Podcasts about Parkinson

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  • 4,609PODCASTS
  • 8,796EPISODES
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  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Parkinson

Show all podcasts related to parkinson

Latest podcast episodes about Parkinson

Cosmopod
Under the Socialist Banner with Mike Taber

Cosmopod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 81:56


Donald Parkinson sits down with Mike Taber, editor of 'Under the Socialist Banner', a collection of resolutions from the Congresses of the Second International's revolutionary period (1889-1912). Donald and Taber go through the various Congresses and discuss their approaches to a variety of issues such as imperialism, the general strike, immigration, women's emancipation, colonialism, and cooperatives. Struggles between reformists and revolutionaries, militarists and militarists, orthodox Marxists and revisionists would culminate in the collapse of the International with the outbreak of World War One. Taber and Parkinson discuss these struggles and the overall strengths and weaknesses of the Second International.

STEM-Talk
Episode 140: Kaleen Lavin discusses the benefits of exercise on aging, Parkinson's and inflammation

STEM-Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 78:13


Today we would like to introduce you to one of our newest colleagues here at IHMC,  Dr. Kaleen Lavin, a research scientist who investigates the molecular mechanisms by which the body adapts and reacts to stressors such as exercise, training and aging. Kaleen came onboard at IHMC last year and is known for her use of computational biology techniques as a means to understand and improve human health, performance and resilience. She also is interested in the use of exercise as a countermeasure for a range of disease conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Today we will talk to her about some of her most recent work that examined the molecular effects of exercise training in skeletal muscle and in people with Parkinson's. We also talk to Kaleen about her recent paper that took a comprehensive look at the current literature surrounding the molecular and cellular processes underlying the molecular benefits that exercise induces in humans. The paper appeared earlier this year in Comprehensive Physiology and was titled, “State of Knowledge on Molecular Adaptations to Exercise in Humans.” Kaleen is a graduate of Georgetown University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in biology. She also earned a master's in sports nutrition and exercise science from Marywood University in Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in human bioenergetics from  Ball State University in Indiana. Show notes: [00:03:02] Dawn opens the interview mentioning that Kaleen grew up in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and asks Kaleen about her passion for music as a youth. [00:03:25] Ken asks Kaleen about her high school years and how she became  a competitive swimmer. [00:04:26] Dawn mentions that Kaleen was an excellent student growing up, but that it wasn't until her junior year of high school that she became interested in science. Dawn asks if it were a teacher who inspired Kaleen. [00:05:21] Dawn asks what led Kaleen to attend Georgetown University after graduating from high school. [00:05:57] Dawn asks if Kaleen knew she wanted to major in biology when she first arrived on campus at Georgetown. [00:06:45] Ken asks about Kaleen's experience of becoming a part of the Howard Hughes Program at Georgetown, which led to her gaining experience working in lab. [00:08:47] Dawn mentions that Kaleen transitioned from competitive swimming to running during her undergraduate years, running a marathon and half marathon. Dawn asks if  Kaleen's father, who is an avid marathoner, gave her the incentive to start signing up for marathons. [00:13:19] Dawn asks Kaleen about a faculty advisor who noticed her passion for running and exercise and helped her decide what to pursue for her master's degree. [00:15:23] Ken asks Kaleen what led her to pursue her master's at Marywood University, a small Catholic University in Scranton. [00:16:56] Ken asks Kaleen what prompted her to pursue a Ph.D. in exercise science at Ball State University, which has one of the longest-standing human performance programs in the country. [00:17:57] Dawn mentions Kaleen's experience with no-breath laps as part of her training when she was in high school on the swim team. Dawn asks Kaleen to explain what no-breath laps are. [00:19:00] Dawn asks Kaleen about a study she conducted for her master's thesis at Marywood that examined the effects of controlled frequency breath swimming on pulmonary function. [00:22:13] Ken asks about how Kaleen's time at Ball State set her up for her post-doc work at Center for Exercise Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [00:24:31] Ken asks what it was about UAB that attracted Kaleen to do her post-doc work there. [00:26:08] Dawn asks about a study published in 2017 by a group at UAB led by Marcas Bamman where researchers took people with Parkinson's disease and ran them through a high-intensity exercise program, finding that you could not only help people preserve some function but al...

When Life Gives You Parkinson's
Two women with Parkinson's, 200 years apart

When Life Gives You Parkinson's

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 39:55


SUMMARY: In the book, “Mary & Me,” author Robyn Cotton draws upon her own experiences with Parkinson's in a fictional novel based in contemporary times and early 1800's London, England when Dr. James Parkinson was roaming the streets and noticing a condition, he called shaky palsy. Not often does Parkinson's play such a key role in a fictional piece of work, Robyn's journey grounds the book in near-real experiences as she and her characters struggle with the degenerative brain disease.  EMAIL Larry and Rebecca: ParkinsonsPod@curiouscast.ca Have questions, comments, or a story idea? We would love you to click here and leave a message https://www.speakpipe.com/WhenLifeGivesYouParkinsons Follow us, Larry & Rebecca Gifford  Twitter: @ParkinsonsPod Facebook: Facebook.com/ParkinsonsPod Instagram: @parkinsonspod KEY LINKS  “Mary & Me” by Robyn Cotton – Buy it on Amazon The BC Brain Wellness Program Tightrope Theatre – “Playing with Words” workshops and the more intense “Express Yourself” six-week course with Rebecca Gifford are open for registration.  Thanks to  Dila Velazquez – Story Producer Our Promotional Partners include:  Diagnosed with Parkinson's? You are not alone. Contact presenting partner Parkinson Canada http://www.parkinson.ca/, call the toll free hotline 1-800-565-3000 or on Twitter you can message @ParkinsonCanada. Thanks also to our content and promotional partners  The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast hosted by Larry Gifford as featured in the MJFF2021 Year in Review.  PD Avengers – We are building a global alliance to end Parkinson's. Join us.  World Parkinson Congress 2023 – It's time to start thinking about making your plans to join us for #WPC2023 in Barcelona, Spain for the sixth triennial congress.  Spotlight YOPD – The only Parkinson's organization dedicated to raising awareness for Young Onset Parkinson's disease and funds for the Cure Parkinson's Trust. 

Parkinson News
O que o psiquiatra que trabalha com pacientes com a doença de Parkinson deve saber. Com o Dr. Felipe Dufloth

Parkinson News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 58:35


Meus vídeos possuem intuito educativo e seguem a ética médica proposta pelo Conselho Federal de Medicina. Atenção: ☛ O conteúdo do canal não substitui a consulta médica presencial. ☛ Busque ajuda médica em caso de necessidade. ☛ Não se automedique! Isso é prejudicial à sua saúde. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Faça sua Consulta Online com um Neurologista especialista agora! Sabia que você pode agendar uma consulta online comigo? Clique no link abaixo e fale direto comigo. https://www.dramarianamoscovich.com.br ✅ Gostou desse vídeo?a - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ✍️ Deixe seu comentário

Substantial Matters: Life & Science of Parkinson’s
Meet the Researcher: Disparities in PD Care

Substantial Matters: Life & Science of Parkinson’s

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 20:33


As with many medical conditions, people with Parkinson's disease (PD) may experience disparities in access to care, in diagnosis, treatments, and ancillary care. These disparities may be based on age, gender, race, financial situation, language barriers, and geographic location, among other factors. Dr. Lynda Nwabuobi, now a movement disorders specialist at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Institute in New York City, received her specialized training at Columbia University, supported by a Parkinson's Foundation Movement Disorders Fellowship.   During her training, she noticed that women with PD who were home-bound were more likely than men to be alone and to have less access to a neurologist. She also recognized disparities in the care between the majority white population of people with PD seen at the main hospital clinic of New York University (NYU) compared to the more racially diverse, multicultural community of people seen at NYU's public Bellevue Hospital nearby – even though they were being treated by the same doctor. In this episode, she describes how she acted on her passion of “creating access to better care to marginalized communities and bring more diversity to the clinic.” Rather than waiting for the community to come to the health care setting, she reached out to them on their turf -- at a farmers' market.

The Rebel Health Coach
146. The Miracle of Melatonin with Dr. John Lieurance

The Rebel Health Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 53:33


Dr. John Lieurance is a naturopathic physician, chiropractic neurologist, and all-around expert in medical biohacking who has been in private practice in Florida for 25 years. He is the chief scientific advisor of MitoZen Scientific and heads up Advanced Rejuvenation, a multi-disciplinary clinic with a focus on treating chronic diseases, regenerative medicine, functional neurology, functional medicine, and stem cell research. Dr. Lieurance has spent most of his career focused on finding solutions for hearing loss, balance disorders, tinnitus, degenerative neurological disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, autoimmune disease, chronic Lyme, Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (CIRS), and mold illness and has suffered from chronic Lyme and mold illness himself for many years. From his treatments, he has seen the same success and ability to recover and regain a normal life—free from the chronic inflammation and pain associated with those disorders—for himself as well as his patients. We talk about the misconceptions around melatonin as well as the many unspoken benefits of high-dose melatonin, and so much more. -- Resources: Learn more at https://www.ultimatecellularreset.com/about-dr-john/ (ultimatecellularreset.com) and https://www.advancedrejuvenation.us/ (advancedrejuvenation.us) Read: http://melatoninbook.com/ (Melatonin: Miracle Molecule) Read: http://methylenebluebook.com (Methylene Blue) Connect with Dr. John Lieurance: https://www.instagram.com/doctormitozen (Instagram) Visit https://thisishuso.com/rebel (thisishuso.com/rebel) and use the code “REBEL25” to save $25 Do you want more to empower yourself through healthy living? Is your busy lifestyle an obstacle to your health? Join https://www.facebook.com/groups/rebelhealthcoach/ (The Rebel Health Coach community) for the support and knowledge you need for better performance, better business and a better you! https://www.facebook.com/groups/rebelhealthcoach/ (Click here to join The Rebel Health Coach community now.) -- Disclaimer: The activities and research discussed in these podcasts are suggestions only and are only advised to be undertaken following prior consultation with a health or medical professional. Fitness training, nutrition, and other physical pursuits should be tailored to the individual based upon an assessment of their personal needs.

Colloquium
Say No and Still Be a Success: How to Achieve Balance in Your Life with Ryan McCostlin

Colloquium

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 46:29


Ryan is the CEO & Founder of Tailwater Dental, an adjust professor at Vanderbilt University here in Nashville, and he writes publicly online at ryanmccostlin.com. He lives in Nashville with his wife and 3 young children. Listen in! Key Highlights: [00:01 - 16:43]  Tips for Managing Your Time Effectively Ryan talks about his experience writing for himself for over a decade and how he started sharing his writings during COVID-19. The most effective people spend their time, energy, and effort on what they can actually influence. Ryan encourages listeners to focus on things they can influence rather than things they cannot. Spend most of your time on things that are important but not urgent. Parkinson's law states that work expands to fill the time available for its completion. Adopting a low-information diet can help focus on the things that matter most. Being mindful of who we are spending our time with can be beneficial. .[16:44 - 44:26]  Quality Time Matters More Than Quantity Time Ryan reflects on his career journey, noting that he has had to say no to opportunities in the past to pursue his true passions. https://www.craftdeology.com/the-story-of-the-chinese-farmer-by-alan-watts/ (The Story of the Chinese Farmer) tells us that a perceived fortune or misfortune isn't always fortune or misfortune. Not always being happy with what we have can be a blessing in disguise, as it can help us learn and grow. The most important thing is to spend with people you love, and that quantity over quality is key when it comes to time at home. Ryan encourages employees to be proactive in their careers and shoot for goals bigger than themselves. [44:27 - 46:28] Closing Segment Check out Ryan's content here - https://www.ryanmccostlin.com/ (https://www.ryanmccostlin.com/)!  Key Quotes: “If I'm thinking through something, it helps to hold myself accountable for communicating these thoughts in a way that's accessible to others.” - Ryan McCostlin “Intimacy can't be scheduled, and tenderness can't be planned. We can't make an appointment with our children to get them to share their real secret fears and dreams.” - Ryan McCostlin “Early in our career, if we can remember that maybe our goal isn't to have a certain number in the bank account. But our goal is to be able to wake up without an alarm clock, on our own terms; that's something that's better to shoot for.” - Ryan McCostlin Connect with Ryan: Website: https://www.ryanmccostlin.com/ (https://www.ryanmccostlin.com/)  Connect with me onhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/brian-c-adams/ ( LinkedIn)! LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, AND LEAVE US A REVIEW on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on. Thank you for tuning in and Stay Tuned for the Next Episode COMING SOON!

On Brand with Nick Westergaard
Optimize for Interesting with Dorie Clark

On Brand with Nick Westergaard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 34:55


Dorie Clark has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50. In addition to being a consultant for brands like Google and Microsoft, Dorie teaches at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School, and she is the Wall Street Journal bestselling author of The Long Game, Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. magazine. We discussed all of this and more this week on the On Brand podcast. About Dorie Clark Dorie Clark helps individuals and companies get their best ideas heard in a crowded, noisy world. She has been named one of the Top 50 business thinkers in the world by Thinkers50. She was honored as the #1 Communication Coach by the Marshall Goldsmith Leading Global Coaches Awards and one of the Top 5 Communication Professionals in the World by Global Gurus. She is a keynote speaker and teaches for Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School. She is The Wall Street Journal bestselling author of The Long Game, Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of the Year by Inc. magazine. A former presidential campaign spokeswoman, Clark has been described by The New York Times as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.” She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, and consults and speaks for clients such as Google, Yale University, and the World Bank. Forbes has declared that “her insights connect marketing, social media, communications, learning technologies, and personal discovery to give us a blueprint for success in the future economy.” She is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School, a producer of a multiple Grammy-winning jazz album, and a Broadway investor.   Episode Highlights Leading with “the fun part” … I kicked off the interview by asking Dorie about some of her interesting activities like investing in Broadway shows and producing jazz albums. This led her to one of the big ideas of her latest book The Long Game … Optimize for interesting. “We're often told to follow our passion but many don't know what their passion is—they have passion shame.” That's why Dorie encourages people to optimize for what's interesting in their lives. If there's a seed of something you like, work to add more of that in your work. In turn, this helps you stand out as a personal brand. What if you're stuck? What if you don't know what the inserting part of your life is? Dorie had a couple of idea starters for this. “First, what did you like to do as a kid? Chances are, you still like the same things now.” You'll have to listen to the show for her other handy hacks. “I look for positive constraints in business,” says Dorie. “Constraints can make us more creative and efficient.” She then noted Parkinson's Law, which says that work will expand to fill the time allotted. What brand has made Dorie smile recently? Dorie cited the fun summer (and sustainable) shoe brand Suavs for all of the good they're doing with their innovative products. “We all consume too much plastic. It's good to see someone doing something about it.” To learn more about Dorie and to take her free self-assessment that goes with The Long Game, head to dorieclark.com/thelonggame. Want more Dorie Clark On Brand? Check out her first appearance back in 2015 when Dorie was one of the first guests on the show! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

„Jetzt erst recht!“  Positiv leben mit Parkinson
Special Folge 53 - Finde deine Superkraft mit Larry Gifford (DEUTSCH)

„Jetzt erst recht!“  Positiv leben mit Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 38:43


Herzlich Wollkommen bei meinem Podcast. Ich habe vor gut 2 Jahren diesen Podcast gestartet weil ich selbst an Parkinson erkrankt bin und mich auf die Suche nach positiven Geschichten zum Thema Parkinson gemacht habe. Dabei spreche ich mit den Menschen, die sich damit am besten auskennen: Betroffene und Angehörige. Angefangen habe ich mit 50 Menschen in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz in deutscher Sprache. In diesem Jahr habe ich das Glück Gäste aus aller Welt in meinem Podcast begrüßen zu dürfen und daher gibt es inzwischen auch einige Folgen in englischer Sprache. Diese ist eine davon! Ich empfehle dir daher, dir die englische Originalfolge anzuhören, darin kannst du Larry sozusagen live sprechen hören. Falls du aber die Folge lieber auf Deutsch hören magst habe ich sie hier für dich übersetzt mit der großartigen Hilfe von Gunnar Sahr, der Larrys Synchronstimme spricht. Für das heutige Podcastinterview bin ich virtuell nach Kanada gereist und habe den großartigen Larry Gifford getroffen. Larry ist ein professioneller Talk Radio Director, leidenschaftlicher Podcaster und engagierte Interessenvertreter für Menschen mit Parkinson. Vor allem aber ist er ein wunderbarer Mensch mit viel Charme, Humor und einem großen Herz. Also begleite mich und triff Larry Gifford. Ich verspreche dir, du wirst diese Podcastfolge nicht vergessen! Links zu dieser Folge: Website der PD Avengers: https://www.pdavengers.com/ Larrys Podcast "When life gives your Parkinson's": https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/when-life-gives-you-parkinsons/id1404983468 Film "The long road to hope": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6tbHSPTEUM Welt-Parkinson-Kongress: Allgemeine Website: https://wpc2023.org/ Informationen zu Reise-Stipendien: https://wpc2023.org/page/TravelGrants Buch "Ending Parkinson's disease" englischsprachige Ausgabe: https://www.amazon.com/Ending-Parkinsons-Disease-Prescription-Action/dp/1541724526 deutschsprachige Ausgabe: https://www.narayana-verlag.de/Schluss-mit-Parkinson-Dr-Ray-Dorsey-Dr-Todd-Sherer-Dr-Michael-S-Okun-Dr-Bastiaan-R-Bloem/b26333 Ich freue mich über deine Rückmeldung zu dieser Folge. Schreib mir gerne unter: kontakt@jetzt-erst-recht.info

„Jetzt erst recht!“  Positiv leben mit Parkinson
Special Episode 52 - Find you superpower with Larry Gifford (ENGLISH)

„Jetzt erst recht!“  Positiv leben mit Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 37:31


Welcome to my podcast which is about living positively with Parkinson‘s disease. My name is Kathrin Wersing, I live in Germany and I started this podcast about 2 years ago because I was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease at the age of 40 and I was looking for positive stories about PD. In my podcast I talk to experts: people who actually live with PD and their family members. I started with 50 inspiring people in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. This year, I am happy to welcome guests from all over the world to my podcast, so there are now some episodes in English language as well. And this is one of them! For today's podcast interview, I virtually traveled to Canada and met the wonderful Larry Gifford. Larry is a professional talk radio director, passionate podcaster, and dedicated advocate for people with Parkinson's. But most of all, he is a wonderful person with a lot of charm, humor and a big heart. So join me and meet Larry Gifford. I promise you won't forget this interview! Links to this episode: Website PD Avengers: https://www.pdavengers.com/ Larrys Podcast "When life gives your Parkinson's": https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/when-life-gives-you-parkinsons/id1404983468 Film "The long road to hope": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6tbHSPTEUM World-Parkinson-Congress: Main Website: https://wpc2023.org/ Information about travel grants: https://wpc2023.org/page/TravelGrants Book "Ending Parkinson's disease": https://www.amazon.com/Ending-Parkinsons-Disease-Prescription-Action/dp/1541724526 I appreciate your feedback on this podcast episode. Feel free to write to me: kontakt@jetzt-erst-recht.info

Neurology Minute
Alpha-Synuclein Amplification for Disease Diagnosis

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 2:29


Dr. Lucilla Parnetti discusses the clinical application of α-synuclein seed amplification assays (SAAs) in the identification of Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies.  Show references: https://n.neurology.org/content/99/5/195 This podcast is sponsored by argenx. Visit www.vyvgarthcp.com for more information.

Casenotes
Ep.4 - Past & Present - Geriatrics

Casenotes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 27:31


Casenotes Past & Present is a Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh podcast. In this fortnight's episode we uncover the history of geriatric medicine, including the use of workhouses and asylums to house the elderly. We also explore medical theories on old age – from the 1600s to the present day, via the discovery of Parkinson's Disease and an allegedly 169 year old man. We also talk to Dr Martin Wilson about his experiences working as a consultant geriatrician in the 21st century. And, to finish off, our case study today is a present rather than a historical one – as Martin tells us about some of the fascinating patients he has met during his work. Website: https://www.rcpe.ac.uk/heritage Twitter: https://twitter.com/RCPEHeritage

Arizona Science
Episode 333: How certain birds can help us understand the development of Parkinson's in humans

Arizona Science

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 5:15


The Red Light Report
Brain & Cognitive Health, Parkinson's & Gut Health, & Cancer via Photobiomodulation

The Red Light Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:31


This week on The Red Light Report, we will continue navigating through the fourth edition of the Red Light Therapy Treatment Protocols eBook that I released last week. The eBook almost doubled in size relative to the third edition, as I added a copious amount of information, research and protocols to this fourth edition.   On the previous solosode, we covered the following topics: Important Concepts; Anxiety, Depression & Stress; Athletic & Exercise Performance; and Bone & Joint Health. In this solosode, we will be covering two BIG topics: Brain & Cognitive Health and Cancer. This may be an episode you will want to share with someone you know that is going through one of these health conditions. The information outlined is invaluable. Even thought there's only two topics this week, I promise there is ample amount of juicy information to listen to and learn. As always, light up your health! - Dr. Mike Belkowski Discusses the following: Brain & cognitive health Mitochondrial dysfunction and how it leads to cognitive issues Ways red light therapy can be used trans-cranially Autism Aging and how it isn't fully understood Treating the cognitive deficits from aging with red light therapy Reversing the aging process in the brain Concussions and traumatic brain injuries Treating gut health Treating Parkinson's disease Treating cancer - Check out the Red Light Therapy Treatment Protocols eBook, 4th Edition - Invest in BioLight:There is only a week left in our crowdfunding campaign on Republic! For a limited time, you have an opportunity to invest in and own a piece of BioLight...Click the following link to learn more: BioLight Campaign - To learn more about red light therapy and shop for the highest-quality red light therapy products, visit www.biolight.shop - Stay up-to-date on social media: Instagram YouTube Facebook

Running Commentary
Long Summer Run - Part Two

Running Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 41:39


Rob and Paul's long run continues on to beautiful Hampstead Heath, where thoughts and chat turn to the future, as a new month begins, kids come of age, and Rob heads for the half century.Thank you for sharing your runs with us, supporting us through the Acast Supporter button and sponsoring Rob for Parkinson's UK; you're wonderful - namaste.Rob's book Running Tracks is available here - https://www.waterstones.com/book/running-tracks/rob-deering/9781800180444, and you can get Paul's award-winning 26.2 Miles to Happiness here - https://www.waterstones.com/book/26-2-miles-to-happiness/paul-tonkinson/9781472975270Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/runningcommentary. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

2 Mikes Parkinson's Podcast
Darbe Schlosser explains how to break through bradykinesia

2 Mikes Parkinson's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 39:10


Darbe Schlosser is the coach, consultant, & creator of the Motorvation System. Motorvation (https://www.motorvationfoundation.org/) provides scholarships for People with Parkinson's to receive fall prevention consulting and coaching. They have administered over 900 hours of training through the Parkinson's Foundation community grant. They are in the process of developing a rehabilitative training taxonomy to improve the deliverance of rehabilitative training to the Parkinson's demographic. In addition to developing the best strategies to overcome movement abnormalities within a highly variable disease, Darbe also focusRD on improving the deliverance of these methods with consideration of movement history, movement goals, and individual constraints that impact learning and performance outcomes. ‍ She believes there exists an interrelatedness between motor output and sounds. Understanding these relationships can better provide you with tools on how to break through mental and motor blocks and successfully deconstruct and reconstruct complex movement patterns.

TechNation Radio Podcast
Episode 22-31 Replacing some of your DNA with new DNA that works better - and stopping it at will .

TechNation Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 59:00


On this week's Tech Nation, Moira speaks with Dr. Alexandria Forbes (whom you may known as Zandy Forbes), President and CEO of MeiraGTx, tells us about their efforts in treating retinitis pigmentosa and Parkinson's, among other medical conditions. MeiraGTx is also working on a new technology to replace defective DNA with new working DNA, and the ability to stop the new DNA should you choose. Then Matthew Ball, the former global head of strategy for Amazon Studios, talks his book: “The Metaverse … and How It Will Revolutionize Everything.”

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries
NEJM This Week — August 4, 2022

NEJM This Week — Audio Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 33:42 Very Popular


Featuring articles on a monoclonal antibody to prevent malaria infection, monoclonal antibody therapy in Parkinson's disease, and dulaglutide in youths with type 2 diabetes; a review article on spina bifida; a Clinical Problem-Solving on diagnostic aspirations; and Perspective articles on building a national public health system in the U.S., on a preview of the dangerous future of abortion bans, on the end of Roe v. Wade, and on code words.

Unravelling | The Messy Truth Of Life
Healing our relationship with food and the body with Lily Parkinson

Unravelling | The Messy Truth Of Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 65:29


A beautiful conversation with the multi-passionate Lily Parkinson about how we can find a more embodied healing path when it comes to the way we eat and perceive our bodies. Lily is a Nutritional Therapist, Embodied Eating Disorder and Mind-Body & Eating Psychology Coach, Yoga Teacher, Medicine Woman and Cacao Ceremonialist.  After struggling for many years with disordered eating, body dysmorphia and anxiety and depression, she began to seek a more embodied and spiritual path of healing through connecting with the wisdom of body and the earth. Lily's soul mission is to support women to find embodiment so that they can find freedom in their food, body and health by combining different healing modalities that encompass the body, mind and spirit as healing resources so that women can live in their wholeness. In this episode we discuss… Lily's own healing journey with food and her body, and how it linked with feelings of unworthiness. How Yoga was the main catalyst for her journey with embodiment to begin. How society, media and the outside world has an impact on the disconnection and dissatisfaction that is so common within the body. Why we need to change the narratives around complementing people on their weight and appearance. The language we use towards ourselves and our bodies, and how awareness of this can be an important first step to healing our relationship with food and the body. The spectrum and complexity of eating patterns and how to notice if these are impacting your overall wellbeing. Some of the most powerful tools, rituals and practices Lily has found to help make baby steps to healing our relationship with food and the body. Some of the deeper reasons we turn to controlling food. And so much more! Links & Resources… Click here to connect with Lily on Instagram. And click here to explore her website. Click here to connect with Lauren on her personal Instagram or here for The Heart Work Studio. Email me here if you want to keep this conversation going.

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
The Millionairess Mentality with Tamar Hermes | EP115

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 43:01


Tamar is a full-time real estate investor. She's a coach author and the founder of wealth building concierge. As the CEO of wealth building concierge. She empowers women to become financially free by teaching them how to invest in real estate. She is also a contributing writer for entrepreneur and her first book, The Millionairess Mentality, a professional woman's guide to growing wealth through real estate was released just recently a month or two ago. And as a three times Amazon number one best-selling book.  In this episode we talked about: Tamar's Bio & Background Duplex Investment Real Estate Investment Geography Partnership Deal Structure Tamar's Role in Closing Deals A book “The Millionairess Mentality” Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned   Useful links: Book: The Power of One More: The Ultimate Guide to Happiness and Success by Ed Myllet https://www.themillionairessmentality.com/ https://quiz.tryinteract.com/#/60bd0792decf1d00177af595 Discover your Investing Personality https://wealthbuildingconcierge.com/ Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name's Jessica galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. All right, ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jess Fraga and you're listening to working capital real estate podcast. My guest today is Tamar Hermas. She is a full-time real estate investor, coach, author, and founder of wealth building concierge, guiding women to become financially free through real estate investing.   She's also a contributing writer for entrepreneur and bigger pockets and has been featured in Buzzfeed fem founder, and the bigger pockets podcasts. Her first book, the millionaires mentality, a professional women's guide to growing well through real estate was released last month and is three times Amazon. Number one, best seller. Well congrats number one and tomorrow. How are you doing?   Tamar (57s): Thank you. I'm awesome. It's an awesome day to be recording an episode with you.   Jesse (1m 4s): Yeah. Well thank you again for coming on the show. You're joining us from Austin today.   Tamar (1m 9s): That's correct. The great, the great city of Austin, where we have booming real estate and lots of people moving here and lost of opportunity.   Jesse (1m 19s): Yeah. Despite your government's best efforts.   Tamar (1m 22s): Yes. We won't talk about politics today.   Jesse (1m 26s): Well, being north of the 45th, we won't get into us politics, but again, thanks for coming on the show. I thought it'd be great to talk real estate with yourself, from your perspective and some of the, the unique aspects and adventures that you've taken in your career to kick us off. What we like to do with guests is number one, talk a little bit about how you got into this crazy world that we call real estate.   Tamar (1m 51s): Yes. So I was 28 years old, an executive in the entertainment industry and realized that while I had a great job, I was in the trap of trading time for money and I didn't like it. And I noticed that the guy that was my landlord collected rent checks every month. And I thought, well, that's pretty cool. I wonder if I could do that. And I wonder if I could stop paying rent. So even back over 20 years ago, people were thinking this way before we learned about house hacking and all of the terms that we have coined today.   And I went ahead, I bought a duplex and the rest is history. It didn't turn out a hundred percent the way I had planned, it was a great deal, but I could have done different things. Now, knowing what I know today, I probably would've been a little more strategic, so it's still appreciated. Great. And it actually is a property that I hung onto sentimentally. It's not, it would make a lot more money if I sold it, but I just don't have the heart to,   Jesse (2m 58s): We just talked before the show about these unique properties that we kind of collect over the years. And that seems like one that's. Is that still with you?   Tamar (3m 6s): It is. It is still with me. And it's, I, I I'm really of the belief that people that build assets, people that build portfolios and have properties or in a lot of deals and partnerships. Those are people that build real wealth, flippers and people that do other strategic moves, where they don't hold the property. That's also a great strategy, but it's more of a job, right? Because as soon as I'm done with the flip, I have to find another flip.   Jesse (3m 36s): Yeah. It's one of the things I always say, the, especially with flipping or if that, you know, your business is birth strategy, anything like that, you really are, you know, a job might be too, you know, condemn them too hard, but it's definitely a business that's an operating business. And as soon as you stop working, the money typically stops coming in.   Tamar (3m 54s): Right. And that's why it's always great. If you have that strategy in place, which is a great strategy, especially if you don't have a ton of money, it's a great way to start because you can make a really good margin on a flip, and then you can use that money to buy and hold something or figure out how to strategically refinance it and get all your money out of the deal. So there are opportunities there, but I definitely believe that holding assets longterm is safe and a great way to have passive income regularly, regardless of what the market does.   Jesse (4m 26s): Yeah. That's a really good point. I think it's similar to, you know, when somebody sells a company and they take that seed money and invest it, one thing with real estate, you know, what other area are you able to take a large chunk of, of capital from the sale of say, you know, fix and flip and utilize that, you know, even if your salary's great Parkinson's law usually tells us that, you know, if we, if we make enough, we will spend probably the same amount, regardless of what percent or what amount we make. So it's a good point. So this, that was your first foray into real estate.   And you, you said 20 years, was that in the early two thousands? That duplex?   Tamar (5m 3s): Yeah, I bought that. I bought that in the early two thousands and, and really my journey. Wasn't very bold. I didn't go and start buying up a lot of properties. I was very tentative because I was, did not know anything about wealth or real estate investing. And I was very afraid. There are big investments. There, there are a lot of money and, and I didn't wanna make a mistake and I didn't want to buy something that, that didn't work out and be underwater.   And really, I was listening to the people that didn't know real estate, or that had a bad experience in real estate. And when you, when you get into the trap of listening to those people, you'll, you'll only hear negative stories. So it's always a good idea to listen to the people that are successful. And that when I started doing that, I really started to steamroll. And the truth is you gotta bet on yourself. And at the end of the day, all of us know more than we think we know we've been so beaten down, just everybody in life is their stories of trauma or hurt.   Even if you had a great childhood where maybe, you know, one day your mom turned around and said no to you. And then, you know, we're, we're we go into the adult world feeling paralyzed with that word? No. So I just think that, that it was, it was definitely the mindset and stepping into the person that I wanted to become and the, and the life that I wanted to create that helped me propel myself into an, into wealth.   Jesse (6m 40s): Yeah. I don't think there's an investor out there that had, has not had that experience of, you know, people at the beginning of your career saying, you know, I've tried it before tenants are gonna put holes in the wall. You know, you shouldn't do it, the real estate markets fickle it's really, until you do it, that you kind of quiet those voices, but a hundred percent when you're at the beginning of your investing career, those are pretty loud voices. And even though sometimes they can mean the be for the best. A lot of times, those voices are very close to home. So you, you take them to heart.   Tamar (7m 10s): Absolutely. And having income. And especially when you haven't grown up with any money, you get very attached to the security and to the comfort of feeling like, you know, your bills are paid, you know, you can go certain places and travel and do the things that we all really enjoy doing. And that attachment creates a lot of fear when we wanna make moves to grow wealth, because there's no way to do it unless you're willing to, unless you're willing to take a little bit of a leap.   Yeah. And the thing that I like though about real estate, more than any other asset is that, or any other, you know, stock market or business venture, is that I can really understand it. And like you said, once you understand it, you can, you can kind of bet on it in a way where you've really mitigated a lot of the risk. So it's almost like not really a bet. Like the stock market is a lot more of a bet business is certainly, I mean, huge rewards, but big bet. And then real estate is like small margins of bet and big rewards.   Jesse (8m 16s): Yeah. I, I can't remember. I always mix the, the three up, but there's the, you know, you can mitigate risk, you can reduce risk, you can eliminate. And I think you, you can bear the risk. So I think, you know, depending on what area in real estate, you invest, you can be super, super conservative where you can be cowboy gun slinging, you know, developer speculating. So I think there's a, there's a wide variety of aspects that you can tackle it. This one thing I, I like to ask investors is this idea that you said you kind of alluded to being tentative at the beginning.   And I'm always curious to know when people switch, if they do from their full-time job to a full-time investor, if they keep both of them at the same time, like what, what did that look like for you when you started ramping up on the investing side?   Tamar (9m 3s): Again, it took me a while to, to let go of a, a very steady stream of income. So the, my corporate, my corporate job, I actually left. And because I was starting the journey of motherhood and realized that I didn't wanna work in the entertainment industry where they absolutely don't, don't give you a lot of time off just because you had a kid it's not, I mean, there are certain companies, but the kind of work that I did, it wasn't like that.   And, and, you know, there's, the entertainment industry is well known for having long hours. It's just the nature of creating TV and movies. And so when I had left that I actually had started in another company and it was, it was very easy to just keep going with that. And even as I was making the income through real estate, I still was holding onto that because I still wanted that were so conditioned. It was like, in my mind, I still thought, well, something can happen in real estate.   And it takes a really long time. But what I did was I created certain posts, certain number posts, where it was like, okay, once I have 10,000 a month, then I'll be comfortable. And I think that's really important because otherwise you just keep racing and racing. Yeah. I have friends that have eight figures and they're still, they still have one of the, one of the partners in the relationship working in a corporate job, because they're just thinking, well, just a few more years, cuz we remember in 2008 and we didn't have money and we never want that to happen again.   So he's just gonna work in the job a few more years that he really doesn't like, because we have, you know, 9 million in the bank, but we're just, we just need another 30, 30,000 a year in cash flow.   Jesse (10m 52s): Yeah. I mean, that makes a lot of sense. Like I have the benefit, you know, my day to day job is in commercial real estate as a broker. So it's kind of like, you know, we, we, we let go of this idea of having guaranteed income a long time ago. So that's why I feel that in my world of the, of the people that do invest, they, they aren't, you know, even, even in their sixties and seventies, sometimes they always have one foot still into, in the, in the brokerage world just because it's, it's that kind of world where you can, you can somewhat manage both, but 100%, I think for everybody having that job, like you said, completely conditioned to have that income, regardless of what it, what it is because of those unknowns, the 2000 eights, the 1992 threes.   But so the, the duplex from there, what did the, the journey look like from there to where you are now and, and specifically in terms of the type of properties or assets that you invest in.   Tamar (11m 48s): Yeah. So I'm still a huge fan of duplexes and single family homes. I think that it's a great way to invest, talk about a conservative investment that can yield a lot of return and tax advantages. So I, I absolutely love that model. It's not the sexiest. It's not like, oh, you know, it's not like saying I own a 150 unit multifamily at the same time. Who cares because the truth is if you need to exit 150 multifamily, it's a lot harder than getting rid of 10 single family homes.   So you have to look at your comfort level. And for me, I still have those sprinkled into my portfolio. And over time, what I've done with my portfolio is I have gone more into a balancing act of having, having a lot of partnership deals. I'm in a lot of syndications and I'm in a lot of Airbnbs where I put the capital in, but I don't do anything, but I own equity and I own, and I, I get paid passive income every month.   So there's all kinds of ways you can structure deals. That's sort of become a, a more fun way for me because I am a people person. And I also have, have a really good radar for identifying talent and identifying really great partners that I can trust. And so at a certain point, I feel like when you're, when I'm in the grind and I have these properties, it's a little lonely, you're kind of on your own, but when you have the partnerships, it starts to get playful.   And at this, and the reason why I keep the single families and some of the other pieces that I still manage is for the real estate professional status, which is a very good benefit. I'm not sure how you have that structured in Canada, but in the states, the, the real estate professional status is allows you to take both active and passive income as a tax deduction, which is really an extraordinary opportunity to offset income.   Jesse (13m 56s): Yeah, my understanding last time I looked into this and we've had cross border accountants and lawyers on the show before my understanding is we don't have it. If I remember correctly, there's a certain amount of hours per week that need to be dedicated to real estate for, to, to classify as that status. Is that, is that correct?   Tamar (14m 12s): Yeah. It's not only that you're working in real estate. So one of the, I'm not a CPA, so please don't take my advice, talk to your CPA. But, but, but the fact of the matter is is that if you are a real estate agent, you're not a real estate professional. Yeah. It really is actively participating in the properties for a certain amount of hours and it actually gets it. The rules are actually quite strict and, and it, and if there is an audit, which is, you know, you never really know happens statistically, we're not, you know, audits.   There was a rumor that audits were on the decline, but we, we know we have a lot of, of fish to fry right now. So, you know, there's a, there's a lot of things happening probably before maybe they get to your tax return to audit it. But that said, I would, you know, do my best to follow the rules. And at the same time, know that the likelihood of you being audited is probably not wildly great. And anyway, the truth is, is that, you know, you stay in line, you have to keep a log and do the real estate professional status in the states.   And if you do and you do it correctly, then you do have an opportunity to, to get a big tax deduction, which is why I do it.   Jesse (15m 29s): Yeah. It makes sense. I mean, I think we've had, I think Laura Lauren Cohen on the show before she's a cross border lawyer and Florida to Toronto is kind of the, the pipeline. And I think part of the status for visa, for Canadians in the states, or one of the, the angles she uses is that, is that status there of real estate professional as part of building a, I guess, an argument for the visa. So in terms of the, the geography you're in Austin, Texas, your proper's, Texas out-of-state instate, what do you like to what you like to buy?   Tamar (16m 2s): Yes, well, I came from California, so definitely exited a lot of that for obvious reasons, beautifully appreciating market, but very difficult for landlords and the, and the tenant laws, which I know that that's something that you contend with too in Canada. And so Texas is for the landlord, which doesn't mean that you want to treat your tenants any less respectfully. However, if a tenant is not respecting you, then you have the right to, to have them have them vacate your premises, which seems reasonable to me.   And, and so, yes, I am investing in Texas. I really have investments across the country. There are so many great markets right now. We've seen so much growth in so many different states. And I try not to manage a lot in, in other states because one, because I'm, I'm, I like my real estate professional status and two, because I, I just don't need to because I'm in Texas and it's a great market to invest in.   Jesse (17m 10s): Yeah, my friends and family in, in California and New York state, they can feel our pain in Toronto and Ontario. I think our laws are more similar to those two states than they are to say, Florida or Texas, for instance. And it's 100% I've, I've probably, I've said it a number of times on the program before where it's, it has nothing to do with trying to do anything nefarious with your tenants. It's just having a level playing field that, you know, both sides are accountable to each other and not one is taken advantage of the other.   And unfortunately, I think the way that stabilization and rent control is developed in, in New York and California, it, it unfortunately goes that way. And it's very difficult to get tenants out when they are violating the terms that you agreed to.   Tamar (17m 54s): Right. And I do have a lot of sympathy for, for creating rules around that, because unfortunately there are people where they'll come in and they'll just take people out and they are displacing people that cannot afford homes. And we obviously have a, a lack of housing. And so that is something that is a consideration from a humanitarian standpoint, although then we have the other side. So yeah, it is, it's difficult to invest in, in, in California. I still do have investments there.   And, but it's, you know, anything that falls under the rent control is, is very difficult to work with.   Jesse (18m 34s): And are they still using the system of there's annual guidelines for increases of rent? Is, is that something they do in California as well?   Tamar (18m 41s): Yes. There are annual guidelines unless someone moves out. Yeah. Then you can, then you can raise the rent, a market rent to market, and I actually have paid, and this is crazy, cuz this, you can buy properties for this. I paid one 10 at $70,000 once. Wow. To vacate. Yeah. And that was, that was my mistake. And part of it is that when you're, when you're in the process, it was a property that I had bought early on that was under rent control. You don't know all the nuances.   And so what hap it's really important when you buy a property to start investigating right away. Okay. What can be done? These are things that I could see could be issues. So I had a tenant that was in there and I probably could have just offered them $10,000 when they moved in. But instead I, I thought, well, that's fine. We'll just let them ride. Well, 10 years later, the property had escalated in value and they were very well situated in the property and just didn't wanna move. And they were smart. They knew their rights.   And so I was really in it stuck between a rock and a hard place. So I think that it's a good lesson for whenever you get any kind of property like multifamily, whatever it is, storage, whatever it is always start right away and look at, okay, these are the potential issues that I see that could happen and figure out how to mitigate them sooner than later. Don't really think hard before you decide, I'll just kick the can on this. Because if you see that it could be an issue later, if you kick the can on it, ultimately you won't be in as strategic of a position to negotiate some sort of a, an exit around it.   Jesse (20m 20s): So that sounds to me that you wanted to get vacant possession for a sale.   Tamar (20m 24s): Well, I wanted, well, there was two, it was twofold. I either wanted vacant possession to, to double the rent from 1500 to 3000, which is a huge difference. Or I wanted possession for the sale. But once you have someone that is occupying the property, if they don't wanna leave and you can't, you know, readily force them, there are certain guidelines, but I, I try to stay within the, the legal parameters because I wanna be a good citizen. And, and so what, what happened is that if you wanna sell the property, if you sell the property with it's the same, it's the same principle also for any kind of real estate that you're doing.   If you sell the property and it's not performing as well as it could, because it has an, it has an issue. Someone else can solve that problem, but they're gonna pay less for the property. Yeah. But if you solve the problem, then you can charge more for the property. So that was my strategy I wanted to, at the time I either wanted, I wanted possession of the property. I wanted possession of that unit. Yeah. So that was kind of how it went.   Jesse (21m 27s): Yeah. It's pretty much standard practice now that in, in Toronto and a couple other cities up here that it's, it is a agreement that you come to, whether it's 20,000, 25, 30,000 in an apartment scenario per tenant to, to leave, I'm amazed that the government is still allowing us to have that adult conversation and contract and say that you agreed to leave if, if this amount is paid, cuz you know, if you just Google that, you'll start seeing a number of news articles that I probably are not dissimilar to your experience in California.   Now, in terms of the, the structure that you typically like to use, you mentioned partners now, is this something where you're doing a JV, a more formal structure, like a syndication what's what do you typically like to do? And I understand that, you know, could depend on the, on the property itself,   Tamar (22m 17s): Right? So it's true. It does depend on the property itself. And what I really work towards is identifying the best partner. So if I'm going to be a limited partner in LP, then I will look for the best sponsors and the Le best terms and the best deals. What did they buy the property for all the questions you wanna ask kind of as an outsider before you give someone your money and you also wanna look at the track record of the operator to make sure, you know, have they exited before, do do they know how to deal with this asset class, all of those things.   So that's what I look for there. A lot of the determination there has to do with, you know, do I, you know, do I like the terms? Do I like the model? Do I do? I think the sponsor can handle, you know, can, can execute on their plan. So with that, I will just put, put money into there. Also, one of the things I look at is what kind of depreciation they offer because depreciation allows us to, with, if you're not a real estate professional, you can do passive, passive income, passive income against passive losses so that depreciation can help you offset some, some, some other passive income, which is really comes in handy.   And you know, it return, it expands your bottom line, right? If they're offering you 17%, but then you get a depreciation, you can think it's like a 22%, which is quite a, quite an attractive return. So on the LPs, that's how I do that. Now, when I GP a project, I'm still looking for the same things, but I'm probably even more strict. And the reason is, is because when, as a general partner, I'm part of that deal and I really need to make 150% sure because I'm the one that's coming to you and saying, Hey, I've got a deal for you and bringing people into the deal.   And I'm also involved in, in the trenches. So with that, I'm looking even with a stronger magnifying glass and, and other deals, it just, you know, partnerships come to me, like I said, I'm in a couple of Airbnbs and the smokes, I own one on my own. And then I have a couple with partners. I do nothing and it's great. We just refied out. I just got all my money out of the deal and it's appreciated hundreds of thousands of dollars. I own equity and I do nothing. And, and so it's a fantastic opportunity.   And for that, I really look at what are the ideas that a partner approaches me with and, or what are the ideas that I'm bringing to a partner? So if I don't, you know, you either have to have the time, the sweat or the, or the deal. So, so I have to look at with me a lot of times, it's I happen to have the capital. So, you know, I'm looking at it from a place of where do I wanna give my capital, but if you have the deal, then you have options of, you know, what kind of partner would be someone that will be reasonable and create, create terms that, that are amenable to both.   So it's a win-win.   Jesse (25m 16s): So once the sale is closed, you always hear that of, you know, the different individuals I, you know, was saying, we just hired a, a new kid at work. And I was basically saying that real estate you're gonna, you're gonna have every different type of individual. And, and some client is going to be the right fit for them. And, and that may be the complete opposite to you. There's always kind of a fit because it's a people business and every person and every client's gonna be slightly different. And one thing I, we were talking about was after the deal is done in terms of closing, if you're the, the operator.   So you're the general partner in this case, you know, one thing you learned really quickly is if you have partners, you know, some people are better at making sure that the bank statement looks okay, others are better at investor relations. Others are better with construction. You said you're kind of a people person, you know, what hat do you typically or feel the most comfortable wearing when you're in that general partner role? And then how do you delegate, you know, those other, those other areas.   Tamar (26m 15s): So I'm very much a friend of the house person. And, and I definitely am a lot involved in, in putting pieces together in consumer relations in, in finding part, the right partners to also partner with us. That is more my wheelhouse, like the underwriting. I can look at it, but I don't wanna sit at a desk and underwrite a deal for, you know, 10 hours a day. And that's what it takes, cuz you're looking at deal after deal, after deal. And some people love that. They, they love the numbers, they love the strategy and that's great, but that's just not, that's not my thing.   So pretty much that's, that's the role that I play. So I might bring in other people to do different things. I usually have other, there's usually several GPS on a deal. So I'm usually not left by myself to kind of delegate everything. I usually have various partners that are very skilled at other things. And, and so that's kind of how it, how it works. And I think it is. I think one of the things that, that I do in my coaching is I talk to clients a lot about what is it that you like, right?   Because we forget as we're in the grind, we're just thinking I wanna make money in real estate and I wanna grow wealth, but there are certain things, there are certain jobs like you're pointing out that, that you may be more inclined towards, you know, you may be the other day working on some prefabs right now in Austin. And the, the general contractor on the job was talking to me about how he just loves to work with his hands. And he likes the, you know, the, the strategies of, of the buildings and he really enjoys that aspect.   Right. For me, that's a little bit of a headache I just wanna look at, okay, does this look right? Does that look right? Is this in line? So, so it's good to get to know yourself and know what you're really good at because it, especially if you, if you are someone that's really handy in construction, flipping might be a great thing for you because if you can take care of that on your own, and you don't need to hire third parties, then you don't need to rely on a huge team. You can oversee it pretty easily and you can probably get it done at a much lower price, which will give you a better profit.   Jesse (28m 24s): Yeah, it makes sense. I mean, if the alternative is your working construction for somebody else and you could be buying the assets, doing the job and coming, coming home with a larger paycheck. That definitely makes sense. I wanna, I wanna get into the book a little bit and coaching before I do, though. I'm just curious. Did your former career, was that an asset in, in how you manage your real estate business? Cuz I, I just imagine your industry, your prior industry, it's fairly chaotic long hours, lots going on was curious how that parlayed or helped or hurt, you know, your world in real estate.   Tamar (28m 57s): Oh, that's a really, that's a really interesting question. No one's ever asked me that, but I would say that someone that can work in a fast paced environment will generally thrive in real estate. If you like a lot of things moving around and fires coming up and you put the fire out and then you gotta walk over here and put another fire out. That's perfect for real estate because we, people like us thrive in that sort of environment. We like things changing. We like things moving and we like solving problems. So I definitely think so.   I also, just from my humble roots of not growing up with a lot of money, I was someone who was very hungry and I not physically hungry. Luckily I always had food, but I was, I was hungry in terms of my drive in terms of creating a kind of life that I wanted for myself. And so I was willing to work hard. I was willing to go to, to a million meetups to meet people I was willing to, to do whatever it took. And it's interesting right now I have a relative that wants to get into real estate.   I, I gave him rich dad, poor dad. And of course now the rest is history, right? Yeah. You can't not read rich dad, poor dad. And think I gotta get some real estate today. What am I doing with my life? And so, and so that happened and he is a super smart guy and he is starting to go to meetups. And I told him, I said, listen. I said, when you go to meetups, I said, do not ask anyone to pick your brain, to pick their brain and do not ask anyone if you can have some of their time so that you can learn, ask them about them, ask them what you can do for them, ask them how they, how you can be of service to them.   Because people love to talk about themselves. And they like people that aren't all about. Like, give me me, me, me, me, because it doesn't show that you're a hard worker, hard worker, someone that is like, Hey, what can I do for you? I'm I'm really willing to, to learn this. Can I, you know, can I just follow you around? And like, you know, help pick up the pieces that maybe fall apart during the day, maybe I'll go get a toilet seat for you and bring it back to the property, you know, be, be of use to people. And that's where you really establish opportunities and friendships. Yeah. I didn't bring toilets to anybody though.   I did other things though.   Jesse (31m 12s): I can't remember which guest, but somebody recently was saying, most people have an eye problem. I did this, I did that. I'm gonna do this. So if you can tap into that ego, that's definitely definitely the route to take. Okay. Let's talk a little bit about the book maybe for, for listeners. You, can you give us kind of a bit of a, what the thesis is and, and how, how it came about to, to writing it? Cause I know it's, it's not a small feat.   Tamar (31m 37s): Yeah, no, it's not. So yes. The book is called the millionaires mentality, a professional women's guide to building wealth through real estate. And I wrote it for a couple reasons. One is that I like to do hard things. Now how many people would not want to write a book and leave a mark on the world? Do book lives well beyond you? It's a really cool thing. Yeah. And statistically it's 81% of people have a book in them or wanna write a book and 3% actually do it.   It's not easy to put all your thoughts together and the editing and the work. And even when you hire people there's work involved. So, so I wanted to do it for that reason because it's one, because it's a challenge. And I wanted to feel like I, the more that I challenge myself, the more I feel confident in myself and the more I'm excited about what I can achieve. And so it was next level for me. And also because it lives beyond me, my daughter, my 20 year old read my book and how much knowledge did she get out of that?   Seeing the journey of where I came from and my thoughts about there's a chapter of it's okay to want money. That's a big thing. That's a big thing for a lot of us that grow up without money. And especially for women, I mean, I don't know what it is and why money became a dirty thing when money is, is a blessing. And it really, it, it supports everything in our, in, in every way. And we can think of it in a great way, or we can think of it as a, as a hindrance. And so as soon as you open up and are excited about it, then you can start to open the floodgates and see what's possible.   And then I just wanted chapters to really outline, okay, how do you do this? How do you get into real estate? All the things that I kind of had to figure out on my own, I just wanted to put it in a book and kind of a in, in terms that I, that I understood in a very personable way. And so that's why I, I created the book.   Jesse (33m 34s): So the, the book and I apologize millionaire, okay. Now the book itself, like I, I, I assume it's, it's something that is for the general population guy or gal, but can you talk a little bit about the, the female experience as an investor? Because we, you know, we've had women on the show before and, and like I said, you know, prior to the show, when we were talking, everybody has a unique experience, but I find that there's some, some commonalities when it comes from women going up into real estate, whether that's in brokerage development investment.   So yeah. Could maybe give a, your thoughts on that.   Tamar (34m 13s): Absolutely. So I'm a super positive person and I love people. I'm not like, oh, men are like, this women are like this. I think just, you know, if you're a good person, then you're a good person. You could be male, female. I can love you the same. And I've had that experience in real estate. We have, 90% of millionaires are made through real estate. 30% are women. So we are a minority. And part of it just has to do with the fact that we haven't not too long ago, we couldn't vote not too long ago. We couldn't even buy a house.   So, I mean, we're just, you know, we're a little bit behind because we haven't had as much time to ramp up, but I feel like women in investing actually have an advantage in that we're very personable, we're nurtures, we're relationship oriented. And if we can just get past the idea that that money is something we need to clinging to, or that there's not enough, then all of a sudden we're able to make decisions that, that give us the opportunity to really grow wealth and own, own a lot of assets and, and have the life that we, that we   Jesse (35m 21s): Want. Yeah. I think, you know, whether it's entrepreneurship business in general or real estate, I feel that having unique experiences it's, I almost see it always as a positive to the team, whether that's unique experience geographically, the way you, you grew up, you know, color creed, you know, whether whether you're male or female, I find that just uniqueness, we'll see a problem that maybe some other person didn't solve. I think the worst thing is when you have a monolith, you know, people that were all grew up the same way and they're all in the business, because then those creative solutions might not be there in your, and your blinders will be the same.   So that's a great point. I wanna be mindful of the time tomorrow. This has been great. We have four questions. We ask every guest that comes on the show, and then we'll kind of wrap up with where people can get ahold of you. So if that works for you, they're easy, easy layup. So don't be, don't be nervous. But if that works, I'll kick those off.   Tamar (36m 18s): Sounds great.   Jesse (36m 19s): Okay. One thing we ask for every guest is your view on mentorship, basically, what would you say to somebody that say female in this case, the, a younger woman that wants to get into real estate investment? You know, what would you say to that person?   Tamar (36m 34s): Well, I, it's interesting cuz I just shared about this relative and he's kind of in the same boat and I would say the same thing to a male as I would a female, I would say if you really want it and you're determined start walking toward it. And how do you do that? You have to get knowledge. So you, if you don't have resources, you have to go to meetups, you have to show up, you have to listen to people, you have to learn. And if you are, if you have resource, definitely invest in a mentorships have been fantastic for me, they've connected me with a lot of higher level people that ha and given me access to a lot of knowledge and opportunities.   So I think that the more you invest in yourself and that means your time and resources, the better. And I think that you can't, I wouldn't, I, you could certainly figure out this by yourself. It is not brain surgery, but it is a lot faster and a lot more fun and easier if you have mentors to support you along the way.   Jesse (37m 36s): Yeah. That makes sense. The beginning of your career, we all have these hard lessons we learned in the first couple years of investing. What was one of those hard lessons that, you know, you know, now you wish you knew, then   Tamar (37m 48s): I'm gonna say the story that I shared about the duplex, where I had to pay someone to get out for $70,000, that kind of hurt. That's a lot of money. Yeah. And, and there's actually two stories we're on the same property. Funny enough. So I would say, you know, get ahead of it and always, just really look at what you're buying and try to understand, you know, it's fine. It's not the end of the world. Like even though I had to pay a certain amount, I still made a ton of money on that property. It's so, you know, it wasn't the worst case scenario really wasn't that bad.   It sounds like, oh my God, you had to pay this woman. But at the same time, I also feel like, you know, I probably put her son through college. I mean, I did, you know, I did a good thing cuz that's a lot of money to someone. So, so that was, that was really great. And the other thing was that on the same property, I had an issue with, with the property where I actually had to Sue the, the owners, they didn't disclose something and I had a plumbing issue. And so the one thing I would say also is try to have as many knowledgeable people as you can look over the contracts.   Yeah. And you know, don't just assume that everything's done right. Just because no offense to realtors or anything, but you know, we're all human, we miss things. So we, we, I would say really just look at what you're signing, pay attention. I mean, really it worked out in my, my favor. Ultimately I actually ended up going to small claims court and I won and I was up against an attorney. And the reason was, was because the, the sellers had signed certain documents, not disclosing some of the work they had done. So, you know, you wanna be careful on both ends, whether you're buying or selling and really pay attention to, to documents.   Jesse (39m 30s): What is aside from your great book, which we'll put a link to. What's something that you are either reading now, just finish that you could recommend to listeners.   Tamar (39m 41s): I'm always reading a couple books at a time. Yeah. The one that came to me is the ed Mylet book on one more. I think it's called or the power, the power of one more.   Jesse (39m 53s): Is it a fairly short book?   Tamar (39m 54s): No.   Jesse (39m 55s): Cause I know he, I know he has like a really like teaser book, but that like jacked me up. I was like, you know, for that whole month I was just like on, I love ed Mylet all of his stuff is, is fantastic. If you, if you haven't listened to him, just, just Google it pretty intense guy. But sorry. So that book, that, that was so   Tamar (40m 14s): Yeah, that book, I mean, honestly, there's nothing really that he's saying that isn't something I've already heard. If you haven't done a lot of mindset work, then it's an extraordinary book. You should get it today because there's a lot of jewels in it. And the one thing that ed does, and I think this is partly part of the reason why you're saying that you like him so much is he really has a great way of sharing an idea and having it land in a way where you really wanna get into action and make a change about it. Hmm. And he puts together a lot of concepts that are, that are really valuable about, you know, how to make it and, and he's very motivating.   So I just, I had heard him on a podcast and I just thought, oh, I'm gonna, I've never really had a book of his. So I, I just started listening to it. And it's, it's really very good.   Jesse (40m 60s): Yeah. That's very cool. I think, I think it was in Vegas. I I've heard him at an event speaking and this one is max max out your life. So very, very head my let sounding. Okay. So the last question I like to ask every guest on the show, first car, make and model.   Tamar (41m 17s): Oh yes. This is great. A Ford escort stick shift and it was light blue. And it I'm very proud of that car because I bought it. I was 14 and a half. I saved all my money until I had $5,000. And then when I was, was 16, I got that car.   Jesse (41m 35s): I was about to say Ford Bronco. And then I realized you were from California, originally not Texas then moved to, okay. So we were gonna put, we'll put everything in the show notes where people can reach out to you, but any place aside from a Google search that you, that we can send them.   Tamar (41m 51s): Yeah. So the easiest way to get the book is just go to Tamar book.com. There's also a quiz to discover your real estate investing personality. And that is@tamarquiz.com. So that is just, those are two really great ways. And they'll take, you you'll get into my, into my wheelhouse. Of course it's in my website is wealth building concierge.com. But both of those will get you closer to me. Especially tomorrow.   Book will get you to my website and my book. My,   Jesse (42m 24s): My guest today has been tomorrow, the millionaires, her maze tomorrow. Thanks for being part of working capital.   Tamar (42m 30s): Thank you so much for having me.   Jesse (42m 39s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you like the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.  

Parkinsons Recovery
Can Rapamycin be Helpful for Parkinson's Disease Patients?

Parkinsons Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:00


Ross Pelton, the Natural Pharmacist, discusses how the prescription drug rapamycin can increase longevity.  The discovery of rapamycin resulted in scientific studies that have enabled scientists to gain a totally new understanding of the aging process and how we might use this new information to improve health and delay the onset of age-related diseases. The topics in this book are collectively one of the most important breakthroughs in the science of life extension that has ever been discovered. The Rapamcyin Story: An interview with Ross Pelton, author of Rapamycin, mTOR, Autophagy & Treating mTOR Syndrome. https://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2022/6/rapamycin Rapamycin: A Quantum Leap in Life Extension: Article was published in the Aug. 4, 2022 issue of the Townsend Leter. https://www.townsendletter.com/article/466-anti-aging-and-rapamycin/ Rapamycin: Extending Health Span and Life Span:  Article was published in Integrative Medicine: May 2022. http://imjournal.com/oa/index.html?fid=Pelton Order At:  LifeExtension.com/rapa

8 O'Clock Buzz
Neurologic links to Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s found in C...

8 O'Clock Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 16:13


In a recently published article in Nature Communications entitled “Neurotoxic amyloidogenic peptides in the proteome of SARS-COV2: potential implications for neurological symptoms in COVID-19“, co-author Nicholas Reynolds, fellow at the […] The post Neurologic links to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's found in C... appeared first on WORT-FM 89.9.

Blockchain Value
Season 2, Episode 9 – How to Make Money Playing Games on a Blockchain (with Neeraj Kashyap)

Blockchain Value

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:20


Neeraj Kashyap is the founder and CEO of Moonstream. Moonstream is a one of a kind web3 game engine with tools to build on-chain game economies. There are tens of thousands of players already participating in game economies built with Moonstream. The company has secured over $3b in transaction volume to date. Neeraj is a mathematician with a Ph.D. in Number Theory. He spent his late twenties in Japan, using mathematics and Machine Learning to build algorithms to diagnose Parkinson's disease and other similar disorders. He worked at Google on TensorFlow, and built knowledge graphs that are being used actively by major US healthcare organizations. He has been a blockhead since 2015, with a focus on building software to connect blockchains to centralized services as well as to other blockchains. In this podcast, Neeraj Kashyap, the founder of Moonstream, will share about the challenges of building blockchain games and how crypto enthusiasts can make a profit playing games on a blockchain. Few gamers know the secret of earning money while playing blockchain games, so tune in to find out!

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
336: How to Live a Life that Nourishes Your Brain, Thereby Elevating the Quality of Your Entire Life

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 67:20 Very Popular


"In the same way that a car that is well-maintained will last longer and be more reliable, you cannot hope to get the lasting high performance you want from your brain if it is not properly cared for and protected." —Kimberley Wilson, author of How to Build a Healthy Brain: Practical steps to mental health and well-being Psychology, Sociology and Neurology. Three courses I often share would be priceless academic courses to take regardless of one's vocation in life. Here on TSLL blog and the podcast, I have explored many topics within the first two subjects whether pertaining to emotional intelligence, relationships and communication, so when I came upon nutrition-trained Chartered Psychologist Kimberley Wilson's book - How to Build a Healthy Brain, I was intrigued and wanted to explore its contents. In so doing, I found what she had to share to be founded in a vast amount of supportive research from reputable institutions (in the United Kingdom and the states) as well as written in an approachable prose for readers, like myself, who do not have an educational background in the field of neurology, but genuinely wish to understand how their brains function and how to care for the brain well in order to live well. Today's post/episode is an introduction, a tasting menu of sorts to explore the wide ranging areas in our lives that contribute to the health (or malnutrition) of our brain and thereby, its capability to work to its full capabilities. Upon sitting down to read the book, once I began, once it was in my hands and I was reading it, it was hard to put down, and annotations now decorate nearly every page. Having completed my first reading of the book, I went back through and took detailed notes summarizing the key points that spoke to me and that I wanted to incorporate or strengthen in my own daily life. I will be sharing those here, but by no means is the list complete. The science of how the brain works, the parts of the brain, etc., are detailed in the first couple of chapters, and are worth reading prior to reading the entire book on your own as she lays a clear foundation of the parts of the 'engine' that make up the brain. While I will be focusing on what to do to strengthen and nourish your brain, reading her book details what happens when the brain is not nourished properly. For example, what chronic inflammation does to the mind and the effects witnessed in our daily lives such as depression, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease and other neurological maladies. However, because I want to lift today's conversation to focus on preventative and constructive habits we can add to our lives to create a stronger sense and state of well-being, I will be focusing on what you can begin or continue to do and how it nurtures the brain, thereby elevating the quality of your entire life. 1. Invest in your neuro 'pension' plan No matter how small your daily investments, so long as you keep contributing to your neuro pension plan, you strengthen your brain and stave off chronic inflammation. Daily investments as they pertain to brain nourishment are a conscious effort to continually be learning something new - whether that is information that is new or a new physical skill. When you learn something new, you are "promoting the growth of new neurones, helping new cells to survive (so be sure to continue to strengthen the newly learned skill with consistent repetition), supporting the survival of pre-existing neurones, and supporting the development of synapses - the communication junctions between brain cells". This process is called Neurogenesis - literally translated as the creation of new neurons. And "neurogenesis is crucial to the process of learning and memory." When your brain undergoes this process of neurogenesis, you are building your 'cognitive reserve' which is what Wilson refers to as the 'brain pension' and was "coined in a research paper published in 1988." I encourage you to read the findings of this research as it is shared in detail on page 52, but to put it very simply, even 137 elderly residents who took part in the study, upon their deaths, while their brains showed physical signs of advanced brain disease, they didn't show any symptoms while alive. Why? Their brains, when weighed were heavier than the others, and it was surmised that these 137 residents had more stored up in their 'brain pensions' . . . this meant that when dementia started to take cells away, they still had more than enough left to function normally." To put it succinctly, prioritize learning new skills and acquiring new information. Make it a way of life to bulk up your neuro pension plan. 2. Prioritize reducing stress in your life There are different types of stress - acute and chronic - and it is the chronic that is a "known risk factor for Alzheimer's". Chronic stress can cause the hippocampi to shrink, reducing your ability to retain information and learn new skills with relative ease. Wilson shares a list of potential psychological signs you might be under excess pressure which is causing chronic stress that while you may be brushing off as what you have to do to live the life you are living is actually a health concern and reason to reassess how you live and what you prioritize: short temper or frustration, increased aggression anxiety apathy, loss of interest overwhelm forgetfulness or poor concentration cynicism loss of confidence/self-esteem impaired emotional responses social withdrawal Now let's look at the good stress that helps us grow and strengthens our ability to do things that are positive, and in fact, we should pursue this type of stress for a healthy brain Wilson encourages. It is called hormesis. It could be physical (lifting weights, strength training or yoga) or it can be psychological (learning a new skill, a new language, etc.). Hormesis involves applying "short-term, manageable pressure" to the body or mind's muscle. "The body responds to this stress by up regulating muscular repair processes and making the muscles more able to tolerate the same amount of stress post-recovery i.e. becoming stronger." The key with hormesis being a good stress is including the recovery time. So for example, do not attend a vinyasa yoga class on Monday and then again on Tuesday. Nope. Give your body at least a day of recovery, maybe even two. You can still walk or run during this time, but don't take a vinyasa class that will stress those same muscles out as were engaged on Monday. 3. Put quality sleep at the top of your list for 'good brain care' "The journey to a more resilient brain and improved mental health starts in bed." —Kimberley Wilson A variety of necessary activities are taking place in our brain when we sleep and are sleeping deeply, reaching all four stages: memory consolidation (moving short-term information that was just gained to the long-term storage location in the brain), Synapses are augmented - changed, which means this is when learning becomes ingrained preparing the brain to learn new things and ensuring what we learned stays with us, enables us to be less reactive to negative stimuli. Wilson also touches on the truth that medication that induces us to sleep does not promote true sleep. In other words, it does not allow us to reach all four stages of sleep. With that said, we have to naturally be able to bring ourselves and keep ourselves in a good night's sleep. How can we do this? Keep a sleep routine - weekdays and weekends Try not to linger in bed whilst you are awake too long on either side - before you fall asleep and once you wake up in the morning. If you cannot fall asleep within 15-20 minutes, don't keep fighting yourself. Turn the light on (a gentle dimmed light most likely) and do something non-stimulating such as journaling, read a non-stressful book, meditation or a simple breathing practice (deep breath in for 6 counts, deep breath out for 6 counts, for example). Once you feel sleepy again, return to bed and turn out the light. Ensure you are sleeping in a cool room (no warmer than 68 degrees Fahrenheit/20 degrees Celsius) If you can, add dimmer switches to your bedroom lights and lamps, and have them dimmed before you enter your bedroom to go to sleep. Keep your bedroom tidy. Clutter causes stimulation and stress which is the opposite feeling you want to have before trying to go to sleep. Don't eat too late, in fact, try making your largest meal lunch and enjoy a lighter dinner that is not too close to your bedtime. Caffeine is a stimulant and can hang around for more than a few hours after you have enjoyed it. If you are not falling asleep and staying asleep, examine when you consume caffeine and try to stop by midday or at least enjoy your last tea (caffeinated) at tea time - 4pm. Avoid alcohol 3-4 hours before bedtime Refrain from using light-emitting devices in bed (tablets, smartphones, etc.) No longer use your smartphone for your alarm clock. Use something different. If worries clutter your mind and prohibit you from falling asleep, put them down in writing in a journal before going to bed. Have a journal or notepad next to your bed to jot down things you don't want to forget that may pop up just as you go to sleep. 4. Feed your brain well "Although [the brain] only accounts for about 2-3 per cent of your total body weight, your brain makes up around 20-25 per cent of your daily energy requirement." The brain doesn't need simply calories of any sort. The brain needs quality, nourishing calories that provide vitamins and minerals feeding all of its cellular activity. "Food is one of the quickest and easiest ways to start improving your brain health." And what I found even more interesting is that thinking about your nutrients, it's not just about today's meal to have a better tomorrow; what you feed your brain effects the brain over time, the long-run. "It's about building up regular long-term habits." So what habits should we be incorporating into our daily diet? Let's take a look: more vegetables - 6 servings a day (1 serving is 2 heaping tablespoons) a minimum of 2 servings/wk of oily fish and/or seafood leafy greens every day - a delicious salad with a homemade vinaigrette nuts - unsalted, and preferably, unroasted (raw), 1-2 servings each day enjoy seeds - chia, sesame, etc. berries of all kinds, and especially blueberries as a daily snack - 3 servings a day cook regularly with fresh herbs - explore growing your own herbs beans - all of the beans you can think of. I incorporate lentils, black beans, and chickpeas most often. olive oil - 3 tablespoons a day cook with alliums - onions, shallots, green onions (spring onions), etc. choose whole grain everything - pasta, bread, etc. Include fiber in your daily diet everyday - look for grains for breakfast such as steel cut oats, and other sources such as beans and farro. Alliums also contain fiber, so add the onions! dark chocolate, 70% cacao at least unlimited tea (except not after tea time if it has caffeine which will affect negatively your sleep) hydrate, hydrate, hydrate - even when you don't know what you are craving, likely, it is hydration - grab the water first, not the food limit the sweets (freely added sugar - cakes, candy, pastries, etc; and limit processed meat to only 3 servings each week no more than 2 glasses of wine/day, red wine is best enjoy chicken 2-3 times a week Eggs - no more than 6/week Looking at such a list may be what we think we want. "Just tell me what to do, and I'll do it." But when you know the why behind choosing such foods, it becomes even easier to find motivation to select the foods above (or not select as in the case with sugar). For example, eating sugar reduces our brain's cognition and the omega-3s in oily fix reduces the brain's aging process. Let me share a few more, but all of the reasons for including or excluding the items I listed above are detailed with research as to how it helps or hinders the brain's ability to function optimally. "Leafy green vegetables are brain-protective" as these vegetables contain 'bioactive nutrients such as beta carotene, folate, vitamin K, magnesium and potassium. Eating nuts (unsalted and raw) five times a week increases brain function, and eating fiber reduces the risk of some cancers due to the prebiotics. Keep in mind, all that I am sharing is merely a tasting of of the details, specific meal ideas and research Wilson shares in her book. 5. Create a regular exercise regimen that cares for your brain It will not surprise you that physical exercise plays a significant role in brain health. The question is how much and how strenuous. Wilson offers three suggestions and reminds readers that any form of physical activity whether structured (taking a class) or physical movement such as gardening, tending to chores or walking rather than driving is beneficial because "movement protects the brain" as it is an organ. With each of the three suggested weekly workout regimens, she suggests at least two or more days of strength exercises for major muscles. If you are not someone who is likely to want to go to the gym and lift weights (I am no longer someone who enjoys this), there are various combination exercise that would equate to strength training as well as aerobic exercise: Vinyasa yoga, rocket yoga, circuit training class, CrossFit, climbing and bouldering, and boxing training. If you prefer more moderate exercise, she suggests 150 minutes a week and for more strenuous workouts such as running, 75 minutes. You can mix and match the two to find a balance that works for you. The type of exercise you engage in regularly will give you certain benefits, so it is best to incorporate some sort of more strenuous or mentally challenging activity that holds your attention in the present moment; however, again, any physical movement is beneficial. Also, especially after strenuous workouts, give yourself the necessary recovery time - a day, sometimes two - not from any type of physical activity, just not that strenuous workout that challenged your muscles. Benefits of exercise (again, please read the book to see specific examples of types of exercise for each of the following benefits): reverse brain aging improved cognitive performance, focus and attention improved memory and processing speeds reduced stress improve sleep quality elevation of mood reduced risk of anxiety, depression and severity of depression if genetically predisposed 6. Why yoga is one of the best things to give your brain As many listeners and readers know, I have been practicing yoga, vinyasa yoga, for 13+ years. A quality and well-trained and informed instructor makes a tremendous difference in our ability to reap the benefits for our brains, so let me share what Wilson writes about yoga: "Though all kinds of physical activity provide health benefits, the practice of yoga is a natural integration of many of the lifestyle factors that have been shown in clinical trials to promote brain health." Yoga packs a one-two punch, and really a third punch as well. Beginning with the breath, yoga helps us to "focus on controlled use of the breath". By doing this we become more aware of our breath, and this ability is strengthened through meditation (we'll talk more about this in the next point). As well, as we move, we are stretching our muscles and our own bodies provide the resistance. So essentially, yoga gives us healthy brain activation through the deep breathing through the nose, the movement "promotes the process of neurogenesis" which was talked about above in #1 and meditation strengthens our control over our thoughts which improves our mindfulness which is associated with "reduced perceived stress, lowered anxiety, reduced inflammatory biomarkers and increased neurogenesis." There are very few reasons to not welcome yoga into your regular exercise program, even if you only include one of the three aspects above. 7. Meditate to strengthen how you think As mentioned above, but I think it is worth underlining for emphasis, especially as we are talking about the brain. When we regularly meditate, having a teacher or instructor guide you through the process as you build your understanding of why and how it works helps you to stick with it when you are just getting started. Meditation helps us become more mindful because we are becoming better at being observers of our thoughts, rather than wrapping ourselves up in them and being reactive which is not helpful. Becoming more mindful strengthens our awareness of ourselves, and helps us to step away from our emotions and thoughts and observe them, acknowledging their temporary nature and where and why they came from. As we begin Season 9 of the podcast, I will share an entire episode that will discuss the paradox of contentment and a piece of this paradox is the realization that when we become more mindful, which is what meditation helps us do, we begin making more constructive choices in our lives. We begin to create environments, engage with people who fuel our lives in ways that alleviate or eliminate stress, and we also give ourselves the tools to navigate situations we do not have control over. So as much as contentment is about finding peace no matter what is going on outside of us, it is also giving us the tools to cultivate a life that invites more of what nurtures us than what harms us. 6 Benefits of Meditations and How to Meditate in Your Daily Life Wilson dedicates an entire chapter to Using the Breath, and begins by stating, "There is one powerful, criminally underused tool that is always available to you: your breath." When we become conscious of our breath and begin to strengthen our breathing (which what meditation exercises), "your breath can significantly improve your emotional resilience and psychological performance in a given task." She goes on to share a variety of options of structured breath practice and then goes on to address the vagus nerve which has a wide-reach throughout our entire body. "[The vagus nerve] is the main structural component of the parasympathetic nervous system, the part of our nervous system that is responsible for rest, relaxation and recovery, and it regulates heart rate and respiration." All of this is to say, because the vagus nerve "passes down the neck, its activity can be influenced by breathing practices . . . this is understood to be the primary way that breathing can have antidepressant effects." Lastly, remember the neuro pension plan we spoke about in #1? "It is important to note that "brain scans showed that regular meditators had thicker brains (think 'cognitive reserve') compared to non-meditators with similar lifestyles." ~Explore more posts and episodes on Mindfulness in TSLL's Archives. 8. Welcome regular visits to the sauna into your life (or 30-minute hot baths) Most of us don't have access to a sauna in our daily lives, but if we do, the brain benefits. Why? "Heat promotes neurogenesis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the compound that stimulates the growth of new brain cells, is reliably increased through exercise." So, while we want to have our regular workout regimen that we discussed above, enjoying 20-30 minutes in a sauna can have the same effects, and if you don't have access to a sauna, I am giving you a reason to enjoy a hot bath for 30 minutes regularly. ☺️ 9. Strengthen your emotional intelligence Emotional intelligence (EQ) is a skill each of us can learn and strengthen. Not only does EQ improve our relationship with ourselves, our self-esteem and confidence, it also strengthens our ability to connect healthily with others, communicating in a non-violent way to both have a voice and listen to what others are truly saying. I won't go into too much detail about EQ here, but be sure to tune in to episode #140 of the podcast which is focused entirely on this subject. However, quickly, let me share a list of ideas to ponder when it comes to understanding our emotions and not shying away from being a student of them: Let yourself feel your emotions - constructively of course, but don't suppress them. This only causes more stress to the brain. Wilson explains that yes, letting yourself feel envy as well as jealousy are beneficial not because we should act on them in the manner that is often shown on television, etc., but rather to observe something in ourselves. Wilson shares quite succinctly: envy reveals our self-esteem is threatened; jealous reveals our exclusivity is threatened, or our ability to feel a part of something with another. We cannot control other people, but we can control ourselves, and if we are depending upon others to lift our self-esteem or make us feel welcome, this should tell us we have some work to do on ourselves, and that is valuable information. Have those necessary difficult conversations if it is a relationship you wish to repair, strengthen or maintain. Use the non-violent communication method as discussed in episode #293. "Even if the other person can't understand or won't change, there is often tremendous value in demonstrating to yourself that you are worth sticking up for." As well, you build your emotional confidence as "having a big conversation makes it easier to have another, and often the conversations never go as badly as you think they will." Let yourself cry. "The action of crying, which typically includes deep breaths, may stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, promoting relaxation and recovery". episode #140: Emotional Intelligence: A Crucial Tool for Enhanced Quality in Life and Work 10. Revel in self-care rituals Self-care and knowing what you need and how it benefits you is part of having a strong emotional intelligence. Each of us is different as to what we need, and why we need it, but if you choose to be the student of yourself, you will discover the answers you have been seeking that seem to be impossible to translate, especially if others seem to have figured it out and you've tried what they've done, but it doesn't work for you. Adhering to a regular self-care regimen is a necessity, not a luxury. We've talked about this truth in previous episodes (#242, #227) and this post about well-being. One of the reasons we must permit ourselves engagement in self-care rituals is that it gives us space and time when we notice we are stressed to decompress so that we don't react, but rather, when we have composed ourselves, respond in a manner we will not regret. 11. Invest in building a healthy social support community Because so much of America's life is go-go-go, our social support structure is weakened, and some relationships receive too much of the burden to care for one another - our spouse, our children, etc. In other words, if after reading #2 on this list you realized how stressed you actually were, start to make real changes, and make room for connecting with people in your life that are healthy connections - friends, neighbors, people in the community you want to be a part of. When you diversify and connect genuinely, not out of a place of desperation or want, such connections may take time, but that is actually quite healthy because you realize who is trustworthy and they see that you are trustworthy, and they also come to realize you don't want anything but a real human-to-human connection. When it comes to friends, be a friend. Connect. Stop dancing on the surface - texting is nice for logistics, but it's not a deep connection. Make time to talk face-to-face, and perhaps you will also realize who your real friends are and who is just keeping you in their circle for disingenuous reasons. By being someone who is grounded and secure, you will be better able to know who to connect with, who to invest your time and who to be vulnerable with, and they will see that in you as well. Having a strong, healthy, social support system reduces stress, rather than creates it. The former is the goal, and that is reason enough to determine who you should share your time with. 12. Know your values and have a purpose that lights you up When you have a purpose, that is your purpose, not society's or your parents or [the person who you are trying to gain approval from], the endorphins increase in your mind when you engage in this activity, and that is positive fuel for the brain as it reduces stress and reduces inflammation. 13. Travel regularly To travel is to feed your brain well. Travel builds cognitive flexibility. So the next time you think taking that dream trip to France is a luxury, oh no, no, no, it is not. It is a necessity. Why? Because you are challenging your mind to be surrounded and immersed in a culture that isn't rote, that isn't what you know or are familiar with, so you are exercising the mind and new synapses are firing, and neurogenesis is happening. A very, very good thing. So where are you going next and how soon can you do it? ☺️ 14. Be a realistic optimist Wilson is adamant that being a positive thinker actual involves a bit of denial and delusion. "It contains too much of what I recognise as emotional suppression for it to be a sustainable approach to psychological health." For this reason she embraces the concept of realistic optimism, "in which you pay attention to negative outcomes but do not dwell on them, instead focusing on the growth opportunities, is associated with greater resilience than either a pessimistic or unrealistically optimistic viewpoint." In other words, mindfulness and meditation come in to play here which give you the tools to observe your thoughts when something goes not as you would have preferred, giving you the space to respond rather than react, and then with a growth mindset, choose constructive action. 15. Failure is a prerequisite to success Speaking of things not going your way, if something didn't work out as you had hoped, some may call it failure, and it may well be in that instance, but when you shift your mind as to how you perceive the event, you give yourself fuel to use to point you in the best direction moving forward for success. 16. Let go of attachment to outcomes To piggy-back onto #15, when it comes to anything in which you are investing your heart, money, hopes and dreams, hold on to hope, but let go of attachment of what has to happen for it to work out well in your mind. If any of the variables are out of your control, which they likely will be or you would have made the changes already, you just cannot know how it will all work out. As we know, often, when it doesn't work out as we planned or expected, it is actually working out in our favor to be witnessed at a later time when we will better be able to appreciate it, but if we are so stuck and so focused on a narrow window of what 'has to happen', we'll never experience the latter outcome that is meant for us to revel in. 17. Clean those teeth! Professionally, that is. So much of our health ties into our gums and our teeth, so keep them expertly clean and tended to by visiting your dentist twice a year and brushing and flossing every day, twice at least. Wilson goes into great detail about the relationship of our teeth to our brain. I will let her explain, but it will give you the motivation to take these simple, regular steps to care for your teeth. 18. Acknowledge the power of social media and be proactive about distancing yourself from mindless use To blanket all social media as bad is incorrect. There are benefits and it comes down to how we use our phone. If you use social media to actively engage - connect, comment, extend appreciation, etc., then its fine, but if all you do is scroll, stop. In all cases, keep your phone out of reach. Don't have it next to you at all times, monitor your use, and use as a phone to stay in touch, but not to entertain you as that too is passively engaging and doesn't add to your social support system. If you use it to reach out to someone - go for it, but consciously be aware of how you truly do use social media. 19. Handwrite rather than typing or solely listening/reading If you are trying to learn something or understand something, take a pen or pencil and write it out. Studies and research have shown, our brains retain more information when we handwrite and we also deepen our understanding of the subject matter when we take the time to write out what we heard, read or are trying to understand. 20. Grow neurotransmitters for good and constructive habits In episode #245, I discussed the findings in the book Hardwiring Happiness which speaks to how we have to essentially train our brain to look for and savor the good, and we can in fact to do this. We can also do the opposite - look for only the negative, the bad, what won't work, and because we are doing this, we are causing more stress to our brain. I want to include a quote from Rick Hanson's book Hardwiring Happiness because it aligns beautifully with what Kimberley Wilson found when it comes to nourishing the brain, “The more [neurons] fire together, the more they wire together. In essence, you develop psychological resources by having sustained and repeated experiences of them that are turned into durable changes in your brain.” In other words, when a good or meaningful moment or event happens, focus on it, celebrate it and savor it. Consciously, really revel in it, no matter how big or small in the eyes of others. If it is something delights you, give it your full attention and dive deep into that feeling and that moment. You are beginning to rewire your brain. Continue to do this - repeat it often, and you can do that by looking for what you want and enjoy. Focus on habits in your life that are good as this will strengthen them rather than berating yourself for doing what doesn't help or isn't working. When trying to learn or acquire new knowledge, concentrate wholly (turn off distractions). When we are doing something new or experiencing something new - travel comes to my mind - our attention is wholly grabbed which makes it easier to absorb all that there is to see and become deeply moved by it. I want to circle back to habits - focusing on the ones you want to have in your life and refraining from dwelling on those that are not wanted. The only way a bad habit will be replaced (old hard-wiring) is if you stop doing it, stop focusing on it and replace it with something that you give your full attention and focus. It will take time to change it, but when you do, and it is a habit that is healthy, you will have all the more motivation to keep doing it, especially now that it is hard-wired into your brain. 21. Reduce money stress While Wilson doesn't go too far in-depth into finances, she does point out that money is a primary stressor in people's lives and chronic stress, if it is caused by money, is not good for the brain. Whatever you have to do to reduce your money stress, do it. Not only for your future financial stability, but for your overall health so you can enjoy a long and healthy life. 22. Find your reason for wanting to improve the health of your brain This # isn't really part of the list, but rather a reminder that if you want to a brain that will be working optimally well into your latter decades of life, the changes you need to make are not incredibly difficult, but rather habits you need to see as beneficial not just for tomorrow or to fit into that favorite pair of jeans, but because you want to enjoy living life and doing what you are doing now and possibly so much more. Wilson reminds readers to have self-compassion as you begin to make any or all of the changes she advises. 'If you need to make significant changes, it is inevitable that you will 'mess up'. Inevitable . . . Remind yourself that this is what change looks like. Remind yourself of the motivation [for making these changes]. Then find something that gives you a quick win for a much-needed morale boost." Why I found this book to be a book to inspire me to act is that it provided detailed reality outcomes that if we take action, specifically this is what happens in the mind, with our emotions, and thus in our daily lives. And when we make these changes to our simple everyday habits, our lives change in powerful ways for the long and short term. No longer should any of the above habits or suggestions be seen as vanity pursuits. These habits enhance your health, your relationships, the quality of a long life you will have the opportunity to live and live well. Petit Plaisir ~Kingdom

Neurology® Podcast
Alpha-synuclein Amplification for Disease Diagnosis

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 23:59 Very Popular


Dr. Jason Crowell talks with Dr. Lucilla Parnetti about the clinical application of α-synuclein seed amplification assays (SAAs) in the identification of Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies. Read the full article in Neurology. This podcast is sponsored by argenx. Visit www.vyvgarthcp.com for more information.

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions
Benjamin Stecher on being a Parkinson's patient advocate

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 28:14


Benjamin Stecher runs a blog called the Tomorrow Edition where he talks about his battle with Parkinson's disease. He has been implanted with a Deep Brain Stimulator an is also on the patient advisory board of Rune Labs where he gives them a perspective from the patient's point of view. ***This podcast is sponsored by Ripple Neuro, check out their Neuroscience Research Tools here*** Top 3 Takeaways:  "It got to the point where the Livadopa medication on-off fluctuations were so impairing to my daily life that I had maybe like an hour where I felt normal per day" "But to compare it to the medication now, it's night and day. It brought my baseline to the point where I felt more or less normal. Now I'm still not completely normal, things need to be optimized, but it's night and day compared to what it was before. It's very easy now for me to have these moments where I even forget that I have this disease at all " "There's nothing in my brain that anybody can point to and say, okay, this is what Parkinson's disease is. I don't believe that Parkinson's Disease exists" 1:00 Do you want to talk about your background? 2:45 "You were pretty young when you were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. Do you want to talk about that?" 3:30 "What was the timeline of the disease?" 6:15 "You decided to crack your skull open and then put something in there. What was that kind of decision like? And then what were the results of that as well?" 7:30 Sponsorship by Ripple Neuro 7:45 "What's it been like and maybe how does it compare to the medication and was the results immediate?" 9:15 "You have an adaptive DBS implanted. Do you want to explain what this is?" 14:15 "Let's talk about your blog Tomorrow Edition" 15:30 "Let's talk about your work at Rune labs" 17:30 "Let's talk about your book to Brain Fables" 23:00 "If you had a magic wand, what would you be doing and what kind of improvements would you want to do?" 27:15 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?" benjaminstecher@gmail.com

I Love Neuro
120: How to Make Staying at the Hospital Safer for People with Parkinson's

I Love Neuro

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:39


The Parkinson's Foundation (PF) has created a Hospital Care Initiative to ensure that people with PD have improved stays at the hospital when they need to go and the best practices occur. We share the stats, resources, checklists, and information that the PF has gathered to help people with Parkinsons, their family members, and their healthcare providers. Check out the resources in the link below: https://www.parkinson.org/expert-care/professional-education/hospital-care-initiative Clinical Recommendations for Hospital Care of People with Parkinson's (includes a medication chart and other resourceful info): https://secure3.convio.net/prkorg/site/DocServer/Clincial_Recommendations.pdf?_ga=2.172708643.1291904141.1658971735-274626827.1637725396 Clinical Checklists (ED, Admission, Perioperative, Discharge: ​​https://secure3.convio.net/prkorg/site/DocServer/Clinical_Checklists.pdf?_ga=2.182672294.1291904141.1658971735-274626827.1637725396 Get the mentorship you're craving inside NeuroSpark! Join the waitlist to be the first to know when we open again: www.neurocollaborative.com/neurospark Email us at info@neurocollaborative.com to let us know if you also received a grant and how you'll be using it! We're on the Top 20 Neurology Podcasts on Feedspot https://blog.feedspot.com/neurology_podcasts/

30 Something with Sonni Abatta
192: When Life Throws You a Curveball, Wing Out that Eyeliner! Guide Beauty Founder Terri Bryant on a Parkinson's Diagnosis, the Meaning of Empowered Beauty and More

30 Something with Sonni Abatta

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 42:18


This week it's all about empowered beauty. Terri Bryant is a celebrity makeup artist and beauty educator. As someone who's been in the industry for years, she knows the ins and outs of what it takes for someone to look and feel their best. After being diagnosed with Parkinson's, Terri wanted to create a way for everyone to feel empowered in their beauty, so she designed a set of tools and makeup for anyone who's ready to make feeling beautiful, a lot easier. Enter Guide Beauty. These ergonomic eyeshadow brushes and the soon-to-be-cult favorite eyeliner tool (that helps you get the EASIEST and most gorgeous winged eyeliner look) are reinventing what it takes to do your makeup, no matter your ability or experience. She's teamed up with actress Selma Blair to launch this line, and this week we discuss what happens when life throws you and your career a curveball; the meaning of empowered beauty; the future of Guide Beauty and more. Check out Guide Beauty's amazing line of products here. Any questions or feedback? DM me! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wegottatalkwithsonni/support

Healing at the Speed of Light
Improving Parkinson's Disease

Healing at the Speed of Light

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 30:58


Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no cure and few treatment options. Cases of Parkinson's disease have increased due to aging populations and longer disease duration. In this episode, Dr. Rountree and Kristi review a 2021 study on how laser and light therapy has been safely used to stimulate neural pathways in the brain. Transcranial light therapy has positive effects on the tissues of the brain; reducing inflammation of the brain and stimulating tissues at the cellular level to help develop new neural pathways.  We have begun live-streaming this podcast. Watch this episode on Facebook right here, and see the next episode LIVE in two weeks!Mentioned in this episode:Improvements in clinical signs of Parkinson's disease using photobiomodulation: a prospective proof-of-concept studyVielightVisit the LTI website for more information and to find a laser therapy provider near you. Are you a healthcare provider?Laser Therapy Institute Podcast YouTube ChannelHealing at the Speed of Light 

Neurology® Podcast
August 2022 Neurology Recall: Parkinson Disease

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 71:56 Very Popular


The August 2022 replay of past episodes showcases recent interviews in the realm of Parkinson disease (PD), with topics ranging from initial clinical management to more advanced methodologies to optimize treatment. This episode features conversations with Dr. Anthony Lang, Dr. Meredith Bock, and Dr. Jan Rusz on dopamine-based therapies in early PD, factors associated with quality of life in PD, and new research on speech impairment subtypes in PD, respectively. The episode concludes with Dr. Michael Fox discussing brain networks and their role in cognitive decline after DBS surgery.

Aging in the Willamette Valley
7/30/22: Mike Studer from Northwest Rehabilitation Associates | Discussing The Effects of Exercise on Parkinson's Disease.

Aging in the Willamette Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 28:13


This week we talked with Mike Struder PT, and Former President of Northwest Rehabilitation Associates. He discussed the effects of exercise on Parkinson's disease. Mike shared his knowledge of the impact of exercise on Parkinson's Disease and how it can be "disease-modifying". Physical therapists prescribe complete plans that are individualized to the subtype or phenotype of PD - it is not a "one-size-fits-all." Programs, such as boxing, cycling, and Tai Chi can be helpful due to the socialization, intensity, and sense that you are doing something healthy and beneficial for yourself. This causes the release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic factors, which can improve PD symptoms.

Vida Potencial | Salud, Nutrición y Estilo de Vid
Todo sobre la vitamina D // Deficiencia y cómo se manifiesta, rango óptimo y mucho más.

Vida Potencial | Salud, Nutrición y Estilo de Vid

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 62:33


Más en: https://www.vidapotencial.com Tienes un 80 % de probabilidad de tener niveles bajos de vitamina D. La vitamina D es una hormona que juega un papel clave en montón de aspectos de nuestra biología y cuya deficiencia puede causar muchos problemas a nuestra salud. En este podcast nos centramos en 5 de ellos, cuya incidencia, como consecuencia del estilo de vida y alimentación que llevamos, se ha disparado en los últimos años. Puedes ver la línea del tiempo más abajo. Gana salud con nosotros: Nuestro programa de Pérdida de Peso -- https://bit.ly/programa_perdida_peso Nuestro programa de Dieta antiinflamatoria -- https://bit.ly/programa_dieta_antiinflamatoria Otros cursos y programas -- https://bit.ly/cursosvidapotencial PROGRAMAS DE NUTRICIÓN Pierde peso de manera saludable, iníciate en la dieta cetogénica o en el ayuno intermitente o mejora tu salud con una dieta antiinflamatoria o regula tus hormonas en la menopausia de la mano de la Dra. Isabel Belaustegui. https://programas.vidapotencial.com CURSOS DE ENTRENAMIENTO Y BIENESTAR Iníciate en el entrenamiento de fuerza o en el entrenamiento con kettlebells de la mano de los mejores profesionales. https://www.campuspotencial.com CURSO 50+ MUJER Optimiza tus hormonas y tu salud. https://www.campuspotencial.com/curso-menopausia/ - Únete a la comunidad, es gratis y siempre lo va ser, suscríbete a nuestra newsletter y descarga GRATIS nuestra GUÍA sobre la combinación de alimentos: https://www.vidapotencial.com/unete/ - Nuestras redes sociales: INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/vidapotencial/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/vidapotencial/ - 0:00 Introducción 1:53 Cómo subir niveles de vitamina D 5:05 Deficiencia de vitamina D 9:20 Salud de los huesos, osteoporosis y vitamina D 13:35 Déficit de vitamina D en niños 15:15 Vitamina D en embarazadas y lactantes 17:10 Rango óptimo de vitamina D 19:05 Niveles de vitamina D y cáncer 22:30 Esguinces y luxaciones y vitamina D 25:35 Dosis adecuada de vitamina D y cómo tomarla 29:45 Hipertensión arterial y vitamina D 32:20 Vitamina D y LDL colesterol 36:20 Deficiencia de vitamina D e inflamación 39:05 Vitamina D y la Covid-19 41:45 Enfermedad de Crohn, colitis ulcerosa y vitamina D 43:45 Impacto de la vitamina D en el sistema inmune 44:40 Alimentación infantil y vitamina D 49:10 Salud cerebral y vitamina D 50:05 Enfermedad de Parkinson, esclerosis múltiple y vitamina D. - Recuerda que: “Todos los productos y contenidos ofrecidos por Vida Potencial (tales como, programas y cursos de nutrición, actividad física y vida saludable, libros, vídeos, artículos, posts, podcast, Vlogs y vídeo-tutoriales) tienen naturaleza meramente informativa y divulgativa y en ningún caso constituye servicio médico o sanitario de ningún tipo ni sustituye la consulta con un médico especialista, por lo que no deben ser aplicados sin la aprobación previa y supervisión de un médico o profesional de la salud especializado, particularmente en casos de personas con patologías, lesiones, limitaciones o anomalías físicas o nutricionales o cualquier otra condición especial. Ninguno de los productos, servicios y contenidos ofrecidos por Vida Potencial pueden servir de consejo médico, diagnóstico, prescripción ni tratamiento de tipo alguno de dolencia, enfermedad o patología.” - Si tienes ideas o sugerencias de cómo podemos mejorar estos videos, o posibles temas que te gustaría que tocáramos, por favor déjalo en los comentarios. - ¡Muchísimas GRACIAS por estar ahí!

Parkinson’s and Me
3.6 Romantizing The Past

Parkinson’s and Me

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 15:59


The road ahead is full of incredible challenges. After the diagnosis of Parkison's Disease, it's easy to push away the future and live in the past. It's important to realize that we remember only the best days while wearing our rose-colored glasses. We forget the average and mundane days and the anxiety that we were feeling. Living in the past keeps us from experiencing the possibility of joy that lies ahead. Daniel shares the results of a recent appointment he had with his Movement Disorder Specialist. Having decreased levels of energy is very common in those diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. Daniel provides some of his strategies in order to keep moving forward even with the lack of energy. Daniel continues to keep his diagnosis a secret from everyone except a select few. His reasoning is simple. To keep working for as long as possible before alerting his employer. However, the reality is that he will not be able to keep it up for too much longer. Once he shares the diagnosis with his employer, that is when he will notify everyone else about the Young Onset Parkinson's Disease diagnosis. This approach is littered with its own consequences. Add your experience and suggestions to the conversation in this Parkinson's podcast. If you would like to leave Daniel a voice message and you live in the U.S. call 1-706-873-1656. Email us at parkinsonsandmepodcast@gmail.com or visit our site parkinsonsand.me --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/parkinsonsandme/message

Daily Dad Jokes
Larry Gifford, Parkinson's advocate and host of "When Life Gives You Parkinson's" shares his best Dad Jokes!

Daily Dad Jokes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 3:28


Larry has spent more than 30 years in radio as a news and sports anchor/reporter, program director, and consultant. Gifford hosts the podcast “When Life Gives You Parkinson's” which details his journey with the disease as a guy in his mid-40's with a family and a career. He was diagnosed with Young Onset Parkinson's Disease in August 2017. The show was named “Best Podcast” by RTDNA West Region in 2020 and among the “Best of 2018” by Apple Podcasts. Gifford serves on boards for the CKNW Kids' Fund, Pacific Parkinson's Research Institute, and the Michael J Fox Foundation Patient Council. He is also has been named an Ambassador for the 2022 World Parkinson Congress in Barcelona, Spain. PD Avengers https://www.pdavengers.com/larry-gifford-bio Larry's Social Media links: https://twitter.com/Giffordtweet https://www.instagram.com/larrygifford1/?hl=en https://www.linkedin.com/in/larrygifford/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Alzheimer's And Parkinson's – How Can We Prevent This? Panel - Steve Blake| Dale Bredesen, MD| Ray Dorsey, MD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 137:31


Dr. Steve Blake • http://www.drsteveblake.com • Book – Nutrients for Memory Dale Bredesen, MD • https://www.ahnphealth.com/dr-bredesen.html • Book - End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline Dr. Ray Dorsey, M.D.• https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/people/26764214-earl-ray-dorsey • Book – Ending Parkinsons Disease #SteveBlake #DaleBredesen #RayDorsey #Alzheimers #Parkinsons Dr. Steve Blake is a doctor of science specializing in nutritional biochemistry. He is Director of Nutritional Neuroscience at the Maui Memory Clinic. He is author of Nutrients for Memory, Fats and Oils Demystified, the McGraw-Hill college textbook Vitamins and Minerals Demystified, Stop Strokes Before they Start, Autism: A Spectrum of Improvement, Mastering Migraines: Prevention and Relief, Arthritis Relief, Parkinson's Disease: Dietary Regulation of Dopamine, Healing Medicine, A Nutritional Approach to Alzheimer's Disease, No More Heart Attacks, Mosby's Alternative Remedies, and co-author of Mosby's Drug Guide for Nurses, 4th edition. He and his wife Catherine live on an organic farm on Maui that is powered by the sun. To Contact Dr Steve Blake go to drsteveblake.com Dr. Dale Bredesen'sis an author and internationally-recognized expert in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, and is a New York Times bestselling author for - The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline Dr. Dale Bredesen's career has been guided by a simple idea: that Alzheimer's as we know it is not just preventable, but reversible. Thanks to a dedicated pursuit of finding the science that makes this a reality, his idea has placed Dr. Bredesen at the vanguard of neurological research, and led to the discoveries that today underlie the ReCode Report. To Contact Dr Bredesen go to ApolloHealthCo.comDr. Ray Dorsey, M.D. is a medical doctor and author of  Ending Parkinson's Disease: A Prescription for Action. Brain diseases are now the world's leading source of disability. The fastest growing of these is Parkinson's: the number of impacted patients has doubled to more than six million over the last twenty-five years and is projected to double again by 2040. Harmful pesticides that increase the risk of Parkinson's continue to proliferate, many people remain undiagnosed and untreated, research funding stagnates, and the most effective treatment is now a half century old. Dr. Ray Dorsey is David M. Levy Professor of Neurology and Director of the Center for Health + Technology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Dorsey is helping investigate new treatments for movement disorders and improve the way care is delivered for individuals with Parkinson disease and other neurological disorders. Using simple web-based video conferencing, he and his colleagues are seeking to provide care to individuals with Parkinson and neurological diseases anywhere that they live. To Contact Dr. Ray Dorsey, M.D. http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/people/26764214-earl-ray-dorsey Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Engineer of Finance
Parkinson's Law - Episode 234

Engineer of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 11:05


Once you hit the retirement age, do you think you're ready? Are you mentally, physically, emotionally, and most importantly financially ready? For today's episode, Ken takes a deep dive into Parkinson's Law. He discusses what the benefits of Parkinson's Law are and how it works. He also differentiates it from other available plans in the market today and why people should consider studying it further. Ken Greene transitioned from being a Professional Engineer (P.E.) to the “Engineer of Finance.” His goal is to help people become financially independent and help them earn better yields with less risk by investing Off Wall Street. Links and Resources from this Episode DISCLAIMER For resources and additional information on this episode go to http://engineeroffinance.com Connect with Ken Greene http://engineeroffinance.com Office 775-624-8839 https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-greene https://business.facebook.com/GreeneFinance EOF Podcast #71: The Greene Machine Parkinson's Law Becoming Your Own Banker Book a meeting with Ken If you liked what you've heard and would like a one-on-one meeting with the Engineer Of Finance click here Show Notes What Parkinson's Law is What impacted Ken's career in the finance industry What the benefits of Parkinson's Law are How Parkinson's Law works What the effective plan is for people who can't find time to look for mentors and study for money Review, Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes. Subscribe with Apple Podcasts Follow on Spotify Subscribe with Stitcher Subscribe with RSS

Sandy Rios in the Morning
A Look At Several Primary Elections Across The Country With Scott Parkinson Of Club For Growth and Heidi St. John

Sandy Rios in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 46:34


Talking Sleep
Sleep-Related Movement Disorders

Talking Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 30:44


In today's episode of Talking Sleep, we look at sleep-related movement disorders. Dr. Afifa Uzzaman discusses when movements during sleep are incidental and when they are cause for concern. She also discusses common sleep-related movements in patients with Parkinson's disease and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Neurology® Podcast
Genetics and the Age-of-Onset in Parkinson Disease

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 14:58 Very Popular


Dr. Jason Crowell talks with Dr. Manu Sharma about the genome-wide association of age-at-onset in Parkinson disease. Read the full article in Neurology. This podcast is sponsored by argenx. Visit www.vyvgarthcp.com for more information.

Running Commentary
Long Summer Run - Part One

Running Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 62:18


Refreshingly, Paul and Rob are both pretty fit, so they set off on a long run. Not Ultra Marathon-long, of course... Featuring adventures for Paul in Dubai and for Rob at the Podiatrist, treadmill tension as Rob questions some of Tonks' wisdom, comedy report, training plans and 10k predictions.Thank you for sharing your runs with us, supporting us through the Acast Supporter button and sponsoring Rob for Parkinson's Uk; you're wonderful - namaste.Rob's book Running Tracks is available here - https://www.waterstones.com/book/running-tracks/rob-deering/9781800180444, and you can get Paul's award-winning 26.2 Miles to Happiness here - https://www.waterstones.com/book/26-2-miles-to-happiness/paul-tonkinson/9781472975270Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/runningcommentary. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

McMaster University neuroscientist Laurel Trainor explores how music affects the human brain - from infant development to helping people with neurological diseases such as Parkinson's.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Les Grosses Têtes
INÉDIT - La blague du jeudi 28 juillet 2022

Les Grosses Têtes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 0:45


Laurent Ruquier raconte une blague de Pierre Doris sur deux anciens qui se croisent et qui parlent de leur maladie du Parkinson. Découvrez la page Facebook Officielle des "Grosses Têtes" : https://www.facebook.com/lesgrossestetesrtl/ Retrouvez vos "Grosses Têtes" sur Instagram : https://bit.ly/2hSBiAo Découvrez le compte Twitter Officiel des "Grosses Têtes" : https://bit.ly/2PXSkkz Toutes les vidéos des "Grosses Têtes" sont sur YouTube : https://bit.ly/2DdUyGg

Hungry Dog Barbell Podcast
Run Your Days

Hungry Dog Barbell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 53:43


This week I'm joined by Kiersten McCartney Physical Therapist and PhD Student at the University of Delaware, studying Biomechanics and Human Movement Sciences, with a passion for engaging people with disabilities in exercise, fitness, and sport. As a lifelong athlete, Kiersten knows firsthand the physical, mental, and social benefits of exercise and believes in the power of fitness as a vessel to help people find their potential. A former exercise physiologist at the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab in Chicago, IL, Kiersten created individual fitness programs for people of all abilities, including those with neurological impairments, such as spinal cord injury, stroke, and Parkinson's Disease. She is currently a member of the Neuromotor & Behavior Lab researching physical activity in people with chronic stroke, under the mentorship of Dr. Darcy Reisman. She is a certified Adaptive and Inclusive Fitness Trainer through the Adaptive Training Academy, an active member in her CrossFit community in Wilmington, Delaware, and can be caught running at sunrise.  Follow her @runyourdays and learn more about the Adaptive Fitness Classes she's running in Delaware

Biotech 2050 Podcast
112. New approaches in CNS diseases, Brad Margus, Co-founder and Executive Chairman, Cerevance

Biotech 2050 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 23:26


Brad Margus is co-founder and Executive Chairman of Cerevance, a drug discovery company advancing a robust pipeline of targeted treatments for patients with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The company's lead program, CVN424, has recently shown significant and clinically meaningful efficacy and safety in a 135-patient, phase 2 clinical study for Parkinson's Disease. Investors include Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Google Ventures, Bill Gates, Casdin Capital, Lightstone Ventures, Foresite Capital, UPMC Enterprises, Dolby Ventures and the Dementia Discovery Fund. In 2013, Margus started Genome Bridge, a non-profit subsidiary of the Broad Institute of Harvard and M.I.T., to build a computational platform for sharing genomic data. From 2009 to 2012, as co-founder and CEO of Envoy Therapeutics, Margus led the discovery of therapeutics for brain diseases and then sold the company to Takeda Pharmaceuticals. From 2000 to 2007, Margus was co-founder and CEO of Perlegen Sciences, a leader in analyzing genetic variation. Concurrent with his business career, for the last 25+ years, Margus has worked as a volunteer in founding and leading the A-T Children's Project, a non-profit that orchestrates and funds research on a rare disease - ataxia telangiectasia or "A-T" - that two of his sons have. A-T causes progressive loss of muscle control, cancer and immune system problems. One supported project involves testing an antisense oligonucleotide gene therapy approach for A-T. Margus currently serves on the Boards of Arvinas (Nasdaq: ARVN), a protein degradation company; Presage Bio, an oncology company; and Neurona, a cell therapy company. He also serves as Co-chair of the Network for Excellence in Neuroscience Clinical Trials External Oversight Board at the Nat'l. Institutes of Health. Margus previously served on the Advisory Council to the National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; the Secretary of HHS's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society; the Board of the Genetic Alliance, representing hundreds of genetic disease advocacy organizations; the Nat'l. Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Advisory Council at the NIH, the Cure Acceleration Network Review Board; as a Harvard Business School Global Advisor, as an advisor to Counsyl (acquired by Myriad Genetics); on the Board of Children's Neurobiological Solutions; the Board of Cellular Research, a molecular biology tool company (acquired by Becton Dickinson); the Board of Second Genome, a microbiome company; the Board of Global Genes, a non-profit supporting all rare diseases; and on the Stanford University School of Medicine's Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee. Margus holds an MBA from Harvard.

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast
Podcast: Virtual Checkup: How Telehealth Brings Parkinson's Care to You (Webinar Audio)

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022


Many people with Parkinson's consider telehealth a useful tool for getting care. But for some, the technology or visit may be tough to navigate. In this episode, experts discuss how to make the most of a virtual visit with a doctor and the impact of telehealth on research and care. Recently diagnosed with Parkinson's? You can play a critical role in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study. Connect with the PPMI team at michaeljfox.org/podcast-ppmi-sites The online part of PPMI is open to anyone over age 18 in the U.S. Join the study that could change everything at michaeljfox.org/podcast-ppmi Like our podcasts? Please consider leaving a rating or review and sharing the series with your network. apple.co/3p02Jw0

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 07.26.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 58:50 Very Popular


First trial to prove a diet supplement can prevent hereditary cancer Newcastle University (UK), July 25, 2022 A trial in people with high hereditary risk of a wide range of cancers has shown a major preventive effect from resistant starch, found in a wide range of foods such as oats, breakfast cereal, cooked and cooled pasta or rice, peas and beans, and slightly green bananas. An international trial—known as CAPP2—involved almost 1000 patients with Lynch syndrome from around the world, and revealed that a regular dose of resistant starch, also known as fermentable fiber, taken for an average of two years, did not affect cancers in the bowel but did reduce cancers in other parts of the body by more than half. This effect was particularly pronounced for upper gastrointestinal cancers including esophageal, gastric, biliary tract, pancreatic and duodenum cancers. The astonishing effect was seen to last for 10 years after stopping taking the supplement. "We found that resistant starch reduces a range of cancers by over 60%. The effect was most obvious in the upper part of the gut," explained Professor John Mathers, professor of Human Nutrition at Newcastle University. "This is important as cancers of the upper GI tract are difficult to diagnose and often are not caught early on. "Resistant starch can be taken as a powder supplement and is found naturally in peas, beans, oats and other starchy foods. The dose used in the trial is equivalent to eating a daily banana; before they become too ripe and soft, the starch in bananas resists breakdown and reaches the bowel where it can change the type of bacteria that live there. "Resistant starch is a type of carbohydrate that isn't digested in your small intestine; instead it ferments in your large intestine, feeding beneficial gut bacteria—it acts, in effect, like dietary fiber in your digestive system. This type of starch has several health benefits and fewer calories than regular starch. We think that resistant starch may reduce cancer development by changing the bacterial metabolism of bile acids and to reduce those types of bile acids that can damage our DNA and eventually cause cancer. However, this needs further research."   New study finds lowest risk of death was among adults who exercised 150-600 minutes/week Harvard School of Public Health, July 25, 2022 An analysis of more than 100,000 participants over a 30-year follow-up period found that adults who perform two to four times the currently recommended amount of moderate or vigorous physical activity per week have a significantly reduced risk of mortality, according to new research published today in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation. The reduction was 21-23% for people who engaged in two to four times the recommended amount of vigorous physical activity, and 26-31% for people who engaged in two to four times the recommended amount of moderate physical activity each week. In 2018, the United States Department of Health and Human Services' Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended that adults engage in at least 150-300 minutes/week of moderate physical activity or 75-150 minutes/week of vigorous physical activity, or an equivalent combination of both intensities.  The analysis also found: Participants who met the guidelines for vigorous physical activity had an observed 31% lower risk of CVD mortality and 15% lower risk of non-CVD mortality, for an overall 19% lower risk of death from all causes. Participants who met the guidelines for moderate physical activity had an observed 22-25% lower risk of CVD mortality and 19-20% lower risk of non-CVD mortality, for an overall 20-21% lower risk of death from all causes. Participants who performed two to four times above the recommended amount of long-term vigorous physical activity (150-300 min/week) had an observed 27-33% lower risk of CVD mortality and 19% non-CVD mortality, for an overall 21-23% lower risk of death from all causes. Participants who performed two to four times above the recommended amount of moderate physical activity (300-600 min/week) had an observed 28-38% lower risk of CVD mortality and 25-27% non-CVD mortality, for an overall 26-31% lower risk of mortality from all causes. In addition, no harmful cardiovascular health effects were found among the adults who reported engaging in more than four times the recommended minimum activity levels. Previous studies have found evidence that long-term, high-intensity, endurance exercise, such as marathons, triathlons and long-distance bicycle races, may increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery calcification, atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death.   Treating dementia with the healing waves of sound Ultrasound applied to the brain could help treat patients with dementia. Tohoku University (Japan), July 20, 2022 Ultrasound waves applied to the whole brain improve cognitive dysfunction in mice with conditions simulating vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The research, conducted by scientists at Tohoku University in Japan, suggests that this type of therapy may also benefit humans. The team, led by cardiologist Hiroaki Shimokawa, found that applying low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) to the whole brain of the mice improved blood vessel formation and nerve cell regeneration without having obvious side effects. "The LIPUS therapy is a non-invasive physiotherapy that could apply to high-risk elderly patients without the need for surgery or anaesthesia, and could be used repeatedly," says Shimokawa. The Tohoku University team found that cognitive impairment markedly improved in mice with conditions similar to vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease when LIPUS was applied to the whole brain three times a day for 20 minutes each time.    Study: ADHD drugs do not improve cognition in healthy college students University of Rhode Island, July 19, 2022 Contrary to popular belief across college campuses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications may fail to improve cognition in healthy students and actually can impair functioning, according to a study by researchers at the University of Rhode Island and Brown University. Study co-investigators Lisa Weyandt, professor of psychology and a faculty member with URI's George and Anne Ryan Institute for Neuroscience, and Tara White, assistant professor of research in behavioral and social sciences at Brown University, had anticipated different findings. "We hypothesized that Adderall would enhance cognition in the healthy students, but instead, the medication did not improve reading comprehension or fluency, and it impaired working memory," she said. "Not only are they not benefitting from it academically, but it could be negatively affecting their performance." This first-ever multisite pilot study of the impact of so-called "study drugs" on college students who do not have ADHD comes at a time when use of prescription stimulants such as Adderall, Ritalin and Vyvanse is common among young adults who believe the drugs will improve their academic performance.  Results of the study, published in the journal Pharmacy, show that the standard 30 mg dose of Adderall did improve attention and focus -- a typical result from a stimulant -- but that effect failed to translate to better performance on a battery of neurocognitive tasks that measured short-term memory, reading comprehension and fluency. Weyandt has a theory about why working memory would be adversely affected by the medication. Brain scan research shows that a person with ADHD often has less neural activity in the regions of the brain that control executive function -- working memory, attention, self-control. For people with ADHD, Adderall and similar medications increase activity in those regions and appear to normalize functioning. "If your brain is functioning normally in those regions, the medication is unlikely to have a positive effect on cognition and my actually impair cognition. In other words, you need to have a deficit to benefit from the medicine," Weyandt said.         Guanabana: the cancer killer big pharma doesn't want you to know about Northeastern University, July 16, 2022  Guanabana is known by a variety of names -- including soursop, cherimoya, custard apple, Brazilian paw paw and graviola. As far back as the 1970s, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigated the merits of guanabana, and discovered the stems and leaves of the tree were successful in destroying cancer cells. "Inexplicably, the results [of the NCI research] were published in an internal report and never released to the public. Since 1976, guanabana has proven to be an immensely potent cancer killer in 20 independent laboratory tests, but as of now, no double-blind clinical trials," reports Christopher Lane, Ph.D., in Psychology Today. Moreover, this study found that a compound derived from the leaves of guanabana was "selectively cytotoxic for the lung (A-549), colon (HT-29), and pancreatic (PACA-2) cell lines with potencies equal to or exceeding those of Adriamycin." And research in the Journal of Natural Products discovered that extracts of guanabana demonstrated pesticidal, antimalarial, antiviral and antimicrobial properties. Likewise, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center states that guanabana shows anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Revered for centuries in South America and Southeast Asia, the bark, leaves, root, seeds and fruit have been used to tame heart disease, asthma, liver issues and arthritis. Guanabana is also helpful for treating sleep disorders, fevers and cough. According to the article, "Guanabana--Medicinal Uses?" extracts of the plant: Attack cancer safely and effectively with an all-natural therapy that does not cause extreme nausea, weight loss and hair loss. Protect the immune system. Boost energy and outlook on life. Effectively target and kill malignant cells in 12 types of cancer -- including colon, breast, prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. Proved to be up to 10,000 times stronger in slowing the growth of cancer cells than Adriamycin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug. Selectively kill only cancer cells, unlike traditional chemotherapy treatments.  *A word of caution: Excessive consumption of guanabana can lead to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration with symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease. Consult with a qualified practitioner before taking guanabana on a daily basis.     High-strength cannabis linked to addiction and mental health problems University of Bath (UK), July 25, 2022 As the strength or potency of cannabis products has increased internationally over the years, so have rates of people being treated for cannabis addiction, say the authors of a new study. Researchers from the Addiction and Mental Health Group at the University of Bath (UK) have systematically analyzed the relationship between the types of cannabis people use and their addiction and mental health problems. Their work draws on 20 studies involving almost 120,000 people. The new study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, suggests that people who use high-potency cannabis are more likely to experience addiction than those using low-potency products. It also suggests that people using high-potency cannabis are more likely to experience a psychotic disorder, such as schizophrenia. These findings may help to explain why more people have received treatment for cannabis problems over recent years. Data from the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction show a 76% increase in people entering treatment for cannabis addiction in the past decade.

Psychiatry Advances
Treating Behavioral Manifestations Of Neurological Illness

Psychiatry Advances

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 44:17


This Podcast describes integrated care at UPMC/PITT between the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology. Psychiatric manifestations/treatment of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's Disease, Epilepsy, and Migraine are discussed with Morgan Faeder MD, PHD. Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Medical Director of Neuropsychiatry and Director of the Consultation- Liaison Psychiatry Fellowship, and Alex Israel MD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychiatrist /UPMC Epilepsy and Headache Centers.

Another Day Above Ground
Getting Better With Laughter

Another Day Above Ground

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 33:07


Join the three boomers, Dale Irvin, Tim Slagle, and Carolyn Strauss as the chat with comedian Joe Antonocci on how he's battling Parkinson's disease with comedy. It's inspiring and really funny.

Naturally Savvy
EP #1108: What's Your Dosha and Why It Matters To You Health with Kulreet Chaudhary, MD

Naturally Savvy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 50:48


Lisa is joined by Dr. Kulreet Chaudhary, MD, is a neurologist, neuroscientist and an internationally recognized expert in the ancient practice of Ayurvedic medicine.  She goes in-depth with Lisa about Ayurvedic Medicine and in particular the doshas.  She blew Lisa's mind with some of the information! Dr. Chaudhary earned her medical degree at Loma Linda University School of Medicine; completed her internship at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and neurology residency at University of California San Diego (UCSD). Chaudhary is the author of “The Prime” (Penguin Random House, 2016) and “Sound Medicine” (Harper Collins, 2020); is a pioneer in the field of integrative medicine and is a highly sought-after speaker, researcher and adviser for Healthy Directions. She is the former director of Wellspring Health in Scripps Memorial Hospital, where she successfully combined conventional treatments with Ayurvedic practices of detoxification, diet and lifestyle management to help patients effectively manage chronic neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and migraine headaches. Her program was so successful that it is now used for a wide range of health concerns, including weight issues and chronic disease. Through her integrative approach, Chaudhary teaches her patients about the connection between mind, body and spirit, which impacts every aspect of health both physically and mentally. Chaudhary also has extensive media experience including being a regular medical contributor for “The Dr. Oz Show.”