Podcasts about cardiac

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Muscular organ responsible for pumping blood through the circulatory system in most animals

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Best podcasts about cardiac

Show all podcasts related to cardiac

Latest podcast episodes about cardiac

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Pediheart Podcast Replay #92: Factors Associated With Shunt Failure In The Single Ventricle Patient

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 34:25


In this replay of episode 92 from 2019, we speak with cardiovascular surgeon Dr. Johann Brink about a recent work he co-authored from the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia about the team's experience with shunt malfunctions. Are there factors that are associated with shunt failure in this sometimes fragile patient group? Survival to Fontan in most series is roughly 70% - what, if anything, can 'move the needle' to higher levels of survival in this patient population? Dr. Brink offers some interesting and important insights this week. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2019.03.126

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans
UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast w/ Corey Cohen (Addison leaves for USC)

Cardiac Hill: for Pitt Panthers fans

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 41:06


In this episode of UnScripted: The Cardiac Hill Podcast, Corey Cohen discusses Jordan Addison's transfer to USC and the troubling state of college football. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Audio Only The Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Medicine Podcast
Michelle James from Stanford on Immune Radiotracers Audio

Audio Only The Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


Michelle James from Stanford on Immune Radiotracers    We chat with Michelle James (in person!) from Stanford about challenges and Solutions for brain immune tracers and a really cool... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Cardionerds
206. Guidelines: 2021 ESC Cardiovascular Prevention – Question #12 with Dr. Laurence Sperling

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 9:30


The following question refers to Section 4.11 of the 2021 ESC CV Prevention Guidelines. The question is asked by Dr. Christian Faaborg-Andersen, answered first by UCSF resident Dr. Jessie Holtzman, and then by expert faculty Dr. Laurence Sperling. Dr. Laurence Sperling is the Katz Professor in Preventive Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and Founder of Preventive Cardiology at the Emory Clinic. Dr. Sperling was a member of the writing group for the 2018 Cholesterol Guidelines, serves as Co-Chair for the ACC's Cardiometabolic and Diabetes working group, and is Co-Chair of the WHF Roadmap for Cardiovascular Prevention in Diabetes. The CardioNerds Decipher The Guidelines Series for the 2021 ESC CV Prevention Guidelines represents a collaboration with the ACC Prevention of CVD Section, the National Lipid Association, and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. Question #12 Medically supervised cardiac rehabilitation programs after ASCVD events and for patient with heart failure carries a Class I recommendation. However, placement of referrals, uptake and enrollment after referral, and rigor of rehabilitation all remain inconsistent. What minimum cumulative duration of cardiac rehabilitation has been chosen as a threshold of effectiveness for cardiac rehabilitation by the European Society of Cardiology? A. 100-300 minutes, 10 sessions B. 300-500 minutes, 16 sessions C. 500-700 minutes, 22 sessions D. 700-1000 minutes, 28 sessions E. >1000 minutes, 36 sessions Answer #12 The correct answer is E: >1000 minutes across 36 sessions. Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary intervention not just including exercise training and physical activity counselling, but also education, risk factor modification, diet/nutritional counselling, and vocational and psychosocial support. A broad evidence base demonstrates that multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation and prevention programs after ASCVD events or revascularization reduce recurrent cardiovascular hospitalizations, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular mortality. In patients with chronic HF (mainly HFrEF), exercise based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) may improve all-cause mortality, reduce hospital admissions, and improve exercise capacity and quality of life. Such programs include a wide array of activities including physical activity, risk factor modification, psychosocial support, nutrition counseling, and more. Despite the heterogenous design of clinical trials, cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to be a cost-effective intervention. Based upon the available review data, the European Association of Preventive Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology proposed minimum standards for secondary prevention cardiac rehabilitation programs. Based upon a comprehensive review of the literature, ESC recommends that cardiac rehabilitation be multidisciplinary, supervised by health professionals, and start as soon as possible after a cardiovascular event. Cardiac rehabilitation should include both aerobic and muscular resistance tailored to the fitness level of the participant, should carry a duration of >1000 minutes in total, and should exceed 36 sessions total. While uptake remains limited, electronic prompts within the medical record and automatic referrals should be considered to enhance referral and participation. Future research should continue to explore the benefit of home-based cardiac rehabilitation with or without telemonitoring. Lastly, studies have shown that uptake remains lower among women, and targeted programs should be undertaken to address such disparities. Main Takeaway Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines provide a Class I (LOE A) recommendation for the participation in multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation programs for the secondary prevention of ASCVD events including revascularization and in individuals with heart failure (mainly HFrEF) to improve patient outcomes.

Tobin, Beast & Leroy
05-12-22 Tobin and Leroy Part 1 - Cardiac Comeback Cats!

Tobin, Beast & Leroy

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:35


CAT FEVERRRR BABYYYYYYY. Cardiac Cats, Comeback Cats, Presidents Cup Cats! Whatever you refer to them as, just make sure you address them as WINNERS! After going down 0-3 Carter Verhaeghe and company fire back with 5 straight goals to take a 3-2 series lead over Ovechkin and the Capitals. #1 Panthers fan Kodak Black was in the building to enjoy the view. Looking forward to tonight's game, the HEAT look to close out the Sixers in Philly. The Grizzlies take things personally as they demolish the Golden State Warriors by almost 40 points. We wrap the hour with Praise of Carter Verhaeghe

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast
Cardiac Xenotransplantation

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 31:08


*** FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScxkGQTz-rh5OfPJBBdyvVZ4Pq2R8NWgBUOC1dt8VQHtvawhw/viewform *** In January 2022, the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the world's first transplant involving a genetically modified animal heart. Join Behind the Knife as we discuss this significant transplant milestone with the 2 surgeons who led this historic case - Dr. Bartley Griffith and Dr. Muhammad M. Mohiuddin! Dr. Bartley Griffith is the Thomas E. and Alice Marie Hales Distinguished Professor in Transplant Surgery at UMSOM. Dr. Muhammad Mohiuddin is a Professor of Surgery at UMSOM and established the Cardiac Xenotransplantation Program with Dr. Griffith, the first in the United States.  Tune in to learn about the history of xenotransplantation and the barriers that have been overcome to make xenotransplantation a reality. Please visit behindtheknife.org to access other high-yield surgical education podcasts, videos and more.  

Sănătatea FM
22 de români aşteaptă, în momentul de față, un transplant cardiac de urgenţă

Sănătatea FM

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


O adolescentă de 16 ani din Giurgiu a primit Inima unui tânăr de 17 ani, aflat în moarte cerebrală în urma unui politraumatism. "Intervenţia a durat 4 ore şi jumătate. Pacienta se simte foarte bine, deși este în a doua zi a intervenției, își... citiţi mai departe

Edge of the Bench
Cardiac Cats

Edge of the Bench

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 31:29


The guys are entrenched in their playoff lives as the NBA and NHL have picked up. Mike begins with a rousing victory speech as the Miami Heat went up 3-2. Mike gives his thoughts on Joel Embiid, Doc Rivers and Spero Dedes. The guys move to all the other NBA series and worry about who may actually take home the NBA title. The guys close with Paul downtrodden on his New York Rangers and Mike rallying the cats as the Florida Panthers have pulled even at 2-2.Twitter: @EdgeoftheBenchInstagram: EdgeoftheBenchFacebook: Edge of the BenchPart of the Walk-Ons NetworkThank you for listening!

Xtalks Life Science Podcast
FDA Approves Bristol Myers' Cardiac Drug for HCM + New Ovarian Cancer Blood Test

Xtalks Life Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 27:30


In this episode, Ayesha discussed Bristol Myers Squibb's new heart drug Camzyos (mavacamten), which has received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of symptomatic obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The drug is the first to target the pathophysiology of obstructive HCM and may be Bristol Myers' next blockbuster cardiac drug. Hear more about the company's looming patent cliff for some of its drugs as well as the company's risk evaluation program for Camzyos given some of its safety concerns.Ayesha also talked about a new ovarian cancer blood test developed by researchers at the University of Manchester that may help diagnose the disease quicker and more accurately, especially in younger women. The test includes a newer ovarian cancer biomarker that when used in combination with CA-125, the biomarker currently used to monitor and screen for ovarian cancer in some cases, could improve its diagnostic value. Learn more about the test and about the importance of women's health advocacy in the early detection of diseases like ovarian cancer.Read the full articles here: Researchers Use Emerging Ovarian Cancer Biomarker to Develop New Blood Test for Ovarian CancerCamzyos Secures FDA Approval for Obstructive HCM, Bristol Myers Eyes it as its Next Big Cardiac DrugFor more life science and medical device content, visit the Xtalks Vitals homepage.Follow Us on Social MediaTwitter: @Xtalks Instagram: @Xtalks Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Xtalks.Webinars/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/xtalks-webconferences YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/XtalksWebinars/featured

Anesthesiology Journal's podcast
Featured Author Podcast: Hypotension and Cardiac Surgical Outcomes

Anesthesiology Journal's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 30:31


Moderator: BobbieJean Sweitzer, M.D. Participants: Balachundhar Subramaniam, M.D., M.P.H. Articles Discussed: Intraoperative Hypotension and Acute Kidney Injury, Stroke, and Mortality during and outside Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Retrospective Observational Cohort Study Transcript

Rush Hour WA with Lachy and Embers
EXCLUSIVE | Former Aussie Cricketer Ryan Campbell speaks about his recovery from multiple cardiac arrests

Rush Hour WA with Lachy and Embers

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 9:31


West Australian cricketing legend Ryan Campbell is out of hospital after a series of cardiac arrests. We ask him about his recovery and what it was like waking up from a coma to hear that Fremantle Dockers are soaring! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Triple M Breakfast with Basil, Xav and Jenna
EXCLUSIVE | Former Aussie cricketer Ryan Campbell speaks about his recovery from multiple cardiac arrests

Triple M Breakfast with Basil, Xav and Jenna

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 9:31


West Australian cricketing legend Ryan Campbell is out of hospital after a series of cardiac arrests. We ask him about his recovery and what it was like waking up from a coma to hear that Fremantle Dockers are soaring See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ESC Cardio Talk
Journal Editorial - Orchestration of vascular smooth muscle cell plasticity using epigenetic therapy

ESC Cardio Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 12:01


With Thomas Thum, Institute for Molecular and Translational Therapeutic Strategies (IMTTS), Hannover - Germany and Bar Christian, Hannover Medical School, Hannover - Germany Link to editorial Link to paper

Visibly Fit with Wendie Pett
Success Story Spotlight: Gina Shares How Just 7 Weeks of New Habits Can Remove You From the Diabetic and Cardiac Heart Risk Stage

Visibly Fit with Wendie Pett

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 22:05


At only 39 years old, Gina had tried "everything." She was on her last attempt to find a solution to her health problems because she was so sick and tired of being sick and tired. Hear her story and how she took that last attempt and turned it into the solution she always desired and deserved. She is getting Visibly Fit in mind, body, emotions and spirit. Tune in. You'll be inspired. _______ Want to learn more? Go to https://getvisiblyfit.com (www.getvisiblyfit.com) You can also watch her share her story and see her then/now images after just 7 weeks on Wendie's YouTube channel. Just https://youtu.be/fxKFdUILruc (GO HERE!)

Cardionerds
200. 2022 ACC/AHA/HFSA Guideline for The Management of Heart Failure – Hot Takes from The Journal of Cardiac Failure Family

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 45:33


CardioNerds  (Amit Goyal, Daniel Ambinder) and special co-host Dr. Mark Belkin, join the Journal of Cardiac Failure Family to discuss the 2022 ACC/AHA/HFSA Guideline for The Management of Heart Failure. The JCF Editor-In-Chief Dr. Robert Mentz, Deputy Editor Dr. Anu Lala, and FIT editors -- Dr. Vanessa Bluemer, Dr. Ashish Corrhea, and Dr. Quinton Youmans -- share their hot takes and practical takeaways from the guidelines. At JCF, we're privileged to share this important document that will support improved care for those living with heart failure,” stated Editor-in Chief Dr. Robert J. Mentz and Deputy Editor Anu Lala. “The 2022 guidelines convey patient-centered updates regarding the language we use to communicate disease considerations (e.g., stages of HF) and practice-changing guidance around the diagnosis and management of HF including newer therapeutics (e.g., SGLT2i). There is an emphasis not only on managing HF but also on how to treat important comorbidities as part of the holistic care for patients living with HF." 2022 AHA/ACC/HFSA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure Executive Summary A Clinician's Guide to the 2022 ACC/AHA/HFSA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure by Dr. Michelle Kittleson CardioNerds Heart Success Series PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Guideline Top 10 Take-Home Messages - Guideline for The Management of Heart Failure 1. Guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT) for heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) now includes 4 medication classes that include sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i). 2. SGLT2i have a Class of Recommendation 2a in HF with mildly reduced ejection fraction (HFmrEF). Weaker recommendations (Class of Recommendation 2b) are made for ARNi, ACEi, ARB, MRA, and beta blockers in this population. 3. New recommendations for HFpEF are made for SGLT2i (Class of Recommendation 2a), MRAs (Class of Recommendation 2b), and ARNi (Class of Recommendation 2b). Several prior recommendations have been renewed including treatment of hypertension (Class of Recommendation 1), treatment of atrial fibrillation (Class of Recommendation 2a), use of ARBs (Class of Recommendation 2b), and avoidance of routine use of nitrates or phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (Class of Recommendation 3: No Benefit). 4. Improved LVEF is used to refer to those patients with previous HFrEF who now have an LVEF >40%. These patients should continue their HFrEF treatment. 5.Value statements were created for select recommendations where high-quality, cost-effectiveness studies of the intervention have been published. 6. Amyloid heart disease has new recommendations for treatment including screening for serum and urine monoclonal light chains, bone scintigraphy, genetic sequencing, tetramer stabilizer therapy, and anticoagulation. 7. Evidence supporting increased filling pressures is important for the diagnosis of HF if the LVEF is >40%. Evidence for increased filling pressures can be obtained from noninvasive (e.g., natriuretic peptide, diastolic function on imaging) or invasive testing (e.g., hemodynamic measurement). 8. Patients with advanced HF who wish to prolong survival should be referred to a team specializing in HF. A HF specialty team reviews HF management, assesses suitability for advanced HF therapies, and uses palliative care including palliative inotropes where consistent with the patient's goals of care. 9. Primary prevention is important for those at risk for HF (stage A) or pre-HF (stage B). Stages of HF were revised to emphasize the new terminologies of “at risk” for HF for stage A and pre-HF for stage B. 10.Recommendations are provided for select patients with HF and iron deficiency, anemia, hypertension, sleep disorders,

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Milind Desai, MD, MBA - New Evidence on Cardiac Myosin Inhibition in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Analysis From Washington, DC

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 29:16


Go online to PeerView.com/XXS860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. What's new in the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)? Hear what was presented at the 70th Annual Scientific Session and Expo of the American College of Cardiology (ACC 2022) from Dr. Milind Desai, as he shares the latest evidence on novel therapies for HCM and considers how these findings can improve outcomes for patients in your clinical practice. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Identify the mechanism of action of cardiac myosin inhibitors for the treatment of HCM, Describe the benefits and limitations of current management strategies for patients with obstructive and nonobstructive HCM, Apply the current body of evidence for cardiac myosin inhibitors to improve outcomes and enhance quality of life in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive HCM, including as an alternative to septal reduction therapy.

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Milind Desai, MD, MBA - New Evidence on Cardiac Myosin Inhibition in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Analysis From Washington, DC

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 29:30


Go online to PeerView.com/XXS860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. What's new in the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)? Hear what was presented at the 70th Annual Scientific Session and Expo of the American College of Cardiology (ACC 2022) from Dr. Milind Desai, as he shares the latest evidence on novel therapies for HCM and considers how these findings can improve outcomes for patients in your clinical practice. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Identify the mechanism of action of cardiac myosin inhibitors for the treatment of HCM, Describe the benefits and limitations of current management strategies for patients with obstructive and nonobstructive HCM, Apply the current body of evidence for cardiac myosin inhibitors to improve outcomes and enhance quality of life in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive HCM, including as an alternative to septal reduction therapy.

PeerView Heart, Lung & Blood CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Milind Desai, MD, MBA - New Evidence on Cardiac Myosin Inhibition in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Analysis From Washington, DC

PeerView Heart, Lung & Blood CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 29:30


Go online to PeerView.com/XXS860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. What's new in the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)? Hear what was presented at the 70th Annual Scientific Session and Expo of the American College of Cardiology (ACC 2022) from Dr. Milind Desai, as he shares the latest evidence on novel therapies for HCM and considers how these findings can improve outcomes for patients in your clinical practice. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Identify the mechanism of action of cardiac myosin inhibitors for the treatment of HCM, Describe the benefits and limitations of current management strategies for patients with obstructive and nonobstructive HCM, Apply the current body of evidence for cardiac myosin inhibitors to improve outcomes and enhance quality of life in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive HCM, including as an alternative to septal reduction therapy.

The Big Run
The Night of the 10,000m PBs - Preview Special - Kojo Kyereme

The Big Run

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:11


Welcome to this special series of preview podcasts to celebrate the return of the Night of the 10,000m PBs.  From Monday to Friday there will be a brand new episode talking to key figures of the events past and future as we look forward to the return of the Glastonbury of Athletics on May 14th. The Big Run is proudly supported for this special Run of podcasts by Like the Wind Magazine. Today I ventured to a brand new hospital to chat with its resident Cardiac physiologist Kojo Kyereme.  Kojo has been running competitively for over 30 years. First, as a sprinter, and now as a marathon runner. He has been ever-present at Night of the 10,000m PBs since its inception. -------- With the support of Like The Wind Magazine and Select Imagery from Curated for Runners.  Like the Wind is an independent journal telling stories about running. Since issue 1, Like the Wind has been published quarterly, with 31 issues under its belt. It is sold mainly through subscriptions, to readers in 40 countries. The strapline of the magazine is: it's why we run (not how to run) and so there are no product reviews, training plans or nutrition tips. Instead, Like the Wind explores topics such as the environment, social issues (like racism or gender inequality), mental health and – quite often – the simple joy of running.  Like the Wind will be producing a special edition programme for Night of the 10,000m PB's for all attendees to the event on May 14th   Like the Wind can be found at www.likethewindmagazine.com where people can subscribe and on Instagram and Twitter as @likethewindmag.  -------- --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thebigrunpodcast/message

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Cardiac survival rates down as PPE impairs CPR performance

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 11:43


Fewer New Zealanders are surviving cardiac arrests outside the hospital, and St John Ambulance believes wearing PPE may be impairing officers' ability to perform CPR effectively. Survival rates are down for the second year in a row. They've dropped from 13 percent in the year to July 2019, pre-pandemic, to 11 percent in the 12 months to July last year. Survival rates are counted as people still alive 30 days after a cardiac arrest. In the year to July 2021, almost 2000 cardiac arrests were treated in the community, with 25 percent living long enough to get to hospital, down from 27 percent two years earlier. So what's behind the drop in survival rates? Kathryn speaks with Medical Director of St John ambulance services, Dr Tony Smith.

ESC Cardio Talk
Journal Editorial - Left atrial strain imaging: ready for clinical implementation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

ESC Cardio Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 11:42


Retired Roaders
More tests in the cardiac department of Dr. Yasir Batres.

Retired Roaders

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 13:04


Stress test followed by an ultrasound followed by a cardiac monitor. They are pulling out all the artillery to get to the bottom of it. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/retired-roaders/message

VA HSR&D Podcasts
Building Resiliency, Quality, and Retention into VA's Cardiac Cath Labs

VA HSR&D Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 22:13


Heather Gilmartin, PhD, NP, investigator and nurse scientist at the Denver/Seattle Center of Innovation in Denver, Colorado discusses her HSR&D Career Development Award program work, which is focused on building supportive learning environments  VA’s cardiac catheter labs.

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today
Pediheart Podcast # 205: Cefazolin Dosing For Pediatric Cardiovascular Surgery

Pediheart: Pediatric Cardiology Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 28:01


This week we move into the world of cardiac surgery when we review a recent work from Australia on levels of cefazolin during and after surgery. Is there an optimal dose regimen that will achieve proper MIC levels of drug? What should the goal of therapy be in regards to MIC levels? Are there novel means of dosing cefazolin? We speak with pediatric critical care pharmacy coordinator at Mount Sinai Kravis Children's Hospital, Dr. Jessica Frye for the pharmacist's perspective on some of these important questions. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2022.02.047

The Dr. Ardis Show
Dr. Ardis, DC interviews Laura Bartlett & Kurt Ruppman: THE CARDIAC TRIFECTA FOR POST -VACCINATION!

The Dr. Ardis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 48:44


In this episode, Laura Bartlett, sister of Dr. Richard Bartlett, reveals the two most feared supplements for Covid-19 in the payment processing industry...and how these might be two of the most significant supplements in the care of the post vaccinated population. She also introduces Kurt Ruppman, the owner of Dallas based company H2Bev. Kurt is the inventor of a revolutionary, patent pending, breakthrough product combining the power of molecular hydrogen and nitric oxide. Hydro Shot is a product recommended by Dr. Richard Bartlett for its efficacy in boosting blood oxygen. Hydro Shot, combined with the two most feared products in the payment processing industry, form The Cardiac Trifecta for post-vaccination support. www.defenseboxes.com www.h2bev.com

The Dr. Ardis Show
Dr. Ardis, DC interviews Laura Bartlett & Kurt Ruppman: THE CARDIAC TRIFECTA FOR POST -VACCINATION!

The Dr. Ardis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 48:44


In this episode, Laura Bartlett, sister of Dr. Richard Bartlett, reveals the two most feared supplements for Covid-19 in the payment processing industry...and how these might be two of the most significant supplements in the care of the post vaccinated population. She also introduces Kurt Ruppman, the owner of Dallas based company H2Bev. Kurt is the inventor of a revolutionary, patent pending, breakthrough product combining the power of molecular hydrogen and nitric oxide. Hydro Shot is a product recommended by Dr. Richard Bartlett for its efficacy in boosting blood oxygen. Hydro Shot, combined with the two most feared products in the payment processing industry, form The Cardiac Trifecta for post-vaccination support. www.defenseboxes.com www.h2bev.com

The Dr. Ardis Show
Dr. Ardis, DC interviews Laura Bartlett & Kurt Ruppman: THE CARDIAC TRIFECTA FOR POST -VACCINATION!

The Dr. Ardis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 48:44


In this episode, Laura Bartlett, sister of Dr. Richard Bartlett, reveals the two most feared supplements for Covid-19 in the payment processing industry...and how these might be two of the most significant supplements in the care of the post vaccinated population. She also introduces Kurt Ruppman, the owner of Dallas based company H2Bev. Kurt is the inventor of a revolutionary, patent pending, breakthrough product combining the power of molecular hydrogen and nitric oxide. Hydro Shot is a product recommended by Dr. Richard Bartlett for its efficacy in boosting blood oxygen. Hydro Shot, combined with the two most feared products in the payment processing industry, form The Cardiac Trifecta for post-vaccination support. www.defenseboxes.com www.h2bev.com

AJP-Heart and Circulatory Podcasts
GLS1 Inhibition Improves Cardiac Remodeling -- Japanese Language Version

AJP-Heart and Circulatory Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 18:19


Are failing hearts addicted to glutamine? In this special episode of The AJP-Heart and Circ Podcast, we bring you a conversation in both Japanese and English with Editorial Board member Dr. Junichi Sadoshima (Rutgers University-New Jersey Medical School), Consulting Editor Dr. Jun Yoshioka (City University of New York School of Medicine), and corresponding author Dr. Manabu Nagao (Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) about the new study by Yoshikawa et al. that explores the interaction between metabolism and pathophysiological cardiac hypertrophy. It is well known that the heart uses various substrates to produce ATP during cardiac hypertrophy. Earlier observations about how cancer cells rapidly consume glutamine during the tumor growth phase led the authors to interrogate the role of glutamine metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. Nagao and co-authors show that glutaminase is upregulated during cardiac hypertrophy, and that suppression of glutaminase 1 (GLS1) attenuates cardiac hypertrophy. GLS1-mediated glutaminolysis contributes to maladaptive cardiac remodeling by increasing anabolic reactions for hypertrophy and proliferation. Glutamine metabolism is essential for cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, glutaminolysis is activated much faster than glucolysis in response to acute stress. Yoshikawa et al. show that a counter-clockwise shift of the tricarboxylic acid cycle contributes to cardiac remodeling. This study is a game-changer. Listen to learn why.   Sachiko Yoshikawa, Manabu Nagao, Ryuji Toh, Masakazu Shinohara, Takuya Iino, Yasuhiro Irino, Makoto Nishimori, Hidekazu Tanaka, Seimi Satomi-Kobayashi, Tatsuro Ishida, and Ken-Ichi Hirata Inhibition of glutaminase 1-mediated glutaminolysis improves pathological cardiac remodeling Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published March 30, 2022. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00692.2021

AJP-Heart and Circulatory Podcasts
GLS1 Inhibition Improves Cardiac Remodeling -- English Language Version

AJP-Heart and Circulatory Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 14:54


Are failing hearts addicted to glutamine? In this special episode of The AJP-Heart and Circ Podcast, we bring you a conversation in both Japanese and English with Editorial Board member Dr. Junichi Sadoshima (Rutgers University-New Jersey Medical School), Consulting Editor Dr. Jun Yoshioka (City University of New York School of Medicine), and corresponding author Dr. Manabu Nagao (Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) about the new study by Yoshikawa et al. that explores the interaction between metabolism and pathophysiological cardiac hypertrophy. It is well known that the heart uses various substrates to produce ATP during cardiac hypertrophy. Earlier observations about how cancer cells rapidly consume glutamine during the tumor growth phase led the authors to interrogate the role of glutamine metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. Nagao and co-authors show that glutaminase is upregulated during cardiac hypertrophy, and that suppression of glutaminase 1 (GLS1) attenuates cardiac hypertrophy. GLS1-mediated glutaminolysis contributes to maladaptive cardiac remodeling by increasing anabolic reactions for hypertrophy and proliferation. Glutamine metabolism is essential for cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, glutaminolysis is activated much faster than glucolysis in response to acute stress. Yoshikawa et al. show that a counter-clockwise shift of the tricarboxylic acid cycle contributes to cardiac remodeling. This study is a game-changer. Listen to learn why.   Sachiko Yoshikawa, Manabu Nagao, Ryuji Toh, Masakazu Shinohara, Takuya Iino, Yasuhiro Irino, Makoto Nishimori, Hidekazu Tanaka, Seimi Satomi-Kobayashi, Tatsuro Ishida, and Ken-Ichi Hirata Inhibition of glutaminase 1-mediated glutaminolysis improves pathological cardiac remodeling Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol, published March 30, 2022. DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00692.2021

Locked On Coyotes Podcast - Daily Coverage of Arizona Hockey
Cardiac Coyotes comeback to defeat Dallas Stars

Locked On Coyotes Podcast - Daily Coverage of Arizona Hockey

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 36:53


Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! HelloFresh Go to HelloFresh.com/lockedon16 and use code lockedon16 for up to 16 free meals AND 3 free gifts. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Shady Rays EXCLUSIVELY FOR OUR LISTENERS, HEAD TO SHADYRAYS.COM AND USE CODE LOCKEDON TO GET FIFTY PERCENT OFF TWO OR MORE PAIRS OF POLARIZED SUNGLASSES. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The County 10 Podcast
Coffee Time: Cardiac & Vascular Interventionalist Dr. Inder M. Singh hopes to bring a personal touch to patient care at Western Wyoming Medical

The County 10 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 15:17


(Lander, WY) – 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM's Coffee Time host Vince Tropea recently sat down with Cardiac & Vascular Interventionalist Dr. Inder M. Singh, M.D., M.S. Dr. Singh has been working with Western Wyoming Medical, and has been coming to Lander on a regular basis since December. h/t Western Wyoming Medical image Dr. Singh comes to Wyoming with a wealth of credentials and experience. He has been named by his peers among Sacramento's Top Cardiologists since 2016, and is well-published in the cardiology, structural and vascular fields, with more than 50 publications and presentations, including JAMA and major awards from the American College of Cardiology. Dr. Singh filled us in on the services he provides, what he hopes to accomplish in the community, and his overall philosophy on patient care. Check out the full Coffee Time interview with Dr. Singh below Be sure to tune in to Coffee Time every morning at 8:00 AM on 1330 KOVE AM / 107.7 FM, or stream it live right here.

Sarc Fighter: Living with Sarcoidosis and other rare diseases
Episode 60 | Jack Boepple's cardiac sarcoidosis hit him like a linebacker. And he would know.

Sarc Fighter: Living with Sarcoidosis and other rare diseases

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 66:56


Jack Boepple is a former Boston marathon runner.  A dedicated Cyclist and a fisherman who disappears into the wilderness for a week every year with his canoe and camping supplies.  But even all of that couldn't prevent sarcoidosis from attacking his heart.  In Episode 60 of the Sarc Fighter podcast, Jack shares the story of how sarcoidosis knocked him back more than a few steps -- and how he never saw it coming -- even when he was in the hospital beating most of the tests. Jack Cardioversion image     Show Notes: Learn about the clinical trial from Novartis: https://bit.ly/3o9LXKk Remember these hashtags for April!  #WhatIsSarcoidosis #MakeItVisible  Here is a link to all the activities for April ! https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/awareness-2022 Universal Barriers Podcast:  https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/sarc-fighter-podcast/ More on Universal Barriers https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/events/universal-barriers-in-dealing-with-a-chronic-disease-a-sarcoidosis-perspective/ Ignore No More https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/ignore-no-more-foundation-for-sarcoidosis-research-launches-african-american-women-sarcoidosis-campaign/ Sarcoidosis Awareness Film: https://www.purpledocumentary.com/ Nourish by Lindsey: https://www.nourishbylindsey.com/ Dr. Jinny Tavee's book, The Last Day of Suffering: https://www.amazon.com/Last-Day-Suffering-Health-Happiness/dp/0615542751 Read about the patient trial with aTyr 1923 https://investors.atyrpharma.com/news-releases/news-release-details/atyr-pharma-announces-positive-data-phase-1b2a-clinical-trial Also -- Note that investors also believe in the promise of aTyr 1923: https://investors.atyrpharma.com/news-releases/news-release-details/atyr-pharma-announces-closing-863-million-public-offering Yale University and sarcoidosis skin treatment | Dr. William Damsky: https://news.yale.edu/2018/12/26/yale-experts-treat-severe-disfiguring-sarcoidosis-novel-therapy Stanford University Clinical trial | Dr. Mathew Baker: https://med.stanford.edu/sarcoidosis/clinical-trial.html   MORE FROM JOHN Cycling with Sarcoidosis http://carlinthecyclist.com/category/cycling-with-sarcoidosis/ Watch the Prednisone Town Hall on YouTube https://youtu.be/dNwbcBIyQhE More on aTyr Pharma: https://www.atyrpharma.com/ Do you like the official song for the Sarc Fighter podcast?  It's also an FSR fundraiser! If you would like to donate in honor of Mark Steier and the song, Zombie, Here is a link to his KISS account.  (Kick In to Stop Sarcoidosis)  100-percent of the money goes to the Foundation.  https://stopsarcoidosis.rallybound.org/MarkSteier The Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/ Donate to my KISS (Kick In to Stop Sarcoidosis) fund for FSR  https://stopsarcoidosis.rallybound.org/JohnCarlinVsSarcoidosis?fbclid=IwAR1g2ap1i1NCp6bQOYEFwOELdNEeclFmmLLcQQOQX_Awub1oe9bcEjK9P1E My story on Television https://www.stopsarcoidosis.org/news-anchor-sarcoidosis/ email me  carlinagency@gmail.com Below is a web generated text version of my interview with Jack Boepple.  Please excuse any spelling errors.  Welcome back to the Sark Fighter podcast. And joining me now is Jack Boepple Lives in Chicago and he's a fellow SARC fighter. Jack, welcome to the podcast. Thank you. Glad you to have me. So you reached out to me after listening a little bit because, • • uh, you have cardiac sarcoidosis. How did you first find out that something was not right with your heart? • • • • • • Um, actually, it was the event itself. So three years ago, March, • • um, I'm sitting on a couch • • • and I could feel • • some palpitations going on. And I put my hand on my chest and it felt like my heart was just rolling. • • So I asked my wife, can you just check my pulse? So she did, that looks fine. Then she put her hand on my chest and she's like, we got to go to the emergency room now because it was just doing all these flip flops. She could tell. She could tell there was something wrong. And I'm like, uh, • • I've had palpitations before. I'm fine. I'm just going to play through • • • • um. • • And so I didn't do anything. That was a Friday. • • And I woke up the next morning and I was still off. • • So I took a baby aspirin I sent a note to my primary, uh, provider, realizing through the portal, realizing she would not see it or address it until Monday. • • And then that day, we went for a long walk. We had friends over, smoked a cigar, had some wine, sundae, went for another long walk, came home, got on the rowing machine, rode for 45 minutes, and by rowing, actually felt better. Um, but I got a phone call on • • • • Monday morning from, um, the primary nurse. And she said • • everything you just described to me, you need to be in the emergency room right now. And I said, I don't want to go to the emergency room. So she made an appointment for to see the primary. And I saw her in the afternoon and, • • • um, she took an EKG • • and she used this very technical term • to tell me what she saw. It looks funky. I'm like, what does funky mean? Uh, so she's like, I think you need to go. I want you in the Ed. I mean, right now. • • And • • • • her office was like a 20 minutes ride from • • • • the, um, hospital. And I'm like, • I want to send you an ambulance. But you're not going to go, are you? I'm like, no, • • • • • I drove to the Ed, • • they checked me in, they did another EKG, and when I got to the Ed, they fast line me. Usually you have to wait forever. I got right in. They did another EKG, they said something's funky. Then they brought in a cardiac specialist. He said the same thing. So they kept me for observation. • • • And the next day, they • • • • • • • did an EKG and they said, based upon those results, we either going to send you to stress, uh, test, or we're going to do an angio on you, uh, angiogram. And I'm like, come on, • • • • • bring on the stress test, because, • • • • um, • I work out quite a bit. • • • • • • • Um, • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I'm losing the term, but all my blood numbers come back great. • I mean, there's nothing wrong with cholesterol. My cholesterol numbers are off the scale. Great. • • • • • • • • • • • I'm like, come on. There's nothing wrong. So then they • • • decided, um, they're working to do a stress test. They're going to do the angio. And I got someone asked me, are you ready to have stents put in your heart? Like, what are you talking about? • • And I'm like, sure, but you're not going to find anything. And so they, • • • • • um, • • • bring me in, I do the angio, and I come out of it, and they're like, yeah, you're right. There was no blockage. Nothing. I'm like, yeah, I told you that, right? But we still want to hold you. And now it's about 400 in the afternoon, and my wife's been there all day. And • • • • I say, go home. Go get some lunch, go take a shower, go feel better. • • And • • • • • in the room talking to a nurse, and next thing, there's four more nurses flying in the room, • and they're saying, we got to go to ICU. I'm like, what? We got to go to ICU now. Wait, you're feeling fine? They've done the angio. • • • • • • • • • I know, but the listeners don't know yet. • • • But you and I live, uh, in a parallel • • • • lifestyle, uh, with respect to the way we work out. You were biking 120 miles a week. You've done a half iron man. You are on, uh, your rower all the time. So you're not just, like, a kind of standard walking around fit guy. Fitness is your lifestyle. • • • Absolutely. • • • • • • • • Not only is it done for physically, but you probably can relate to this, that it's a mental release. And so when you're doing you're on your bike or you're working out, all of sudden a you're solving all the problems you're trying to work through. Yeah. So the nurses come rushing into the room, you're sitting up saying, okay, something's funky, but I'm killing it on all these tests. And they keep accelerating the level of care, • • • • • right? All these nurses are running around me, and I have one nurse just staring at me, and I'm staring at her, and she goes, hello. And I say, hello back. And she jumps backwards. • • So apparently I found out later that • • • • I think my heart rate is, like, • • • • 100 and $8200 something very high. • And apparently, when it's that high, um, you're coding. And so they're not used to anybody • • being conscious when this happens. And so • • • • they're willing me down to ICU. I'm fully conscious of what's going on. They get me in there, they hook me up, and, • • • • • • • um, • • • they're pumping me full of all these • • • drugs, um, to try to get the heart rate down, Amyotarone. They just give me an IV of it. They're just trying to do this. • • • And after about 8 hours of my heart at this elevated rate, they come in and say, • • we're going to have, uh, to shock you. I'm like, really? And • • • • • • • • • • • I'm like, in the morning now, • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • like, wow, this is real. All of a sudden, this is real. • • My wife is with me, and I'm like, I want her with me. But I'm like, that's selfish. I don't want her to see me be shocked. So I asked her, do you want to be here for this? And she's like, no. • So she leaves the room, and they give me, • • • um, a Twilight drug and said, you won't remember anything. • • Uh huh. So they hit me. I remembered, no way, • • • really. And this is to get your heart rhythm back into a normal range, right? It's a • • • reset. So they were trying to reset my heart. And it • • did. • • • • • • And, • um, they said most people, just after it happened, the nurse said, you did so well. I'm like, what does that • • • • mean? They said, you didn't swear. I'm • • • • • • • • • • • • • like, I got through that. • • • • • And, • • um, they described it like being hit by a truck. And I said, I don't know what that means, but I played football, and I feel like I just got hit by a professional linebacker, and I didn't have any pads on. I mean, it just wax the hell out of • • • • • • you. • • Uh, so the rest of the night and when you're nice to • you, you're watching your • • • monitors. • • • • • • • • • • And I said a prayer that • • • night, and I said I would never, ever talk about it to • • • anybody. • • And a few days later, we had someone visiting us, a good friend of ours, and she was on a spiritual journey long before I was. And she asked the one question where I had to tell what • happened. And she asked, how does this change your relationship with God? And I looked at her, and I'm like. I said, it didn't. I said, when I'm sitting there and I'm watching those monitors and I'm watching my heart, trying to get back to where it was, this abnormal • • • state. I said a prayer of thanks. I said, thank you for the great life I • • • had. Please watch my offer. My wife. Please watch over my • girls. I'm not the type of person to sit there and beg and plead. So I said a prayer of • • thanks, • • • mhm, because I've been thankful for all the great opportunities I've had. Sure. • • • So the thing I said I would never talk about. I talked about. • • • • • • And it's been a real journey since then. • So then the doctors are trying to figure out what caused all this. So they went down the Lyme disease • • route. • • • • They did, um, all these different things. I did a cardiac MRI. I don't know if you ever had to do one of those. That's not one of those MRIs where you can just put in the tube. I fall asleep in those things. Mri I do, too. That doesn't bother • • me. Yeah, so they put me in, but you got to hold your • • • • • breath throughout, um, the test so your chest isn't moving up and • • down. And so they can isolate what's going on the • • chest. And after that cardiac MRI, they sort, uh, of had an idea that maybe it was sarcodosis. So that was their working theory at that • • time. And they would not let me leave the hospital until I had an • • • • ICD and, um, pacemaker installed on my • chest. So from the time I entered the hospital, the time I left, it was eight • • days. Went through all these • • • tests. It wasn't • • • • • • • • • until several, um, weeks later that I actually did a Pet scan. And that was basically their • • confirmation • • • that it looks like sarcastosis. As you probably know, they never can say it is sarcodosis unless they do a • • biopsy and they can actually confirm it. Well, Pet is noninvasive, • • • so, • • • uh, they figured out it looks. • • • • • • • • • • • Like where in your heart, Jack, is it on a valve. • • • • • • • • • • • • Or the way it was described to me, it's both on the • • • inside and the external of the heart. And that's the tricky part is the external part of the • • heart. The internal part of the • • • • • • heart. • Um, you can eventually address through ablazion. But if it's also on the external part of the heart, the external ablaze procedure is much different. They have to go underneath your ribcage and • • • up and then break the sac around the heart, then try to do the blazing that way, which is a much more tricky operation. Yeah, but I went from being on no medications whatsoever to being on. I can't tell you how many • • • • • • pills. One of the reasons I reached out to you is a lot of the folks talk about how the sarcmens just beat them up. And I've been fortunate. • The methotrexate I'm • • • • on and, um, the pregnantone I'm • • on, they really didn't, um, beat me up too bad. But the cardiac meds just wailed on me. Amy odorone. One of the side effects of amioterone • • • • • • • is, • • um, sun. But if you get in the • • • • • • sun, you just start burning up rather quickly. Like I could literally, on a sunny day, walk across a sunny parking lot when my wife would pick me up from the train station and I'd be beat • red. So it turned me into a • • • • • vampire. And you're an outdoors guy, right? • • So, nine, 09:00 the morning to four, 04:00 the afternoon. I just stayed in the • • shadows, and it • • just killed me. Just. • • Absolutely. I wanted to be. • • • • • • • • • Outside. Are you retired • • • or what is your job? Were you not working? What was going on then? So I'm still working. Uh, • I work for, um, Blue Cross. Blue Shield of • • Illinois. I don't know if you've ever, um, heard of Lean or Six Sigma, but that's sort of my gig. Basically it's process improvement type of work. I go in and look at • • • • • • things. • • • • Um, yes, but in the summer months, I like to be outside. I love the • • • • • • • • fish and do all that stuff. So that was really a Downer trying to get addressed to those drugs. And there's other drugs that they keep on wanting to slow your heart down. So lisinopril is one of • • them. It just slows everything down. And I was being lethargic, and I'm like, this is not how I want to • • • • • • be. And so that sort of started the journey towards getting off. How do I get off? Uh, these cardiac meds. So they transitioned me about a year later to this drug called Soda • • • • • Law, which doesn't have any side effects. Amy, odorone, but it has different side effects, which is more • • lethargy. And I'm • like, I can't do • • • • • • • • • this. I started, um, exploring • • • Ablation and • • • • • my, • • • • • um, um, electrical cardiologist. He's done a bunch of Ablations, but the fact that it might have to be both internal and • external, he said, I want to give you • • to refer you to one of the experts in the field to do this, because if it's external, I don't have experience doing that. Tell us all what Ablazion actually • • • • is. So my understanding, I'm going to get this wrong, and you get people. Okay. I won't correct you, that's for sure. So it's basically the same approach as an angio. They come in • • • through the leg, • • and when they find a • • • • • • • • • • • spot, • • um, they believe is • • Sark, they try to poke it and figure out, is this causing the heart to go crazy or not? Yeah. And if it • does, then • • • • • they do, um, some type of cauterization or some type of way • • • to remove that tissue. The granuloma. Yes. Right. Okay. • • • • • • So I, um, talked to two different experts. • • • • One guy said, you just might have to live this way the rest of your life. And I talked to another guy like, you're too young to be living like • this. This is what we can do for you. And it • • • was considered a high risk procedure. But I'm like, I can't continue to live like • • • • this is like. You can't pass a couch without taking a nap. Right. With talking about the lethargy and all • • • that. It wasn't that, um, bad. • But for me not to be able to work • • • • • out, that was my • • • • release. I needed to be able to work out, • • • • and it • • just beat me to the point I couldn't do anything. Got it. So eventually actually did this • ablasian. And before you do the Ablasion, they stopped you on all cardiac meds because they want the SARC to be • • • active. So what does that mean? When the sarcas is active in the heart, that means you can go into V TAC. And • • so two • • days before the procedure, I'm off all cardiac meds. I'm sitting at my desk upstairs, my wife's downstairs, and my device • • • fires. And so I • scream and she comes running up and she finds me basically in a fetal • • • • • • • position, um, • • • because I wanted to be tack. And so the device did what it was supposed to do. They've called an insurance policy, and • • • it reset the heart. And • • • • • • so the guy doing the um, Ablaze like, yeah, we want your heart to be active so we can find it. And after he did the procedure, he came in and visited with me, and he • • • • • • said he was all amped up, all excited. He's like, we found five spots, and we got him. • • • • And he's like, no more um restrictions, no more cardiac men. You can start going back and doing your normal • • activities. • • And they were in there for five, 5 hours. And they said, we still see stuff on the external part of the heart. But you know what? We had you under for five, 5 hours, see what this • • • does. And here I am, a year later, I haven't had • • • • events, and I'm off cardiac meds, which is good. I'm working out again, but I always have to watch my heart rate because you don't want this little device to fire. And so you still have • • • • • the um, pacemaker. Is that essentially what it is? Pacemaker and ICD ICD, which is basically shocks your • • • • heart. So if that thing fires, that means you're • • • • • • having laypersons from heart • • • attack. Correct. And the technology in the ICD is nothing but amazing. They can set the levels as to when it goes into pacing • • • • • mode, when it, um, will fire a warning to your heart to say, Knock it off and then to the full • • • • • • • • • • • • • reset. It's just rather amazing. The other thing about the • Ablazion • is the device was pasted me, like, seventy, 70% of • • the. So instead of my heart working on its own device had to keep on helping it. And I'm like, that doesn't sound right to • • • me. And so after the um, Ablasian, I'm being paced less than one 1% of the which is just • • • • huge. My heart's • • • working by itself now, which is what I • wanted. You're still taking a very small amount of prednisone, right? Yeah. • • So when I did all this started, they had me at twenty, 20, and then they stepped it down. I'm at two, 2.5 • • now. • • • • • And • • the Maxwellsight, I'm on • • fifteen, 15 once a • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • week. I know that's • • • • low, • • • • but it's still a drug. Also, they throw in • • • the Alanronite and • • • • • the • • • um, looking for the other drug. I'm on folic acid. So the allndronate to try to help • • • alleviate bone loss. Um, I think the folic acid does something else to counter one of the side effects of the • • methotrexide. Okay. By Sark Dock, actually. Who's one of the docs has been on your • • podcast, Dr. • • • • • • Sparn. He's, uh, my Doc. • • • • • Wow. Listening to your podcast has started connecting a bunch of dots for • • me. I think one of the podcasts you talked about, what's the most important factor in dealing with Sarcodosis? I'm listening to this, and I'm trying to • guess, and I like health. And I was wrong. It was zip code. And I'm like, okay, I'm very fortunate to be where I • • am. One of the leading guys in Sark research is • • here. He's my Doc. So I got very lucky. • • • And my cardiologist, um, at Northwestern, have been nothing but outstanding. • • • • And the guy to do the Ablation, um, was out of the University of Chicago, who was considered a leading expert in doing Ablasians. • • • And I feel very fortunate. • • • • • • So I guess when I wrote you just like three years. • • • • • • Wow. I know a lot of this discussion on this is • • about the people that hits the most is the pulmonary people. • • • • • But there's a small population of cardiac people out here, too, • • that there's additional level of complexity that goes into it. And even rarer is those of us who are neurosark people. • • • • • • • • So, • • • um, it is a lot. So, uh, let's back up a little bit. Thank you for sharing the story of your • • incident, but you mentioned your wife and your daughters, and you are my age, so I'm assuming that your daughters are grown or nearly grown. So tell us about your family • • • • life. Yeah. So my wife and I, next year, will be married. Forty, 40. We were high school • • sweethearts. I was a football player. She was a • • cheerleader. Cute. You got me by a couple of years on the marriage. I think we were on thirty 38th year, but, yeah, go ahead. All right. • • • • • • • • And with, um, the Air Force Academy. So, uh, I was in the Air Force, and both daughters were born • • while we were in the Air Force. Uh, so the oldest, Christine, • is, • uh, thirty 35. The Madeline is thirty 31 • • • and is an occupational therapist. • • Uh, and she loves what she does. And she • • welcomed a son into the, uh, world a year ago. So it's our first grandchild. And my daughter Madeline is in marketing, um, living downtown Chicago, having a blast. • • • • • • • • • • So it's been a lot of fun with the girls raising them. They're, uh, both University of Iowa grads, and they had a lot of fun • there and learned a lot, and they made a lot of friends. In • • • fact, my wife's, um, husband is also she met him at the University of • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Iowa. Again, both of, um, them are very close to us. • • So we're staying here for a while. Yeah. Your daughter's husband, I • • • believe. Yeah. • • Right. Well, that's, um, • • • • • • • • • • • cool. So you've led an active life. You were a football • • • • • • • • • player. I've got to talk a little bit about the bicycling and so • • • • forth. So you, uh, were riding one 120 miles • • • a prior to this. And I consider myself pretty avid cyclists. But for me, one 100 miles a week is a week that I put a star next to in my logs. Like, this was a really good week. And you were doing that • • regularly. Yeah. That was several years ago when I was really, just really into • • • • • it. And, • • • um, my baseline is jogging. So that's where I started. And I've • done four • • • • marathons, including the Boston Marathon, which was joy to Drew. Congrats. Thank you. • • • • • • And three of the four marathons, um, I did under four, 4 hours was my goal. And • • • • so I was training for this, um, one • marathon. And I usually never signed up in advance • • because if the weather was bad in Chicago, I didn't want to be running in nasty weather. And so I went to sign up the day before, and they were like, • • • no, it's, um, all full. I'm like, But I trained for a marathon. I'm ready to go. So someone then told me about triathlons. And I swam in high school, too. So I'm like, okay, I can do the swimming part. So I got on a bike and it was one of these old swim • bikes. And I realized, all right, I got to do something better than this. And so I started upgrading the • • bikes. • • And my very first Triathlon, um, I did was a half Iron Man because I trained • • • for a marathon. I'm like, uh, I can do this stuff. And I'm like, after I did it, I'm like, oh, I can do a full Iron Man. And my wife's • • like, not happening. • • Uh, so a full Iron Man for people that don't know is you start out with • • • • a two, 2.4 miles, I • • • • • think. And then you ride your bike. One 112 miles, you run a marathon, correct. All back to back to back, correct? Yeah. So I did a half version of. • • • • • • • • • • That. So we • • • host an Ironman event here, uh, in Roanoke, Virginia, where I live, and it's a half. And I just did the bike part last • • • year. Not as part of the event, uh, but just to do it. And of course, here we live in the mountains, • • • • • so it's a very • • difficult. Fifty 50 it is. • • • Fifty, 56 miles. • • Uh, • • right. I can't imagine doing, um, all those other things on either side of it yet. Lots of. Lots of people do. Or to double it. That's. • • • • • • • • • Crazy. But it's something I really enjoyed. I just enjoyed the feeling of being outside and in • • • • • shape again. That's part, uh, of the journey. I'm trying to what's my • • new exercise normal. So last • • • • • • • • summer I was only, um, able to get forty, 40 miles a on the • • • • • • • • • • • bike. I think I even wrote this to you. I'm pedaling, I'm pedaling. I'm like, I know I'm going fast. And I look down the speedometer and I'm like, no, you're • • • • • • • • • • • not. That's part of getting older, too. I understand that. • • • • But just the energy doesn't seem to be close to what I've expected on the trajectory of getting • • • • • older. Now, the ablation that you had done, uh, when was that? That was March of last year. So you're still basically recovering from that, would you • • • • • • • • • • • • say? • • • • • • Um, • • • • • again, I don't think so. • • • • • Because it's a year out and I had no cardiac events. So should I start having cardiac events • • • • again then? Maybe I need to go back and get another • • one. And I've heard there's been people that have to go back and get repeated ablations, but I think if I go back again, they're going to play with the external part of the heart because there's still the scarring there on • that. • • • • • • • But otherwise, I, um, feel pretty good. So you're walking around feeling good, • • but your fitness level hasn't returned to the fitness level that you had pre ablaze and • precise. No, not even close, right? It might not. • • Right. I will never run seven and a half miles every other day ever again. It just won't happen. Right. So I now do • • intervals. I was told that's mhm even better for me. So I get my heart rate to a certain, um, • • point, and then I walk until it gets to a certain point. And I keep on bouncing up, back and forth. Right? Because • • • • • • • • • again, I don't want this device to. • • • • • • • • • • Fire. Um, it seems to me like you're living right on the edge. So you're doing intervals, which is where you run really hard and you watch your heart rate get jacked up. And then when it gets to a certain point, you walk until it comes back down. And then you do it • again. And, uh, then you walk until it comes back down. Then you do it again. And I've done this on the bike, and I've done it running as • • • • well. And the word, um, when you're running is, • • • • uh, Norwegian word • • • • • fartlek, which is not what it is. I think it's F-A-R-T-L-E-K. • Fartlek. It's named after the guy that developed. So, um, you're doing that. So you're really pushing the boundaries, right? Yeah, I'm trying to get back to feeling fit. So I guess to answer your early • • • question, I'm better than where I was before the Ablaze, but I'm not preparedak event. Uh, so not even • • • close. So how have you reimagined your life now since you've had to go through. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Sarcodosis? • • • • • • • Um, I think I take things more in stride now. • • • • • • Maybe it's just, um, everything I just look at, • • like, thankful for every moment I have now. Because, again, I thought this could have been it. I can't tell you how many times my wife and I have been told that if I had not been in • • • shape, no way. There's just no way I would have made it. So the fact • • • • • • • • • that I just, um, did a stress test, and the nurse looked at my record and she's like, I've never seen anyone be in V tag that long and come out of it. • Okay. • • • • • • So I feel very blessed. Um, so I try to look at that. I do a lot of volunteer • • • • work. I refocused my energies, um, and doing volunteer work again with the skill set I have, it's very specialized. • • • So I work with a group called Catch a Fire, which • • is basically a clearing house for, um, nonprofits to find volunteers. So over the last three years, I've done about over ninety 90 with • them, ranging • • • • • • • from, um, helping do Mission Vision value statements to Excel training, • • to doing data analysis to doing all these different • • things. And I've met all these different non profits across the United States. I've actually worked with some guy in Australia, worked with a couple of folks in • • • • • • Africa. It • • really seemed to be focusing more on • • that, hoping to get to retirement, um, at some point. Right. Because I think that • • • • will keep my mind • • active. Right. And when you go outside and so you ride your bicycle • • • • • • now on the trails and paths, um, around Chicago, trying to stay off the road so you don't have to fight with the cars. Right. So they converted old rail lines around here a long time ago. So there's a whole network. The one near me is called the Prairie Path. • And it's limestone paved • • • • • • and it's just a much safer • • ride. Back in my heyday, when I was really, um, going at it, I would ride on the streets, but I usually drive a half hour west of where I am to get more towards the countryside where there is less • • • • traffic. All it takes is one guy not paying attention • • and you're in a world of hurt. Yeah, no, it's • • true. I'm riding more and more offroad myself, but I still do get out on the roads. We're very fortunate • • • that you can be rural very quickly when you're outside Roanoke, Virginia, as opposed to Chicago. • • • • Right. We're a small • • • • city. Virginia's Blue Ridge is how, um, we're now marketing this. • • • • • • • • Region. And you've got a grandchild. • • • • • • • • • • Um, four years ago I had none. Now I have six. Holy cow. So, grandchildren changed the way I, uh, look at • • • • life, that's for • • sure. And, um, I'm sure that that's the same for • • • you. • • • • • Absolutely. He just turned one. And so, • • • • • • • • • • • • um, we've actually, uh, made going over the last three weekends. We're looking around, it's snowing outside. Let's see if our daughter wants to visit her. So we go over • • • • there, we eat lunch, and then we play for a couple hours until he's ready for a nap. So that's just really refocus what's going on. • • • • And he's at an age • • • where he's very active, like my oldest daughter was. And • • so it's like playing with my daughter again. He wants to fly around the room. And so it's just a lot of fun doing that. • • So it's the point. Now he recognizes me and as soon as he sees me again, he wants to start flying around the room. So it's a lot of fun. But I will tell you, making that little kid fly around the room, I'm gassed after it's over. Right. • • • So I think again, that's part • of dealing with how my body reacts to stuff. Now, before I could do anything, • • • • and I'd be • • • • • • fine. • • • • • Yeah, it's frustrating. You, uh, can't do what you once did. So they call sarcaidosis the Snowflake disease because it impacts each of us • • • • differently. I've also run the Boston Marathon. Um, Congratulations. Thank • • • • you. I just always thought of myself as, uh, the guy that would always be fit and would always be healthier • • • • • than a certain large percentage of the people walking around beside me. • • • And I guess now I think I was arrogant to think that because sarcodosis just knocks you back a step. Two steps, three steps. • And it's hard to realize that • • • • • while playing with my grandchild tires me • • • • out. Yeah, • • • • • • • • • • absolutely. Again, your form of, um, it is • • • much. I think each form is so unique, and I was so lucky to have my aspect of it addressed through the Ablasian. So it's sort of like. But every time I go out, I am looking at that watch going, Is my heart gonna play nice today or not? So it's always in the back of your mind, is what's going to • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • happen? To answer, I think, your earlier • • • • • question, it's always there in being thought of. So your doctor, Dr. • • Spoon, said that your sarcoidosis is not active, but he described it as simmering. Can you tell us what that is? Because I hadn't heard that before, but I think there are times when that's been my • • case. Right. So the last Pet scan I • • • • • • • had, he said, um, great • • • • • • news. There's no stark activity, uh, in the • • heart. There's no stark activity in the • • lungs. But as I look at your lymph nodes, they're • • glowing. And he said, it's not • • active. So let's just call simmering. It's • • there. • And let's not mess with your current medication • • regime, because ideally, they would love to taper you off. But I've had more than a few doctors tell me that if • • • you let the Sark flare again as you taper your meds, it comes back with a vengeance. And I really don't want vengeance, because vengeance, in my case, means I get more scarring on my • • heart. And then I got to rinse and repeat the medications, the ablaze again. So if I have to live with the • • medication regime I live on right • • now, so be it. And I think I've heard a couple of people on your • • • • podcast. I've just got to learn to live with what's being done. But in my choice with the cardiac Mans, I had another alternative, which was the ablasian. • Right. But you don't want to have to do another ablaze, • • • • • because even if that works, your heart will never • • be what it once. • • • • • • • • • Was. Every time they do that, it hurts your heart a little bit more. Right. And every flare you get hurt your heart a little bit more • • • permanently. • • And the phrase heart transplant has been used in front of me before, and that • • • • just scares me. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • And again, I don't want to ever get there, • • • • but it's out • • • • • • • there so whenever they do an Echo cardiogram, they're looking to ejection fraction. And I'm like, • • • • • • borderline. Okay. And they're like, if it drops to a certain point, then, • • uh, the next consideration • • • • • is heart transplant. I'm like, let's not go there • • • • • • yet. Let's see what we can do without before we get there. • • • Right. So you get up in the morning • • • • • • and do you work from • • • • home? What do you do? Do you go to work? I'm in a hybrid schedule. So two days at home, three • • • • • • • • • days at work. • Um, and, • um, three days are downtown Chicago. Uh, so if you ever been to • • • • Chicago, the Blue Cross building is right across from Millennium Park. If you ever went and saw the • • bean. I can see that from my office. Wow. • • • • • • • • • • • And the Metro, which is the, um, commuter training. You take that in • • • • there. We actually have a bus that runs from this train station, um, to the building. But I walk. I walk every time. So it's about twenty, 25 minutes. And again, I like being • outside. Yeah, I love the bean. The bean is so • • • • • • • cool. It's a sculpture that's shaped like a bean, and it's about the size of a small house. Is that fair? Yeah, that's fair. And it's just you see a mirror reflection no matter where you walk around it or under it or • • • • • • whatever. I love the bean. That's so cool. Um, and so you're, uh, walking twenty, • • • • • • 25, um, three days a week, and you're feeling fine, right? Yeah, they're back. So I'm walking fifty, 50 • • • • • • minutes. It's feeling okay. • • Um, • • • • • • • • • • • • • • awesome. You mentioned your relationship with God before we were talking, and other people have brought that up. Have you become more or less religious, or do you look at things in a more philosophical way? • • • • • • • • Now I'm going to go • • • towards no. But I also will say I continued, I'm continuing my spiritual journey. I'm continuing to try to • • • • • • • • • • • understand my faith, • • • um, about that. So right now I'm reading something • • that's • • where there was a group • • • • • • • • of priests, um, that actually did a critical evaluation of, • um, the four Gospels, trying, uh, to say, is this something that Jesus really would have said? And it's • • • • • really in depth. So I keep on exploring things. They might not be popular topics to talk about, but I'm just trying to • • • explore my • • • • • • • • • • faith. If you think about the volunteer work, I • • • • • • do think Christianity, a lot of it is about giving • • • • • • • • • • back. So, yes, I've been doing more and more and more of • • • • • • that. • • • • • But, • • • um, it's something I continue to explore, and it's just to • • me, it's fascinating. I think the underlying • • message • • • of Jesus, • • • • again, • • • • uh, love your • • neighbors • • • • • and love God above all. I think that's a great message, and it's hard to practice it sometimes loving your neighbors, but it's great to aspire to that. • • • • So I'm really interested in understanding about • • • that. Got you, Jack. Is there anything else you want to add at this. • • • • • • • • • • • Point. • • So this is an um aside. • • • • • • • • So after I had this cardiac • • • • • • • • • event every year since, two, um, thousand and one, I've gone on a canoe • • • trip. I don't know if you heard of • • • • • • • • • • • • Quetico. Yes, I've been there three times. Okay. • So for the • • • • • listeners, if you've heard of Boundary Waters in • • Minnesota, it's a place where there's no motor boats. It's canoes only quadico is the Canadian version of that. It has bigger in • • size and it may allow fewer people • • in. So I've been doing quadico trips, eight day, seven night trips since two 2001. And when nine • • • 911, we were in the • • • • • • • field. Nine 911, I what happened • • • on • • Tuesday? And, • • uh, uh, we were in the field. We had no • • idea. And when we came out of the field, we were • • • • • • • • • • told they like playing jokes. And you come back like, there's something like the camp ran out of hot water and the guy that picks us up • • • • says they • • • bombed the towers in the Twin Cities. • • • Um, I'm like, who's going to bomb Minneapolis St. Paul, right? Yeah. And so we thought it was a joke. We didn't believe it. And it took a phone call • • • home and for my seven year old daughter at that time to say, yes, they bombed New York to make it • • • • • real. • • Anyway, I go up to quitaco every year. And after this cardiac event, I said, I'm going. And my wife is like, you're not. I'm going. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • And two months before a • • trip, I got a blood clot. So with • • • • • this device, the ICD pacemaker, um, they run wires, uh, through your veins, down to your • • • heart. And typically, if a blood clot shows, it shows up • • • early. But mine showed up late. So now I'm on blood • • thinners. And if you know about the credit • • • • • • • code, there is no seven 711, no emergency care. You're all by yourself. There's no communication. Correct. Unless you have a • • • cell phone, right? Yeah. When we went, there were no cell phones, no walkie talkies, • • nothing. And • • so I'm going. Even with this heart condition • • • • • • • • • • and my reaction to Amy odorone • • • • • and the blood thinners, I'm going, which • • is • • • fairly not smartly, dangerous. A month before I went, I'm owing the grass • • • • • and come in and take a shower. And I'm washing myself. I'm, um, like, what's • • • this? I had a • • • • • hernia. • • And so I'm like, come • • • • on. So I bought one of those • • • • girdles that pushed it in. So I, um, went to Quidico that year with. You • • did? Yes. With all that going on. And my wife was not pleased, but I'm like, I got to go. This is sort of, um, like my annual • • • release. So I thought you would appreciate that • • story. It goes back to what I need to, um, be. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Outside. One of my bucket list things is to get back • • • • • • there. It's been over twenty 20 since I went, but I went three years in a row with a local group of guys and the fishing is the best fishing I've ever had in my • • life. But it's rigorous because we would paddle, I think, about one 110 miles where they dropped us off. Then we would sort of paddle back to a pickup • • • point in the canoe. And then you Portage between the Lakes. So you're carrying your canoe, you're carrying your backpack, you're looking out for • • • • bears, and you just basically fished your way to the, um, next campsite. Is that how you guys did it? Absolutely. • • And there's • • something people like. It's just canoeing. Well, the portagne is what kills people. So I brought a couple of newbies this year, • • • and the portages just kick their butt. Yeah, well, they can be a mile • • • • long. Some of them are very short. You hop for there's four, 400 within the Quittico Wilderness. Right. And only, as I recall, only two, 200 of even have names, and the rest of them are just regarded as large puddles. They're not worthy. But you go • • • • from body of water to body of water to body of • • • • • • water, and you follow your map and, • • um, hope you don't get lost. I had some scary moments, but I can't believe you're able to do that with • • • Sarcardosis. Yeah. So I'm still doing it • • • • • • • • • and made it through that trip. Uh, okay. But, • • um, that's what I want to • • • • • • do. And you've talked about it, I think, on your podcast several times • • about you got to get back • to what feels right. Your body might not be one 100% the way you want it, but you got to get back to what you want to • • do • is make the effort. So I just keep on making the • • • • • effort. Do you carry the canoe yourself when it's your, um, turn on the. • • • • • • • Portage? This year I did, yes. This year I, um, canoe because I had a solo canoe, and I did • • • a solo paddle because I was with two other guys, two new guys, and I couldn't find a four fourth. I • • • • sold. Okay. Call me. What month do you go? • • • Typically, I typically go after Labor Day just because the mosquitoes are down. Okay. And that's a good time to go. And again, if you're going back there at some point and you want a suggested • • • route, I've been through all the entry points in quadico, and I've hit most of the major paths, so I definitely have suggestions or, uh, tell you where it would be fun to go. Okay. Yeah, we'll have to talk. We'll start boring people really fast if we get into a deep dive into this remote Canadian • • • • • wilderness. • • • • • But, yeah, I can't believe that I'm, um, talking to somebody else who's actually been there, because when I bring it up, • • everybody, they have no idea what I'm talking about. Sometimes boundary waters mean something to people. Right. But critico, you fly in on a float plane, they drop you, uh, off, and • • then it's fantastic. I love it. Well, Jack, thank you so much good luck at the critico this year. If you're planning, uh, to go in September again. • • Absolutely. Okay. All • right. And I wish you all the luck in the world with fighting sarcodosis. • • • And thanks, uh, for fighting the good • • fight. Alright. Uh, thanks and I appreciate you let me tell my. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •  

Metabolic Moments - Live better longer
Metabolic Moments: Arrested Actions – Cardiac vs. Pulmonary Arrest

Metabolic Moments - Live better longer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 2:47


Scott is in CPR training and wonders what he's treating. Would you like to learn more too? Listen and learn today!

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast
The Root Cause of Cardiac Arrhythmias is...

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 12:05


Learn more about the root cause of cardiac arrhythmias and the problems with the current solutions for this issue. FREE COURSE ➜ ➜ https://courses.drberg.com/product/how-to-bulletproof-your-immune-system/ FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS Find Your Body Type: https://www.drberg.com/body-type-quiz Talk to a Product Advisor to find the best product for you! Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Dr. Berg's products. Product Advisors are available Monday through Friday 8 am - 6 pm and Saturday 9 am - 5 pm EST. At this time, we no longer offer Keto Consulting and our Product Advisors will only be advising on which product is best for you and advise on how to take them. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/drericberg/

TopMedTalk
Cardiac enhanced recovery - essential update | EBPOM Chicago

TopMedTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 31:12


"How do we share enhanced recovery with the world? There's been a lot of work in this area..." This crucial update covers enhanced recovery in cardiac; all the latest on investigation, implementation science, integration and dissemination. Recorded at the Evidence Based Perioperative Medicine (EBPOM) Chicago Conference. For more information on EBPOM check out www.ebpom.org Presented by Michael C Grant, Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Heal
Save A Life|Tyesha Jones RN

Heal

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 30:56


Heal with Angelica Watters's Podcast with Special Guest Tyesha Jones Episode 7: SAVE A LIFE! I will be speaking with Tyesha Jones about her start in the healthcare field, her healing journey, and her start of her CPR business Gifted Hands Health Solutions and why learning CPR is critical to one's life! Special Guest Information: My name is Tyesha Jones. I am a mother of two boys, a registered nurse, and the owner and founder of Gifted Hands Health Solutions. I've been an RN for almost 10 years now, and have worked in a number of different specialties. I currently work in homecare. Aside from nursing, I began my own business in 2019 teaching CPR and other health training classes. During the pandemic I branched out and also began offering premium high quality medical scrubs. Gifted Hands is my new baby! I get so excited when I'm teaching or get a new order. I now truly feel like I'm walking in my purpose! I created my company to normalize the practice of cpr throughout the community, not only for healthcare professionals like myself, but literally for everyone! CPR is needed during Cardiac arrest emergencies, and is a leading cause of death over cancer and other diseases. I know it is so important to have some sort of knowledge and skill related to it, so I feel it's my duty to spread this Knowledge. I also lost my father to cardiac arrest in 2020 so my passion for teaching this subject has gone a little deeper. It has definitely been tough juggling being a mom, still working as an RN full time, while also running 2 businesses, but I wouldn't have it any other way! I love everything I do, and everything I am. I have a very strong village and support system that has been with me every step of the way and I am forever grateful to them. Website: Ghcpr.org Ghscrubs.com FB: Gifted Hands Health Solutions Gifted Hands Scrubs IG: @giftedhandscpr @gifted_scrubs More info about The Host, Angelica Visit: https://linktr.ee/SupremelyDivine_ Support this podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/heal/id1612311737 YOUTUBE : https://youtube.com/channel/UCGGovfyBC92zSj1GITVnUIg

DKBmed Radio
4/13/2022 - COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters & BA.2

DKBmed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 21:09


Dr. Paul Auwaerter discusses new vaccine boosters, global impact of the pandemic, and the BA.2 Subvariant. Topics: *New boosters in the future? *Challenges of additional boosters *Cardiac concerns with COVID-19 vaccines? *Collateral effects from the pandemic *Latest news on BA.2 Subvariant Post-test for CME/CE credit: https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty/4-13-22-episode/eval Access our resource center, download webinar slides, and claim credit at https://covid19.dkbmed.com/multispecialty Presenting faculty: Paul G. Auwaerter, MD, MBA, FIDSA, Past President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

JACC Podcast
Sex-Specific Considerations in Drug and Device Therapy of Cardiac Arrhythmias: JACC Focus Seminar 6/7

JACC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 11:39


The Internet Book of Critical Care Podcast
IBCC Episode 124- Neuroprognostication After Cardiac Death

The Internet Book of Critical Care Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 53:03


In this beast of a 53 minute podcast, we tackle the approach to prognosticating neurologic function of our patients after cardiac arrest. This is hard! As Dick Cheney taught us, there are lots of known and unknown-unknowns. Read through the chapter, then come listen to all things: nuances around confounders, using structural and functional tests. How imaging can lead us astray. Is there a troponin of the brain? Josh even admits to what he'd take to the proverbial desert island. 

This Week in Virology
TWiV 886: COVID-19 clinical update #109 with Dr. Daniel Griffin

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 39:29


In COVID-19 clinical update #109, Daniel Griffin discusses cardiac complications after infection or vaccination, long COVID in children, fourth vaccine dose in Israel, no need for fourth vaccine does in EU, dexamethasone dosing, immunomodulation therapy, MIS outcomes in children, US long COVID effort launched, and herd immunity. Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Cardiac complications after infection or vaccination (MMWR) Long COVID in children (Future Med) Fourth vaccine dose in Israel (NEJM) No need for fourth vaccine dose (Eur Med Agency) Dexamethasone dosing (Intensive Care Med) Actemra priority review (Roche) Guidelines on anticoagulation therapy (American Soc Hematol) MIS outcomes in children (JAMA) Biden launches long COVID effort (USA Today) Herd immunity and COVID (J Inf Dis) Contribute to ASTMH fundraiser at PWB Dr. Griffin's treatment guide (pdf) Letters read on TWiV 886 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your questions for Dr. Griffin to daniel@microbe.tv

Goldie On Ice Podcast
Episode 62: Comeback, Cardiac Cats Strike Again

Goldie On Ice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 14:54


Host Steve Goldstein discusses the Panthers' incredible multi-goal comebacks in the last week against the Devils and Maple Leafs as the team gears up for the playoffs.

Female Athlete Nutrition
72: An Athlete's Heart 

Female Athlete Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 49:46


In this episode of the Female Athlete Podcast, I speak to sports cardiologist Dr Jonathan Kim. We start off exploring the new field of sports cardiology, and how it's evolved recently with rising awareness of heart conditions in athletes. Exercise results in adaptations to the heart that are normally beneficial, such as lower resting heart rates and increased cardiac muscle strength, otherwise known as “athlete's heart”, however, as Dr Kim explains, some changes in the heart can pose risks and indicate underlying problems. We discuss cardiac fatigue following strenuous events like a marathon, underlying the importance of taking enough rest to fully recover. It's not just older individuals at risk of heart problems, in fact, even the youngest and fittest athletes can be at risk. Dr Kim outlines causes of heart conditions independent of age and fitness related to genetic and inherited pathways: knowing your family history is the best prevention tool. Cardiac issues can also be acquired and athletes aren't immune! While exercise certainly is medicine, it is not a cure-all or vaccine against disease! This episode covers some of the warning signs of cardiac illness, many of which overlap with the symptoms of REDS: exercise intolerance, increased RPE, decreased performance and motivation, and increased fatigue. Chest pain is not always present! Working with a team of professionals -cardiologists, dietitians and psychologists- is important in understanding the cause of symptoms: REDS, a heart condition, and/or something else. Other more specific signs requiring medical attention include unexplained breathlessness, chest tightness when warming up (even if it goes away during exercise), and lightheadedness/ fainting. We touch on returning to exercise post Covid-19 for both asymptomatic and symptomatic cases, and Dr Kim provides reassurance and comfort debunking the extremely conservative advice that was initially circulating. By resting until asymptomatic for 3 days, before gradually progressing training load, the majority of people can return to their usual activity levels in just a few weeks (disclaimer: every case is different of course). Use code RISEUPNUTRITION for 25% off any InsideTracker plan + free results review over phone/ email with a registered dietitian, me! Follow Dr Jonathan Kim on Twitter @jonathankimmd Dr Kim's Official Bio: Dr. Kim is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Chief of Sports Cardiology in the Division of Cardiology and Orthopedics at Emory University and additionally holds an adjunct Professorship in the School of Applied Physiology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his Bachelor of Science at Emory and was a Fulbright Scholar before attending Vanderbilt Medical School. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine/Pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital and cardiology fellowship at Emory (Dr. Kim was chief fellow at Emory 2013-14). In addition to his clinical role, Dr. Kim conducts NIH-funded sports cardiology research at Emory. He is the Team Cardiologist for the Falcons, Braves, Hawks, Dream, Sports Medicine at Emory and Georgia Tech, and is a member of the NBA Cardiac Advisory Committee, NFL Cardiovascular Task Force, and the American College of Cardiology's Sports and Exercise Council. He is also a consultant for Major League Baseball. He is the Co-Medical Director for the AJC Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta, GA. Learn more about Lindsey's Services and the Team at Rise Up Nutrition: www.riseupnutritionrun.com Worried that you have RED-S? Curious to know how we could help or how you can recover fast?! Download the RED-S Recovery Race & see how you place for more support: www.riseupnutritionrun.com/reds

Plant-Strong
Ep. 138: Dr. Heather Shenkman - Treating Cardiac Disease from the Heart

Plant-Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 62:23


Dr. Heather Shenkman has known she wanted to be a doctor since she was a young girl and today, she's one of the top Interventional Cardiologists in the country. You see, while Heather does perform complex angioplasties and other surgeries to open up clogged coronary arteries, she prefers to help her patients reduce their risk of heart disease through not only medication, but also a healthy lifestyle, including a whole-foods, plant-based diet and regular exercise. Heather herself has been plantstrong since 2005 and her book, “The Vegan Heart Doctor's Guide to Reversing Heart Disease, Losing Weight, and Reclaiming Your Life” outlines her simple path to reclaiming and living a full and active lifestyle. Not only do we discuss facts about blood pressure, heart disease, and statins, but we also discuss specific lifestyle changes to help you become PLANTSTRONG with your whole heart. Episode Resources Watch the Episode on YouTube PLANTSTRONG Podcast Episode Page Dr. Heather Shenkman Website Join the Free PLANTSTRONG Community with over 26,000 members PLANTSTRONG Meal Planner - Perhaps our most powerful tool - the PLANTSTRONG Meal Planner is packed with hundreds of our favorite whole foods plant-based recipes and your membership allows you to curate a personal collection of menus so your family favorites are always at your fingertips. The integrated grocery list makes shopping a snap and our meal planning experts are on hand seven days a week to answer questions to chat about food. Save $10 off the annual membership with the code PLANTSTRONG PLANTSTRONG Foods - shop our official plantstrong foods including pizza crusts, granolas, cereals, popcorn, soups, chilis and broths! Visit plantstrong.com for all PLANTSTRONG Resources, including books, recipes, foods and the PLANTSTRONG Coaching Programs

Carnivore Cast
Dr. Philip Ovadia - Heart Surgeon on How to Control Metabolic Health

Carnivore Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 39:30


Dr. Philip Ovadia (@Ovadia_Heart_Health) is a board-certified cardiac surgeon and founder of Ovadia Heart Health. As a heart surgeon who was once morbidly obese himself, Dr. Ovadia has seen firsthand the failures of mainstream diets and medicine. He realized that what helped him lose over 100 pounds—focusing on his metabolic health—was the same solution that could have prevented most of the thousands of open-heart surgeries he has performed. Dr. Philip is the author of the book Stay Off My Operating Table - A Heart Surgeon's Metabolic Health Guide to Lose Weight, Prevent Disease, and Feel Your Best Every Day.   This episode is brought to you by Optimal Carnivore. Do you struggle to eat organ meat? Optimal Carnivore was created by Carnivores for Carnivores. They created a unique organ complex from grass-fed animals in New Zealand. It includes 9 different organs -  Liver, Brain, Heart, Thymus, Kidney, Spleen, Pancreas, Lung etc.  Taking 6 capsules is the same as eating an ounce of raw organ meat from the butcher. Get 10% off your order by going to https://amzn.to/3hSXXtu and using the code: carnivore10 at checkout! (currently only shipping within the US)   This episode is brought to you by Upgraded Formulas. It's incredibly difficult and important to know what mineral and nutrient deficiencies you may have, on any diet and on a carnivore diet as well. Blood tests are an incomplete picture and we know that there are problems with applying recommended daily allowances to our diet and lifestyle. Upgraded Formulas offers an Upgraded Hair Test kit and consultation, as well as minerals that absorb really well so that you can vanquish any of those hidden deficiencies that are affecting the thyroid, adrenal, or much more.   Go to UpgradedFormulas.com and use code "CARNIVORE15" to save!   What questions would you like answered or who would you like to hear from in the carnivore or research community?   Let me know on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.  

MyHeart.net
Late Cardiac Effects After Stem Cell Transplant with Drs. Wendy Bottinor & Carrie Lenneman

MyHeart.net

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 13:04


Dr. Alain Bouchard continues his discussion of the cardiac effects of cancer treatment with Drs. Wendy Bottinor, VCU Health, Richmond, Virginia and Carrie Lenneman, UAB Medicine, this time focusing on stem cell transplant patients.About the HostDr. Alain Bouchard is a clinical cardiologist at Cardiology Specialists of Birmingham, AL. He is a native of Quebec, Canada and trained in Internal Medicine at McGill University in Montreal. He continued as a Research Fellow at the Montreal Heart Institute. He did a clinical cardiology fellowship at the University of California in San Francisco. He joined the faculty at the University of Alabama Birmingham from 1986 to 1990. He worked at CardiologyPC and Baptist Medical Center at Princeton from 1990-2019. He is now part of the Cardiology Specialists of Birmingham at St. Vincent's Health System, Ascension.Medical DisclaimerThe contents of the MyHeart.net podcast, including as textual content, graphical content, images, and any other content contained in the Podcast (“Content”) are purely for informational purposes. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or heard on the Podcast!If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. MyHeart.net does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Podcast. Reliance on any information provided by MyHeart.net, MyHeart.net employees, others appearing on the Podcast at the invitation of MyHeart.net, or other visitors to the Podcast is solely at your own risk.The Podcast and the Content are provided on an “as is” basis.

AJR Podcast Series
Detecting Pulmonary Hypertension with CT Pulmonary Angiography and Automated Cardiac Chamber Volumetry.

AJR Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 10:44


Full article: https://www.ajronline.org/doi/abs/10.2214/AJR.21.27147  Early diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension are crucial to prevent chronic progression and a poor prognosis. The nonspecific presenting symptoms and need for right heart catheterization may contribute to a delay in diagnosis. In this episode, Sara Tedla MD, discusses a recently published study in AJR, which evaluates the utility of cardiac chamber volumetric measurements based on non-gated CT pulmonary angiography and the updated 2018 pulmonary hypertension criteria.

VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts
Cardiac Nutrition for Patients with Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease (MMVD) | VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

VETgirl Veterinary Continuing Education Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 21:36


In today's VETgirl podcast, we interview Dr. Callie Harris on the use of nutrition and how it relates to cardiac health! We've all seen this patient - an older small-breed dog who comes to your veterinary clinic for an annual wellness visit. You do your routine exam, including auscultation, and you hear a heart murmur. The dog appears healthy, but you know that his age and breed put him at risk for mitral valve disease. How would you handle the conversation with the client at this point? Can we implement a multi-modal approach including nutrition into our management of chronic valvular heart disease (AKA myxomatous mitral valve disease) in dogs? Learn it in this VETgirl podcast!

Healing Hearts: Empowering Pediatric Critical Care Providers
Cardiac Lesion Series: Truncus Arteriosus

Healing Hearts: Empowering Pediatric Critical Care Providers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 10:09


In the cardiac lesion series, pediatric Intensivist, Dr. Laura Ortmann, describes the background of the cardiac lesion, what it looks like clinically, the most common complications post-operatively, and how the lesion is managed. In this episode, she will discuss the Cardiac Lesion Truncus Arteriosus. There are four different types of Truncus Arteriosus and each type depends on how the pulmonary arteries come off the truncus. If you want to listen in order of the series, this episode follows ALCAPA. Listen in to learn more!

Oxygenaddict Triathlon Podcast, with Coach Rob Wilby and Helen Murray - Triathlon coaching by oxygenaddict.com

Richard Murray has had one of the most decorated triathlon careers - double World Junior duathlon champion, double African Triathlon champion, multiple ITU World Series event winner, Commonwealth Games Bronze medalist, and 4th place at the Olympic games in 2016. However, 8 weeks before the 2020 Olympics (in summer 2021), things changed in an instant for Richard during a swim session where he could feel things were not right, with his heart racing and beating erratically during his warm up. He was taken immediately to hospital and subsequently diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, a condition where the heart loses it's ability to regulate how fast it beats. He underwent heart surgery in an attempt to cure the condition and be ready in time for the Olympics. This is Richard's story, in his own words for the first time, of recovering from cardiac care and his return to health and racing.Sponsorsprecisionfuelandhydration.comThis show is brought to you by Precision Fuel & Hydration, who have a range of tools and products to help you personalise your fuelling and hydration strategy so that you can perform at your best. Long time listeners of the show will know them as “Precision Hydration”, but they've changed their name to reflect the fact that they've been helping athletes nail both aspects of their performance for a long time now.Everyone sweats differently and the amount of fuel we require varies depending on factors like the duration and intensity of our activity, so a one-size-fits-all approach to fuelling and hydration just doesn't cut it. Head to precisionfuelandhydration.com and use their free online Sweat Test and Quick Carb Calculator to understand your fluid, electrolyte and carbohydrate needs during training and racing. Then book a free one-to-one video consultation with the team to refine your hydration and fuelling strategy for your next race.As a listener of the show you can get 15% off your first order of fuelling and hydration products - listen to the show for the discount code! Quick Carb CalculatorFree online Sweat TestBook a free 20-minute hydration and fueling strategy video consultationDidn't catch the discount code to get 15% off your first order of fueling and hydration products, drop Andy and the team an email at hello@precisionhydration.com and they'll be happy to help youLike what you heard in this interview? Join hundreds of other age group triathletes making the most of their limited training time, training with Team OxygenAddict! http://team.oxygenaddict.com - The most comprehensive triathlon coaching program for busy age groupers. To find out more, You can book a zoom, phone or skype call with Rob or the Team here Join the Oxygenaddict Triathlon Community page on facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/666558563716897/Listen on Spotify: http://bit.ly/OATriPodSpotifyListen on iTunes: http://bit.ly/OATriPodiTunes

Cardionerds
186. Case Report: Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: An Iatrogenic Left to Right Cardiac Shunt – SUNY Downstate

Cardionerds

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 47:27


CardioNerds (Amit Goyal and Daniel Ambinder) and guest host, Dr. Priya Kothapalli (UT Austin fellow and CardioNerds Ambassador), join SUNY Downstate cardiology fellows, Dr. Eric Kupferstein and Dr. Gautham Upadhya to discuss a case about a patient who had coronary artery bypass grafting that was complicated by a LIMA grafted to the great cardiac vein. Dr. Alan Feit (Professor of Medicine, SUNY Downstate) provides the E-CPR for this episode. Dr. Moritz Wyler von Ballmoos (Director, robotic cardiac and vascular surgery for Houston Methodist Cardiovascular Surgery Associates) provides a special perspective regarding coronary artery bypass grafting as it relates to this case. Episode introduction with CardioNerds Clinical Trialist Dr. Jana Lovell (Johns Hopkins). Left Internal Mammary Artery (LIMA) to Left Anterior Descending (LAD) artery anastomosis is the cornerstone of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery. Anastomosis of the LIMA to the Great Cardiac Vein (GCV) is a known but rare complication of the surgery. Currently there are no clear guidelines in regard to further management. We report a case of a LIMA to GCV anastomosis managed with a drug eluting stent (DES) to the mid LAD after ruling out a significant left to right heart shunt. Jump to: Case media - Case teaching - References CardioNerds Case Reports PageCardioNerds Episode PageCardioNerds AcademyCardionerds Healy Honor Roll CardioNerds Journal ClubSubscribe to The Heartbeat Newsletter!Check out CardioNerds SWAG!Become a CardioNerds Patron! Case Media - Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: An Iatrogenic Left to Right Cardiac Shunt Angiography Episode Schematics & Teaching - Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: An Iatrogenic Left to Right Cardiac Shunt Pearls - Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: An Iatrogenic Left to Right Cardiac Shunt Listen to the patient's story. The patient determines when the angina is no longer stable angina.The placebo effect of our interventions should not be discounted.LIMA to GCV anastomosis creates a left to right cardiac shunt. A Qp:Qs greater than 1.5 signifies a significant shunt.Increasing the pressure in the coronary sinus may actually be beneficial to the patient.LIMA-LAD is remains the most efficacious and long lasting graft but why not other arterial grafts? Notes - Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: An Iatrogenic Left to Right Cardiac Shunt Iatrogenic anastomosis of the LIMA to the GCV is a rare but noted complication of CABG surgery. Review of the literature has reported under 40 such cases of arteriovenous fistula formation in the coronary system. Detection of the anastomosis generally stems from recurrent angina which can be attributed to unresolved ischemia or coronary steal syndrome but also can be detected with new heart failure (namely right sided heart failure due to left to right shunting). Diagnosis is usually made with coronary angiography, but CT coronary angiography has also been reported. Due to the rarity of this complication, no clear guidelines are in place directing the management leaving it to the discretion of the various Heart Teams. Evaluating for signs of heart failure and/or ischemia, and measuring the Qp:Qs have been the most common signs directing management. Various options are available for closing the fistula and include coil or balloon embolization, vascular plugs, venous ligation or a covered stent. Redoing the surgery is also an option. Spontaneous closure of the fistula has also been reported. Lastly, if redo surgery is not performed then regardless of fistula closure, coronary intervention for the native diseased artery may be pursued to relieve symptoms. References Boden et al; COURAGE Trial Research Group. Optimal medical therapy with or without PCI for stable coronary disease. N Engl J Med. 2007 Apr 12;356(15):1503-16. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa070829. Epub 2007 Mar 26. PMID: 17387127.