Podcasts about cardiac

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Muscular organ responsible for pumping blood through the circulatory system in most animals

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  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about cardiac

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Latest podcast episodes about cardiac

WhatCulture Wrestling
NEWS - REAL LIFE Firings Used In WWE Storyline! The Miz & Maryse Raw Return! Triple H's Cardiac Event Was “Very, Very, Very Serious”! WWE's Original Golden Egg Plans REVEALED?!

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 17:21


Today's wrestling news, including...REAL LIFE Firings Used In WWE Storyline!The Miz & Maryse Raw Return!Triple H's Cardiac Event Was “Very, Very, Very Serious”!WWE's Original Golden Egg Plans REVEALED?!ENJOY!Follow us on Twitter:@AdamWilbourn@AndyHMurray@WhatCultureWWEFor more awesome content, check out: whatculture.com/wwe See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Plant Trainers Podcast - Plant Based Nutrition & Fitness
A Plant-Based Diet For Heart Rehab Patients with Colleen Montgomery - PTP431

Plant Trainers Podcast - Plant Based Nutrition & Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:28


In this episode of The Plant Trainers Podcast, we talk with Colleen Montgomery all about a plant-based diet for cardiac rehab patients and the importance of lifestyle on our overall health. Colleen breaks down some cardiology information for us like what cardiac rehab is, who should be getting it, and what lifestyle changes can be made to improve cardiac health. We discuss statins and why you would want to try to avoid them, how to cautiously get to exercising and we also discuss why children and teens need to start making smart decisions for their health now.  Colleen Montgomery is a Clinical Exercise Physiologist, Certified Plant-Based Health Coach, and owner of Wellness Within LLC. During her 12 years working with heart patients she discovered the powerful medicinal effects of food and other lifestyle choices. Now, her clients improve their heart health in big ways by combining the most effective behavior change techniques with the healthiest habits on the planet. Share this out with any cardiac patient you know.  In this episode we discuss:  Finding plant-based Dr Greger and Esselstyn  Didn't wait till she was sick  Cardiac rehabilitation Cardiac risk factors and genetics  Preventing cardiac events Reversal  Marking small changes or being predominantly plant-based  Side effects of statins  Don't stop medications on your own  What to look for to talk to your doctor about reducing meds  Exercise and precautions Tips for teens

Sigma Nutrition Radio
#415: Prof. Bruce Neal – Can Salt Substitutes Reduce Cardiac Events & Death?

Sigma Nutrition Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 46:24


Bruce Neal is Executive Director at The George Institute for Global Health Australia; and Professor of Medicine, UNSW Sydney. Prof Neal is a UK-trained physician who has 25 years' experience in clinical, epidemiological, and public health research with a focus on heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Bruce has a longstanding interest in high blood pressure and diabetes and the potential for both clinical interventions and changes in the food supply to deliver health gains. His work has been characterised by its focus on collaboration, quantitation, translation and impact. He holds professorial appointments at UNSW Sydney, Imperial College London, and an honorary appointment at the University of Sydney. He has published some 450 scientific papers and since 2016 has been identified by Thomson Reuters as one of ‘The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds', an acknowledgement provided to just a few thousand researchers across all disciplines, worldwide. He has particular expertise in the conduct of large-scale clinical trials addressing cardiovascular disease but has also done a significant body of work addressing food policy issues related to sugars, fats, portion size and food labelling. Find the show notes at sigmanutrition.com/episode415/

Cardionerds
164. Case Report: “A Good Candidate” Advanced Heart Failure in an 18-year-old Man with Autism Spectrum Disorder – Cleveland Clinic

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:59


CardioNerds (Amit Goyal and Daniel Ambinder), are joined by guest host Dr. Alex Pipilas (CardioNerds Ambassader, Boston University), and Cleveland Clinic fellows, Dr. Gary Parizher, Dr. Ambreen Ali, and Dr. Tiffany Dong. They discuss a case of an 18-year-old man with Autism Spectrum Disorder presented with advanced nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Due to anxiety, he was unable to tolerate right heart catheterization, and the initial evaluation for advanced heart failure therapies was deferred. With assistance from a multidisciplinary team, catheterization was successful, and he underwent cardiac transplantation. Faculty experts, Dr. Richard Dane Meredith (Cardiovascular Imaging, Mission healthcare), Dr. Julie Niezgoda (Congenital Cardiac Anesthesiologist, CCF), and Dr. Ran Lee (Critical Care Cardiology and Advanced HF/Transplant Cardiologist, CCF) provide the E-CPR for this episode. Audio editing by CardioNerds Academy Intern, Dr. Leticia Helms. Claim free CME just for enjoying this episode!  Disclosures: NoneJump to: Pearls - Notes - References CardioNerds Case Reports PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Episode Teaching Pearls - Heart Failure with Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism spectrum disorder should not be regarded as a contraindication to organ transplantation.Respect for patient discomfort with procedures, and efforts to mitigate that discomfort, are essential.A multidisciplinary team approach, especially one utilizing allied health support services, is important to provide care to adolescent patients with advanced organ dysfunction, particularly those with developmental disabilities. Notes - Heart Failure with Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in social interaction and the presence of restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests, or activities (2). In 2016 the CDC estimated one in 54 children age 8 had ASD (3). Despite ASD's prevalence, studies of organ transplantation in children and adolescents with developmental disabilities are lacking. Guidelines from the International Society for Heart Lung Transplantation indicate that heart transplantation cannot be recommended in patients suffering from severe cognitive-behavioral disabilities (4). However, the definition of “severe” is not clear, so the assessment of severity of a cognitive impairment, as well as whether the impairment constitutes a contraindication to organ transplantation, falls to healthcare providers on a case-by-case basis.             Cardiac transplantation in a patient with ASD has been documented previously (5). Nonetheless our case represents an important example of advocacy for lifesaving care in patients with developmental disability. Without any one component of the team taking care of our patient, including physicians and allied healthcare providers, he would have died of refractory cardiogenic shock. However, with individualized care and a multidisciplinary combined effort, his providers were able to overcome the obstacles posed by his ASD and deliver indicated interventions. References - Heart Failure with Autism Spectrum Disorder 1.  Baran, David A., et al. "SCAI clinical expert consensus statement on the classification of cardiogenic shock" Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 94.1 (2019): 29-37. 2. American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th edition. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association, 2013. 3. Baio J, Wiggins L, Christensen D, et al. Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder among children aged 8 years - Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 11 Sites, United States, 2014. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 2018; 67:1-23. 4. Mehra M, Canter C,

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast
Clinical Challenges in Surgical Critical Care: Arrhythmias

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 28:32


Cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation are common in any ICU. But, adequately addressing additional perioperative considerations is key in the surgical ICU. In this Critical Care episode of Behind the Knife, Drs. Bankhead, Dumas, & Park will address how to approach a critically ill patient who presents with an arrythmia. Hemodynamically stable vs. unstable patients are discussed, as well as the current ACLS guidelines for management of a patient in cardiac arrest.  Referenced Articles and Guidelines: 1. Van Gelder I, Groenveld H, Crijns H, et al. Lenient versus Strict Rate Control in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation. NEJM 2010.  2. Walkey A, Hogarth K, Lip G. Optimizing Atrial Fibrillation Management: From ICU and Beyond. CHEST 2015.  3. AFFIRM Investigators. A Comparison of Rate Control and Rhythm Control in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation. NEJM 2002.  4. ACLS Training Center: Tachycardia with a Pulse Algorithm. https://www.acls.net/acls-tachycardia-algorithm 5. ACLS Training Center: Cardiac Arrest Algorithm. https://www.acls.net/acls-secondary-survey 6. ACLS Training Center: Acute Coronary Syndromes Algorithm. https://www.acls.net/acute-coronary-syndromes-algorithm Please visit behindtheknife.org to access other high-yield surgical education podcasts, videos and more.  

Spoonful of Sugar
Clinical Concepts - Cardiac Arrest

Spoonful of Sugar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 51:02


Cardiac arrest can be a harrowing phenomenon to witness both within and outside of a hospital. Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) is a set of clinical guidelines used in managing cardiac arrest. Most residency programs will introduce their trainees to the basics of ACLS, but even as a medical student it is very important to understand the purpose of ACLS and the elements involved in delivering life-saving care. The goal of this episode is to review the components of the ACLS algorithm and discuss important considerations surrounding the care of cardiac arrest patients. Disclaimer: the purpose of this podcast is to educate and facilitate discussion, and the contents of this episode should not substitute advice from a qualified, board-certified practicing physician.

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 76 - Eating Disorders

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 22:24


Episode 76: Eating Disorders. The malaria vaccine is announced by Dr Parker, eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia are briefly discussed by Sophia, Jeffrey and Dr Arreaza. Introduction: Introducing the malaria vaccine (RTS,S)Written by Hector Arreaza, MD; read by Tana Parker, MD.  Today is November 26, 2021.Malaria is a devastating disease that continues to kill thousands of people every year around the world. Since the year 2000, there have been 1.5 billion cases of malaria and 7.6 million deaths. In 2019, there were 229 million new cases, and 409,000 deaths, mostly children under 5 years of age.Effective vaccines for many protozoal diseases are available for animals (for example, the vaccine against toxoplasmosis in sheep, babesiosis in cows, and more.) However, vaccines for protozoal disease in humans had not been widely available … until now. The RTS,S is a vaccine against malaria approved by the European Medicines Agency in July 2015 for babies at risk, and it was rolled out in pilot projects in Malawi, Ghana and Kenya in 2019.  In October 2021, the World Health Organization announced the recommendation of this anti-malaria vaccine. The trade name of this vaccine is Mosquirix®. The vaccination is recommended for children in sub-Saharan Africa and other regions with moderate to high transmission of Plasmodium falciparum, which is considered the deadliest parasite in humans.  The approved vaccine has shown low to moderate efficacy, preventing about 30% of severe malaria after 4 doses in children younger than five years old. Implementation of vaccination is not free from challenges, and it should be executed not as the solution for the disease, but as part of the solution, along with other efforts such as mosquito control, effective health care, and more.RTS,S is an add-on to continue the fight against malaria worldwide. Hopefully we can lighten the heavy burden of malaria for more than 87 countries that suffer the severe consequences of poor control of this devastating disease. This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. ___________________________Eating Disorders. Written by Sophia Dhillon, MS3, Jeffrey Nguyen, MS3. Discussion with Hector Arreaza, MD.  This is not intended to be a comprehensive lecture on eating disorders. This episode is intended to give you basic information, hoping to motivate you keep learning about it. Let's start talking about eating disorders today, specifically anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. What is an eating disorder? An eating disorder is a disturbance of eating that interferes with health. As a reminder, health is “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity.” So, an eating disorder, in a wide context, is any eating pattern that is out of what is considered “normal”, and that variation in feeding causes health problems. But in general, when we talk about eating disorders in medicine, we refer to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, but it includes also avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, binge eating disorder, night eating disorder, pica, and rumination disorder.  ANOREXIAIn general, anorexia is characterized by immoderate food restriction, inappropriate eating habits or rituals, obsession with having a thin figure or an irrational fear of weight gain as well as distorted body self-perception. There are 2 main subtypes of anorexia: restricting type vs binge-eating/purging type. Tell us the difference between anorexia restrictive type and binge eating-purging type.Anorexia, restrictive type is when weight loss is achieved by diet, fasting and/or excessive exercise, meanwhile the binge-eating/purging type entails eating binges followed by self-induced vomiting and/or using laxatives, enemas or diuretics. These patients will have intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat. They will have a distorted perception of body weight and shape or denial of the medical seriousness of one's low body weight.Anorexia nervosa is different than avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder. In anorexia, you have an altered perception of your body (“I'm fat”), but in avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, your perception of your body weight and shape is not abnormal. “I'm skinny, and I'm OK with that.” This is new information for me. I thought anorexia was present always when a patient refused to eat, whether you liked your body or not.Why do people develop eating disorders? There are so many reasons why people develop eating disorders. First, it can be psychological due to low self-esteem, feelings of inadequacy or failure, feeling of being out of control, response to change (i. e. puberty) or response to stress. Second, it can be due to interpersonal issues like having trouble with family and personal relationships, difficult expressing emotions or feelings, or even history of being teased based on size or weight. Lastly, it is the social and cultural norms that we grow up in. There are cultural pressures that glorify thinness and place value on obtaining the perfect body, narrow definitions of beauty that include women and men of specific body weights and shapes. Sometimes there is no reason. Some people just get obsessed with their weight and perceive themselves as “fat”. Effect of anorexia on different parts of the bodySince these patients are scared of gaining weight, how does it affect the entire body?Anorexia can affect multiple systems in our body. Just to name a few symptoms that it can manifest as: amenorrhea, infertility, constipation, dizziness, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, dry skin and even hair loss. Starvation induces protein and fat catabolism that leads to loss of cellular volume and atrophy of the heart, brain, liver, intestines, kidneys, and muscles. Cardiac: It can decrease cardiac mass, decrease cardiac chamber volumes, cause myocardial fibrosis and pericardial effusion. These manifestations are reversible if the patient gains weight. Functionally, it can cause bradycardia due to increased parasympathetic activity, hypotension, decreased heart rate variability and QT prolongation on ECG. Lungs: shortness of breath due to weakened and wasting of the respiratory muscles, pneumothorax and aspiration pneumonia. GI system: it leads to gastroparesis with bloating, constipation, severe pancreatitis and mild transaminitis. Hematologic: anemia, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Skin manifestations include dry/scaly skin, hair loss, acne, hyperpigmentation and acrocyanosis. You can also find lanugo, which is a very thin, light colored hair on the face and body. It is thought that the lanugo is an adaptation from the body to keep it warm. Lanugo is common in patients with anorexia nervosa or other causes of malnourishment. That's why wearing coats in warm weather can be a silent sign of anorexia. Other subtle signs include social withdrawal, fidgeting (to burn calories), and always “eating” in private.  It is important to remember that all these manifestation that Jeffrey mentioned are not present with intermittent fasting because intermittent fasting is an intermittent restriction of food, the nutritional needs are met during the “feasting” periods after “fasting”. Some may argue that intermittent fasting may promote eating disorders, but I believe intermittent fasting is just an effective treatment for obesity.Treatment plan for anorexiaThere are several treatment options for these patients. We can refer them to nutritional rehabilitation where they can supervise meals. We can refer them to psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or motivational interviewing. There is also a drug called Olanzapine for this condition. Sometimes, patients may need admission to the hospital. I learned recently that UCLA has an Eating Disorder Program which includes inpatient services. Some centers are very specialized and include family therapy and group therapy. Listeners, you can continue to research about anorexia, it's is fascinating. The prevalence of anorexia in the US is estimated to be 0.6%[3]. BULIMIABy definition, bulimia nervosa is when a person binge eats and then uses certain behaviors to prevent weight gain. These behaviors may include self-induced vomiting, using laxatives or diuretics, exercising excessively, or fasting and having a restrictive diet. Signs and symptoms to look forA physical examination is key. On physical presentation, these people usually can have overweight or obesity. That's the main difference with anorexia. Anorexia: skinny people, bulimia: normal weight, overweight or obesity. Regardless of their weight, these patients are malnourished. They may lack some essential nutrients causing serious health consequences. That's why nutrition cannot be assessed by BMI only. Common signs they will present with will include tachycardia, hypotension (systolic blood pressure below 90), dry skin, and hair loss. If the person uses self-induced vomiting to prevent weight gain, they may have erosion of the dental enamel from all the acid that comes up when they vomit. There may also be scarring or calluses on the dorsum side of the hand from all the acid too. Their parotid glands, that are located on the side of the jaws will also be swollen, causing a sign known as chipmunk face of bulimia.From talking to this person and getting a detailed history, we will learn of the symptoms bulimia nervosa can cause. This will include lethargy and fatigue, irregular menstrual periods in a female, abdominal pain and bloating, and constipationThis disorder really does take a toll on the body. There's plenty of complications that come with it as well. Let's try to break it down by system. GI system has the most complications: esophageal tears from the vomiting called Mallory-Weiss syndrome, which will present with bloody vomits, a loss of gag reflex, esophageal dysmotility, abdominal pain and bloating, GERD, diarrhea and malabsorption of nutrients, fatty stools known as steatorrhea, colonic dysmotility leading to constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, rectal prolapse, and pancreatitis. Cardiac: serious complication is ipeac-induced myopathy, let's spend a little time on this. Ipecac is a syrup that someone with bulimia nervosa may use to make themselves vomit. If a person uses this syrup frequently or for a long amount of time, there is a component called emetine will accumulate in muscle, including cardiac muscle. If a person uses ipecac chronically, it can be detected in the urine for up to 60 days. This will damage the heart muscles or myocardium and lead to cardiomyopathy. It will present with symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, hypotension, tachycardia or bradycardia, T wave abnormalities on ECG, conduction delays, arrythmias, pericardial effusions, and even congestive heart failure. Cardiomyopathy may be irreversible. Renal system: dehydration, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, hyponatremia, and metabolic alkalosis. This could happen in patient who use diuretics as a purging mechanism. Endocrine system: Electrolytes and hormones imbalance. The endocrine system primarily impacts the reproductive and skeletal systems. Among 82 women treated for bulimia nervosa, menstrual irregularities were present in 45 percent at pretreatment and in 31 percent at 12-month follow-up. These irregularities may look like spotty or very light menstrual cycles. Cycles may be very erratic or completely absent. Skeletal system: osteopenia and osteoporosis are common with bulimia nervosa. Osteopenia means weaker and more brittle bones. Osteoporosis is more serious than osteopenia and can more easily result in fractures.The diagnosis of bulimia nervosa can usually be made clinically. And after the diagnosis with bulimia nervosa, the first step in helping them is always getting a full lab work up to see what systems to the body have been impacted. Treatment options include nutritional counseling, behavioral therapy, and even medications. If a person needs help connecting with someone that can help with this disorder, there are organizations that they can contact which will connect them with proper resources in their area. Organizations include the Academy for Eating Disorders and the National Eating Disorders Association. Bulimia nervosa is more prevalent in females than males in all age groups. In the US, adult prevalence is 1.0% and adolescent prevalence is 0.9%, with the median age of onset of 18 years. After comparing different age groups, we have seen the prevalence of bulimia nervosa has increased over time. Conclusion: Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are eating disorders that can have consequences on the health of our patients. We should know the difference between these two diseases and know the resources available in our community to assist these patients. The diagnosis may be done clinically, but you will need to order labs or imaging for a full assessment. Eating disorders are an example of the direct effect a mental illness can have in the body. In the specific case, anorexia and bulimia cause malnutrition. The treatment of these diseases requires a multidisciplinary team to treat the patient and the family as well.____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 76 “Eating Disorders.” We started this episode with exciting news about the new malaria vaccine, a step forward on our fight against malaria. Sophia, Jeffrey, and Dr Arreaza presented an interesting overview about anorexia and bulimia. They taught us that if a patient perceives him or herself as “fat”, but they are actually underweight, they may have anorexia. Patients with bulimia tend to have normal or above normal BMI but have periods of binging and purging. Be aware of these conditions while assessing your patients' nutritional status and treat appropriately or refer as needed. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RBresidency@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Tana Parker, Sophia Dhillon, and Jeffrey Nguyen. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week! _____________________References: Malaria's Impact Worldwide, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/malaria_worldwide/impact.html, accessed on November 15, 2021.  Constitution of the World Health Organization, Basic Documents, Forty-fifth edition, Supplement, October 2006, accessed on Aug 26, 2021. Accessed on November 15, 2021.  https://www.who.int/governance/eb/who_constitution_en.pdf. 12 Secret Signs of Anorexia, CBS News, August 12, 2010, https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/12-secret-signs-of-anorexia/3/.  Hudson JI, Hiripi E, Pope HG Jr, Kessler RC. The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Feb 1;61(3):348-58. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2006.03.040. Epub 2006 Jul 3. Erratum in: Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jul 15;72(2):164. PMID: 16815322; PMCID: PMC1892232. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16815322/.  Mitchell, James E, MD; and Christie Zunker, PhD, CPH, CHES, Bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder in adults: Medical complications and their management, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/bulimia-nervosa-and-binge-eating-disorder-in-adults-medical-complications-and-their-management?search=Bulimia%20nervosa%20and%20binge%20eating%20disorder%20in%20adults:%20Medical%20complications%20and%20their%20management&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1 Yager, Joel, MD, Eating disorders: Overview of epidemiology, clinical features, and diagnosis, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/eating-disorders-overview-of-epidemiology-clinical-features-and-diagnosis?search=Eating%20disorders:%20Overview%20of%20epidemiology,%20clinical%20features,%20and%20diagnosis&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1 Yager, Joel, MD, Eating disorders: Overview of prevention and treatment, UpToDate, October 2021. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/eating-disorders-overview-of-prevention-and-treatment?search=Eating%20disorders:%20Overview%20of%20prevention%20and%20treatment&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1

EMRA*Cast
Digitalizing Cardiac Arrest

EMRA*Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 25:21


EMRA*Cast Host Shreyans Sanghvi, DO, takes us on an innovative journey with Andrew Chu, MD, PGY4 at Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency and fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital's Healthcare Transformation Lab, and Leland Perice, MD, Ultrasound Fellow at Maimonides Medical Center. Their first experiences with patient codes catalyzed their drive to explore the intersection of healthcare and digital innovation. In 2020, in the midst of the COVID-19 global pandemic, they embarked on a journey to create a digitalized treatment algorithm. Brandishing a Silicon Valley approach to mastering cardiac arrest management, Dr. Chu and MGH's Jared Conley, MD, PhD, MPH, created the MGH ACLS. 

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast
Cardiac Disease or Preeclampsia? An Unusual Case Study

The Critical Care Obstetrics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 41:48


Suzanne and Stephanie discuss an unusual case demonstrating  the multi system effects of preeclampsia. Listen and learn as they walk through the issues this patient encountered.The experts at Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics pool their decades of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women to discuss the challenges encountered in caring for these vulnerable women.Dr Stephanie Martin is the Medical Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist with expertise in critical care obstetrics.Suzanne McMurtry Baird, DNP, RN is the Nursing Director for  Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics with many years of experience caring for critically ill pregnant women.Julie Arafeh, RN, MS is the Simulation Director for Clinical Concepts in Obstetrics and a leading expert in simulation.

JAMA Editors' Summary: On research in medicine, science, & clinical practice. For physicians, researchers, & clinicians.
Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection for Knee Osteoarthritis, Bariatric Surgery for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Liver and Cardiac Outcomes, mRNA Vaccination and COVID-19 Hospitalizations, and more

JAMA Editors' Summary: On research in medicine, science, & clinical practice. For physicians, researchers, & clinicians.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 12:12


Editor's Summary by Linda Brubaker, MD, Associate Editor of JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, for the November 23, 2021, issue.

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (#17 Pitt Coastal Champions)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:24


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen praises Pitt for their huge win over Virginia to win the ACC Coastal. He also talks about what this means for the program. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

JACC Podcast
Assessing Cardiac Amyloidosis Subtypes by Unsupervised Phenotype Clustering Analysis

JACC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 15:15


Pass the Salt Live
Coach Dave LIVE | 11-22-2021 | 500 NEW BILLIONAIRES SINCE LOCKDOWNS! – AUDIO ONLY

Pass the Salt Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 30:14


LINKS FROM TODAY’S SHOW: JFK Death Announcement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PXORQE5-CY Satellite Phone: https://SAT123.com Robert F Kennedy on Tucker: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXbuoaXbJSU Archbishop Vigano: https://rumble.com/vpelhb-breaking-exclusive-archbishop-vigano-appeals-for-a-worldwide-anti-globalist.html  Phil Robertson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BEeVXaZ5Vs Hagee’s Mega Church chants “Lets go Brandon” https://www.operanewsapp.com/us/en/share/detail?news_id=26a8d4e6c8a18c9fea9345fc68b61892&news_entry_id=12784592211118en_us&open_type=transcoded&from=news&request_id=share_request Cardiac surgeon Warning: https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/11/no_author/red-alert-renowned-cardiac-surgeon-steven-gundry-warns-rna-covid-19-vaccines-more-than-double/ […]

Keto Mans Club Podcast
Dad Does Keto | Keto Man's Club Podcast Episode 109

Keto Mans Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 42:36


Jason Thompson of Iowa is your regular guy - 37 years old, works as a sheet metal foreman, has a wife and two kids, hunts and fishes... and at one point was nearly 285 pounds on his 6' frame. As a self-proclaimed "steak and potatoes" guy - and with a love of alcohol - Jason joined his wife on a keto way of eating to help them both lose weight. As you'll hear in this episode, Jason has dropped a lot of weight, and his finding new ways to experiment with his physicality. We'll talk about calorie loads and shredding out... you'll love it!Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jthomp_ketocarnivore_adventure/ Check out our This week's product partner: SOM Sleep https://bit.ly/3oEQH81Use discount code TKMC10 for 10% off your order.TKMC Discord: https://discord.gg/kPDn4NwPlease help us get the word out by sharing about our podcast with your friends and family. You can use the share buttons on the player on our website if you would like to send them a link directly.You can also use the Subscribe button to make sure you don't miss an episode if you're using the web player.You can reach us a number of ways:Email: KetoMansClubPodcast@gmail.comWebsite: http://www.TheKetoMansClub.comLeave a voicemail comment or question by calling 512-518-6161InstagramPodcast: @ketomansclubpodcastChris: @DuckmanketoJim: @JiminmanjrAlberto: @el.KetoCholo

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (#19 Pitt beats UNC, Coastal on the line)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 50:57


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen welcomes Cardiac Hill's Collin Sturchio to break down the win over UNC and the upcoming battle for the Coastal vs. UVA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Deconstructed Cardiology
Cardiac Amyloidosis

Deconstructed Cardiology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 13:13


What is cardiac amyloidosis? Explained in simple terms.

The Ringer NBA Show
The Cardiac Lakers, the Church of Scottie Barnes, and More Early Season Story Lines We Love | The Answer

The Ringer NBA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 50:17


Chris and Seerat start their NBA affirmations by discussing the new rule changes and how they are affecting refereeing around the league (1;00). Then they dissect the Lakers' entertaining fourth quarters (6:00) and wax poetic about Gary Payton II (14:00) and Evan Mobley (23:00). They wrap everything up by showing the Chicago Bulls some love (33:00) and sharing their thoughts on the blooming Cade Cunningham vs. Jalen Green rivalry (40:00) and the NBA's new generation. Hosts: Chris Ryan and Seerat Sohi Production Assistant: Chris Sutton Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Pediheart Podcast #185: How Long Should Infants With SVT Be Medically Treated?

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 31:39


This week we delve into the world of EP when we review a recent work from the team at Rady Children's Hospital on length of treatment for infant SVT. Is there an optimal length of therapy for the infant with SVT? Are there predictors of recurrence that might suggest benefit to a longer course of medical therapy? We speak with Director of Pacing at Rady Children's Hospital, Dr. Matthew R. Williams who is the senior author of this week's work. doi: 10.1007/s00246-020-02534-5

The Radiology Review Podcast
Congenital Cardiac Anomalies Part 1

The Radiology Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 18:38


Part 1 review of congenital cardiac anomalies for radiology board exams.  Check out additional free educational content at www.theradiologyreview.com. 

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (#25 Pitt handles Duke)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 23:27


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen discusses the takeaways from #25 Pitt's win over Duke, and previews UNC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Nutrition with Judy
7 Principles for Metabolic Health from a Cardiac Surgeon - Dr. Philip Ovadia

Nutrition with Judy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 38:08


Hey guys! I had the pleasure of sitting down with Dr. Philip Ovadia for a discussion on metabolic health. Dr. Philip Ovadia is a board-certified Cardiac Surgeon and founder of Ovadia Heart Health. His mission is to optimize the public's metabolic health and help people stay off his operating table. As a heart surgeon who used to be morbidly obese, Dr. Ovadia has seen firsthand the failures of mainstream diets and medicine. He realized that what helped him lose over 100 pounds was the same solution that could have prevented most of the thousands of open heart surgeries he has performed—metabolic health.In Stay off My Operating Table: A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health Guide to Lose Weight, Prevent Disease, and Feel Your Best Every Day, Dr. Ovadia shares the complete metabolic health system to prevent disease.Dr. Ovadia grew up in New York and graduated from the accelerated Pre-Med/Med program at the Pennsylvania State University and Jefferson Medical College. This was followed by a residency in General Surgery at the University of Medicine and Dentistry at New Jersey and a Fellowship in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Tufts – New England Medical School.All about Dr. Philip Ovadia- 12 myths about metabolic health- 5 markers to define metabolic health- 7 principles of metabolic health- Sleep- Ideal diet for metabolic health?- Heart disease at younger ages- Where can people find Dr. Ovadia_____RESOURCES- Dr. Ovadia at www.OvadiaHeartHealth.com- Twitter: https://twitter.com/ifixhearts- Book: Stay off my Operating Table – A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health - Guide to Lose Weight, Prevent Disease and Feel Your Best Everyday: https://amzn.to/3AUXjFj____CHECK OUT MY BOOK, Carnivore CureSIGN UP FOR MY WEEKLY NEWSLETTER: _____ ADDITIONAL RESOURCESNutrition with Judy ArticlesNutrition with Judy ResourcesCutting Against the Grain Podcast_____ FIND ME

Radiology Cardiothoracic Imaging Podcasts | RSNA
Episode 14: Cardiac Imaging Trends Over the Last Decade

Radiology Cardiothoracic Imaging Podcasts | RSNA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 33:58


Host Praveen Ranganath is joined by Dr. Russell Reeves, the lead author of the recently published “Cardiac Imaging Trends from 2010 to 2019 in the Medicare Population”, to discuss the past, current, and future landscape of cardiac imaging trends. Tune in and enjoy!

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (Pitt slips vs. Miami)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:38


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen discusses Pitt's loss against Miami, what constitutes a safety, and what the Panthers need to do from here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

UK HealthCast
Cardiac Amyloidosis

UK HealthCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


Dr. Gaurang Vaidya, a cardiologist for UK Healthcare joins us to discuss Cardiac Amyloidosis treatments.

Cardionerds
157. Case Report: A Case of Complete Heart Block In A Young Adult – Stanford University

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 60:17


CardioNerds (Amit Goyal and Daniel Ambinder), join CardioNerds FIT Ambassador, Dr. Pablo Sanchez, and his co-fellows, Dr. Jimmy Tooley and Dr. Maggie Ning from Stanford University for an important case discussion about an An otherwise healthy young adult presented with fatigue and was found to be in complete heart block due to sarcoidosis. Dr. Ronald Witteles, (Stanford University Program Director for the Stanford Internal Medicine residency program and advanced heart failure specialist who's particular expertise focuses in the treatment of amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, and cardio-oncology) provides the  provides the E-CPR for this episode.  Claim free CME just for enjoying this episode!  Disclosures: Dr. Witteles reports that he has served as an advisor for Pfizer, Alnylam, Eidos, Regerenon Pharmaceuticals, Janssen, and IonisJump to: Patient summary - Case teaching - References CardioNerds Case Reports PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Patient Summary - Notes - Complete Heart Block due to Sarcoidosis An otherwise healthy young adult presented with fatigue and was found to be in complete heart block. Imaging studies were suspicious for cardiac and pulmonary sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis was confirmed on biopsy. Given the high risk of future cardiac events our patient underwent a dual chamber ICD implantation. He was started on prednisone and methotrexate for immunosuppression. Case Media - Click to enlarge Episode Teaching - Notes - Complete Heart Block due to Sarcoidosis Pearls - Complete Notes - Complete Heart Block due to Sarcoidosis Cardiac sarcoidosis is a disease characterized by noncaseating granulomas involving the heart that can exist alone or together with other organ system involvementDepending on the sites of cardiac involvement it can present as conduction system disease, ventricular arrhythmia, or heart failureCardiac sarcoidosis should be considered in patients with history of sarcoidosis involving other organ systems who develop left ventricular dysfunction, wall motion abnormalities, or arrhythmiasCardiac sarcoidosis should be considered in patients who present with otherwise unexplained heart block or ventricular tachycardia (VT) It is generally recommended that patients with cardiac sarcoidosis with an indication for pacemaker receive an ICD at time of implantation regardless of history of VT Notes - Complete Heart Block due to Sarcoidosis 1. What is Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a rare disorder of inflammation characterized by the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues. It most commonly involves the pulmonary system, but other organ systems can be involved including the heart. Sarcoidosis typically affects young adults, and its etiology is still uncertain. 2. What is Cardiac Sarcoidosis and how is it diagnosed? Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) can occur alone or with systemic disease and depending on the cardiac sites of involvement, can present as conduction system disease, ventricular arrhythmia, heart failure, or sudden cardiac death. 3. How is Cardiac Sarcoidosis diagnosed? Diagnosis of CS is challenging as the gold standard is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), though sensitivity of EMB is low given the often-patchy tissue involvement. Societal guidelines on the diagnosis of CS require either a positive EMB or biopsy-confirmed extracardiac sarcoidosis with evidence of secondary criteria to suggest cardiac involvement - unexplained VT, high grade AV block, third degree AV block, LVEF

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross
Screening teens for cardiac problems

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 32:33


Darla Varrenti, Nick of Time Foundation, on screening teens for cardiac problems // Chris Sullivan's Chokepoint -- delays to the already-20-year-old Tacoma I-5 HOV project // Hanna Scott with highlights of the Bellingham City Club's public safety discussion // Dose of Kindness -- War Heroes on Water // Gee Scott on Halloween costumes and candy // Hanna Scott previewing tonight's Seattle mayoral debate // Chris Sullivan recapping the cleanup of I-90 following the semi crash See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cardiac Consult: A Cleveland Clinic Podcast for Healthcare Professionals
Talking Tall Rounds®: Blood Conservation in Cardiac & Vascular Surgery

Cardiac Consult: A Cleveland Clinic Podcast for Healthcare Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 15:16


Dr. Jennifer Hargrave provides an overview of the Blood Conservation in Cardiac & Vascular Surgery Tall Rounds® session.

Locked On Coyotes Podcast - Daily Coverage of Arizona Hockey
Cardiac Coyotes unable to complete comeback, still remain winless

Locked On Coyotes Podcast - Daily Coverage of Arizona Hockey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:34


Armando Velez of Locked on Panthers joins Robyn and Carl as they all discuss the Arizona Coyotes 5-3 loss to the Florida Panthers. How did the Coyotes manage to stay in the game despite being outmatched the majority of the game? Plus, what's coming up for both of these teams? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Badass Women at Any Age
102 Self Made Badass with Nancy Duitch

Badass Women at Any Age

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 32:12


After losing her 20 year old brother to cardiac arrest in his sleep, Nancy Duitch's life changed forever.  Learning that her family had a, not so rare,  genetic syndrome that would impact her throughout her lifetime, Nancy delved into wellness,  beauty and skincare products that would become an incredibly successful career.  As the founder and CEO of Sera Labs and CSO of the wellness division of CURE Pharmaceutical Nancy, Nancy has over 30 years experience as an entrepreneur and leader in the consumer products industry.  She has founded and developed several diverse businesses from startup to public company level and she has executed state of the art campaigns generating over 3 billion dollars in revenue for some of the most well loved consumer brands.  In just 2 short years after the start of Sera Labs, Nancy brokered the sale of that company to CURE Pharmaceutical.  She will continue as the CEO of Sera Labs as well as assume the additional role of Chief Strategic Officer of CURE Pharmaceutical.  Nancy is also passionate about and heavily involved in several philanthropic activities supporting children in need  After losing two siblings to sudden cardiac death when they were in their 20s, Nancy and her mother embarked on a mission to educate and raise awareness and resources to help fight sudden death in children and young adults.  In 1995 they founded the Cardiac and Arrhythmia Research and Education Foundation which continues to play a critical role in supporting thousands of patients and their families.  What You Will Hear in This Episode:  Nancy's personal journey and the devastation and impact of losing 2 siblings to cardiac sudden death Getting heavily involved in wellness and skincare and the direct response world. Biggest challenges: The lack of respect that women got in business in the 80s and 90s, especially if you are a tough business woman. Overcoming the challenges.  Never quitting, being able to evolve and make quick pivots. The importance of resilience and awareness.  Knowing and understanding what your vision is when opportunities come. Making commodities novel and simplifying complicated products and messages. Nicole Kidman as a strategic partner Embracing mentors and constructive criticism. Quotes: “If you never quit and you keep down a path and put the blinders on you will win at the end of the day.” “I hire to my weaknesses.  I know what my weaknesses are and I think most women do.” “Never quit on anybody.” “One of the most difficult things to do is to take a complicated product, a complicated message and simplify it.” “I had to climb the ladder myself, but to do that you've got to take some risks.” “My best talent is having a great team.”   Mentioned: Seralabshealth.com Seratopical.com Ab roller Gendered Ageism Survey Results Not Done Yet! Not Done Yet! Amazon Bonniemarcusleadership.com The Politics of Promotion Fb @Bonnie.Marcus LinkedIn: @Bonniemarcus Twitter: @selfpromote IG: @self_promote_  

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (#17 Pitt topples Clemson)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 36:41


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen discusses Pitt's statement win over Clemson and their #17 ranking. He also weighs in on Kenny Pickett's Heisman campaign as well as the attendance at Heinz Field. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Let's Talk Wellness Now
Episode 138: Cardiac Changes Related to the COVID and Vaccine Injury with Dr. Peter McCullough

Let's Talk Wellness Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 30:09


Dr. McCullough joins Dr. Deb to discuss the cardiac risk factors of COVID illness and V-Injury. Dr. McCullough shares data on the cardiac inflammation seen with this disease and they discuss the new disease that is being seen as a result of this virus and post-vaccine injury.   Do not miss these highlights: [04:32] The effectiveness...

Beers With Bands
Past Life: Window Shopping Economics

Beers With Bands

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 72:06


On this weeks episode I sit down with the band Past Life, a joy rock band from Philadelphia. We talk about the forming of the band, their early releases, and the singles leading up to their new album. We also talk about working on their music videos for "Cardiac" and "Two Wolves". Before we get to the crazy stories that they have to tell we talk about their newest album Window Shopping Economics which came out on 10/8. It is a great album that makes you want to get up and move, definitely a must to check out! This episode features the songs "Cardiac" and "My Winner" from the album Window Shopping Economics. You can find Past Life on all streaming sites and here: https://linktr.ee/pastlifephl --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/beers-with-bands/message

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Pediheart Podcast #183: Feasibility of Real Time Myocardial Contrast Echo To Assess Pediatric Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:36


This week we delve into the world of heart transplantation and echocardiography to review a recent work on non-invasive assessment of the pediatric heart transplant patient. Can stress echo and real time myocardial contrast echo identify coronary vasculopathy in this patient group? How do the results compare to coronary angiography? How difficult is this form of imaging and can it be done by pediatric echo techs and staff physicians? Professor Jonathan N. Johnson of the Mayo Clinic shares his insights this week. DOI: 10.1016/j.echo.2020.12.009

Brains and Gains with Dr. David Maconi
Dr. Thomas O'Connor - Shelby Starnes' Client Health Disaster

Brains and Gains with Dr. David Maconi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 43:32


Dr. Thomas O'Connor and IFBB Pro Jodie Engel join us today to discuss the medical complications Jodie has experienced in the past year after using extreme protocols given to her by her bodybuilding coach.  0:00- Intro 1:10- Jodie's medical history and medications prescribed 6:40- Rhabdomyolysis diagnosis 9:00- Hospital admission 12:00- Blood work values 12:45- Dr. O'Connor gives his input 14:30- Powerlifters vs bodybuilders health risks 15:10- Holding coaches liable 18:10- More on Jodie's current condition 21:00- Cardiac and renal diagnoses 24:40- Potential for return of cardiac health 25:50- Resting heart rate 28:00- Going to a university hospital 30:15- Dialysis  32:00- Ace inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers  35:15- Cardiac remodeling 37:30- Next steps for Jodie Dr. O'Connor's website: https://www.testosteronology.com/Dr. O'Connor's IG: https://www.instagram.com/drthomasoco...Dr. O'Connor's YT: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp3E...Jodie's IG: https://www.instagram.com/jodie_engle...Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DaveMaconi 

Discover CircRes
October 2021 Discover CircRes

Discover CircRes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 30:54


This month on Episode 29 of Discover CircRes, host Cynthia St. Hilaire highlights four original research articles featured in the September 17th and October 1st issues of Circulation Research. This episode also features conversations with BCVS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award finalists, Dr Jiangbin Wu from the University of Rochester, Dr Chen Gao from UCLA, and Dr Chris Toepfer from Oxford University.   Article highlights:   Raftrey, et al. Dach1 Extends Arteries and Is Cardioprotective   Zhang, et al. Blood Inflammatory Exosomes and Stroke Outcome   Joyce, et al. Cardiovascular Health and Epigenetic Age   Liu, et al. Wls Suppresses Fibrosis in Heart Regeneration   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Hi, and welcome to Discover CircRes, the podcast of the American Heart Association's journal, Circulation Research. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire from the Vascular Medicine Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. And today, I'll be highlighting articles presented in our September 17th and October 1st issues of Circulation Research. I also am going to speak with the BCVS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award finalists, Dr Jiangbin Wu from the University of Rochester, Dr Chen Gao from UCLA, and Dr Chris Toepfer from Oxford University. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The first article I want to share is titled, Dach1 Extends Artery Networks and Protects Against Cardiac Injury. The first author is Brian Raftrey, and the corresponding author is Kristy Red-Horse from Stanford University. Coronary artery disease occurs when blood vessels supplying the heart develop atherosclerotic plaques that limit blood flow, which prevents oxygen and nutrients from reaching the cardiac tissue and often leads to a heart attack or cardiac arrest. The suggested strategy for treating coronary artery disease is to promote the growth of new blood vessels to compensate for the dysfunctional ones. Several factors are known to control coronary blood vessel development, including the transcription factor, DACH1. In mice lacking DACH1, embryonic coronary artery development is stunted. But whether increasing DACH1 protein levels boosts heart vessel development, and whether this would work in mirroring coronary arteries, were unanswered questions. Cindy St. Hilaire:        This group engineered inducible gain-of-function DACH1 mice and found that DACH1 over expression in the embryo boosted coronary artery development. The team then used the same model to induce DACH1 in adult mice for six weeks. While there was no apparent differences in the artery growth between the animals and the controls under normal conditions, after myocardial infarction, the mice over expressing DACH1 had better recovery and survival with increased artery growth and heart function. The results paved the way for studying the mechanisms of DACH1-mediated protection, and how they might be leveraged as potential coronary artery disease treatments. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The second article I want to share is titled Circulating Pro-Inflammatory Exosomes Worsen Stroke Outcomes in Aging. The first author is Hongxia Zhang, and the corresponding author is Kunlin Jin from University of North Texas Health Science Center. Aging is associated with declining tissue function and an assortment of health issues. But in rodents at least, certain factors, including the plasma of youthful animals and the exosomes of stem cells, can have rejuvenating effects on old animals. Exosomes are small membrane-bound particles containing cellular contents that circulate in the blood after they're released from cells. This group has shown that as rats age, the animals' serum exosomes accumulate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as C3a and C3b. Cindy St. Hilaire:        When these aged rats were subjected to stroke, and then injected with serum exosomes isolated from either old or young rats, those receiving youthful exosomes fared much better in terms of infarct size and sensory motor deficits, while those receiving aged exosomes fared worse. The team went on to show that injected exosomes accumulate at the site of stroke injury, but those from old donors caused more neuronal damage, as seen by reduced synaptic function. Preventing C3a activity on microglia reversed the effects of the old exosomes and improved stroke outcome, suggesting that such modulation of inflammatory molecules might be a treatment strategy for stroke. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The next article I want to share is titled Epigenetic Age Acceleration Reflects Long-Term Cardiovascular Health. The first author is Brian Joyce, and the corresponding author is Donald Lloyd-Jones. And they're from Northwestern University. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that regulates gene transcription. Studies of young and old individuals have shown that at certain locations in the genome, methylation status is highly correlated with age. These methylation patterns are also linked to measures of cardiovascular health, including blood pressure, cholesterol level and body mass index. This suggests that if a person has particularly good or particularly poor cardiovascular health, their DNA may appear younger or older than the individual's actual age. Cindy St. Hilaire:        This group tested the hypothesis that people with poor cardiovascular health exhibit methylation changes more commonly found in elderly individuals than those with good cardiovascular health. And if so, DNA methylation patterns might be useful for predicting future cardiovascular risk. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The team examined DNA methylation of over a thousand individuals enrolled in a prospective heart health cohort, testing them around age 40 and then again at around age 45. Changes in methylation status were then compared to individuals' cardiovascular health scores over a longer period. Sure enough, faster epigenetic changes did correlate with poor cardiovascular health later in life. Data from the second cohort of individuals supported the initial findings. This study indicates that DNA methylation status may be an early biomarker that signals cardiovascular issues, and may therefore allow for prompt implementation of treatment and prevention strategies. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The last article I want to share is titled, Yap Promotes Noncanonical Wnt Signaling from Cardiomyocytes for Heart Regeneration. The first author is Shijie Liu, and the corresponding author is James Martin. And they're from Baylor College of Medicine. After a heart attack, cardiomyocytes are destroyed and replaced with a fibrotic scar that interferes with the contractile function of the heart. While adult mouse and human hearts are similar in this regard, the hearts of newborn mice possess greater regenerative capacity, and this regeneration capacity persists for approximately one week. The transcription factor YAP is known to regulate regenerative processes in neonatal hearts of mice. And its deletion eliminates regeneration, and its over-activation in adult cardiomyocytes reduces fibrosis. Cindy St. Hilaire:        These experiments suggest cardiomyocytes transmit signals to cardiac fibroblasts. Wntless protein regulates the release of Wnt signaling molecules and also is a target of YAP. Mice that lack Wntless in their cardiomyocytes appear to have normal heart development and function. However, their neonatal regenerative capacity was impaired. In the weeks after heart injury, the mice that lack Wntless had reduced heart function, increased scar size and increased numbers of activated cardiac fibroblasts compared with that seen in controls. The study indicates that Wntless is critical to the regeneration of cardiac tissue, and may perhaps be leveraged to minimize scarring after heart attacks. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I'm really excited to have with me today the three finalists of the BCVS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award. The first person I'm going to be speaking with is Jiangbin Wu, who is a research assistant professor at the Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute at the University of Rochester. Thank you so much for joining me today. Jiangbin Wu:               Thank you. Cindy St. Hilaire:        And congratulations, actually. I know this is a highly competitive award that gets a lot of applications, so congrats on becoming a finalist. Before we get to your abstract, which is related to mitochondria and calcium influx in cardiomyocytes, I was wondering if you could share a bit about yourself. Maybe what your research path was, and what brought you to study cardiomyocytes and the mitochondria that are within them? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. Right now, I'm an assitant professor at Cardiovascular Research Institute of University of Rochester. Previous, I was actually studying in the cancer field and also some kind of mitochondria work in some cancer cells. Although when I came to the University of Rochester and I switched to cardiovascular and then we are working on a kind of microRNA[at the initial. The way we screen for these is just by doing the RNA-Seq is target the microRNA. and then we start to study the function of these genes, and found that it's a mitochondria calcium channel regulator. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The title of your abstract is FAM210A Maintains Cardiac Mitochondrial Homeostasis Through Regulating LETM1-Dependent Calcium Efflux. So before we unpack what all those words in the abstract title mean, could you tell me how you ended up focusing on FAM210A? What does this protein do, and why'd you focus on it? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. As I mentioned that we just gathered this protein actually is by some kind of chance as a microRNA target. And this protein full name is family with similarity 210 A, actually is a family of proteins. This is just one of them. And the way discover is localized in mitochondria in the membrane. And also, there is some other people's report is in mitochondria. And we want to sort out its function inside the mitochondria and in the cardiac background. So we do some kind of omics or mass spec to get its interlocking interacting proteins. And then we found LETM1. It's a calcium channel inside the mitochondria in the membrane. So we figured out is, this FAM210 protein regulate LETM1 function in calcium, pump calcium is part of the mitochondria matrix. And I think this is a very important, because calcium overload is always happening in the very heart of the cardiomyocytes. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's a perfect segue, because my next question was really what is the gap in knowledge that your study was trying to address? Were you really focused on just the function of this one protein, or what was the greater goal of this study? Jiangbin Wu:               Actually, the function this protein is the initial step. Our final aim is to use this protein, to over expression this protein in the heart failure patient or in some kind of heart failure models to do the, sort of do the work in some heart failure patients. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Maybe a gene therapy approach, or if there's a pharmacological way to up regulate this protein? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah, because we've proposed that the self expression of this proteins will reduce the calcium overloading cardiomyocytes, which is a major cause for the cardiomyocytes death in heart failure process. So over expression will reduce this kind of process. And then it will make the cardiomyocytes survival in the failure heart. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is interesting. I mean, obviously you were using a mouse knockout model, so you know what's driving the expression down in that case. But in humans, what do we know about the regulation of this protein? Is anything known, or any known causes that cause its reduction in expression? Jiangbin Wu:               Actually, we do. Its expression in heart failure is slightly increased in heart failure. So we feel it's a kind of some kind of compensating effect to try to save the heart from failing. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Interesting. It's just not turned on early enough, in that case then. Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. And for the regulating protein for this one, I think we find microRNA can suppress its expression, but not too many other influences on these regulator proteins. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is so interesting. So what's next? What are you going to do next on this project? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. I think currently, we are just at the start to do some kind of therapeutic effect that use to these proteins. I think we will do more deep in the therapeutic effects for over expression of these genes in... Currently, we are working on mouse models. Maybe in different heart failure models to prove that it's very benefiting to the heart failure patients. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Wonderful. Well, congratulations on an excellent study. Really looking forward to your presentation, which is coming up shortly, and really looking forward to your future research in this field. Jiangbin Wu:               Okay, thank you. Cindy St. Hilaire:        So I also have with me, Dr Chris Toepfer, who's another finalist for the BCVBS outstanding early career investigator award. He's a principal investigator from the University of Oxford, and his abstract is titled, Defining Diverse Disease Pathway Mechanisms Across Thick And Thin Filament, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Variance. So congratulations, Chris, and thank you for joining me today. Chris Toepfer:             Thank you very much. It's great to be here. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Before we start to discuss your abstract, I was wondering if you could just share a little bit about yourself. Maybe your career path, and how you came to study hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? Chris Toepfer:             Yeah, sure. I guess this story gets longer and longer every time somebody asks it,right, in your career? Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's a good thing. Chris Toepfer:             Yeah. I started out as an undergraduate in London, and actually during the second year of my undergraduate degree, I fell into a lab kind of out of interest. It was starting to study cardiac muscle mechanics. And that was the lab of Professor Michael Ferenczy. And ended up, after I finished my undergraduate degree, I joined him for a PhD. I had a PhD program that also took me overseas to the NIH to work with Dr James Sellers, who was a muscle motor protein biochemist. And we really, I sort of really fell in love, with the idea of studying disease of multiple levels, and understanding how the heart would function from the basic molecule up to the entire organ and looking at different systems in between. Chris Toepfer:             And that's what led me to then, so my postdoctoral position to seek out a completely different direction in some ways, but something that could also extend how we could look at the heart. And that's where I moved to Boston to work with Christine and Jonathan Seidman. I'm looking at more of the genetic basis then of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy rather than just, sort of more diffusely the mechanisms underlying cardiac muscle contraction. And then two years ago, I moved back to the UK to Oxford to sets up my own group, which has been fun during the pandemic as you can imagine. Cindy St. Hilaire:        It's hard enough starting up a lab under normal times. I can't imagine doing it during a pandemic. Chris Toepfer:             And we are now completely focused on stem cell models and CRISPR CAS engineering, and trying to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a dish. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's wonderful. And actually I looked at your CV. We actually overlapped a little bit. I was doing my postdoc at NIH in the NHLBI while you were there for your graduate school. So I too fell in love with kind of the starting with the human as the model path of research. So maybe you can  kind of fill in all the listeners in who aren't cardiomyopathy experts. So what is, I guess, in a nutshell, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and what gap in knowledge was your study specifically addressing? Chris Toepfer:             So in general, about one in 500 people have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. And for those that are genetically linked, a lot of them are in the key contractile proteins of the heart, the drive muscle contraction. And what you often see in those people is they have thickened hearts. And what happens is actually the heart begins to be too hard, and it actually relaxes very poorly in between beats. Chris Toepfer:             So what we are really trying to understand in this disease and with this abstract was how are different forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy created? Because it can be a couple of different forms. There are different proteins involved that have very vastly different functional mechanisms within the cell. So would this, we went away, we generated some stem cell models where we could then differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Model the disease in a dish. And we made kind of a group of good methods to go and look at what was happening inside the cells. And then we could screen drugs against what's happening inside those cells, so that was kind of the idea of what we were looking at, at the time. And what's fallen out of all of that is a drug now called Melacamptin that's starting to get to the clinic, which addresses some of these underlying mechanisms we were beginning to study. So that's what I'll talk about a bit later on in our session today. Cindy St. Hilaire:        It's great. One of the things you focused on in the abstract is comparing these thick and thin filament variants. What are the implications of those, I guess, in the human disease state, but also in how you could design or use your stem cells as a model, and were any of the results that you found surprising? Chris Toepfer:             So I think what was the really key finding that we saw was that the thick filament variants seemed to be switching myosin, which is a molecular motor that drives cardiac muscle contraction very much to arm”ON”. And my sort of analogy to that is they're all very sort of bodybuilder like. Myosin switched on, ready to go to work causing way too much contraction. And the compound that we were using at the time Myocamptin, we could turn those off and resolve the disease. Whereas with the thin filament variants, they were operating through a completely different mechanism. And when we tried to treat them with the same compound, they wouldn't always salvage disease. So though the face of it, they look the same in the dish, in that they contracted too much, relaxed very poorly. You're clearly doing it via complete different mechanism. And that's what we're starting to dig into now. And that's what we'll be talking about. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. And that's actually kind of the question I was going to finish up with you. What are the, I guess translational implications? No, yes. You're using this drug. Is that only good for thick filament-like variants? And are you going to be able to screen patients to tell which variant they have, and therefore if this or that drug might be useful? Chris Toepfer:             So we're in a real golden age now for genomics where I guess patients can come into the clinic and they can be sequenced and you could maybe tell them now what might be the underlying cause of their disease. I am not a clinician, but what we, as a basic scientist can say is, well, we can go away and try and understand whether this variant you may have in your genome is causative of disease. And if it is what mechanism that may fall under, what may be causing them to have this phenotype? Chris Toepfer:             And I think what we can do is we can try and then bin the subpopulations of variants, and try and find novel drugs or novel pathways that we could try and find drugs for to treat the disease, and to differentiate them from each other. So I think it's too early to say whether Mylocamptin will be able to sort this for everybody, I guess we will find out in the next years. But I think already we can start thinking about, well, what would be the next step after this? We can bring precision medicine even further. And that's, I think the goal where we're heading towards. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Well, that's wonderful, and this is a wonderful abstract. I'm really looking forward to seeing the full study and your presentation later on. And thank you so much for joining. Chris Toepfer:             No. Yeah. Thank you for having me. I'm really looking forward to it later on. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Great. Dr Chen Gaol is the third finalist for the BCBS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award. She's an assistant researcher at UCLA, and her abstract is titled, Functional Impact of RBFox1C in Cardiac, Pathological Remodeling through Targeted MRNA Stability Regulation. So congratulations, and thank you so much for joining me today. Chen Gal:                    Absolutely, thank you for having me. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Before we jump into your abstract, could you share with us a little bit about your career path, and how you came to study the role of RNA binding proteins, I guess specifically in pathological cardiac remodeling? Chen Gal:                    Yes, I think my research over the years has been into the very basic questions, which is I'm interested in looking at how the RNA is being regulated. For example, how the RNA is being spliced, is being ideated, and how the RNA is being degraded if it's ever been translated into protein. And the second half of my research is of course, physiological driven, because I'm interested in different type of cardiac disease, starting from the traditional heart attack to the now more emerging medical need, which is the cardiometabolic disease. So I was trained as a molecular biologist. I started in molecular biology Institute at UCLA. My PhD supervisor is Dr Yibin Wang, who first introduced me to understand there is actually a whole new world of R regulation at a post-transcription level. Chen Gal:                    So at that time we basically utilized the R sequencing. Just look for the easiest to heart, and try to understand how these RNA are differentially spliced in the heart. And I was so interested in understanding more about a cardiology. So I decided, even if I move out to my postdoc research I still want to continue working in the heart, although at a totally different angle. And that is when I started to really try to understand different aspects of RNA regulation. So now I am starting to be a junior faculty, establishing my own lab. And I really wanted to understand more how different steps of our metabolism is regulated. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Really timely research. And I really like how you are doing a great job combining extremely basic biochemical processes with advanced disease states. An extra, that's why this abstract made it as a finalist. So congrats on that. So your study was focused on the RNA binding protein, RB Fox one, which has several isoforms. And so can you tell us which isoform you were looking at, and why you were interested in that particular isoform? Chen Gal:                    Yes, actually I've studied about ISO form of RPFox1. It itself, is actually subject to alternative splicing, while generating one nuclear, and another simosolic isoform. Where I was a PhD student, I was very simple minded, just trying to screen for the R binding protein that actually is expressed in the diseased heart. So RBFox1 is at least at a transcriptional level, the only one that we identify to be to decreased in the fatal heart. The nuclear function, the nucelo ISO form of RPFox1 is mainly regulating alternative splicing. But it is when I was studying this nuclear function of the RBFox1, I identified there is actually another isoform where she is in the set ourselves based on the different of c terminal domains of the RFox1. So I was just wondering, apparently you shouldn't be regulating and splicing anymore. I just move on to another layer of RA regulation. And then what I found most interesting is these RBFox1 is regulating the R stability, which is something that we'll talking about later today. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's great. So to do this study, you actually created a new knockout mouse model where you specifically deleted this one C isoform. What was kind of the baseline and maybe the disease state phenotypes that you saw in that mouse? Chen Gal:                    The result and phenotype so far is very striking. We utilize the CAS nine CRISPR technology simply because for, we were lucky the settle the Fox warehouse, one extra axon. So that does allow us to coach the lox P side, just blanking in that particular AXA. And in theory we could across it with different CRE, and to generate either cardiac or different tissue, specifically knock out. Even at a baseline we see a decreased cardiac function when we inactivate this isoform in the adult heart. And when we look at the gene expression profile is, I call mind-blowing type of experience, because turns out this gene not only is regulating some of the inflammatory genes, but also is helping involve protein translation and delivery metabolism, which I hope in the future will set us on the path to really understand the role of this RP Fox1. Not only into HFpEF, but also in the cardiometabolic disorder. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, that's great. It's so rewarding when you do this one really big kind of risky experiment, and it turns into not just one interesting path to study, but multiple. One of the things that you mentioned in the abstract is clip seek. I was wondering if you could tell us a little bit about this technology, and how you used it in your study? Chen Gal:                    Yeah. I think one of the rewarding parts for me focusing on the R metabolism is really driving different accounting and sequencing tools, and utilize that in the heart. So cardiomyocyte has been traditionally viewed now to be very easy to work with type of model comparing helo cells, right? And I think in the field, we are still so short of knowledge, what type of the cutting-edge tools that we can use in the heart. My research involved clip seek, which is to use UV crosslinking the RNA with the R binding protein. So that will allow us to understand which are the RNA targets that are directly interacting with the RNA binding protein. I'm also using great seek, which is to find dynamically label the recency size to RNA. And that will allow us to look forward to RA degradation profile at a global level in the baseline or under disease. So I thought those are really cool technologies, and that's something that makes me excited about my work on a daily basis. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, that's wonderful. So what's next? What are you going to do after this initial study? What's the next question you're going to go after? Chen Gal:                    Yeah, like I mentioned, I'm interested in, honestly, different type of heart disease, not just the stress induced heart failure, but also the recent years, I started to branch out a little bit to understand more of the biology of HFpEF. For example, how the R binding protein that we are studying right now is playing a role in the development of HFpEF. Or we actually understand very little about them, the micromechanism for HFpEF development, right. What are the RNA splicing profile in the cardio metabolic disorder on account? We also find differential regulation of R stability in the HfPEF compared to the HFpEF compared to the HFrEF. So I thought those are really interesting questions that I would like to pursue in the future. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's great and best of luck in those future studies. Chen Gal:                    Thank you. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Before we leave, I was wondering if you could share with us any advice that you would give to a trainee, maybe something that you wish you knew ahead of time in this kind of early career stage. Chen Gal:                    I consider myself a really, really lucky person. And if I have one word to give to the younger people, younger than me, is to find great mentors for your career. And luckily our field has a lot of good mentors who are ready to help us every single step of our career. For example, my PhD supervisor, Dr Wang. And I have met a lot of good mentors inside and outside of UCLA. I'm pretty sure this is the same thing for Chris, who is trained by Dr Seidman, and everybody know how great a mentor she is. So I think having a great mentor will help you every step of your career development to making sure you're always on the right track. And that, that is also something that you will do when we have our own lab, because we want to be great mentors for our trainees as well. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I know. That's something I strive for too, is to emulate my amazing mentors that I've had. What do you think is a good quality for a good mentor? Like what's one of the, I guess key features that you look for in someone that you would like to be your mentor? Chen Gal:                    For me, I think my mentors are all cheerleaders. They never try to push me to move out one career path versus the other. They are good listeners, and they are also my role models. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's wonderful. Chris, what's a piece of advice that you would like to share with trainees that your former self wish you knew of? Chris Toepfer:             I think it's very important to echo the message of a good mentorship, and a good lab environment that allows you to flourish and really helps you to grow yourself to the future. And also helps you understand the bits of you that you could actually grow as well, a little bit better. So you become a more rounded scientist. I think something that's really important or something that I've always found very infectious is to find mentorship and mentors that are also incredibly enthusiastic about you as an individual, as well as the science. I think that that can really drive you. And I think that's also an important thing to have in yourself, to have, to find that question for yourself that really drives you and you can be really enthusiastic about. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I totally agree. Well, thank you again for joining me today. Congratulations on being a finalist, and I wish everyone the best of luck in their presentations later on at BCBS. Chen Gal:                    Thank you so much. Jiangbin Wu:               Thank you. Chris Toepfer:             Thank you very much. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's it for the highlights from the September 17th and October 1st issues of Circulation Research. Thank you for listening. Please check out the CircRes Facebook page, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram with the handle  @CircRes and #Discover CircRes. Thank you to our guests, BCBS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award Finalists, Dr Jaobing Wu, Dr Chen Gal, and Dr Chris Toepfer. And a special congratulations to Dr Toepfer who won this year's competition. This podcast is produced by Asahara Ratnayaka, edited by Melissa Stoner, and supported by the editorial team of circulation research. Some of the copy texts for highlighted articles is provided by Ruth Williams. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire. And this is Discover CircRes, you're on the go source for the most exciting discoveries in basic cardiovascular research. This program is copyright of the American heart association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American heart association. For more information, please visit AHAjournals.org  

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (Pitt crushes VT to become Coastal favorites)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:39


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen discusses what was so important in Pitt's huge win over Virginia Tech and what it means for the rest of the ACC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

JACC Podcast
Modulation of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis by Epicardial Adipose Tissue: JACC State-of-the-Art Review

JACC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 21:14


ESC Cardio Talk
Journal Editorial - Novel actors on the stage of cardiac dysfunction induced by anti-PD1 oncological treatments

ESC Cardio Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 9:09


With Carlo Gabriele Tocchetti & Alessandra Cuomo, Federico II University, Naples - Italy Link to paper Link to editorial

Keto Mans Club Podcast
More "Being," Less "Doing" | Keto Man's Club Podcast Episode 108

Keto Mans Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 69:24


Jay Campbell has a lived a varied life - he played college and professional basketball, had an appearance in "Forrest Gump" and is now an author and health expert. On the show this week Jay discusses some of the science in men's health, including therapeutic testosterone, peptides and more. Jay clearly knows his stuff as you will quickly find out... enjoy the chat!https://jayccampbell.com/ TKMC Discord: https://discord.gg/kPDn4NwPlease help us get the word out by sharing about our podcast with your friends and family. You can use the share buttons on the player on our website if you would like to send them a link directly.You can also use the Subscribe button to make sure you don't miss an episode if you're using the web player.You can reach us a number of ways:Email: KetoMansClubPodcast@gmail.comWebsite: http://www.TheKetoMansClub.comLeave a voicemail comment or question by calling 512-518-6161InstagramPodcast: @ketomansclubpodcastChris: @DuckmanketoJim: @JiminmanjrAlberto: @el.KetoCholo

Straight A Nursing
Cardiac Pharmacology PodQuiz – Episode 175

Straight A Nursing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 24:37


Have you tried a PodQuiz before? If not, you are in for a treat! PodQuizzes are a great way to study using auditory learning that's not just passive listening..it's active and super engaged. Here's how it works...I ask a question and then pause to give you time to think of and say the answer. Then, I tell you the answer. It's essentially flashcards for your ears! And, the best part is...you can study while you exercise, fold the laundry, organize a closet or take the dog for a walk. In other words, you don't have to sit at your desk 24/7. Cue the confetti, folks! To get MORE PodQuizzes, check out my members-only podcast, Study Sesh at https://www.straightanursingstudent.com/study-sesh  Use PROMO code SSOCTOBER21 to save $15 off your subscription to Study Sesh! Offer valid until end-of-day, October 17th, 2021. This episode covers cardiac pharmacology...so get up from your desk, pop in those earbuds and let's get to studying!

Birdland BS
Cardiac Kids (E214)

Birdland BS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Today is Tuesday, October 12th, 2021 and this week on Birdland BS: - Ravens pull out an overtime win as they give us MULTIPLE heart attacks on MNF - Now they go to work to prepare for a tough Chargers team on Sunday...but what will the RB room look like...we talk Schefter rumors - The Terps lose big to another ranked team in Ohio State...but now they head to Minnesota to try to right the ship despite losing ANOTHER top Wide Receiver - And in this weeks rundown we are talking emails, crazy finishes, mlb controversies, and knock outs!

REBEL Cast
REBEL Core Cast 66.0 – Congenital Cardiac Issues

REBEL Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 27:51


Take Home Points Once you figure out the neonate that presented to your ED is sick, run through a differential of why then can be sick so you don't anchor. I like to use TIMOT (Trauma, Infection, Metabolic, Organs, Tox) but use whatever works for you. Use your detailed history looking for risk factors to ... Read more The post REBEL Core Cast 66.0 – Congenital Cardiac Issues appeared first on REBEL EM - Emergency Medicine Blog.

TopMedTalk
REVIVEme - opioid overdose and naloxone | TopMedTalk at the ASA

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 28:27


Welcome to TopMedTalk's exclusive - as live - coverage of The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) annual general meeting; join Desiree Chappell, TopMedTalk's lead presenter, Monty Mythen TopMedTalk's Editor in Chief and Sol Aronson, tenured Professor, Duke University speak with their guest Bonnie Milas, Cardiac anesthesiologist, University of Pennsylvania. More info here: https://www.asahq.org/advocating-for-you/reviveme

JACC Podcast
Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: JACC Review Topic of the Week

JACC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:39


Saving Lives: Critical Care w/eddyjoemd
Peripheral Intravenous (IV) vs. Intraosseous (IO) Access in Cardiac Arrest in < 1 minute (Journal Club-ish)

Saving Lives: Critical Care w/eddyjoemd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 0:58


Cardiac arrest with no IV access: Should we place a peripheral IV or place an intraosseous (IO) access? Let's examine the data. #shorts Show Notes: https://eddyjoemd.com/io-or-iv Although great care has been taken to ensure that the information in this podcast are accurate, eddyjoe, LLC shall not be held responsible or in any way liable for the continued accuracy of the information, or for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies, or for any consequences arising therefrom. Website: www.eddyjoemd.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/eddyjoemd Twitter: www.twitter.com/eddyjoemd Facebook: www.facebook.com/eddyjoemd Podcast: https://anchor.fm/eddyjoemd My Amazon store for resources you may find helpful: www.amazon.com/shop/eddyjoemd Citation: Schwalbach KT, Yong SS, Chad Wade R, Barney J. Impact of intraosseous versus intravenous resuscitation during in-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective study. Resuscitation. 2021 Sep;166:7-13. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.07.005. Epub 2021 Jul 14. PMID: 34273470. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/eddyjoemd/support

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Pediheart Podcast #181: Delirium In The Pediatric Postoperative Cardiac Patient

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 29:01


This week we enter the world of cardiac critical care to discuss delirium in the postoperative pediatric cardiac patient. We speak with nursing scientist, Professor Sandra Staveski of UCSF about a recent large multicenter study she conducted on this topic. How prevalent is this problem and why is it an important morbidity to tackle and reduce? How can nursing interventions reduce this problem and how can the ICU team working together identify and manage this problem? Dr. Staveski shares her deep nursing and critical care knowledge with us this week. DOI: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000002591

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio
PROOF: Lindsey Graham OWNED by Pfizer - Cardiac Sonographer Blows Whistle: Jab DEADLY For Young People - Airline Industry SHOCKS Communists With POWER MOVE!

The Patriotically Correct Radio Show with Stew Peters | #PCRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 55:49


South Carolina Senator, Lindsey Graham, is a communist whore for big pharma and the military industrial complex. Lauren Witzke joins Stew with the receipts! Heather is a brave whistleblower who came forward on her lunch break at work, because she just can't take it anymore! The worst factions inside the globalist power structure are not hiding it anymore. They will rule over you, and you will be a subservient slave. Clay Clark joins Stew Peters. our countrymen are being murdered in every major American city, and it was ALL PLANNED by the so-called "elected representatives" responsible for destroying America. Airline workers and travelers are NOT HAVING this tyrannical communist mandate, and they're all uniting to fight, and fight HARD! Go Ad-Free, Get Exclusive Content, Become a Premium user: https://redvoicemedia.com/premium Follow Stew on social media: http://evrl.ink/StewPeters See all of Stew's content at https://StewPeters.TV Watch full episodes here: https://redvoicemedia.net/stew-full-shows Check out Stew's store: http://StewPeters.shop Support our efforts to keep truth alive: https://www.redvoicemedia.com/support-red-voice-media/ Advertise with Red Voice Media: https://redvoicemedia.net/ads

The Real Estate Sessions
Episode 295 – Wendy Pollack, Realtor and Professional Development Specialist – Cypress Realty

The Real Estate Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 21:53


THE REAL ESTATE SESSIONS PODCAST Episode 295:  Host: BILL RISSER Guest: WENDY POLLACK Episode Summary: Meet today's guest https://www.realliving.com/wendy.pollack (Wendy Pollack), a realtor and a Professional Development Specialist at https://www.realliving.com/cypress-realty (Real Living Cypress Realty) in Fort Myers, Florida. In this episode, I sit with Wendy, who grew up in Long Island, New York, and is currently based in Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida. She talks about her path into Real Estate, exploring to find the right career option for her skillset, with her passion for helping new Real Estate agents. Top Takeaways: "I'm not in it for the money. I'm in it really to see them succeed." - [Wendy Pollack] "The most important thing is your sphere of influence, people who know you, like you, and trust you." - [Wendy Pollack] Episode Highlights: [00:20] Intro [01:00] Meet today's guest, Wendy Pollack. [06:25] What career were you thinking about as a teenager? [14:40] How did you educate yourself so you could help others? [18:06] Why Wendy settled in Fort Myers. [19:30] What one piece of advice would you give a new agent? [21:38] Outro Episode Notes: As a teenager, Wendy had considered going into a fashion-based career while working at a gift store till she went to college at Adelphi University. She had studied nursing for a few months, till she realized it wasn't for her and changed to study Exercise Physiology. After school, she worked in Cardiac rehab and then corporate fitness. Wendy got into Real Estate after she relocated to Florida 27 years ago. She had a few clients in Real Estate and was encouraged to get involved in it. She had enjoyed the experience but took a break at some point to raise her son till he was 13 before getting back into Real Estate again. After returning to work for a while, an opportunity opened up with a position as Professional Development, Recruiting, and Sales Manager. Wendy shares that she loves helping new realtors become successful, which is her job. Bill shares that Nursing is the second most common career that can quickly pivot to and succeed in Real Estate. Seeing her son take up his passion for photography also encouraged her to focus more on learning about her work and getting well educated on it. She had gotten more attracted to Instagram, which she employs as a tool in her work. Other forms of technology besides social media are CRM programs, Drip Campaigns, newsletters, and different kinds of automation. Wendy shares that they settled in Fort Myers to get away from the people in the area where she grew up and get closer to a beach environment with the seaside views and lovely weather. Essential advice to new agents: The most important thing is your sphere of influence, people who know you, like you, and trust you. If you have a good sphere of influence, you will work faster and get ahead quicker. If you don't have that sphere, you have to work hard in your environment. Being proactive and reaching out to people still definitely works. Connect:  Find | THE REAL ESTATE SESSIONS At https://www.therealestatesessions.com (The Real Estate Sessions) Find | Bill Risser At bill.risser@ratemyagent.com On https://twitter.com/billrisser (Twitter) On https://www.facebook.com/billrisser (Facebook) On https://www.youtube.com/user/billrisseraz (YouTube) Find | Wendy Pollack On https://www.linkedin.com/in/wendy-l-pollack-4a375b56/ (LinkedIn) Website – https://www.realliving.com/cypress-realty (Cypress Realty) RATE & SUBSCRIBE At  http://www.ratethispodcast.com/REsessions (Ratethispodcast.com/REsessions) On https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-real-estate-sessions/id1025257682?ls=1&mt=2 (Apple Podcasts) On https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cDovL2JpbGxyaXNzZXIubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M= (Google Podcasts) On...

TopMedTalk
Exercise and the cancer patient during the COVID-19 crisis | EBPOM 2021

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 47:45


This piece focuses upon multimodal prehabilitation through the lived experience of clinicians from the different healthcare systems of Europe, the United States and the UK; both prior to and during the pandemic. We hear about the implementation of rehabilitation programs and research studies, which have managed to adapt, in the COVID era. Presented by Denny Levett, Professor in Perioperative Medicine and Critical Care at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation trust and Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Southampton with her guests Franco Carli, Professor of Anesthesia at McGill University and Associate Professor in the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill University, Staff anesthesiologist at the McGill University Health Centre, Gerard Danjoux, consultant in Anaesthesia and Sleep Medicine at South Tees Hospitals NHS Trust, Professor Sandy Jack, PhD, Consultant Clinician Scientist in The Anaesthesia and Critical Care Research Unit at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Honorary Senior Lecturer at the University of Liverpool, University of Southampton and University College London, Dan Engelman, President of the Enhanced Recovery after Cardiac surgery society, Baystate Health in Massachusetts, Medical Director, Heart, Vascular & Critical Care Services, Baystate Medical Center and Associate Professor of Surgery University of Massachusetts Medical School-Baystate. Like this, want more? Try this piece now: https://www.topmedtalk.com/models-of-prehabilitation-ebpom-2020-2/ And remember, Evidence Based Perioperative Medicine (EBPOM) offers high quality video presentations as well as a chance to attend our next live conference here: www.ebpom.org

White Coat Investor Podcast
MtoM #32 - Pediatric Cardiac Intensivist Gets PSLF

White Coat Investor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 12:06


Jennifer did a 4 year residency, 3 year fellowship, 1 additional training year as a pediatric cardiac intensivist, and then no payments required due to the pandemic. This all made PSLF worked out really well for her, getting $246K forgiven. Learn more about PSLF and whether it is right for you. https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/public-service-loan-forgiveness/  Our sponsor today is DLP Capital Partners, which provides private real estate funds on both the equity and debt side. Their funds provide solid returns and low correlation with your stocks and bonds. As evergreen funds, they are also far more liquid than most real estate funds. I have invested on both the equity and debt side and appreciate the fact that they don't make money until I make money. Learn more about DLP at https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/dlp  The White Coat Investor has been helping doctors with their money since 2011. Our free financial planning resource covers a variety of topics from doctor mortgage loans and refinancing medical school loans to physician disability insurance and malpractice insurance. Learn about loan refinancing or consolidation, explore new investment strategies, and discover loan programs for specifically aimed at helping doctors. If you're a high-income professional and ready to get a "fair shake" on Wall Street, The White Coat Investor channel is for you! Be a Guest on The Milestones to Millionaire Podcast: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/milestones  Main Website: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com  Student Loan Advice: https://studentloanadvice.com  YouTube: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/youtube  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewhitecoatinvestor  Twitter: https://twitter.com/WCInvestor  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thewhitecoatinvestor  Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/whitecoatinvestor  Online Courses: https://whitecoatinvestor.teachable.com  Newsletter: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/free-monthly-newsletter