Podcasts about big hat

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Best podcasts about big hat

Latest podcast episodes about big hat

BMitch & Finlay
Blame Pie Calls, World Cup Review, Big Hats, & Big Bets

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 37:01


Hour 4 - 00:00 - Blame Pie Calls, Make Sure To Park Legally Before Calling. 19:10 - Landphill's Big Hat and World Cup Review 29:52 - Heard It Here First & Ovi Bet

The Colin McEnroe Show
Long live the movie musical

The Colin McEnroe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 50:00


The Nose is off this week. In its place: The movie musical died a long, slow death a long time ago. Right? Well, except that there's Spielberg's West Side Story. And Hamilton and In the Heights and Tick, Tick… Boom! And A Star Is Born and The Greatest Showman. And Annette and Cyrano. Oh, and Bohemian Rhapsody and Rocketman and Elvis. And Encanto. And those are just from the last five years. And I could keep going. This hour, a long look at the long-dead movie musical. Long live the movie musical. Some stuff that happened this week, give or take: Irene Cara, ‘Fame' and ‘Flashdance' Singer, Dies at 63 Ms. Cara was a child star from the Bronx who gained fame in the 1980s as a singer of pop anthems and as the star of the movie “Fame.” Christine McVie, Fleetwood Mac Singer-Songwriter, Dies at 79 The greatest film of all time: Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles For the first time in 70 years the Sight and Sound poll has been topped by a film directed by a woman — and one that takes a consciously, radically feminist approach to cinema. Things will never be the same. Glass Onion Is Expected To Gross $15 Million In Its One-Week Theatrical Preview This Was the Worst Thanksgiving Weekend in Box-Office History. Yes, Disney's animated “Strange World” is a bomb — but without Netflix's “Glass Onion,” the weekend would have been even worse. Was ‘Glass Onion' a Success? Peeling Back the Layers on Netflix's Box Office Gambit Top Gun: Maverick Is Being Re-Released In Theaters Before Avatar Comes For The Box Office Crown Indiana Jones And The Dial Of Destiny Trailer Breakdown: Where There's A Whip, There's A Way ‘Nasty, vile, want to unsee': Mum sparks debate over multi-use of ‘family sick bowl' Social media is split Brian Robinson's BIG HAT deserves all caps because it's a BIG HAT It's BIG HAT world, and we're living in it. Cocaine Bear: the trailer for 2023's wildest film is everything and more The Elizabeth Banks-directed caper, based on a true story, looks to be exactly what the internet wants it to be The 2023 Oscars Will Televise The Presentation Of All 23 Awards Categories A teary Will Smith opens up to Trevor Noah about the ‘rage' behind his Oscar slap Nicole Kidman Receives Standing Ovation at Broadway's ‘The Music Man' After Bidding $100,000 for Hugh Jackman's Signed Hat Why has the internet invented a fake Martin Scorsese film? Thousands of Tumblr users have been making posters, soundtracks, drawings and fan fiction for a 1973 Scorsese film starring Robert De Niro — but it never existed A man won the legal right to not be ‘fun' at work after refusing to embrace ‘excessive alcoholism' and ‘promiscuity' Video games for dogs aim to help aging canine brains Aubrey Plaza Is Leveling Up—and Still Pranking Her Costars The famously deadpan Aubrey Plaza is reaching new heights with a star turn in the new season of The White Lotus and a mega Francis Ford Coppola project on the horizon. Helena Bonham Carter: Good on young men for finding middle-aged beauty sexy The London Library's first female president on why she thinks Johnny Depp has been ‘vindicated' and the ‘horrendous' treatment of JK Rowling ‘Avatar' and the Mystery of the Vanishing Blockbuster It was the highest-grossing film in history, but for years it was remembered mainly for having been forgotten. Why? Rolling Stone: The 100 Greatest TV Theme Songs of All Time From Seventies sitcoms with expository jams to modern prestige classics with experimental scores, from ‘Sanford and Son' to ‘Succession,' from ‘Match Game' to ‘Game of Thrones' Poynter: We asked, you answered: Here are your favorite journalism movies We've published our own list before, but we wanted to hear from you. Legendary Entertainment Formalizes Sony Deal After Cutting Ties With Warner Bros. Adults Are Spending Big on Toys and Stuffed Animals—for Themselves The Last Real American Dictionary Scrabble's new edition is full of delightful new words. But are there enough of them? Kylie Jenner's Humongous Christmas Tree Has Pissed Off A Lot Of People, But I'm Just Trying To Figure Out What That Potato Sack Thing Is Another day, another drama. This time about a Christmas tree. Planes, Trains and Automobiles at 35: An Oral History of One of the Most Beloved Road Movies Ever Made Starring Steve Martin and John Candy, the John Hughes road trip comedy had a nearly four-hour runtime at one point. Hear from cast, crew, and Hughes' family about the classic. ‘Wednesday' Summons Record-Breaking Debut Week On Netflix With 341.23M Hours Viewed NYC is hiring a rat czar. ‘General aura of badassery' required. GUESTS: Jeanine Basinger: Founder of the Department of Film Studies at Wesleyan University and the author of many books on film; her latest is Hollywood: The Oral History Steve Metcalf: Director of the University of Hartford's Presidents' College The Colin McEnroe Show is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode! Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Colin McEnroe and Cat Pastor contributed to this show, which originally aired March 5, 2020.Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donateSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pick Six NFL Podcast
Week 13 TNF Recap: Bills Found Their Run Game, Patriots Offense Struggles, Josh Allen Wears a Big Hat (Football 12/2)

Pick Six NFL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 49:46


Will Brinson, Ryan Wilson, and John Breech recap TNF matchup between the Bills-Patriots.  Join the Pick Six Pro Football Pick'Em Contest: https://picksixpod.football.cbssports.com/opm Get 20% off Pick Six merch using code PICKSIX20: https://store.cbssports.com/collections/pick-six?utm_source=podcast-apple-com&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=buy-our-merch&utm_content=pick-six-collection Visit the Pick Six YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/picksix 'Pick Six' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts. You can listen to Pick Six on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Pick Six NFL podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Pick Six NFL podcast." Follow the Pick Six team on Twitter: @picksixpod, @willbrinson, @ryanwilsonCBS, @johnbreech, @billtrice31 Check out the Pick Six Instagram page https://www.instagram.com/picksixpod/?hl=en Read the Pick Six newsletter here: https://www.cbssports.com/newsletters/picksix/ Join our Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/758548147935545/ For more NFL coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Joe Giglio Show
Jack Fritz and a Big Hat Bet

Joe Giglio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 49:12


Jack Fritz joins the show to discuss Trea turner rumors and give his ideas for the Phillies offseason. Later, Joe and Tucker decide on a bet in which the loser must don a big hat. 

Scalzo & Brust
4PM: Benny Big Hat

Scalzo & Brust

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 52:19


Benny is wearing a hat that's too big for his head. Do you want your friends to tell when something looks bad on you? Tausch joins the show to talk Ben's hat, The Packers, Matt LaFleur and Aaron Rodgers. Do the Packers have a talented roster? Is Matt LaFleur in over his head?

Rumble in the Morning
Sports with Rod 11-30-2022 …The Hottest World Cup Fan …. It's funny, it's a big hat

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 8:57


Sports with Rod 11-30-2022 …A guy named Christian sent the Iranian Soccer Team Home …The Hottest World Cup Fan …. It's funny, it's a big hat …Norfolk State took on the number one ranked basketball team in the land

Sorry We Love Football
Big Hat Energy w/Courtney Maginnis

Sorry We Love Football

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 77:13


Comedian and Commanders fan Courtney Maginnis joins to hate on yet another botched Sean Taylor tribute in DC, announcer small talk, Deshaun Watson's return and more! Next up in honor of the World Cup we're going to Futbol our Football aka bring one thing over from soccer that you'd like to see applied to the NFL! Then it's on to Week 13 previews and predictions followed by, as always, YOUR listener mail!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Straight Outta Vegas with RJ Bell
Hour 1 - Really Big Hat

Straight Outta Vegas with RJ Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:17


Covino and Rich debate if a wild fashion statement from the NFL will turn into a real fashion trend among fans. The guys examine if Aaron Rodgers is being selfish by saying he will be playing this Sunday against the Bears. Plus, Rich has identified the most overused take in the NFL.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sporticast
Fox Posts Big Thanksgiving Ratings / NFL Player Wears Big Hat

Sporticast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 27:17


Scott and Eben discuss a big weekend for Fox Sports, with large viewership across NFL, NCAA and World Cup games. They also talk about the U.S. team in Qatar, and an NFL player's big hat. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Connor Happer Show
November 29 – Segment 3 – Allan Bell - Sportsline

The Connor Happer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 17:03


AB gives us his NFL thoughts. The Big Hat, Aaron Rodgers, the Bills. And how he feels about Matt Rhule and the World Cup

Mason & Ireland
HR 2: Cancel Culture

Mason & Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 53:29


The guys talk about a clip from Lamar Odom where he points out, why the Phoenix Suns have a gorilla as a mascot? Have you ever thought about it? We have the clip from Lamar. What do you think? Should the Gorilla get canceled! Also, If you got a million dollars to spend it on ONE Team, who would you spend it on? There is a guy who is spending a $900,000 on USC to beat Utah in Las Vegas this upcoming Saturday! Ticketmaster is under investigation for her botch on the Taylor Swift tickets and Brian Robinson from the Washington Commanders wore a BIG HAT! have you seen it. Corporate Greg has his topics ready for BOBCAT! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bet Sweats
Week #12 NFL Takeaways (11/28)

Bet Sweats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 17:02


Joe. O and Erin give their biggest takeaways from Week #12 of the NFL Season including Brian Robinson Jr.'s Big Hat and Trevor Lawrence's great performance to lead the Jaguars over the Ravens. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Emily's Down In Denton Christmas

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 78:12


We discuss Nick's Thanksgiving in Granger, Texas, how he thinks he already won Christmas, and Emily needing a place to crash in Denton before her friends wedding.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BMitch & Finlay
Commanders Win Again - 6-1 in Last 7 Games & Brian Robinson's Big Day and Big Hat

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 36:40


Hour 1 - 00:00 - Commanders Win Again - 6-1 in Last 7 Games 20:40 - Brian Robinson's Big Day and Big Hat 30:45 - How To Buy a Big Hat

BMitch & Finlay
Brian Robinson's Big Day and Big Hat

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 10:07


Brian Robinson had his 1st career 100 yard game and he had a big hat

Wetootwaag's Podcast of Bagpipe Power
S6 Barry Shears' new Book, Donald MacDonald's old Book and John Walsh Shuttle pipes

Wetootwaag's Podcast of Bagpipe Power

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 68:46


S6: Barry Shears' new Book, Donald MacDonald's old Book and John Walsh Shuttle pipes Tunes: Barry Shears: The Royston Session, Dave MacIsaac's Pipe Jig, Chateau Barra Glen, Jerry Holland's Pipe Jig, Mary Jane Kelly, Aunt Mae's Reel, Captain Angus MacDonald (Lament For A Friend), John Mc Eachen's Reel, Hug air a bhonaid mhoir (Celebrate the Big Hat), Walter Beaton's Reel, Snuffing the Candle Donald MacDonald: A Highland Reel, Sweet Molly, Sleepy Maggie, Lady Seaforth (reel), Lady Mary Mackay (reel), Brogues an' Brochan an'a', Roy's Wife, Cameronian Rant, Jenny Dang the Weaver, Tail Toddle, Old Rusty Gun, The Piper's Maggot, Mary Gray, Keep the Country Bonny Lassie, Earl Marischal (A reel). David Young: Jolly Robin +X+X+X+X+ Barry Shears 2022: Legacy: A Collection of Photographs and Music by Barry Shears is the source for the following tunes: The Royston Session, Dave MacIsaac's Pipe Jig, Chateau Barra Glen, Jerry Holland's Pipe Jig, Mary Jane Kelly, Aunt Mae's Reel, Captain Angus MacDonald (Lament For A Friend), John Mc Eachen's Reel, Hug air a bhonaid mhoir (Celebrate the Big Hat), Walter Beaton's Reel, Snuffing the Candle. You can buy Legacy here: https://capebretonpiper.com/ Donald MacDonald 1828: Donald MacDonald's Collection of Dance music is the source for the following tunes: A Highland Reel, Sweet Molly, Sleepy Maggie, Lady Seaforth (reel), Lady Mary Mackay (reel), Brogues an' Brochan an'a', Roy's Wife, Cameronian Rant, Jenny Dang the Weaver, Tail Toddle, Old Rusty Gun, The Piper's Maggot, Mary Gray, Keep the Country Bonny Lassie, Earl Marischal (A reel). Available here: https://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/archive/105682473 (Except for Sleepy Maggie and Sweet Molly which was not printed in the edition at NLS, you can see it at Ceol Sean: https://ceolsean.net/content/McDlight/Book01/Book01%202.pdf +X+X+ David Young 1730s: Jolly Robin by David Young, Drummond Castle Manuscript: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/musicfiles/manuscripts/drummond1.pdf +X+X+X+X+ Fin Here are some ways you can support the show: You can support the Podcast by joining the Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/wetootwaag You can also take a minute to leave a review of the podcast if you listen on Itunes! Tell your piping and history friends about the podcast! Checkout my Merch Store on Bagpipeswag: https://www.bagpipeswag.com/wetootwaag You can also support me by Buying my First Album on Bandcamp: https://jeremykingsbury.bandcamp.com/album/oyster-wives-rant-a-year-of-historic-tunes or my second album on Bandcamp! https://jeremykingsbury.bandcamp.com/album/pay-the-pipemaker or my third album on Bandcamp! https://jeremykingsbury.bandcamp.com/album/bannocks-of-barley-meal You can now buy physical CDs of my albums using this Kunaki link: https://kunaki.com/msales.asp?PublisherId=166528&pp=1 You can just send me an email at wetootwaag@gmail.com letting me know what you thought of the episode! Listener mail keeps me going! Finally I have some other support options here: https://www.wetootwaag.com/support Thanks! Listen on Itunes/Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/wetootwaags-bagpipe-and-history-podcast/id129776677 Listen on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5QxzqrSm0pu6v8y8pLsv5j?si=QLiG0L1pT1eu7B5_FDmgGA

Dragnet
The Big Hat

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 25:07


The Hobbled Goblin Podcast
Episode 105 - Big Hat Bite!

The Hobbled Goblin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 68:02


Thanks for listening! You can find us at various places.Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thehobbledgoblinWebsite: https://thehobbledgoblin.com/thg-podcastFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/thehobbledgoblinInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hobbled_goblin/?hl=enTwitter: https://twitter.com/Hobbled_GoblinTwitch: https://www.twitch.tv/thehobbledgoblinBecome a member of the Goblin Horde on Discord: https://discord.gg/SrYudSFOur logo was created by the talented Tassiji Stamp: https://tassji_s.artstation.com/?fbclid=IwAR05hAwWjkzRyXwA6pvyshksystohtOhw0jt5dZ6ln5KTGc5y-F7nvpwRJUMusic has been used with permission by Adrian von Ziegler: https://www.youtube.com/user/AdrianvonZiegler?app=desktop

We Are! (Watching One Piece)
Episode 88: BIG HAT w/ Paramecia Fancast

We Are! (Watching One Piece)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 163:50


THE BIG HAT! THE BIG HAT IS REAL! This week we're joined by Paramecia Fancast's hosts to discuss the Reverie, why the Queen didn't make it, who is the Onceler of One Piece, cover story context for Lulucia, the moon, anime soda, and a whole lot more!  Join our Discord: http://discord.gg/WSv2KW34rk This episode came out early for our Patrons! Thank you for supporting on Patreon! We Are! On Twitter: @wearewatchingOP @noimjory @ghostofjo

Scott and Sadie's 20 Minute Morning Show
Everyone follows the guy in the big hat...

Scott and Sadie's 20 Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 20:26


Catholics have a lock on parades. Happy Monday!

Inventors Helping Inventors
#213 - Big Hat, No Cattle - Alan Beckley

Inventors Helping Inventors

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 5:19


Alan provides a new Thursday Thought episode. In today's episode, Alan shares what "Big Hat, No Cattle" - means for inventors - also why you must avoid this. Pursuing "grand vision" inventions is often a boondoggle. Focus on solving small, annoying problems that millions of people have. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts, so you won't miss a single episode. Website: www.alanbeckley.com Membership: www.alanbeckley.com/IHI35  

Macabre Masters
Big Hat, No Cattle: An Analysis of Urban Legends

Macabre Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 61:37


In a more chill episode, the crew discusses urban legends that scare them. Macabre Masters: www.macabremasters.com Email: macabremasters@gmail.com Anchor.fm: Macabre Masters • A podcast on Anchor' Leave us a message about something spooky - (423) 436-1958 Pope: Website: www.beetlemilk.com Instagram: @pope_af BeetleCast: Anchor.fm/BeetleMilk Favorite Twitch Streamer: twitch.tv/Ghostbody Favorite Onlyfans: @OperationGhostbooty OriginalNick: Lore-Cast: https://anchor.fm/lore-cast Instagram: @theoriginalnickshow_official Beth: Beth wants every woman in the US to know she's got your back.

Tower Power Hour
Ep 68 - Big Hat Energy w/ Jacob Daniel

Tower Power Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 105:48


Check out Jacob at Biblical Anarchy! - https://www.youtube.com/c/Daniel3BiblicalAnarchy - https://linktr.ee/BiblicalAnarchy Check out Top Lobsta's shit! - www.toplobsta.com Listen to Jose's Podcast, No Way Jose! - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/no-way-jose/id1546040443 - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzyrpy3eo37eiRTq0cXff0g Listen to Cole's Podcast, Two and a Half Takes, on the TPH Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Jacob - @BiblicalAnarchy Top - @Toplobsta_ Jose - @2020NoWayJose Toad - @Anarcho_Toad Cole - @TowerKingCole Intro by Dickie Walnuts! Twitter - @pine__barrens Thumbnail art made by Top Lobsta! Twitter - @Toplobsta_

MaddzTaddz: Beyond The Bike
Episode 115: Big Hat Energy

MaddzTaddz: Beyond The Bike

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 16:25


Feel like you're in a FUNK? Some quick hit tips & tricks to get you back to feeling footloose and fancy free FAST!

Soul of a Leader
Big Hat No Cattle

Soul of a Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 45:34


Bruce grew up in North Dakota and over the last 30 years has been a clinician, researcher, and teacher. Dr. Perry is the Principal of the Neurosequential Network and also a bestselling author. He most recently published a book with Oprah Winfrey titled What Happened to You: Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing which is now a #1 New York Times Bestseller! Dr. Bruce Perry believes that everybody has a story. “You just need to slow down and take the time to get to know someone. It's always worth it”

Soul of a Leader
SOAL 71: Big Hat No Cattle

Soul of a Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022


Bruce Perry grew up in North Dakota and over the last 30 years has been a clinician, researcher, and teacher. Dr. Perry is the Principal of the Neurosequential Network and also a bestselling author. He most recently published a book with Oprah Winfrey titled What Happened to You: Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing which is now a #1 New York Times Bestseller! Dr. Bruce Perry believes that everybody has a story. “You just need to slow down and take the time to get to know someone. It's always worth it”

So Bad It's Good with Ryan Bailey
SUPER SIZED SOLO RECAP OF SUMMER HOUSE!!! KYLE'S STYE GETS BIGGER, CARL IS DATING SOBER, LUKE WEARS A BIG HAT, WHERE HAVE I BEEN AND SO MUCH MORE

So Bad It's Good with Ryan Bailey

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 113:57


Thanks for your patience this week, guys! Will be releasing a couple solo recaps the next couple of days for you to enjoy. Hope everyone has a great weekend! Start it of with a full recap of this weeks Summer House. Kyle and amanda hate each other! Also, So Bad It's Good has merch now! Go to www.sobaditsgoodmerch.com to order yours TODAY! -Start a new healthy habit today. Visit seed.com/SOBAD and use code SOBAD to redeem 20% off your first month of Seed's Daily Synbiotic. That's seed.com/SOBAD and use code SOBAD - I found my next TV obsession on Sundance Now and you will too! Try Sundance Now free for 30 days by going to SundanceNow.com and use promo code SOBAD. That's SundanceNow.com, code SOBAD for 30 days of free streaming! SundanceNow.com, code SOBAD. Also, So Bad It's Good has a voicemail now! 323-425-9542. Pleas feel free to call with your thoughts! If you do you are giving me full permission to use on the show! Also, I'm on CAMEO. I'll be filming in Dorit's Room so sign up today at cameo.com and search Ryan Bailey! Have a great week guys! Remember to subscribe and join me Monday thru Thursday for interviews with podcasters and reality stars, show recaps, Garth and Justin, Bill and Becky Bailey and so much more!! Plus, tell your friends. I, honestly, think there is something for everyone in these pods. The more the merrier!  ALSO GO CHECK OUT THE PATREON patreon.com/sobaditsgood. Support what we are doing here. THANK YOUUUUUUU!!!!! If you're enjoying the insane amount of blood, sweat and literal tears of this pod consider telling a friend or rating us 5 stars on iTunes! Special shoutout to Maritza Lopez (Insta: @maritza.gif) for all of her insanely hard work creating these beautiful pieces of art on my instagram and patreon page!!  Time Stamps are below. Use them. They are your friend. This pod isn't meant to be digested all at once! Contact me on Insta if you need me to send them to you if you can't find them! 5:52-Show Notes/summer House Instagram: @sobaditsgoodwithryanbailey, @ryanbailey25 Twitter:@ryanabailey25 TIKTOK @sobaditsgoodwithryanb Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

LSI Behind the Win
All About BRAC

LSI Behind the Win

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 63:25


In this episode: Steve's experience working for Congress and the valuable lessons he's had during his career, the '93 BRAC, reorganization of the Department of Defense, and LSI's pre- and post-BRAC work. Then, the 2005 BRAC and the community strategies surrounding it, identifying community funding, and Steve's Big Hat award.  If your team needs assistance developing community strategies or funding, or wants to get inside of military or DOD installations, please reach out to our team at social@lsiwins.com. Follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!

JoyPad Podcast
Mr. Big Hat Returns, OR, The Hunt for Sponsors, OR, Jared Leto's Cult, OR, Twitch is Weird

JoyPad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 56:58


This week, 3 of our 4 members just talk about... uhm, whatever. It goes places. Topics of discussion include: Twitch Streaming, Supermassive Games' "House of Ashes," and Jared Leto?

Tier Three Podcast - A Blood Bowl Podcast
Chaos Dwarves & Greebo - The Big Hat party

Tier Three Podcast - A Blood Bowl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 73:13


Hey There, This episode the boys delve back into Kickstarter Korner and talk about the current Greebo Games Kickstarter project. Also the Blundering Brotherhood give of they're opinions on how to build a Chaos Dwarf team. We also have a affiliate link with Firestorm Games. Check it out and help the channel : http://www.firestormgames.co.uk/?aff=5efcb13a26174 If you wish to send your questions to Jay & Boy Blunder email : tierthreepodcast@outlook.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TierThreePodcast/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/tier_three_podcast?igshid=1dtw7wowlvhyl Twitter: https://twitter.com/podcast_tier?s=21 "March of the Spoons" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ New logo design by Jackos Designz fine him on Instagram: https://instagram.com/jackos_designz?igshid=15j1r80l739o7 Enjoy and subscribe!!

Northern Entertainment Sound Transmission
Season 2 Transmission 1 - Celebrity Deathmatch: Big Hat Logan vs Robert Carlisle

Northern Entertainment Sound Transmission

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 150:37


It's the grand return! We took a minute so you didn't have to hear our static mics and iPhone recorders, and we're back in the stu to bring you the latest. Prepare for Robert Carlisle ad libs and the signature Monster crack.

Finding the Funny
9: Big Hat, No Cattle

Finding the Funny

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 45:03


Ruth brings an "Urban Dictionoir" segment this week and Ange tells us all exactly how she feels about brunch, yes brunch, she really has strong opinions on it!  Plus Ruth Jones (all round comedy legend and one of Finding The Funny's fave ever guests) gets back in touch to tell us an embarrassing boozey story. And finally the girls reflect on how difficult this time of year can feel, as party season begins and we're all under increasing pressure to "show up".  We love hearing from you! You can find the show on Instagram, just search "finding the funny". We also have a Facebook page, search for "finding the funny podcast", or you can send us an email hello@ruthcorden.com  

SuperMegaCast
EP 269 - The Big Hat (ft. NothinButLag)

SuperMegaCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 56:42


Our good ol' boy NothinButJustin is back in town! Listen as we hoot AND holler! Get 35% OFF your first month of Dream, PLUS get a free mug and frother. Head to BeanOrganics.com/SUPER Get Honey for FREE at JoinHoney.com/MEGACAST. Visit ExpressVPN.com/supermega to get three extra months free.  Cut your wireless bill to 15 bucks a month at MintMobile.com/SUPERMEGA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Neurons to Nirvana
Stories from the Stage with Joey Sommerville and Peter Stroud

Neurons to Nirvana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 77:52


Kindred spirits and newly found friends, Joey Sommerville (also known as Papa J, trumpeter extraordinaire) and Peter Stroud (legendary guitarist) sit down with Tom. Each artist offers their perspective on creativity, mortality, and friendship —all the while celebrating the power of music to heal and augment the human experience. Hear Peter's uncanny connections to getting the gigs with Pete Droge, Sheryl Crow, and Don Henley and listen to the lyrics inspired by a parting friend, Ike Stubblefield, in Joey's developing new single, See You on the Other Side. Peter Stroud is Sheryl Crow's guitarist of 22 years and serves as her Music Director. He has also toured or recorded with Don Henley, Sarah McLachlan, Stevie Nicks, Shawn Mullins, Pete Droge, and founded his own band, Big Hat. Outside of performance, Peter is a co-founding partner with Artistory, a company offering deep-dive metrics data for the music industry and fan engagement through social media. He formerly co-founded 65amps, a manufacturer of high-end “boutique” guitar amplifiers. Papa J has solidified his place in music history, transforming his sound and genre over the years. An iconic contemporary jazz trumpet player, Joey was hearing another kind of music in his head, a “New Sound” informed by years of performing with blues legends and jam band superstars, including BB King protégé Big Joe Burrell and mega band Phish. Papa J has collaborated with celebrated artists, including Earl Klugh, Marion Meadows, Jeff Bradshaw, Bob Baldwin and he has four solo albums. Joey is an active community servant, including serving on the Board of Directors of the How Big is Your Dream Foundation, an Atlanta based charity that provides music education programs to students in underserved communities. Song Credits: Might As Well Be You, 2019, Written and Performed by Joey Sommerville, Produced by Joey Sommerville and Martin Guigui Airplane Mode, 2021, Written by John Stamp, Performed by John Stamp featuring Peter Stroud A Feather in the Breeze, 2012, Performed by Big Hat A Prayer for Peace, 2002, Performed by Joey Sommerville, Produced by Sojo Music Inc. Covered by an Underground Umbrella, 2021, Written by Kevin Kinney, Performed by Peter Stroud (Guitar), Ike Stubblefield (Hammond B-3), Robert Kearns (Bass) and Fred Eltringham (Drums), Mixed by Nick Didia

The Collapsing Game Shelf Podcast
Splendor - Mr. Fluffy Shirt Big Hat

The Collapsing Game Shelf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 39:07


Join us this week as we discuss Splendor, a game where the players take the role of gem merchants vying to become the most prestigious merchant in the land. Space Cowboys https://www.spacecowboys.fr/splendor-english Board Game Geek https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/148228/splendor Contact Us! collapsinggameshelf@gmail.com

MoneyBall Medicine
The Legacy of Stanford's Biomedical Informatics Program

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 50:16


Harry traveled to the San Francisco Bay Area this summer, and while there he interviewed the co-founders of three local data-driven diagnostics and drug discovery startups, all of whom participated in the same graduate program: the Biomedical Informatics Program at Stanford's School of Medicine.  Joining Harry were Aria Pharmaceuticals co-founder and CEO Andrew Radin, BigHat Biosciences co-founder and chief scientific officer Peyton Greenside, and Inflammatix co-founder and CEO Tim Sweeney. The conversation covered how each company's work to advance healthcare and therapeutics rests on data and  computation, and how the ideas, skills, connections each entrepreneur picked up at Stanford have played into their startups and their careers.Radin's company, formerly known as twoXar, models pathogenesis computationally to identify potential drug molecules, shaving years off the drug development process. Radin developed Aria's core technology, a collection of proprietary algorithms for discovering novel small molecule therapies. The algorithms incorporate system biology data, disease-specific data, chemistry libraries, and more than 60 separate AI methods to sift through molecules with known chemistry to find those with novel mechanisms of action and favorable safety profiles absorption properties. Whereas traditional drug discovery methods have a 1-2% success rate after 4 years, Aria claims its approach has a 30% success rate after just 6 months. It has a pipeline of at 18 drug candidates in areas including kidney, lung, and liver diseases, lupus, cancers of the liver and lung, glioblastoma, and glaucoma. Radin holds MS and BS degrees in computer science from Rochester Institute of Technology, studied computational biology and medicine through the Stanford Center for Professional Development, and was formerly an advisor to several venture capital firms and startup accelerators. Greenside started BigHat to combine wet-lab science and machine learning with the goal of speeding up the design of antibody therapies. BigHat's lab consists of numerous “workcells,” each of which cycles through multiple tests of a given set of antibodies synthesized from in silico designs. Assays characterize each antibody variant for traits such as yield, stability, solubility, specificity, affinity, and function. Machine learning algorithms determine how mutations affected each of these properties and feed this learning back into a new set of designs for the next round. The company says this approach allows it to identify therapeutic-grade antibodies faster than traditional bulk screening techniques (in days rather than weeks or months). Greenside is a computational biologist with a PhD from Stanford, an MPhil from Cambridge University, and a BA from Harvard. Silicon Valley Business Journal named her to its 2021 list of “Women of Influence in Silicon Valley.”Sweeney co-founded Inflammatix to develop a new class of diagnostic tests that—rather than searching for a specific bug—“read” the host response of a patient's immune system for clues about the cause and severity of an infection. The problem, as Sweeney originally saw it, is that traditional tests can only detect infections once a pathogen has spread to the bloodstream, meaning that doctors often guess incorrectly about whether a patient needs an antibiotic, or which one they need. Inflammatix is built around the idea that the human immune system has evolved targeted responses to different kinds of infections and other diseases. These responses are complex and vary according to age and setting, but by analyzing mRNA samples from multiple, diverse cohorts, the company believes it can identify a “reproducible signal in the ‘noise' of multiple datasets.” Inflammatix is developing a cartridge-based system called Myrna for use in emergency rooms, urgent care clinics, and outpatient clinics that can screen for acute bacterial infections, viral infections, and sepsis in 30 minutes. Sweeney is a physician and data scientist who earned an MD/PhD from Duke and then trained as a general surgery resident at Stanford.Please rate and review MoneyBall Medicine on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to the page of the MoneyBall Medicine podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3.Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4.Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5.Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6.Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7.Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8.If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9.After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is MoneyBall Medicine, the interview podcast where we meet researchers, entrepreneurs, and physicians who are using the power of data to improve patient health and make healthcare delivery more efficient. You can think of each episode as a new chapter in the never-ending audio version of my 2017 book, “MoneyBall Medicine: Thriving in the New Data-Driven Healthcare Market.” If you like the show, please do us a favor and leave a rating and review at Apple Podcasts.Harry Glorikian:Home base for MoneyBall Medicine is the Boston area. It's one of the world capitals for biomedical innovation and the digital revolution in healthcare. So I don't have to venture far to find great guests.But obviously Boston isn't the only capital for biosciences innovation. This summer, during the brief break between surges in the coronavirus pandemic, I escaped to the San Francisco Bay area. And while I was there, I got a lesson about the considerable impact created by one particular Bay Area institution. Namely, the Stanford School of Medicine's Biomedical Informatics program, or BMI for short.BMI trains students how to use and adapt computational methods like machine learning to solve hard problems in biology and medicine. And a remarkable number of BMI alumni have fanned out into the world of life science startups. On today's show you'll hear from three of them. We'll talk about the work their companies are doing now and how the skills and connections they picked up at Stanford have played into their careers.The first guest, and the person who helped to organize the group interview, has actually been on the show twice before. His name is Andrew Radin, and he joined me in November of 2018 and again in August of 2020 to talk about his Palo Alto-based company Aria Pharmaceuticals, formerly known as twoXar. Aria uses a collection of proprietary AI algorithms to discover new small-molecule drugs for a range of diseases. In traditional drug discovery, years can go by between the identification of a new drug candidate and testing the drug in animals. Radin says Aria's AI can reduce that time to just weeks.Andrew kindly recruited two of his fellow Stanford BMI alumni for our conversation. One is Peyton Greenside, the co-founder and chief scientific officer at BigHat Biosciences in San Carlos, California. The company combines wet-lab science and machine learning to make it easier and faster to design new antibody therapies. And again, the leap forward is that BigHat's rapid cycle of antibody design, synthesis, and characterization vastly speed things up, reducing the time required to identify new therapeutic antibodies from months to just days.And our final guest is Tim Sweeney. He trained as a surgery resident at Stanford and then founded a company to tackle one of the biggest problems in acute care, namely how to diagnose infections faster and more accurately. The company is called Inflammatix, and it's building a device that emergency departments and outpatient clinics can use to rapidly analyze messenger RNA in patients' blood to screen for sepsis and other kinds of infections.All three of these companies are benefiting in different ways from the computational methods their founders studied at Stanford. And they've got some great stories to share about how their time at BMI convinced them that future progress in medicine and drug discovery would depend on data above all else.We originally planned to meet up in person for this interview. But we switched to Zoom at the last minute out of concerns over the Delta variant. So without further ado, here's my talk with Andrew Radin, Peyton Greenside, and Tim Sweeney.Harry Glorikian: Well, hello everybody. And welcome to today's show. Tim Sweeney: Thank you. Peyton Greenside: It's great to be here. Harry Glorikian: Yeah, it's, it's great to have all of you here. For everybody listening and watching, we were actually supposed to do this in person, but unfortunately the Delta variant sort of threw a monkey wrench in that whole process. So I reserve the right that we can do this in the future and actually get together when this whole thing is over, like normal human beings. Each of you are working on super exciting things. Different companies, focusing in different areas. And I know you all know each other, so I'm going to step back one second and say, if you had to give a brief description of your company or pretend you don't know each other, where we're at a cocktail party and you're going to give me two or three sentences about what you're doing and why it's interesting, how would you sort of do that? And Andrew, since you're the ringleader that sort of helped bring this group together, I'll throw it out to you first to sort of get going.Andrew Radin: Well, that's a lot of pressure, but certainly like, our description I think is pretty simple. We are a preclinical stage pharmaceutical company. And we happen to have a proprietary artificial intelligence platform that's discovered all the assets that we have under development. And these days we have 18 programs, 18 different disease areas where we've got new experimental medications and we are working on progressing those new inventions to the clinic and ultimately to FDA approval.Harry Glorikian: Peyton?Peyton Greenside: Hi everyone. I'm Peyton and one of the co-founders of Big Hat Biosciences, and our mission is to improve human health by making it easier to design advanced antibody therapeutics. So we actually do that through a combination of a high-speed wet lab and machine learning techniques in order to very iteratively design and improve antibodies until they meet unmet patient need. And it's been a lot of fun. Then we've been founded since 2019.Harry Glorikian: And finally, Tim. Tim Sweeney: thanks for the opportunity, Harry. Inflammatix was founded about five years ago, spun out of Stanford along with, of course, Aria and Big Hat. We are designing novel diagnostics focused on acute care and critical illness needs. So we basically have a data analytics platform that allows us to decode certain signals of gene expression within the immune system. And then for those of you watching, I'll show you, we have a cartridge that allows us to sort of implement that in a 30 minute point of care diagnostic setting.So our particular focus is basically bringing precision medicine into acute care settings, the hospital, the clinic, the ICU, where sort of historically there hasn't been a lot of diagnostic innovation. Harry Glorikian: Interesting. That's funny because I actually, I wrote a a textbook on how to commercialize novel diagnostics a few years ago. Because you know, unless you've been through the ringer, you may not know all the different pieces.But you guys now all know each other right? Now, that may not surprising because we're in Silicon Valley, and I'm actually in Berkeley right now, but that's close enough. And drug discovery companies and tech companies are all swimming around each other. But your connection is a little bit deeper. I mean, you guys all went to Stanford together. So this is not necessarily a commercial for Stanford, but it's, that's pretty interesting that three CEOs of data-driven, you know, healthcare companies out of the same class, whoosh, come out of Stanford. So how did you, how did you guys meet at first?Andrew Radin: Well, and I would say we're not the only ones to—it's just, you know, the people that happen to be in front of you today. It was funny. So, right before this, I sent a panicked email, because I didn't want to say something that wasn't true. I was like, Peyton, you were in this class, weren't you? Peyton Greenside: Yeah. I don't know if I was Andrew's TA or if we'd all actually been in the same class. But I think our Stanford journeys all started, it sounds like, the same year. Same time. And we all were taking translational bioinformatics, which was a course taught by, I believe, Atul Butte who I think, you know, really brought to fame the idea of big data for biology, what you can draw out a very large data sets and drawing insights. So we were all in the same class and with many other people, as Andrew said, and it was a lot of fun. And I think it was the start of long journeys for all of us than in a similar vein. Andrew Radin: And it was a place for…I think what was awesome about that class, again, not to be an advertisement for the coursework, but it was kind of my characterization of the class was, you basically learned how other people use data science to solve some medical mystery, like across the spectrum. And so the, the purpose of learning all that was to just kind of fill you full of ideas of things that you could do. And then the kind of the capstone of the class was a final project where you basically had to come up with something, right? And so you were just sort of primed with all this like super interesting sort of research on how other people had approached very different problems in the space. And for me, it was just the source of lots of interesting ideas that then, you know, helped me ultimately create what's the technology behind our company today. Tim Sweeney: It is remarkable how much came out of Stanford biomedical informatics. Though, I mean, to Andrew's point, there are, there are a number of other CEOs that came through in that sort of in maybe a five or seven year stretch, all out of the same program. And I think a lot of it had to do with that, yes, this one particular class had all the different applications of data science sort of across the spectrum of life sciences, but they also attracted people like that. Right? I mean, everyone on this call has a very different background before Stanford BMI. And I think that was part of what made that culture so special is that it ended up being a real team sport, whether your background was medicine or business or math or computer science or bio-engineering or anything else, learning a technique from A, and applying it into area B, I think, was a pretty successful way to grow innovation. Harry Glorikian: I feel like as a venture guy, I should be standing at the exit door and just sort of saying, you know, “What's your idea, what's your idea,” screening as they're coming out the door.Peyton Greenside: Well, you know, some folks have also become venture capitalists. Harry Glorikian: That's true. Peyton Greenside: Yep.Harry Glorikian: So was there anything in particular that you guys, interests or questions or discussions that you sort of bonded over that sort of brought you together? I mean, even, even as just friends that decided to keep in touch? Andrew Radin: Well, I think it's probably different for different people. I think the first real interaction I had with Tim, you know,the details escape me, because this is almost 10 years ago now, but I remember, he's a medical doctor, right? He's got a MD and a PhD if I'm, if I'm not mistaken. And so my, you know, I'm a hardcore computer scientist. That's my background. And so back in those days, I was rapidly learning all I could about medicine and biology. And I don't remember the topic, but I do recall him helping me after class was something that wasn't just quite, you know, sitting in my head correctly. And I remember thinking like, what a nice dude, to, like, you know, kind of take some time and give me like, you know, a little private tutoring. And then and then if I recall afterwards, you said, yeah, so I'm trying to do this stuff with some clinical data. Can you help me with this sort of stuff? Which if I remember correctly, I never actually helped you. I was talking about, oh, I might be able to help you. And then eventually you said, “I figured it out. I don't need you”Tim Sweeney: I said I needed to build a web scraper. And I said, I have no idea how to.Andrew Radin: Oh yeah, I have totally done that. Lots of times. So yeah, something like that. That's how the conversation started with Tim, which was sort of to the point about having very different backgrounds, You know, with Peyton, I don't really recall the first interaction. I remember we were in a journal club, maybe with Russ and you were talking about some stuff, but I think the more I got connected to her was around the time she was working on her defense and I actually went to her PhD defense. And I have this BS detector that sometimes go off a little early, right? When people make a statement, I'm like, “I don't know about that.” We're sitting in her defense and every time she said something that made me, do one of these, like, “Wait a minute,” she instantly resolved that in the next sentence. I was like, “Okay. All right. That's cool.”Peyton Greenside: Okay, that feels good. Fortunately, fortunately. Andrew Radin: You don't have to pass my scrutiny obviously, but yeah, I think that led to a number of kind of interesting conversations as she was contemplating, you know, what to do next. She was moving through her career, but yeah, I think that the interactions are very, very different for each person. At least that's my view, but I don't know if you guys have different memories. Peyton Greenside: Yeah, I think what's, what's interesting, I mean, just generally I agree with that. And I think one of the most interesting parts of BMI, as Tim said, is just the backgrounds that everyone has. And I also come from the kind of applied math, computer science background, and there's this kind of fascination of what you can do with computational skills in biology. I think to me, a lot of the conversations were around where do I even apply this to? I think people sort of think of computational biology as a, maybe sort of a niche, small field at the intersection of maybe somewhere where biology meets, I guess, you know, statistics, computer science and math. But it's so broad and it's so vast. And I think most of the, I say the most exciting conversations I've had are, you know, we work in immunology, you know, you're a clinician, you work with clinical data. How do you apply these tools? The most daunting but fun task upon showing up at Stanford with such an incredible ecosystem here is, where do you even focus your attention? Where should you work? There's too many exciting opportunities to pick. And I think some of the fun conversations I remember also having a Tim, with a more clinical background, is what's actually useful? You know, I want, I want to do something useful and sort of try to figure out, you know, where this, you know, where are you can actually kind of apply your time to the most impactful problem. It was a lot of fun. Andrew Radin: And I think, Tim, it'd be great for you to share. I mean, when we first met, I'd asked you kind of like, what were you doing there? What your story was? I can't remember the words back then. But you basically said like, “Look, I'm a surgeon,” if I recall, “I'm trying to save people's lives and I'm just thinking like, is there a better way? Can I like just, you know, do something that's going to have a much larger impact? And I don't know what that is yet.” I know I'm wildly paraphrasing what you said, right. But I'm thinking about like what that could be. And I think. You know, when I met you, you were sort of on the hunt for figuring out where to apply, you know, kind of the, the skill set.Tim Sweeney: I think that the everyone shows up with their strengths and weaknesses. Mine certainly was the summer before the program actually started, I had to take, you know, basic courses in computer science and linear algebra. And I remember, I mean, I literally went from my last overnight call at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, running two ICUs, to the next morning CS 106x. Which, because it was the summer, was filled with all the high school students that are just total whiz kids, like 16 year olds, and they're like, you know, we're learning like order of operations or something and they're raising their hands and I'm like desperately trying to write down like, oh, if n means....You know, and obviously Andrew and Peyton were among the folks that sort of helped me on the basic science side of things. But I think that the story about sort of getting the question right is absolutely correct. And I remember actually the time that I knew I was in the right program was maybe two or three months in to training. They used to have these like sort of work in progress talks, and it was like, you know, Wednesday or Thursday or something, you bring a lunch. And somebody was talking about this thing that sounded very, very cool to me. It was all about how you could, you could program a system to learn new knowledge on its own. And it was like, you know, generalized AI for health data. And I was incredibly impressed. And, and the first example that was given was like, you know, so we've sifted through all of the billions of data points. And I have discovered—he stumbles over the drug name—I've discovered that plopacapagril, by which he meant clopidogrel, is associated with bleeding events. And everyone goes, “oh.” And I put my hand up, like, “That's an anti-platelet medication.” And he looks at me and I'm like, “the point of that is that it thins the blood.” He looked at me and was like, “So bleeding is a known side effect?” Totally crestfallen that people knew this already. Like, he had no idea. I was like, I do have something to contribute, so it's good. It's a good merge.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So, you know, Tim, you're running a diagnostics company you know, Peyton and Andrew you're running what I'll lump together as drug discovery companies in different markets, different regulatory processes. You know, I'm sure there are common challenges to life science startups in the valley. What are some of the biggest challenges that you guys see? Is it scalability? Is it finding the right people? Is it finding the right investors? Where do you guys see your challenges?Andrew Radin: And I would just say for a little clarification to Peyton's point about there's so many different problems. Even though Peyton and I are both in the business of creating new medicines, we couldn't be any more different. We're a small molecule company. She's a large molecule company. If you know what that means. You know, I'm making motorcycles, she's making trucks. Like, we're just, we're just, we're just doing completely different things. To your question about like, kind of what are the very similar things, we're not really even competing with one another from that perspective.But I think, to answer your question, at least from my viewpoint, you kind of have to do all those things. I think, you know, in startups, everything has to work. You can't sort of have any one thing that doesn't function and whether that's the science or the fundraising or the team or all of those things, if you've got a problem in any one of those areas, it can be life-threatening to the company.And so I think part of the experience for the entrepreneur is sort of, you know, because your time is limited and your resources are limited is sort of finding a best fit to try to solve, you know, or, or to maximize all of those problems simultaneously. And I would say all the things that you've listed, they all at various points in the company, they've been critical and it's more of a juggling act rather than “Geez, all you need to do is just knock it out of the park, on, you know, financing and who cares about anything else?” We know lots of stories where that hasn't gone well. Or you knock it on the park on an exceptional team, and the other things don't come together. So, you know, from my standpoint, all of that stuff has to work. Peyton Greenside: I think my answer continues. I think one of the things I, and what many people who just find, I would say many scientific, inquiries fascinating, is just what to work on that. And I have the same problem now, you know, I think it happened when I went to Stanford and happened you know, postdoc and have it happened now.And, in the context of my company, wo we basically have a platform that can work on engineering any protein. We work on antibodies, but really can be anything. So, you know, we have this landscape. There are tons of diseases with unmet need. There's sort of tons of opportunities for the type of therapeutic protein you would use, whether that's a standard antibody, monoclonal IgG, sort of a next generation antibody. And so we always have to decide, you know, what, what are the programs gonna be? What are you going to go after? What's the modality? And I think at the crux of it, like you know, for a drug discovery company, is what is the shape of your company. But our platform is so broad that basically we can work on so many things. And I, once again, by myself faced the same problem, which is okay, like, you know, where should we focus our attention? And that's been really fun. This is getting maybe more of Tim's background, but so we're learning more about the clinical side of things and where that need is and where that pairs with our technology. But I agree with what Andrew said, nothing really can go shortchanged, but that's been the same theme, I would say just now in a different vein. Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, I think about this as a balance of dynamics where you're at different stages at different points, depending on where you are in the development cycle. And you need different people and different issues become a problem at different points or maybe become more acute at different points. But you know, all of you guys have one theme in common, which is why we're on the show together. It's data and some form of machine learning or other, you know, part of artificial intelligence that's being applied to find something valuable or identify some valuable piece of information that can make something actionable. It's sort of a big question, but how do you employ machine learning and AI in what you're doing in each of your businesses? Because I think of these things as like I have a toolbox and then I have to apply that tool in a very specific way with a specific set of knowledge that can feed it, where I can get an output that I'm looking for. And so each one of you, like you said, Andrew, you're, you're working on the motorcycle, she's working on the big truck, and he's trying to make sure that everybody gets diagnosed and not, not ends up in worse than they already are. So how are you each of you thinking or approaching this in your own unique way? If you can summarize. Tim, why don't you go first?Tim Sweeney: Our tests work by measuring a discrete number of genes within the body. It's their expression levels. So for instance, for our flagship test inset, we look at 29 different gene expression levels from, from blood. And then of course we have to somehow integrate  29 different levels into actionable information. And so the backend of that is the data science part, the machine learning. So step one is actually choosing what to measure. And then after you've chosen what to measure, then it's training hardened algorithms that turn 29 different things into a score that says, “This person has a bacterial infection.” And then of course doing that repeatably, doing it in a way that is traceable and verifiable. And then all of the post hoc, you know, how is it affected by different demographics? And how has it, in the actual context of care, and of course in the coming years when actually implemented in a health system, how does it impact patients and providers and does it save costs and improve outcomes?And maybe just since I didn't get a chance to answer, I think one of the questions about challenges is a lot of times it changes with the application that you're taking farther. Right? One of the things that we all have in common, I think is that we're all platform companies. And to, to Peyton's point, like you can apply that data science platform to a lot of different areas, but each one of those areas has to be taken through a very long development process to actually help a person and the challenges totally change along that development life cycle. Harry Glorikian: And just for everybody listening—so you developed this product. What is the, so what, what is the impact? Tim Sweeney: In our case, we decided that we wanted to go after one first indication that would be a big enough hit to make the business matter. We've got lots of things we'd like to do in the long run, but sepsis is an area of outstanding unmet need. And the “so what” is right now, if you go in and you're feeling sick and you see a doctor and you want to know, Hey doc, like, do I need antibiotics? There is literally no test that can answer that question. It's a guess. So it's not to say that antibiotics aren't administered quickly, but as a physician myself, I can tell you that that is it's a guess at first, and then you have to wait for tests to come back and those tests themselves are imperfect. And so something like 40% of antibiotics are probably misprescribed. And if you knew in 30 minutes, Hey, this person has a bacterial infection or no, you could greatly simplify care and really improve outcomes. And that's the premise. But the challenge of course is that beyond the data science, there's so much that goes into building the product and proving out the clinical data and get it through FDA and then getting it reimbursed and, and, you know, getting it rolled out more broadly, if you want to get to the point where you've actually helped a number of people and built a solid business. Harry Glorikian: When I, in my last company, before I moved on to venture, I, we had a strategy consulting firm and we did a lot of digging into sepsis. That was a big problem, a nut that people were trying to crack, and, you know, if you could crack it, the opportunity is quite significant.So Peyton, Andrew, how do you guys think about it? Because I'm, I'm thinking manipulating an antibody and sort of tweaking little parts of it until you find the exact fit. [It requires] supercomputing or massive computing. Peyton Greenside: It's funny. I actually think that the context in which we all met, which is you know, when I think big data was becoming really popular in medicine is actually a great context, I think, for where Big Hat ended up, and it's funny, because it's going to been kind of a long journey—it always happens when I look back, I'm like, yeah, that makes, that makes sense. Right? Based on where I was. We actually put a lot of our attention into integrating the wet lab with the dry lab. And this is actually, you know, with a goal of making big data into what I might call sort of smart data or agile data, which is that the idea of back in the day when first, I would say you got tons and tons of really large data sets. And you can sort of mine them, or you can look for trends. You can sort of just figure out something, you know, interesting relationship between gene expression and patient outcome. And I kept throughout my career feeling frustrated by being handed the dataset and sort of having to just mine it and not having kind of, you know, ownership of being able to say, “I want to look here, I want more data here.” Right? You're sort of handed a really large data set and you're, a passenger in this dataset that has already been generated. You cannot modify it. That's kind of the fixed dataset. And, you know, as a computational person, that, that you're often the second person, like a wet lab or experimental lab is making the data, then you kind of get it right. And so, you know, throughout I would say, especially in my time at Stanford this was very much the case, where I was felt kind of trapped in being given a data set that I didn't actually design, but I could sort of mine. And so at Big Hat we're basically trying to now put computation in the driver's seat and kind of change that paradigm. We're actually now, instead of just getting one large data set that you design up front, you acknowledge that biology and the science are very iterative, right? As as you said, you sort of start with an antibody sequence, but, you know, would you stop there? If you could just make one tweak, maybe you'd make it, you know, 10x better, 100x better with two. So how do you enable it? How do you want to enable that very rapid cycling? And so we view this as kind of the intersection of how closely can a lab and the computational side interact and how can they inform each other? How can you one learn from the other? And so we actually enabled a computational person to design an antibody on Monday and in a few days you synthesize, purify, characterize the antibody and kind of understand, are you moving in the right direction or are you not? And repeat, and then repeat it and repeat and repeat. So you don't get kind of stuck in the fixed data set again. So it's really attractive for a lot of ways, right? There are a lot of reasons you kind of can end up in a really good regime and it's big data or sort of area, but, you know, there's kind of a lot of lost opportunity in terms of being able to kind of be very agile and move toward something that looks promising and then iterate more. And the goal is that that will allow us to enable types of antibodies they don't even exist today because you can't engineer them that easily. You're kind of are stuck with a fixed format. So that's been really fun. And so we've been spending a lot of time designing the wet lab to kind of support the machine learning side and data science side from the ground up and, and vice versa.And so it's a pretty unique sort of set up. And I think I like to think of it as sort of smart data, right? You're thinking really closely about what should I generate that will be helpful and can use that to inform how you redesign the next dataset and improve your antibody every time in our case.Andrew Radin: Yeah, it's interesting to hear the different stories. You know, I think all of us are kind of taking the approach that, you know, what data sources and what artificial intelligence allows you to do is to take real world data and then make some prediction under uncertainty. You know, with the expectation that prediction is potentially better than what you could, what you could do with other methods.And so, you know, kind of tying this back to when I was student and thinking about where are the places I can make a big impact, it was very interesting to me that with very complex diseases there was really no single biomedical measurement that would help kind of unravel the mystery of the biology behind that disease. And therefore could, you know, explain something about pathogenesis that would lead to a new discovery or a new medication as a result. And, you know, part of that coursework in 2.17 was this concept of integrative genomics. This idea of using, you know, different data sources that are all keyed to the same thing, maybe a, a gene or a gene product, and kind of looking for that overlapping evidence.And there were some great papers that were shown. There was one, I think, by, by Eric Lander in particular, where he was using, GWAS and proteomics and maybe some gene expression microarray data, each of which would give you, you know, like hundreds of quote-unquote “answers” and the real answers in there buried with a bunch of false positives. But ultimately what would happen in this paper is he showed that there was one overlapping gene in all three of these datasets and he ran some assays and determined, indeed that was the key to unlock this mystery. And that certainly worked well if all of your data sets are sort of keyed to the same thing, but that's not the reality of biomedical data sets. There's genomics measures, there's chemistry measures, there's phenotypical measures, there's different patient measures. And unless you're conveniently measuring them all from the same patient population over time, which is very expensive and very, very time consuming to do, there's really no easy way to sort of key all these things together. And my thought was like, “Hmm, maybe, maybe there, there is a way.” And so the technology that I created and ultimately has been expanded upon is taking this concept, the concept that the answer to a very complex disease doesn't necessarily live in any one measurement or anyone biomedical data set. And if you have the ability to ultimately pull in lots of very diverse—and by diverse I mean statistically independent—data sets across a wide range of biomedical measures and integrate them as a single processing unit, you can ultimately uncover things that other people essentially haven't noticed before. And then use that, in our case, you know, to do lots of things, but in our case specifically to develop new therapeutics. So in all of our disease areas, ultimately what this means is we are working on new mechanisms of action. These are, these are new, if you will, new concepts or new understanding of biology in these disease areas and therefore what it means or what the impact is—to your earlier statement—is, we're going after biology that potentially has a disease modifying effect that others have not approached before. And therefore the promise of the opportunity is to make a significant dent in these very complex diseases. And so that's a kind of a high level view of what we do, but ultimately it's all about, you know, integration of these very different datasets. And then using that to ultimately come up with new experimental medicine that we would explore and experiment with and see what it can mean for patient impact.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I think that's one of the most exciting parts of when I talk to everybody. Assuming the system is designed well, and the data going in is actually good, it's like, “Wow, I didn't notice. I didn't know that that happened. I didn't know that pathway was involved or this little tweak could make this difference.” And so that's what I see when I talk to different people that are working in this area. “I just didn't know,” or “None of the papers talked about this,” or “That's not what I learned in school.” And so that's the most fascinating part of these systems where you can identify things faster, hopefully and more accurately, hopefully than you might normally do with a human being. No knock to human beings, all of them are valuable, but it seems the systems move at a different pace and can handle a much broader level of data being input into them. And so that brings me to the question that Andrew, you and I have talked about. If you had to put a timeframe around it or something is, is this shortening the time to discovery? And I think you and I, the last time we talked, you said to about three years where I can shave off on the front. And then at some point when I have to get to a mouse, I have to follow the normal trajectory of that mouse. But if that's changed and you you've, you're finding other areas, I'd love to hear it. But Peyton and Tim, where do you see the aha the speed or the financial impact of what you're doing? You're doing it because it's moving at faster or you're able to identify something that you haven't, but it's better than X or Y that's already being done in the marketplace.Peyton Greenside: For us actually, this is, I mean, we do do things faster. We do improve on a lot of metrics. But it's actually, at least for my companyl about designing antibodies that couldn't otherwise exist. So for example, the standard monoclonal IgG, there are many tools out there to sort of discover initial molecules and optimize them, but you start getting into these kinds of next-generation or kind of Frankenstein antibodies, antibodies that are a tenth of the size, or SCRBs which are these fragments that are part of car T therapies or other formats.They become more complex and people have trouble engineering them, and you can kind of run your imagination and say, well, if I had the ability to engineer things, what other formats would I conceive? Would I consider, tiny antibodies like cell-penetrating peptides that can get into cells and sort of have all sorts of characteristics? But they're difficult to engineer.And so we actually, instead of sort of doing the same thing faster we actually think more about how can we expand the universe of what could be a potential therapeutic protein and how would that solve current patient needs in ways that existing therapeutics do not. And we do that by doing things faster, sort of, and cheaper and, sort of. More smartly. But hopefully that's what we really care about. Tim Sweeney: I'd answer probably somewhat like Peyton's. But if you look at a diagnostics and biomarkers in particular, a lot of diagnostics are about, “Hey, you know, we found that if you measure this one protein that's useful for health.” So it's just a very slow process and it's not optimized. You tend to study things that are obvious because they're easy to measure. Or like in our field, there's one protein called procalcitonin that's sort of the current closest biomarker for whether or not somebody has a bacterial infection, but PCT, as procalcitonin is abbreviated, was discovered 30 years ago and it was originally basically by accident that someone even measured it in someone with bacterial infections, and then it worked pretty well. And you know what I mean, it's a sort of based on serendipity and it can't be improved upon it has. However good procalcitonin was yesterday, that's how good it's going to be tomorrow and how it's going to be the day afterwards.I think the benefit of data science and in diagnostics was really began with cancer, when you had sort of the wonderfully successful tests like Oncotype showing how you could measure signals across complex diseases by integrating things from multiple biomarkers. And a lot of those were designed and there, again, the problem was that they took a long time to develop. And of course they take a long time to actually run, right? I mean, most of them, if you've ever had one of those tests done, it's like a week to send out, you know, you send some tissue to a company, it gets processed. You get your answer seven days later. So one of the things we're doing differently, one, it has to do with the way that we gather and integrate data sets to empower faster discovery.And that's kind of like Andrew. The other is basically the ability to build new answers that haven't yet existed, sort of more like Peyton. And ultimately the hope is to create a feedback loop where you know, better and better versions of the tests can be slowly released. And so over time, it's not just that you're sort of stuck with, “Hey, you know, procalcitonin is as good as it is [going to get].” It's like, you know, you're on Insept version five in 2030, and it's now X percent more accurate. And I think that's a real benefit to patients.[musical transition]Harry Glorikian: I want to pause the conversation for a minute to make a quick request. If you're a fan of MoneyBall Medicine, you know that we've published dozens of interviews with leading scientists and entrepreneurs exploring the boundaries of data-driven healthcare and research. And you can listen to all of those episodes for free at Apple Podcasts, or at my website glorikian.com, or wherever you get your podcasts.There's one small thing you can do in return, and that's to leave a rating and a review of the show on Apple Podcasts. It's one of the best ways to help other listeners find and follow the show.If you've never posted a review or a rating, it's easy. All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for MoneyBall Medicine, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but it'll help us out immensely. Thank you! And now back to the show.[musical transition]Harry Glorikian: So you guys have been doing this for a while. Do you see the promise of big data and AI playing out the way that you thought and or is, or is it different than you thought now that now that you like jumped into the pool and you've been swimming in it for a while? Is it fulfilling the dream you had, is it more exciting than you thought?Andrew Radin: It's a funny question. Coming from very different industries, you know, looking at where I was 10 years ago, I think I was very naïve about what it actually takes to bring a drug to market. And I think in the very early days of the company, you know, my prior startups, you know, one of them I was in and out in a year and it exited. And there's no such thing in this industry, to do anything like that. And so, you know, part of it was biased by my prior experience, but I think part of it as well is, sometimes I think it's also hard to see how far things have moved along. And I think even in Tim's description is he was sort of talking about, well, you know, this, this was state-of-the-art science, you know, in decades past you know, the work he's doing today was impossible back then. So, you know, there's sort of these steady, incremental improvements.And I, and I think part of what really is happening in the industry is that the things to solve essentially are becoming exponentially harder. For example, for high throughput screening, which is maybe the old way of doing things, to find a hit is exponentially harder. For diagnostic tests or blood tests to sort of detect these nuances, you sort of have to bring in these technologies and these capabilities that are exponentially better at solving those things.And so I think what happens is, you can therefore characterize it in a different way, you know, is the time faster compared to the old way? Well, of course, because those old ways just don't have a chance of being able to do these things. Like, is it cheaper? Well, yeah, because those old ways, again, just don't have a chance. But I think part of it is what is the pace of innovation? And that's, I think kind of where the rubber meets the road and what is actually possible and what it's capable of. And so today, you know, we're, we talk about having, you know, 18 concurrent disease programs and we've got a very small team and we haven't raised very much money. You know, that would just be flat out impossible 10 years ago. And we still like raise some eyebrows around that, but now, it's okay. We recognize software is doing a lot of what used to happen in the wet labs. So this, you know, sort of fits within the expectation of what a modern technology company would do in this space.So I think there's that other angle of where expectations are kind of catching up with what's actually been produced. And therefore, you know, at, at some point we become the old technology. Thirty years from now, some next generation we'll be talking about, oh, those, those slow, painful people that, you know, tried this in the past kind of stuff. And so it's, you know, each, I think each iteration of innovation has its moment in the sun, if you will. And this is definitely the time for the work that we're collectively doing.Peyton Greenside: I think the promise is ahead of us. We're in an amazing time where I think things are starting to gain traction. We're starting to get tools and infrastructure, but if I were to say my conception of what machine learning and data science and generally computational power is going to do in biology and medicine, I think it's just starting.So I'm excited to see things like AlphaFold. I'm excited to see a lot of these kind of tools and capabilities to be unlocked. But I think, you're solving a complex problem, right? That protein that you're affecting is in a cell, it's part of the tissue, and it's part of a human, and there's so many more layers, I think, to consider.Yeah, we're making great progress. And I still certainly believe in the potential. That's why I'm here. But I do like to say, I think we're at the very, very early days. And as Andrew said, I think it's going to be fun to see what happens in 30 years. So I'm still very excited, but I wouldn't say we're at the accomplishments that I would consider as sort of really demonstrating the cornerstones of machine learning in, in biology and medicine.Tim Sweeney: I have to agree with Peyton, I think the best is ahead of us. So one of the courses we had to take at Stanford BMI, and I don't know if you two remember this, was Marc Musen taught this course on ontologies, but part of it had to do with sort of like the history of applications of sort of clinical data systems. And the oldest one, I forget the details, but it was in like, the '70s. And it was around sort of you know, clinical decision support for therapeutic prescribing. Obviously that system isn't around today and failed for its own reasons and he sort of walked through all of the failures of systems since then.And maybe one of the most remarkable things is how, how little AI and machine learning is actually employed in most clinical practice. You know, for all the buzz around computer vision, the AI that radiologists use most is probably their dictation. I mean, it isn't yet commonplace to have machine assisted radiography reads. And so will that be coming? Absolutely. But the interesting challenges in each successive generation of like, oh, you know, we got pretty close, but it turned out that X wasn't good enough, or it wasn't built in the right way to be integrated with workflow or is coming soon, but still needs some regulatory work or whatever else. There's plenty left to do. Peyton Greenside: I, I think that's probably one thing we all experience actually transitioning from academia to industry is, what's exciting in academia is not necessarily what's going to be reliable when you really want to make a good drug. So what you might think about it, you'd be like, “Oh man, that's a really cool model. I'd love to try that, you know, that's great.” And you kind of go right into industry and you're like, okay, well this is going to matter. This is, this is going to go to patients. It has to work multiple times. I think it is a very different standard. Right. And so I actually think it's the right thing. Just because you find something to be very, very cool and kind of, you know, I would say cutting edge, you really want it to work and want it to work over and over again. I think there's an unappreciated gap between when something is first proposed or conceived of or demonstrated and when you can really make it work at scale, over and over again in areas that matter.So I think we're basically in that transition, for, I would say, a lot of these techniques in biology and medicine. Now let's get to work and practice. Let's get to work and practice reliably. And now we can start sort of really seeing where we're going with the needle on really impactful problems. But it's funny, because I do think that's an important divide between sort of where we all started together.Andrew Radin: Yeah, no, I would, I would agree with that. I mean, look, most of our focus, these days is not on discovery. It is actually in the development of the therapeutics. It is about, you know, preparing for IND filings. It's all the regulatory work we need to do there. It's medicinal chemistry. It's a whole bunch of things that are outside of the discovery process. And as we proceed to the clinic, more and more of our overall effort as an organization has less to do about the core innovation that created all of these assets and more about the heavy lifting you have to do to ultimately get that product to market.And I think, to kind of tie it back to my previous comments, I think there's been a new generation of capabilities that has been created. To what these guys just said, it's gonna be a while until we actually see those things in the clinic. And to Tim's point about, you know, computer vision and radiology, like there's, there's a lot of good science that's already there and has been shown, experimentally to do a better job than obviously the, the human looking at those images. But yeah, it it's gonna take awhile until that becomes the standard. I am, you know, my daughter was born almost five years ago now, but I was shocked to observe, even back then, which is only five years ago, that medical records were being passed from clinic to clinic with a fax machine. It just blew my mind. Like you gotta be kidding me, a fax machine? I don't think I've seen a fax machine in all these years. And so, yeah, I think part of it is, if you want to take the place where innovation moves the slowest it's certainly got to be, you know, government, healthcare, or education. I'm not sure which of those might be the slowest, but there is a time for these new technologies to permeate the industry. And that is going to take time. And I think that's when, ultimately, patients and the people that are on the receiving end of all this innovation, like that's, when they're going to see that difference. And it is going to take many years for this stuff to kind of make its way through the process and ultimately into the hands of providers and ultimately to patients. And that big benefit is going to come in the years to come. It's obviously not in front of patients in many cases.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, maybe my brain is wired towards risk or innovation because I'm like, “well, if you're, if you wait till it's done to get involved, you're way too late,” right. You're going to be a dinosaur or you're going to be obsolete. And we've seen that in a lot of areas of tech compared to, you know, old standard industry.There was a great piece the other day about this engineer at Ford who had been working on the gas engine for 40 years and then wakes up one morning and he's like, I need to take early retirement because software and electric EV is the way it's going to go. And now I'm just in this sort of maintenance mode of what I'm doing.And I think about healthcare and I'm like any institution that isn't at least dabbling in using image analytics. for radiology or something and starting to  get used to this, I think they're way behind where they may want to be in the next five years, because technology doesn't follow just a slow curve on the way up. It has a way to go straight up at one point it before moving into an exponential curve. And I think the same for you guys. I mean, those companies that are not involved are partnering, investing in entities like you guys is, if you wait till it's finished, you're, it's already too late. Because Andrew, your system will keep kicking out new molecules and Peyton, you'll be making new antibodies and it'll be a little too late to catch up. I mean, that's, that's the way I think about it. Andrew Radin: I would temper that a little bit and the reason I would say that is because the companies that have been successful in the past in creating diagnostics and therapeutics…Products are on patent. They have long life cycles and they generate lots and lots of cash. And so, you know, big pharma, big diagnostics companies, they can kind of wait around and sort of see how things shake out with different younger companies and simply, buy or acquire, assuming that the companies are willing to be acquired. And so I think, large firms have been very successful in becoming, you know, acquisition and essentially manufacturing and marketing machines. So I don't necessarily think that some of these larger and established players that they're necessarily, their livelihoods are threatened. I think they will continue to acquire the best of the best with their, with their large cash reserves. I think some companies in this space will gather the momentum and break out. And I think in time we might see some changes over time as to what the big, you know, sort of players are in this space. But it's unlike other industries. Certainly software. It's like MySpace disappears and Facebook reappears the next day. And that's because you can deploy new technology and move users over in the course of an afternoon. And from a therapeutic perspective or a diagnostics perspective, that's just not that the pace at which those things move.So there's, there's lots of room for that. You know, and maybe similar in the automotive industry, you kind of have to build a factory and build some cars. It takes some times, right? So, so maybe there's some parallels there, I think in some cases, but. I don't see like a wholesale change happening overnight. At least from where I stand. Harry Glorikian: Not overnight, but we definitely have to have dinner and like have a discussion around this topic. Because I would love to bring some examples to the table about how I see things. Once you digitize something, the model itself doesn't have to stay the same way as it used to be. It is up for change. So I think those are the shifts that may change the dynamics of the market.But I'd love to have that discussion with a wonderful glass of wine. After having come from Napa this week, I can show up with a few nice bottles. Thank you so much for taking the time. Andrew, thank you for bringing this group together. Peyton, Tim, it was wonderful to meet both of you. I hope that we stay in touch and I'll keep watching the companies as they, progress. And I wish you guys incredible success. Peyton Greenside: Thanks so much. Tim Sweeney: Thank you Harry. Andrew Radin: It was our pleasure.Tim Sweeney: Andrew, Peyton, good to see you as always.Andrew Radin: Absolutely. Peyton Greenside: You too.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's show. You can find past episodes of MoneyBall Medicine at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab “Podcast.” And you can follow me on Twitter at hglorikian.  Thanks for listening, and we'll be back soon with our next interview.

Retro Radio Podcast
Lum and Abner – Big Hat Style Show. 460611

Retro Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 13:50


Lum has taken on a new persona of Bon Mott, famous hat designer. To debut his new lineup of women's hat creations, he's planning a big fashion show. Grandpap and…

The Nerds With Accents Podcast
Episode 70: Nerdery & Nonsense: Big Hat, No Cattle

The Nerds With Accents Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 94:55


Friend of the pod, J The Tenken, joined Joe and JG this week. They discussed Loki episode 4, JG's anime recommendation 91 Days, Joe FINALLY attempting to finish watching Gundam Seed, The Rise of Kyoshi, PlayStation announcing Ghost of Tsushima's Director's Cut  & Standalone Expansion, The Harder They Fall Teaser Trailer, Lovecraft Country not returning for Season 2, Masters of The Universe: Revelation trailer, Chainsaw Man trailer, Pokemon Theme Park Celebrating Nature, Streets of Rage 4 DLC -Mr. X Nightmare Coming on July 15, Bioware Reveals New Star Wars: The Old Republic Expansion With “Legacy Of The Sith", listener feedback, Absurd Nerdery, and PLENTY more nonsense in between.  Be sure to follow, rate, review and tell a friend to tell a friend!  Joe's Socials: Twitter-@VI_Otaku   JG's Socials: Twitter-@JayGJ   TNWA Facebook Page https://facebook.com/TNWAP   TNWA Twitter https://twitter.com/TNWAPod   TNWA Site https://thenerdswithaccents.podomatic.com/

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales
Ep147 - Lauren Marcus: Be More Chill, Tick, Tick... Boom

The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 53:49


From iconic stage roles, to cabaret and rock band performances, this performer is building a successful artistic career while also navigating an autoimmune disorder with grace. - “I would so much rather have tried and failed, or tried and not gotten to where I want to be, than to have never have tried.” An actress, singer, and songwriter, Lauren Marcus made her Broadway debut as Brooke in Be More Chill after previously originating the role at Two River Theatre in 2015, and again off-Broadway at Signature Theatre in 2018. She also starred as Amy in Company at Barrington Stage Company alongside Aaron Tveit, and as Brigid in The Humans at St. Louis Rep., a performance which earned her a BroadwayWorld Regional Theatre Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama. As a retro pop singer/songwriter, Lauren performs regularly with her band around New York City, and in 2016 released her debut EP Never Really Done with You. She is also a veteran at cabaret clubs like 54 Below, Joe's Pub, and Rockwood Music Hall. Up next, Lauren will appear in the movie adaptation of Tick, Tick... Boom, and debut a brand new show on June 18th at 54 Below.  From Chicago, to New York, to Scotland, Lauren shares that she “always wanted to be an actor”. And like every artist, she has had a unique experience navigating life during COVID-19. She shares with us feeling like she's “living COVID backwards”, having felt fine at the start, but now like she's dragging; and how she pushed through to create her newest song (and video) “Big Hat” for the NPR 2021 Tiny Desk Contest. Lauren talks about her desire and drive to create and leave behind things that will outlive her; a legacy - things her future children can listen to. She candidly opens up about her journey with alopecia, both the internal and external struggles she navigates as a performer, and notes that losing her hair “affected every single aspect” of her life in a way that she never, ever would have guessed. We also discuss Lauren's upcoming show at 54 Below on June 18th!  In this episode, we talk about: Lauren's retro pop singer/songwriter style  Imposter Syndrome  How she and husband Joe Iconis support each other's work  Writing a one woman show about her Alopecia journey  The number one thing Alopecia has taught her  Leading by example, and the importance of visibility Connect with Lauren: IG @laurmarcus Twitter: @laurmarcus Web: LaurenMarcus.com Connect with The Theatre Podcast: Support us on Patreon: Patreon.com/TheTheatrePodcast Twitter & Instagram: @theatre_podcast Facebook.com/OfficialTheatrePodcast TheTheatrePodcast.com Alan's personal Instagram: @alanseales Email me at feedback@thetheatrepodcast.com. I want to know what you think. Thank you to our friends Jukebox The Ghost for our intro and outro music. You can find them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook @jukeboxtheghost or via the web via jukeboxtheghost.com. A very special thanks to our patrons who help make this podcast possible! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Hour 1 - Buzz Question, Big Hat Days, & Flag Day

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 37:33


Kicking it off with the Buzz Question about flying flags over Fresno City Hall. Big Hat Days in Old Town Clovis returns with a stellar turnout. Tomorrow is the day, 6/15 marks the reopening of California. A moment on Flag Day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Philip Teresi Podcasts
Hour 1 - Buzz Question, Big Hat Days, & Flag Day

Philip Teresi Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 37:33


Kicking it off with the Buzz Question about flying flags over Fresno City Hall. Big Hat Days in Old Town Clovis returns with a stellar turnout. Tomorrow is the day, 6/15 marks the reopening of California. A moment on Flag Day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hark! The 87th Precinct Podcast
Ed McBain's Nocture - Book 48: The Essence Of A Big Hat

Hark! The 87th Precinct Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 53:52


Hark! It's an 87th Precinct Podcast. McBain returns, after a break from the series in 1996 for reasons we outline, to bring us this tale of terrible things happening at nighttime. This is a dense book with stories that are in turns tragic, comic, graphic and upsetting. This is our first podcast 'together' since the pandemic hit and we're a little giddy with excitement, especially when Stevo gets hold of the 1997 TV Guide containing the story 'Reruns' (see our last extra episode!) and then Paul gives us a round-up of everything going on in McBain/Hunter's life during this period. We'll return soon with our bonus episode, then it's onto book 49 - The Big Bad City. Fare Thee Well.

Bad!!! A Show of Cursed Concepts
Episode 55 - big hat, Bigger Hat, BIGGEST HAT

Bad!!! A Show of Cursed Concepts

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 52:35


Gabe gets recruited by Disney, Anna gets a quarter stuck in their flip phone, they both speculate about Airplane Themed Jesting, and also everyone say hello to Ramesses 11!!! It's Bad!!! Find us on Twitter @badcursed, and if you want to send us some cursed audios, send them to badcursedconceptspodcast@gmail.com and we'll give them a listen! Be sure to give yourself a fancy title (and tell us your pronouns!) Bad!!! is part of the Common Unity Media podcast network! Many exciting things are happening, like a Patreon, a merch shop for your favorite shows, and special exciting bonus content! Head on over to commonunity.media to check it out and peruse the other wonderful shows on the network! If you want to see lists of audios and extra info about Bad!!! episodes, head over to our fan wiki, created and maintained by our lovely listeners! https://bad-cursed-podcast.fandom.com/wiki/Bad!!!_-_a_Cursed_Concepts_Podcast_Wiki Additionally, we now have the honor of an Out Of Context Quotes page! Give it a follow on Twitter @badcursedquotes

Philip Teresi Podcasts
Hour 2 - Big Hat Days, Matthew McConaughey, Electric Chair Or Firing Squad

Philip Teresi Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 36:52


Big Hat Days is coming back to Old Town Clovis next month. With community votes in and overwhelmingly supportive of the Tatarian nomination, a moment on the naming of the new FUSD campus. Actor Matthew McConaughey is considering a run for governor in TX. South Carolina passes a law that will make inmates choose electric chair or firing squad.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Hour 2 - Big Hat Days, Matthew McConaughey, Electric Chair Or Firing Squad

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 36:52


Big Hat Days is coming back to Old Town Clovis next month. With community votes in and overwhelmingly supportive of the Tatarian nomination, a moment on the naming of the new FUSD campus. Actor Matthew McConaughey is considering a run for governor in TX. South Carolina passes a law that will make inmates choose electric chair or firing squad.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gaming with the Salty Slacker : A Malifaux 3rd Edition centric podcast

Some game talk and my impressions on the changes on the Big Hat keyword. Honestly, not to much! Gaming with the Salty Slacker | Facebook Gaming with the Salty Slacker are creating a miniature games 'cast. Hoping to expand into video soon! | Patreon --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder
Big Hat. No CATTLE. Mt 23:8 (S2-Episode #64)

Be With Me: 7 Minutes of Biblical Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 7:58 Transcription Available


The Gospel writer Matthew has something to say. He's gonna GO OFF on the Scribes and Pharisees for an entire chapter. But first...you'll never believe this...he says to OBEY THEM. Yup, PRACTICE AND OBSERVE the good stuff: their OFFICE, their fidelity to the OT and the scriptures. But wait, there's more: Watch their LIVES. We don't want comic book characters of what spiritual leadership looks like. We want those who walk the talk. We want those with a big hat and lots of cattle, that is fruit. Paul says multiple times: do as I do. do as I say. I ended up today in gratefulness for the pastors and spiritual leaders that I have had in the "sweet tenderloin" of my life. They helped with the born again part, and since then have borne burdens and lived faithful, though human lives. It is a high call and I am grateful. You have shown me that the spiritual walk is possible. Go be a JOY to your pastor today. If you don't have one, consider getting one. Your listening is a delight to me. Thank you.Bewithme.us@gmail.com. Spotify. Deezer. Apple Podcasts. www.bewithme.us

Everyone Loves Guitar
Peter Stroud Interview: “I asked God but I never got an answer to that question…” 

Everyone Loves Guitar

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 174:25


On this Peter Stroud Interview: Losing his brother & coming to grips with this devastating experience... working with Brendan O’Brien, Pete Droge, Keith Richards, Stevie Nicks, Willie Nelson, getting the gigs with Sheryl Crow & Don Henley (great audition story), cool shares about meeting Jimmy Page, Paul McCartney, Billy Gibbons, Eric Clapton... founding Big Hat, and business ventures 65amps & Artistory… his great vintage guitars, becoming a parent, and more. Cool and sincere... If you’d like to support this show: http://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/support  Peter Stroud is Sheryl Crow’s guitarist of 22 years & her Music Director. He’s also toured the world, and/or recorded with Don Henley, Sarah McLachlan, Stevie Nicks, Shawn Mullins, Pete Droge, and founded his own band, Big Hat. Peter is also a co-founding partner of Artistory and 65amps Subscribe https://www.everyonelovesguitar.com/subscribe/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EveryoneLovesGuitar/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everyonelovesguitar/ 

2shot 2sDay
Days of Future Hard Pass (go away 2020)!

2shot 2sDay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2021 23:24


In our New Years episode everything old is new again including our top 2020 moments, Consumers Distributing, Bobby Orr and the Big Hat conspiracy.

In Strahd We Trust
Big Hat Energy

In Strahd We Trust

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2020 94:21


In Strahd We Trust is a real play D&D 5E adventure of Curse of Strahd.  OUR CASTOliver: DMChristianne: Kimiko - Child of NoneDon: Val Daardendarien - The UprisenRyan: Kazimir - Shepherd of MenDavid: Branimir - The Shining Protector GET IN CONTACT WITH US!Patreon: instrahdwetrustEmail: InStrahdWeTrust@gmail.comTwitter: @InStrahdReddit: u/InStrahdWeTrustOur official art has been done by Bella Mowczko. Check her art out on instagram: @bellamowczko.art MUSICMain ThemePinky23956: In Strahd We Trust ThemeAmbiance TracksOur music has been provided by BATTLEBARDS.COM. Apply the code: InStrahdWeTrust at checkout for your discount.Alexander Nakarada: Downtime - Fantasy Ambience In Strahd We Trust is unofficial Fan Content permitted under the Fan Content Policy. Not approved/endorsed by Wizards. Portions of the materials used are property of Wizards of the Coast. ©Wizards of the Coast LLC. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Schemes and Stones: A Malifaux Podcast
Episode 164 - Initial Impressions on Big Hat

Schemes and Stones: A Malifaux Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2020 75:00


Today I take a look at the Big Hat crew. Online community sites are A Wyrd Place, Wyrd Forums Support to my Patreon site here Schemes & Stones Discord server link (need software first) can be found here Schemes & Stones Blog site can be found here Schemes & Stones Youtube site can be found here Schemes & Stones facebook group can be found here

Fresh Daily
461: The epic Alice Ivy and the Big Hat Conundrum.

Fresh Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2020 12:43


Dragnet
Dragnet 55-02-15 ep287 The Big Hat

Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2020 25:07


The show takes its name from the police term "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet is perhaps the most famous and influential police procedural drama in media history. The series gave audience members a feel for the danger and heroism of police work. Dragnet earned praise for improving the public opinion of police officers. Actor and producer Jack Webb's aims in Dragnet were for realism and unpretentious acting; he achieved both goals, and Dragnet remains a key influence on subsequent police dramas in many media..---------------------------------------------------------------------------Sherlock Holmes Radio Station Live 24/7 Click Here to Listenhttps://live365.com/station/Sherlock-Holmes-Classic-Radio--a91441----------------------------------------------------------------------------Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

One Rental At A Time
Key Points from Millionaire Next Door Interview Bill Danko Big Hat no Cattle and Dr South - Dr North

One Rental At A Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2020 5:06


One Rental At A Time
The Millionaire Next Door Discussion, High Income not the Goal, Key to Happiness - Big Hat No Cattle

One Rental At A Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2020 33:49


Sisters Talkin' Shit
Big Hat: The Dad Episode

Sisters Talkin' Shit

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2020 37:34


This is all about our Dad. We have been alluding to him for a while now... Trigger warning for people who have had malignant narcissists in their lives. It's a loose, unscripted conversation about our memories and experiences with a toxic father.

Steam Powered Scoundrels: A Malifaux Podcast
Best Laid Plans: Big Hat vs. Nightmare

Steam Powered Scoundrels: A Malifaux Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2020 50:27


Bringing back a format we tried a year ago. Now that we have more people able to record, we can make these without forcing you to constantly listen to Ironsides games. This is also the first recording that doesn't involve Doug! Listen to best buds Nate and Roman play each other over vassal, recording their immediate reactions and tactics before the game starts, between each turn, and after. Nate was having a bit of an issue with his audio for a few rounds but you can still get what he's saying.Roman - NightmareThe Dreamer + Ancient Pact & 9ss Lord Chompy Bits + Inhuman Reflexes Widow WeaverBandersnatchSerena BowmanCoppeliusWicked Doll + Ancient Pact Nate - Big HatSo'mer Teeth Jones + Two Gremlins in a Ghillie Suit & 7ss Skeeters x2 Lenny Jones Georgy & Olaf + Inferiority ComplexOld Cranky Good ol' BoyBanjonistaBayou Gator

The Harl'e'faux Show
Ep.2 - The Tale of the Biggest Hat [Som'er]

The Harl'e'faux Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2020 81:39


The guys sit down to discuss Bayou master Som'er Teeth Jones and his Big Hat keyword!! Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tandgproductions Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HarlefauxShow Watch us on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/tgproductionsofficial

日积月累
Look at my big hat

日积月累

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 0:07


日积月累
Look at my big hat

日积月累

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 0:07


The Bellas Podcast
"She Likes to Wear the Big Hat"

The Bellas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2020 41:28


Happy New Year from the The Bellas Podcast! In Opening Up, Nikki and Brie share their New Year's resolutions for 2020. For Matchup of the Week, the Bella Twins debate: Do you take advantage of every opportunity that comes to you, or do you trust that the right things will come back around? Brie and Nikki respond to a listener voicemail for Dear Bellas, WWE superstar Daniel Bryan is back to host another hilarious edition of Bella Brains, and in Bella Army Q&A, the twins answer a couple fan tweets about their best and hardest moments of 2019. Help the Bellas kick off 2020 right by leaving a 5-star rating and a review with your favorite part of the show. Tweet your questions with the #BellasPodcast hashtag for Brie and Nikki to answer on future episodes. Blinkist: Visit Blinkist.com/BELLAS to try it free for 7 days and save 25% off your new subscription. Skrewball Whiskey: Go to SkrewballWhiskey.com for more info. Drink responsibly.

OTR Detective – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio

Friday and Smith search for a diamond robber. Original Air Date: February 15, 1955 ‘ Support the show monthly at patreon.greatdetectives.net Support the show on a one-time basis at... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

The Great Detectives Present Dragnet
EP3020: Dragnet: The Big Hat

The Great Detectives Present Dragnet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2019 31:00


Friday and Smith search for a diamond robber. Original Air Date: February 15, 1955 ‘ Support the show monthly at patreon.greatdetectives.net Support the show on a one-time basis at http://support.greatdetectives.net. Read more ...

Dragnet – The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio

Friday and Smith search for a diamond robber. Original Air Date: February 15, 1955 ‘ Support the show monthly at patreon.greatdetectives.net Support the show on a one-time basis at http://support.greatdetectives.net. Read more ...

Build Tune Race
Race Track Announcing and Big Hat Mafia with Barrett Green!

Build Tune Race

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2019 54:05


In this episode I get the chance to talk to Barrett Green about the background and what got him started as a Drag Racing Announcer! Find out what it has taken to make it a full time job! He has traveled all over the US and has announced at many races like the Doomsday No Prep, Street Outlaws No Prep Kings, Lights Out 10 Radial Race and much more! Barrett has also created a brand around BIG HATS call the Big Hat Mafia that he sets up and sells at many races and online at bighatmafia.com! If you enjoy these podcast please hit that Subscribe/follow button for more racing podcasts! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/buildtunerace/support

Salt & Sorcery Cast
Farline Shadows 7: Big Hat, Bigger Dreams

Salt & Sorcery Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2019 55:17


The Canal Express pick up a new crew member and investigate the Dock Worker's Union's invasion of their turf.Showrunners: Dylan, Trav, Kavin, Matt, and Braxhttps://www.twitch.tv/saltnsorceryhttps://twitter.com/saltnsorcery

Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast
Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast for Friday (8/23)

Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2019 13:05


We Discuss: NFL Preseason Disaster, Tom Brady's Big Hat and Sneaking Drugs Through Security See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Chromacast
Chromacast 51.1 - Jeff Devoe - Chromacast x The Weekend Dance Party Takeover (June 2019)

Chromacast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2019 63:02


To kick the summer off in June, the Chromacast crew had the pleasure of being featured on The Weekend Dance Party on WPVC 94.7 FM Charlottesville! Andy 909 and Philophonic host the electronic music broadcast live, every Saturday from 9pm -12am EST. You can catch the live stream on WPVC’s website or check out the archives on Andy909’s Mixcloud account. Episode 51.1 of Chromacast is the rebroadcast of Jeff Devoe’s set, covering some tech house, techno, and progressive house, featuring tracks from Franky Wah, Chus & Ceballos, Oscar L, Derrick Carter & Denney, and John Monkman, just to name a few. Also, the Chromacast crew started making music as ManIsMetaphor and we’re debuting our first track titled "Amygdala" in this mix! High Quality Download: www.bit.ly/chromacast-51-1-jeffdevoe Tracklist first in comments below. Check out more from The Weekend Dance Party: www.947wpvc.org www.facebook.com/CharlottesvilleEDM www.mixcloud.com/andy909 www.mixcloud.com/philophonicinthemix Tracklist Josh Butler - Rabbit Hole (Original Mix) Supernova - Buy Me A Dring (Original Mix) Franky Wah - To The Rhythm (Original Mix) dreamAwaken - Moon Stoller (Emmanuel Satie Rework) Chus & Ceballos, Oscar L - Sostenido (Original Mix) Tucci - Broken Circuit (Original Mix) Franky Wah - Bad Man (Original Mix) Melanie Ribbe - Get It Right (Original Mix) Chicks Luv Us - Bad (Original Mix) Gene Farris, Marco Lys - Turn It Up feat. Gene Farris (Extended Mix) Derrick Carter, Denney - Mr. Big Hat feat. Derrick Carter (Original Mix) Pete Tong, John Monkman - Placebo (Original Mix) DJ San - Cupola (Jerome Isma-Ae Remix) Orkidea - Nana (Jerome Isma-Ae Remix) donnerstag - In Space (Original Mix) ManIsMetaphor - Amygdala (Original Mix) Franky Wah - Get Me High (Original Mix) Gowal - Without End (Original Mix) John Monkman - WARP (Original Mix)

CRANEiacs
Session 46: It Was a Big Hat

CRANEiacs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2019 58:00


S04E07 (A Lillith Thanksgiving) & S04E08 (Our Father Whose Art Ain't In Heaven)   Our hosts discuss Ryan's recent Vegas trip, themed gifts, and create a new hit game show. Rate! Review! Subscribe! Email us! CRANEiacs@gmail.comTweet at us! @CRANEiacsJoin the Facebook Group!  https://www.facebook.com/groups/CRANEiacsPodcast/

Dragnet | Old Time Radio
Ep287 | "The Big Hat"

Dragnet | Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2019 26:34


Latest episode of Dragnet | Old Time Radio Classics --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/otr-dragnet/support

MisanthroPlay
#69 No Im Not Big Hat Cowboy

MisanthroPlay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2018 120:06


Robert and Alva discuss Red Dead Redemption 2, and how to examine a game surrounded by unacceptable labour practices.We Play: Pokémon Let’s Go, Evee! The Lost Child, Mega Man X, and SNK 40th Anniversary Collection.And hey. Nice.

What The Folklore?
Episode 202: Stinkbox 360

What The Folklore?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2018 57:24


"Sima Who Wore the Big Hat" has an ending that assures you that it's ok to not challenge any of your preconceived notions. It's also one with an immensely solvable problem at the heart of the plot. This episode brought to you by executive producer Cole, Aarne-Thompson type 780, "The Singing Bone" Suggested talking points: Sam R. I., warsad, the true origin of basketball, secret stink crypt, space jam disease, stinkweapon, hat ordeal, punk rock prodigy, @AndrewtheBrobdingnagianbardwhodoesthethemesongtoourpodcast.com, buttsword master, four-sword style, pup shred If you like our show, find us online to help spread the word! Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube. Support us on Patreon to help the show grow at www.patreon.com/wtfolklore. You can find merchandise and information about the show at www.wtfolklorepodcast.com.

Freight Train Boogie Podcasts
Freight Train Boogie Show #428

Freight Train Boogie Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2018 59:42


Show #428   Malcolm Holcombe - I Don't Wanna Disappear  (Come Hell Or High Water)  Shemekia Copeland - Great Rain  (America's Child)   Buffalo Gospel - 18 Wheeler  (On the First Bell)   Asleep At The Wheel - Pencil Full of Lead  (New Routes) (mic break) David Olney - This Side Or The Other  (This Side Or The Other) The Jellyman's Daughter -  I Hope  (Dead Reckoning)   The Naked Sun - War with Shadows  (War with Shadows)   Chad Elliott And The Redemptions - Hills Of Tennessee  (Rest Heavy) Malcolm Holcombe - -It Is What It Is  (Come Hell Or High Water) (mic break) Kristina Murray - Made In America  (Southern Ambrosia) Don Gallardo -  The Bitter End  (Still Here) Lyman Ellerman - Bigger Plans  (I Wish I Was a Train) Ashleigh Flynn & The Riveters -  -Big Hat, No Cattle  (Ashleigh Flynn & The Riveters)  (mic break) Malcolm Holcombe - Left Alone  (Come Hell Or High Water)

The Thing Minute
Episode 17: It's a Big Hat, It's Cool

The Thing Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2017 26:52


Minute 17: Helicopter Flies to the Norwegian Base Guest: James Stacey For links to everything we talked about, go to www.thethingminute.com!

How To Fix The Music Business
Sheryl Crow Guitarist Peter Stroud Goes Platinum

How To Fix The Music Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2016 57:30


My guest on the show today is Sheryl Crow's Music Director & guitarist Peter Stroud. Peter Stroud gets around. It’s funny how often I am flipping around the channels late at night and see Peter on stage somewhere. He’s played with Pete Droge, Sarah McLachlan and Don Henley, recorded on albums with Stevie Nicks, The Dixie Chicks, Shawn Mullins and Michelle Malone. As a guitarist and Musical Director of Sheryl Crow’s band, Peter has been a recurring player in her creative legacy going all the way back to her smash album The Globe Sessions. Alongside Sheryl, he has shared the stage with Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Prince, Chrissie Hynde and countless other musical legends. That’s a full plate by anyone’s measure, but like I said, Peter gets around. He co-founded a hugely successful guitar amplifier company, 65 Amps, and is a partner in the recently launched the Emerging Artist Network, a company that connects developing artists with brand patronage. Peter also is part of a band called Big Hat with guitarist Audley Freed and a band of killer musicians. In 2012, Big Hat self released their debut EP, with no record company involvement, so all the promotion and marketing was up to the band. The track “Feather In The Breeze” was added by fans to a couple of popular playlists on Spotify and over time, got over a MILLION plays. Because there was no record company involved, the money went straight to the band. There’s a lot of debate and mystery about where the money goes in streaming, so when I invited Peter on the show, I asked him if he could share the real numbers of what the band got paid...he gracefully agreed. I think you’ll all find this very interesting, I know I did - its not often that artists share this kind of information. Of course we riff about a ton of other stuff too - this is a good one! Stuff we talk about on this podcast: Peter Stroud on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/loudstroud Peter Stroud on Twittter: https://twitter.com/PeterStroud Big Hat: http://www.bighatband.com/about-us Sheryl Crow: http://www.sherylcrow.com/ 65 Amps: http://www.65amps.com/ Emerging Artist Network: https://emergingartistnetwork.com/ Chris Shiflett's Walking The Floor Podcast: http://walkingthefloor.com/ Jason Isbell: http://www.jasonisbell.com/ Pete Droge: http://www.puzzletreemusic.com/ Yacht Rock Review: http://www.pleaserock.com/tributes/yacht-rock-revue Peter's Music Recommendations: Sturgill Simpson: http://www.sturgillsimpson.com/ The Shelters: http://www.thesheltersmusic.com/            

Under the Crossbones The Pirate Podcast
052 - Javier Dominguez of Big Hat Pirates

Under the Crossbones The Pirate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2016 46:56


For extended show notes and more pirate goodies, visit www.UnderTheCrossbones.com     Javier Dominguez of Big Hat Pirates is on the show today.  Sure, we're talking about pirate hats.  Super bad ass custom pirate hats at that.  But we're also talking about creativity (of a form that I'm terrible at) and when and how an artist has to let go of his work and let the consumer do with it what they will.   This is a really great talk with a talented and forward-thinking artisan.   Plus comedy from Danny Minch and a song called "Devil's Advocate" from Silvertung    Important Websites: Javier Dominguez of Big Hat Pirates - https://www.facebook.com/TheBigHatPirates/ Danny Minch - http://dannyminch.squarespace.com/ Silvertung - http://www.silvertung.com/ You can get my latest comedy special, "Pretty From TheBack"at http://bit.ly/prettyfromtheback Additional Show Notes: www.UnderTheCrossbones.com/052 Support the show!: www.UnderTheCrossbones.com/support

AWESOME ASTRONOMY
#49 - July 2016

AWESOME ASTRONOMY

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2016 59:42


The Discussion: Earthling slave John got married! The new fashion of requesting telescopes at weddings, a good time of year for solar astronomy, the scores are in for the results of Jeni’s master’s degree, Jeni gets a sciencey summer job and we make a joking (but no less genuine) appeal for astronomy equipment to review in future shows. The News: Rounding up the space and astronomy news this month we have: NASA inflate Bigelow Aerospace’s inflatable habitat on the ISS Progress on NASA’s attempts to send humans beyond low Earth orbit Analysis of ALMA data hints at planetary formation beginning earlier than thought An update on the origins of the elusive Planet 9 The Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft gets ready to orbit the gas giant Arizona astronomers find 65 young galaxies – the oldest galaxy cluster yet discovered Woobusters: Continuing our quest to debunk the myths and conspiracy theories that persist in every dark corner of the news and the internet. This month’s topic, picked at random from Paul’s Big Hat of Woo, is moon landing hoaxers – the mother of all space-related conspiracy theories! Q&A: Listeners’ questions via email, Facebook & Twitter take us on a journey into the astronomy issues that have always plagued our understanding or stretched our credulity. This month we get a question about our own observing and imaging of the skies: How do you think the name of Planet 9 will be chosen if it’s eventually discovered – is it too late to start a campaign for Planet McPlanetface? Gavin Mills from Canberra, Australia

AWESOME ASTRONOMY
#48 - June 2016

AWESOME ASTRONOMY

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2016 59:52


The Discussion: Exam season is well underway for Jeni, Paul & Ralph ran the AstroCamp dark sky star party in Wales and the jet stream causes frustration for sky watchers in the UK. But the big event last month was the transit of the planet Mercury with a full day of observing this phenomenon for many parts of the world. The News: Rounding up the space and astronomy news this month we have: A possible new particle that threatens the foundation of physics discovered at CERN Is the life-hunting Exomars 2 ever going to get off the ground? 1,284 exoplanets discovered: 550 are rocky, 100 are earth sized, with 9 in their habitable zones The May 2016 transit of Mercury and witnessing the black drop effect DIY carbon nanotubes among 56 patents released by NASA and space elevators SpaceX make Paul look silly (again) Woobusters: Continuing our quest to debunk the myths and conspiracy theories that persist in every dark corner of the news and the internet. This month’s topic, picked at random from Paul’s Big Hat of Woo, is Flat Earth (heaven help us!) The Interview: For the interview this month we welcome the University of Oxford’s Professor Daniela Bortoletto who helped build the Large Hadron Collider and researches the findings of the world’s largest atom smasher. We take the opportunity to discuss: What is the Higgs boson and why it’s so important Why was the Higgs so hard to discover Daniela’s construction of LHC sensors & detectors The possible detection of a new particle that breaks the Standard Model Is the Standard Model broke or is this new particle a false discovery How much certainty is needed for a new discovery at CERN Q&A: Listeners’ questions via email, Facebook & Twitter take us on a journey into the astronomy issues that have always plagued our understanding or stretched our credulity. This month we get a question about our own observing and imaging of the skies: Loved the astrophotography verses visual conversation. Maybe you could talk about what astronomy set up you use and what you prefer, ie telescope type? @CosmicBeach from Norwich, United Kingdom

AWESOME ASTRONOMY
#46 - April 2016

AWESOME ASTRONOMY

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2016 70:43


Download Episode! The Discussion: This month Jeni has a PhD offer that’s getting us all excited, Paul’s been clocking up the miles to teach science and astronomy to schools and Ralph’s just excited because he’s got a new telescope. Mat & Phil from Project Helium Tears join us again on the day they launched their 2nd Star Wars themed balloon to the edge of space. The News: We start the news with last month’s total solar eclipse seen from parts of Asia before explaining the research that suggests an ancient cataclysm caused Mars crust & mantle to shift. Then we discuss the launch of ESA’s Exomars part 1. And we finish with a round-up of the news from NASA’s Insight mission, the 1st analysis of the atmosphere of a super earth exoplanet atmosphere and the latest SpaceX attempt to bring down the cost of commercial spaceflight. The Interview: For the interview this month we welcome Apollo 12 lunar module pilot and Skylab 2 commander Alan Bean. We discuss: 44 years of humans staying in Low Earth Orbit Nearly missing out on walking on the moon due to lightning Saving the Apollo 12 mission The colourful crew of Apollo 12 Finding organic matter in lunar orbit Competing with smarter astronauts – and not being Clint Eastwood! A moonwalker’s impressions of the moon The feeling of the moon’s surface underfoot And the full hour long interview with Alan Bean will be released in May 2016. Woobusters: Continuing our quest to debunk the myths and conspiracy theories that persist in every dark corner of the news and the internet. This month’s topic, picked at random from the Big Hat of Woo, is The Dead Cosmonauts conspiracy. Q&A: Listeners’ questions via email, Facebook & Twitter take us on a journey into the astronomy issues that have always plagued our understanding or stretched our credulity. This month we tackle: When will the Theory of General Relativity become Law? Brad Bell from Texas, United States