to ask if your antiplatelet of choice is cilostazol for this population, yes or no. Leave us your comments, and let us know. Venous sinus thrombosis, or CVST, is a less common form of stroke most commonly affecting women and young individuals. In our past podcast, we've covered many aspects of CVST, especially when it comes to therapy with anticoagulation, anticoagulant of choice, and duration of therapy. In the October podcast, we reviewed a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing direct oral anticoagulants to vitamin K antagonists in the adult patients with CVST. But there are many aspects of this disease that we have not yet covered. For instance, you may ask, how common is this relatively uncommon condition? In the adult population, the incidence of CVST varies depending on the age of individuals studied, and ranges between 1.3 to 2.7 per 100,000 in women between the ages of 31 to 50, which is the adult population at highest risk for this disease. But the incidence of CVST, for instance, in the pediatric population is largely unknown. Some studies suggested an incidence rate of 0.67 per 100,000 in the pediatric population. That's roughly less than half the incidence rate in young female adults, but these reports are from the 1990s and are likely very outdated. Nowadays, many of the pediatric conditions, especially infectious conditions, that can predispose children to CVST are more readily diagnosed and treated. On the other hand, we now perform a lot more imaging than 30 years ago. Our neuroimaging modalities are more accurate, so we are more likely to diagnose CVST than before. So, the question is, what is the contemporary incidence of pediatric cerebral venous sinus thrombosis? In this issue of the journal, in the study titled "Contemporary Incidence and Burden of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Children of the United States," Dr. Fadar Otite and colleagues conducted a retrospective analysis of the New York State Inpatient Database, or SID, from 2006 to 2018, and the National Kids Inpatient Database, referred to as KID, from 2006 to 2019, for all hospitalized CVST cases. KID is the largest publicly-available pediatric inpatient care database in the United States, containing about 3 million pediatric discharges. They included over 700 hospitalized CVST cases from the SID database and 6,100 hospitalizations from the national KID database for the current analysis. And here's what they found. Number one, in terms of significant risk factors associated with CVST, congenital circulatory system anomalies, infections, head trauma, dehydration, and anemia were amongst the top CVST risk factors in the pediatric population. So that's very good to know. Number two, in terms of presentation, seizures were the most common presentation among all pediatric age groups, with close to half of infants with CVST presenting with seizures. Number three, in terms of outcomes, the rate of mortality was twice higher in the infants group as compared to all other age groups. And finally, the overall incidence of CVST, which was the main question of the paper, in this population was 1.1 per 100,000 per year, with a peak incidence during infancy of 6.4 per 100,000 per year. Interestingly, incident admissions also increased annually by 3.8% throughout the study period, which was close to 15 years in this paper. And the national burden of hospitalization dramatically and exponentially grew during the study period. So, here are the top three points from this study. Point one: Girls included less than half of all admissions nationally and statewide, and the overall burden of CVST was higher in boys than girls. That's a dramatic difference between the pediatric and adult populations. Point two: Incidence of CVST in infants was higher than five times that of other age groups at 6.4 per 100,000 compared to overall incidence in children, which was 1.1 per 100,000 people per year. Mortality was also two times higher in infants than in any other age group. And finally, point 3, incident admissions and national burden of hospitalization have dramatically increased over time, but it remains unclear whether true incidence has been on the rise or if simply more cases are recognized nowadays due to heightened awareness of this condition and our advanced neuroimaging capabilities. This study, of course, has some limitations. Data was only obtained on patients admitted, so many patients that may have had CVST but not admitted are not captured in this database. So, in summary, CVST can have catastrophic consequences in children and lead to long-term neurological deficits. Having a high clinical suspicion and early recognition remain crucial for prompt treatment and improved outcomes in this population. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Endovascular treatment, or EVT, is an effective method to achieve recanalization and to improve clinical outcomes in ischemic stroke patients with a target vessel occlusion. Both advanced age and having a large infarct volume at the time of presentation are negative predictors of beneficial outcomes post-EVT. Despite this, the neurological benefits of EVT seem to persist across the spectrum of age, and the same has been observed for a range of ischemic core volumes. But it's important to note that, in general, patients presenting with large ischemic core volumes were excluded from the original thrombectomy studies, and currently there's several ongoing trials to determine whether EVT is beneficial for the large core population. Now, the question that everyone is interested in answering is whether there is an actual ischemic core volume beyond which endovascular therapy is either futile or potentially even harmful, and if this magic futile core volume is the same for all patients, or does it differ depending on the age and other factors. In a previous podcast, in an interview with Dr. Osama Zaidat, we learned about that important interaction between the presenting ischemic core volume as measured by ASPECTS score and advanced age in an analysis of patients enrolled in the STRATIS registry. In that study, no one over the age of 75 achieved functional independence post-EVT if the presenting ASPECTS score was under 5 regardless of the angiographic outcomes. In that interview, we also discussed the limitations of STRATIS registry as a non-randomized, single-arm study, and the issues surrounding using ASPECTS score to define ischemic core. In today's podcast, we're going to revisit the important interaction between the presenting ischemic core volume and age while reviewing a pooled analysis of seven endovascular clinical trials in the paper titled "Significance of Baseline Ischemic Core Volume on Stroke Outcome After Endovascular Therapy in Patients Age 75 Years or Older." I'm delighted to be joined today by the first and senior authors of this paper, Drs. Koji Tanaka and Andrew Demchuk. Dr. Tanaka is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at Kyushu University in Japan. With his experience working at the leading center for conducting stroke clinical trials in Osaka, he has now joined the Calgary Stroke Program as a research fellow. And he's accompanied today by his fellowship director, Dr. Demchuk. Dr. Demchuk, of course, needs no introduction to our Stroke readership and our podcast audience. He's a Professor of Neurology at the University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine. He's a stroke neurologist and a leader in the field of cerebrovascular research who has been involved in multiple clinical studies and randomized trials, including the seminal studies that led to the approval of EVT as the standard of care for treatment of stroke. And, of course, he's a very special guest of this podcast this morning as he was my very own fellowship director. Top of the morning to you both, Andrew and Koji. Welcome to the podcast. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Thanks, Negar. It's great to be here. Dr. Koji Tanaka:               Thank you very much for your invitation. That is a great honor to be here. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Thank you both. Andrew, let's start with you. Can you please provide us some background on the pooled analysis and the HERMES collaboration, please? Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Yeah, HERMES is a really, it's been a really fun journey. Years back, when these trials all came out roughly at the same time, right? There was a real quick succession of trials, the MR CLEAN trial was obviously first, and ESCAPE and others quickly followed it. It became very clear to us that it just made total sense to collaborate. And so we got together as a group and decided we will pool the data. We'll do it in a very careful scientific way with basically an independent statistical analysis, and develop a core imaging lab, and really actually share the workload amongst us. I remember one of the really interesting tidbits about HERMES is when we got together, in order, I think, to really build trust in the group, one of the important things we decided early was we were going to have a snake draft. If you don't know what a snake draft is, Negar, it's essentially where you take turns selecting a topic through each of the trials. So, every trialist got an opportunity to pick a topic, and we just went down the list until everyone had their turn, and then we'd start over again and do it again. And I think that really worked very well to be as democratic as possible with this, and as fair. And it really allowed for a lot to get done because whoever was motivated in the collaboration was able to do an analysis. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         So, what a great summary of this collaboration. So, it's true collaboration between the trialists that basically gave us those seven original randomized trials. Andrew, can I just stay with you, and can you tell us a little bit about the patient population that were enrolled in those trials? Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Yeah, I think one of the important things to know, and I think a limitation for any kind of analysis like this, is the trials generally were small core trials, right? I mean there are some, MR CLEAN was certainly a more generalized population, but many other trials, including ESCAPE, I mean the "S" and the "C" in ESCAPE is "small core," right? And so a lot of these trials were small core. So, we don't have a lot of data in larger core patients. But, as you can imagine when you do core lab analysis, you realize that some of the stroke patients weren't as small core as we thought they were when we enrolled them. So, there is some sufficient data to hypothesize. I would consider this paper very much hypothesis-generating. So, yeah, it is a limitation to be considered here. I mean, our sample size isn't very large in the big core patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Perfect. Thank you, Andrew. So, again, a recap for our listeners, that we are looking at pooled analysis of seven original trials of thrombectomy, but keeping in mind that those patients that were enrolled in the trials had, generally speaking, small presenting ischemic core. So, now, Koji, on to you. Can you walk us please through the current study, and what was the premise of it, and who was actually included in this study? Dr. Koji Tanaka:               Yes. In this study, we aimed to evaluate association between baseline ischemic core volume and the benefit of endovascular therapy over the best medical treatment on functional outcomes. Patients were categorized age over 75 years, and less than 75 years old. The primary outcome of interest was a modified Rankin Scale of three or less, and we included 899 patients who underwent this baseline ischemic core volume measurement, which corresponds to 51% of our patients in the HERMES collaboration dataset. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         All right. So, just a quick recap of what you said. Thank you for this. So, we have 899 patients. Those patients were all included in the HERMES collaboration, but, of course, these are patients in whom we had presenting ischemic core measurements. And that will get me, actually, Koji, to my second question. Can you please walk us through how you did analysis of ischemic core volume measurements in this study? Dr. Koji Tanaka:               In this study, ischemic core volume was measured by CT perfusion in 591 patients and by diffusion-weighted imaging in 309 patients. We defined the ischemic core volume as a relative cerebral blood flow of less than 30% in CT perfusion and diffusion coefficient of less than 620 square micrometers per second in diffusion-weighted imaging. Previous studies showed ASPECTS moderately correlate with ischemic core volume in both CT perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging. For example, ASPECTS of eight can be considered as ischemic core volume of 20 milliliters. But underlying [inaudible 00:28:21] were different between CT perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging, and previous studies suggested CT perfusion occasionally overestimates the ischemic core volume was on diffusion-weighted imaging. In this study, the results did not change when analyzing CT perfusion and diffusion-weighted imaging separately. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Yeah, that's a really important point Koji makes, is that because we had sort of a, not quite a 50/50 split, we had a 60/40 split of CTP and DWI, we did analyze them separately, and the odds ratios of treatment effect were pretty similar at different core thresholds. So, they're fairly similar when you separate them out, but obviously the methodology is a little different between a CTP and a diffusion. And to Koji's point, he's absolutely right, the CTP has a tendency to slightly overestimate core when you compare to diffusion. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Yeah, and thank you. I think you already sort of alluded to what I was going to ask you and Koji, because, in reality, we have different ways of measuring core. We have the ASPECTS score, which is just a quick and dirty way of estimating or guesstimating core, and then we have CT perfusion, and we also have diffusion that sometimes is available to us, but not always. And the question is, in the heat of it, how we're going to measure the volume. With post-processing softwares, with CT perfusion, we get a quick potential ischemic core volume, but we don't have that capability with diffusion even if we did get diffusion. So, I think it's important to know that what Koji mentioned, an ASPECTS of eight can, more or less, in a quick fashion, be thought of as about 20 cc of core. And the other point that Koji raised was that CTP, again, this is sort of ballpark, can tend to overestimate ischemic core if you were to compare that with diffusion-weighted data. So, with that, now we have a study in which we have core volumes, and we're going to look at outcomes from endovascular thrombectomies compared to best medical management and see whether there is a correlation or interaction between ischemic core presentation, especially age. So, my next question would be to Andrew, can you walk us please through the main findings of the paper? Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   The whole goal of this paper was really to understand, are there thresholds in the older patients? When we looked at overall, and Bruce Campbell and the team wrote an important paper with HERMES and the CTP cohort overall, and the sort of message there was if you looked at shift analysis, there wasn't actually a core threshold found at all in HERMES for lack of benefit. There was a benefit across all the core volumes, but, of course, that's all ages. So, we were really interested in looking at the older patients because we felt there's more likelihood the core volume will matter in the elderly than in the younger patient. We know the younger population, it benefits overwhelmingly with EVT, it's hard to even find a core volume threshold. So, that was a premise. Essentially, we had 247 patients over 75 in the overall cohort, of which 98 had EVT. So, it was a decent population, and not a huge sample, but a decent sample. And so we looked at various things. The first thing that was interesting we found was that infarct volumes, the average infarct volume to achieve an mRS three or less, was lower in the older patients, significantly lower, was 23.9 for younger patients under 75 and 10.7 for the older patients. You tend to have much smaller infarcts to achieve good outcome. And so that was kind of interesting, and I think that's been shown by others. Then we got into the weeds to try to figure out, OK, what are these thresholds? And if there's one figure that matters, Negar, you know me to always point out that there's always one figure or table in a paper that's kind of where the money is, where the real learning is, and that's Figure 2 on this paper in my opinion, beautiful figure with four figure A, B, C, and D. And it really sort of nicely highlights these issues and these cutoffs. But what we saw is that in the older patients who received EVT, around 50 mils seemed to be a threshold to achieve zero three, you had to, to see treatment effect, you had to have a baseline infarct volume less than 50 mils for a zero three outcome advantage. For zero four, it was 85 mils. And then we looked at this issue of what we called futility, true futility. And that's a very controversial thing. What is futility, or how do you measure futility? And really, I think, we even had a debate about this as a HERMES group when we were designing the analysis, and we sort of landed on mRS five six. A 90% chance of mRS five six, right? That's quite the bar, right, to say true futility because some people argue mRS four is still not a horrible outcome. Culturally, that is an OK outcome in some situations. But when we did use that five six 90% threshold, it was 132 mils. So, you're getting up to these really large volumes. But here's the catcher in the whole thing, and Koji will probably speak to this a bit more. I don't want to steal his thunder too much, but this issue of reperfusion seemed to matter in this. And we'll come back to that maybe with another question. Reperfusion matters a lot when you think about these thresholds. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         OK, so, Andrew, a lot of information, I don't know if I need a recap myself to recap, but basically what you mentioned is that for the older patients who received EVT, if we keep our eyes on the outcome of mRS of zero to three, it seems to be the magic core volume for that outcome post-endovascular therapy that it lands on the magic volume of 50 cc core. Did I get that right? Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   That's correct. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Then if you're still a bit more lenient with the definitions of what is favorable outcome, what outcomes we're looking at and so on, so forth, for an mRS of five to six, then when we talk about futility of endovascular thrombectomy, the volume that you mentioned, and again I want to ask you this, this volume is for elderly over the age of 75, is 130 mil. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   132, but yeah, absolutely. But there's a real catcher here, and we need to really emphasize the catcher in this. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Okay. I will ask you one more question before I go to Koji, which I'm sure is going to tell us more about that catcher. Andrew, can you please tell us about the factor of time? I feel like that is something that we need to discuss, as well. Your study included patients early on in their stroke onset, but we're talking about an important interaction. The question is, do you think the results of this interaction would be different or impacted by the value of time? Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Hypothetically? It must, right? I think that that must be the case. We don't have any data specific to this. That would be an interesting Aurora analysis to do. Now, of course, the challenge with late window analysis is, we are really small core in our late window trials, we probably have even a much smaller proportion of large cores. So, to be able to even tackle that question in the late window is, I don't know if we have the data yet, to be honest. But it makes sense that you would expect the thresholds to be a bit lower the later you are in the window. But that is a hypothetical opinion. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Right, so, I want to take that and come to Koji. I want to digress a little bit to Koji and see how we can understand the finding of this current analysis of this paper. So, small core patients early on into their onset, we're looking at the interaction between age and their core volume and coming up with numbers 50 cc for the elderly population. If you're looking at the outcome of zero to three or 132, as Andrew pointed out, for an MRS of much higher, four or five. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Actually five, six, 90% chance of five, six. So, it's there. It's like almost everybody got five, six, took 132 mils to get there. So, it's like this extreme outcome. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Right, so, exactly, and I have to correct it, again, mRS of five or six or dead or almost dead mRS basically. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   In 90% of patients. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         90% of patients. So, we have these important numbers here, and I want us to basically understand these numbers in these volumes in the context of the recently published RESCUE-Japan LIMIT study. Can you tell us a little bit about that study and how we can make sense of these volumes in the setting of that paper? Dr. Koji Tanaka:               In the recent RESCUE-Japan LIMIT trial, the median ASPECTS was lower, and baseline ischemic core volume was greater than those in our study. And surprisingly, the median ischemic core volume in that trial was close to our threshold to predict less than 10% of patients achieve a modified Rankin Scale of four or less after endovascular therapy. We thought this is due to much higher complete reperfusion rate in HERMES patient. We have much interest in their additional analysis for outcomes in elderly patients by reperfusion status. This potential benefit of endovascular therapy in the area is promising for the future clinical trials. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   I think just to add to that, it was actually really interesting, Negar, because when we were analyzing all of this and then the trial came up and it was actually really nice because we're like, OK, how does our data relate to their data? And that's where Table 2 comes in, and it would almost be worth putting on the pod, whatever, I don't know if you have on your podcast website, you have one figure that you can sit there with as you listen to the podcast, because that would be the figure. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         We'll work on that Andrew, but tell us a little bit more because, really, when I read the trial results, the way I understand it is that people enrolled in RESCUE-Japan that were older than 75, and these are all large core patients, benefited more from endovascular therapy than their younger counterpart. How do I understand that? I don't know how to wrap my head around that finding. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   You want to try to answer that, and then I'll add? Dr. Koji Tanaka:               As I mentioned previously, we want to know about the exact patient population just only for elderly patients, whether they have a exactly larger ischemic core volume or as well as their functional outcome. How many patients achieved modified Rankin Scale four or less or three or less, or more than five or six? Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Koji's point's very important. We actually don't have the breakdown of the mRS, so we don't know if they created a lot of fours, or threes, or what. So, that's one issue. But I think that the key to this whole thing is to understand that this is a 2022 trial. HERMES data is essentially a 2015 equivalent where we're looking at a number of clinical trials who roughly ended between 2014, 2016. So, the technology, the technique, the operators, are just at a different level back then than now. And quite frankly, EVT is an improving treatment. We probably don't even fully understand how much, I mean, we're just getting better at it. And I think what's happened here is the reperfusion rates have improved. And our HERMES reperfusion rates, remind me, Koji, I think they're about half, we think, in HERMES, than like the TICI 2bs, threes, are half in HERMES what they got in RESCUE-Japan LIMIT. So, when you achieve successful reperfusion, what were the numbers here? TICI 3 was 43% in the Japan RESCUE LIMIT, and 8.6% in HERMES. Okay, TICI 3s were not ... Now that may be slight differences in core lab interpretation, but we were just starting to get good at 3s. We were getting a lot of 2bs and some 2cs, but we weren't getting a massive number of 3s back in 2015. Well, voilà, now we are, right? We're hitting home runs when we didn't before. And I think that has really shifted the goalposts on the large core. If you open the vessel, they can still do well if they're elderly, but you've got to really open that vessel. And in HERMES, we only did that in a small portion of patients. So, these thresholds are sort of representative of 2015 skill. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Golden points, Andrew and Koji, both of you. I want to recap what you mentioned here. A note to all of our audience and listeners that we are looking at an analysis with RESCUE-Japan, an analysis of a 2022 study. And the patient population that were enrolled were also treated much later in terms of time than the patient population that was enrolled in the HERMES collaboration and in all of the trials that contributed to HERMES. So, we've got to remember that EVT is this fluid, ongoing, everyday-improving therapy, from our techniques to everything else, you know, how fast we get patients to the angiosuite. And the point that you raise, I want to repeat that, the percentage or the odds of achieving a perfect reperfusion was, in RESCUE-Japan, was 43% odds of TICI 3 reperfusion, whereas only 8.6%. So, when we're talking about all of these predictive modeling or predictive factors that will tell us who's going to do well, who's not going to do well, it also is predicated on the angiographic success. And perhaps in the earlier trials or even the early study that we covered as part of the STRATIS registry, we put everybody, TICI 3s with TICI 2b or better, whereas nowadays we accept the best, TICI 3s, and maybe that improved percentage in the most recent trial, the RESCUE-Japan, really did what it had to be done for the elderly population to keep that in mind. And Andrew, before we end our interview, I want us to get your top two takeaway messages from this paper. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   Clearly, elderly patients do better when their strokes are smaller, that we know, compared to younger patients. But it's all about hitting the home run. It's all about hitting the home run. Figure 2C and 2D, you can see that if you achieve that high TICI score, a significant proportion of elderly patients potentially could still benefit, 30–40% reasonable outcomes with bigger cores if you get those high TICI scores. So, it is about hitting the home run in reperfusion in the elderly. You need to go for it, and hopefully you're successful, because if reperfusion isn't successful, then generally the outcomes are not ideal and they certainly worsen as the core volumes become larger, bigger. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         Before I ended the interview, given Andrew's tremendous experience as a longtime fellowship director and seeing that he was flanked by two of his fellows, one past, myself, and one present, Koji, I had to ask him one final question of what his philosophy is as an educator. Dr. Andrew Demchuk:   I have a sort of philosophy on life with fellows. I always look for the special power in a fellow. I realized a long time ago we're all, we're not perfect, nobody's perfect, I'm not perfect, but there's usually a special power in people, and if you spend the time to get to know them, you identify that special power, and you really help harness it because you know that if they can harness it when they go back to their faculty job, they're going to really contribute something special to their team, right? You can imagine six special powers from six different people in a team. Now you've got a real team, right? If you know what your power is, you know your limitations, but you know where your strengths you can add to the group, and that's what we try to do here when we can. It's not always, you know, special powers, you have to kind of seek them out. But they're there in most people, and that's really important for career down the line. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         And this concludes our podcast for the December 2022 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check out this month's table of contents for the full list of publications, including our very interesting Stroke Images series. In this month, we have a case of progressive cervical myelopathy secondary to a dural AV fistula supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. We also have a separate case of carotid rete mirabile imaged with a four-dimensional flow MRI study. And with these cases, we bring our 2022 Stroke Alert Podcast series to an end. Over the past 12 months, we've ended our podcasts with various inspirational tales. From the moving account of the American runner Steve Prefontaine and the remarkable journey of the Syrian refugee and Olympian swimmer Yusra Mardini, to the discovery of positron and Commander Armstrong's landing on the moon, our podcast stories have but one thing in common, which is the story of human perseverance and consistency in the face of hardship. So, as we end 2022 to start 2023 anew, Andrew's comments on finding that special power in each of us resonate with our resolution to stay alert with Stroke Alert. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

The Andrew Price Podcast
#35: Creating a Niche in the Digital Art World w/ Ergo Josh

The Andrew Price Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 110:07


In this podcast, we talk to Ergo Josh, a Digital Artist on YouTube where he teaches his audience illustration. We discuss the exploration of creating art piece and the technicalities behind being a content creator. Ergo's Links: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@ergojosh Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ergo.josh/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ergo_josh Website: https://www.ergojosh.com/ Links discussed in podcast: Meds Map: https://medsmap.mykajabi.com/landing-... Analytical FigureDrawing: https://www.cgmasteracademy.com/cours... Will Weston Classes: https://drawingamerica.com/weston/ Ilya Kuvshinov: https://www.artstation.com/kuvshinov_... Robot Pencil: https://www.robotpencil.net/robotpenc... Signup to Poliigon: https://www.poliigon.com/?utm_campaig... Chapter Markers: 00:00:00 - Intro 00:00:25 - Podcast Start 00:07:13 - Artists that inspire Ergo 00:09:05 - Anime culture and its influence on art 00:13:46 - Benefits of going to conventions 00:19:38 - Ergo's background in art 00:23:43 - Making income as a Digital Artist 00:34:17 - Why it's important to use reference 00:51:49 - Poliigon Ad 00:52:42 - Essential lessons to learn in 2D Illustration 01:03:41 - Courses and Mentorships for 2D art 01:17:15 - Loish and learning new skills 01:24:48 - Using new platforms to connect to an audience 01:26:31 - Is the Instagram bubble going to pop & video replacing photo 01:31:54 - How video and A.I. changes the value of art 01:35:02 - Dealing with social media controversy in the art world 01:45:34 - Ethics of emerging technology Send in your video question: https://www.blenderguru.com/podcastqu... Listen to The Andrew Price Podcast: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3iQrZmx... Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast... Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=... Anchor: https://anchor.fm/andrew-price-podcast Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/the-andrew-... Pocket Casts: https://pca.st/g63tah31 RadioPublic: https://radiopublic.com/the-andrew-pr... ----------------------------------------------- Follow me: Twitter: https://twitter.com/andrewpprice Instagram: http://instagram.com/andrewpprice Facebook: http://facebook.com/blenderguru ArtStation: http://artstation.com/artist/andrewprice Blender Guru: http://www.blenderguru.com Poliigon: http://www.poliigon.com

Animation Industry Podcast
Episode 190: Laura Gonçalves Journey To Create The Garbage Man

Animation Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 53:41


This chat is with a 2D animator from Portugal named Laura Gonçalves. She is known for animated films like Drop by Drop, Three Weeks in December, and her most recent, The Garbage Man. She shares how she worked with the BAP Animation Studio collective to produce her film. Tune in to Ibele and Gonçalves to hear: *How Gonçalves received funding for her film in Portugal *What options you have pursuing animation as a career in Portugal *Gonçalves' complete process to produce her super unique style and story Social Links: *Watch The Garbage Man here: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/screening-room/the-power-of-family-memory-in-the-garbage-man *Follow Gonçalves on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/la_lauragoncalves/

Popzara Podcast
Pokémon Scarlet and Violet: The Evolving Charm of Pocket Monsters

Popzara Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 41:03


On this highly collectible episode of the Popzara Podcast our own trainers Cory Galliher and Nia Bothwell join the gym to take on Pokémon Scarlet and Violet, their journeys to becoming true Pokémon Masters, and the evolution of all-things Pokémon. Do Pokémon Scarlet and Violet have technical hiccups? You bet!. Does that detract much from the experience? Not really. It's a snark-free chat about the latest chapter in one of Nintendo's best-selling franchises, as well as the evolution of Satoshi Tajiri / Game Freak's eternally popular series from the early days of 2D pocket monsters to recent 3D updates like Pokémon Legends: Arceus. It's a journey from Game Boy to Switch and everything in-between, and who better than a duo of true Poke Nerds taking a little nostalgia trip with a few thousand of their dearest friends?

Welcome to the Metaverse
An Undeniably Good Use For Blockchain & NFTs - TinyTap - The Giant Internet School - with CEO Yogev Shelly

Welcome to the Metaverse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 40:48


With all the negative news of late around the ongoing FTX saga, I wanted to showcase a really clear, undeniably positive use case of blockchain technology and it just so happened that I came across a platform doing really amazing work, called TinyTap. On this week's episode of the Welcome to the Metaverse podcast, we chat to TinyTap CEO - Yogev Shelly. TinyTap are a platform that empowers teachers and educators to create interactive, gamified content. You can do this on their website, using their really simple 'no-code' tools to create fun, educational 2D games for kids. Teachers creating the games get paid when they're content gets played and there is now this massive, fun resource for kids to learn online. They have over 12 million families using the platform currently. Interestingly they've recently become a subsidiary of Animoca Brands, who as you'll know are a major success story in this space and they are now integrating blockchain and NFTs to give teachers full digital ownership and control over their content, alongside publishing rights for it too. You'll hopefully see in this episode the power of what blockchain and digital ownership can do for good in the context of education, with our guest Yogev Shelley, who does an awesome job of explaining the shift that is happening here. Thank you Yogev for coming on the show. Grab you 30% of Realm Academy - just use the code FRANKS30 at checkout! - click here This show is brought to you by Everyrealm, who are your portal to the metaverse. If you want to level up quick and learn about : Metaverse Foundations, Intro to Blockchain and Advanced Topics in Web - taught by leaders at top companies in the industry like Ledger, The Sandbox & Dragonfly Capital, then Realm Academy is the place to do it. The code you need is FRANKS30 (F-R-A-N-K-S no. 30) - just enter it at checkout for 30% off, absolute no brainer, grab it quick! Join 10s of 1000s of others who've already made their way to the metaverse. Search ‘Realm Academy' or click the link above Check out more at https://everyrealm.com and join their industry newsletter here : https://everyrealm.substack.com/ --- TinyTap Links Website : https://www.start.tinytap.com/ Web3 Portal : https://web3.tinytap.com/ Animoca Brands article : https://www.animocabrands.com/animoca-brands-acquires-tinytap Twitter : https://twitter.com/TinyTapAB Everyrealm's Links Realm Academy : https://everyrealm.com/realm-academy - 'FRANKS30' at checkout for 30% OFF! Twitter : https://www.twitter.com/everyrealm Discord : discord.gg/everyrealm Newsletter : https://everyrealm.substack.com/ Search 'Everyrealm' for more ======================= I always love to hear from you, say hello on the following links! : Twitter : https://twitter.com/luke_franks LinkedIn : Search Luke Franks =======================

Of Course You Realize THIS Means Podcast - A Looney Tunes Discussion
Tonic DNA Animation Director Todd Shaffer and Senior Animator Alain Sequin Talk Looney Tunes Cartoons, Space Jam, and Disenchanted!

Of Course You Realize THIS Means Podcast - A Looney Tunes Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 35:05


  On this week's podcast, Animation Director Todd Shaffer and Senior Animator Alain Sequin from Tonic DNA sat down with me to discuss their work on The Looney Tunes Cartoons series currently available on HBOMax; Space Jam: A New Legacy and over on Disney+ the latest feature Disenchanted! Tonic DNA is a Montreal-based studio that specialize in a vast range of animation techniques including 2D, 3D, Motion Design, Stop-Motion, VFX and Live-Action. Tonic DNA had a hand in some of the most memorable Looney Tunes Cartoons including; Big League Beast, Puma Problems and Graveyard Goofs! They also did the promo piece called Dynamite Dance which launched the whole shabang! The Credits for Goofy Graveyard! FOLLOW THE GUESTS: TonicDNA.com Todd Shaffer ToddShaffer.com Alain Sequin Instagram   Comment below with your favorite bit from this episode! FOLLOW and SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST: @ThisMeansPod Rate, Subscribe & Like on iTunes, Spotify and more! Instagram: THIS MEANS PODCAST  

Reality Escape Pod
REPOD S4E10 - Digging for a Pony: David Spigner, CEO of Boda Borg, Sweden(ish)

Reality Escape Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 73:18


In Season 4, Episode 10, we head to Sweden to explore Boda Borg... or at least that's where we thought were going with this episode. As it turns out, the President/ CEO of Boda Borg is an American business strategy visionary living in Laguna Hills, California named David Spigner. There is surprisingly little information about the Boda Borg story, and we are thrilled to share the tale of how he became the owner and President of what was originally a Swedish company. Boda Borg has been around since 1995. That is way longer than escape rooms have existed, and it was ingenious in the way it approached what they call "reality gaming." David Spigner recounts how he helped propel it from rooms decorated only with flat, 2D paintings into interactive multidimensional sets with movie-like narrative and feel. He candidly shares his global ambitions as well as the hurdles of trying to explain the appeal of Boda Borg to financial lending communities. David Spigner is an excellent storyteller, and we were enthralled with his tale of discovering and shaping Boda Borg. Spigner is an unusual guest in that his approach to the immersive gaming world comes from a very business-oriented, strategic mindset with aspirations towards massive global expansion. And yet, in chatting with him, it was clear that he intuitively understands the appeal of physically immersive gaming. This was a fascinating conversation that you shouldn't miss.   Show Notes   Episode Sponsors Thank you to our sponsors:  Morty - A free app for discovering, planning, tracking, and reviewing your escape rooms and other immersive social outings. Escape Tales - Escape Tales is an acclaimed series of tabletop escape room games— each featuring a unique blend of mind-bending puzzles masterfully woven into thought-provoking, robust narratives. Use code “roomescapeartist” for 25% off all Escape Tales products and Books of Rituals on Board & Dice. Buzzshot - ‘Customer Satisfaction Software' for your escape room business. Streamline your marketing and grow your escape room business with pre- and post-game features including robust waiver management, branded team photos, and integrated review management. Use code REPOD2022 in the dropdown list when booking a demo for 20% off your first three months. Reality Escape Convention - RECON Our escape room and immersive gaming convention, will be an incredible event for creators and consumers of the games we love. We hope to see you in Boston. Learn More about RECON. Music Credits  All music provided by GameChops:  "The Legend of LoFi" by Dj Cutman & James Landino "Hateno Village" by Mikel & GameChops Production Credits REPOD is produced by Lisa Spira and edited by Steve Ewing of Stand Inside Media.   

The Business of Authority
Predictions for 2023

The Business of Authority

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 48:58


Planning around the amped up fear about uncertainty—recession, inflation, monetary policy, cryptocurrency, war, politics (just to name a few).The power of building even more discreet and creative niches—and making money from them in new ways while serving people who energize and inspire you.
The birth of a major social media platform that optimizes information exchange within communities—with tighter controls on access.Soloists will keep multiplying, especially those migrating from tech space layoffs and those disenchanted with corporate business-as-usual.We crave connection even more after a long shut-down—we are drawn to those who help us feel connected in our work and our lives.Quotables“There is going to be so much fear about things like recession inflation, monetary policy, war, politics—and it's easy to get sucked into that. But those who don't—those who conquer it—have got the opportunity to up our game and take home a bigger share of the marbles.”—RM“There's a great line from Game of Thrones. There's a character called Little Finger, and he's talking about how the world will be thrown into chaos. And he says ‘Chaos is a ladder'. And it's such a great way to look at it…like it can be good.”—JS“Niching is actually fun because you're finding your people, you're finding the way that you can use your superpower…the next thing you know, your business is full of people who energize and inspire you.”—RM“Another social media related prediction that I'll make is that LinkedIn benefits from all of this bananas on Twitter.”—JS“A reasonable number (of those laid off from tech) will say, you know what? 
I'm done. I'm done with somebody else having control over me…I am gonna do this on my own.”—RM“There's a really interesting development in the AI world called stable diffusion, which turns text prompts into unbelievable 2D images.”—JS“Actuarial valuations were a commodity, but nobody recognized it until somebody decided to start a new firm and change the pricing structure. And then guess what? All the big firms dropped their prices and started to finally look at that data as a commodity.”—RM“If your clients cannot differentiate you from other people who have a similar looking resume in any meaningful way—like they don't see any meaningful difference between you and the next 10 people—then you're on sort of thin ice.”—JS