Podcasts about Central Texas

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  • 791PODCASTS
  • 1,642EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
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  • Dec 2, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Central Texas

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Latest podcast episodes about Central Texas

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing
EP#306 Achieving financial goals by investing in real estate with Kavitha V. Baratakke

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 28:18


Kavitha Baratakke, Founder of Cherry Street Investments is an Austin-based Real Estate Investor with over 12 years of real estate investing experience. Prior to real estate, she spent almost 20 years as a Technology Professional working for IBM and Atlassian in various roles across Software Development, Customer Services, Partner Relations and Technical Account Management. Kavitha brings strong project management, problem-solving and presentation skills from her Technology background to Real Estate.  As an investor, Kavitha has successfully acquired, rehabbed, managed, owned and operated several single-family and multi-family investment properties in the Central Texas area. She sponsors real estate syndications in Multifamily, Build-to-Rent, Townhome Communities, Senior Living and Land Banking investments. She prefers strong growth markets like Austin, DFW, San Antonio, Phoenix, and Atlanta.Key highlights- Know your sponsorer & location before investing in syndication- Investing in assets with bigger profit margins- Educate yourself before you invest- Positioning yourself to attract capital- Common mistakes while raising capitalFollow Rama on socials!LinkedIn | Meta | Twitter | InstagramConnect to Rama KrishnaE-mail: info@ushacapital.comWebsite: www.ushacapital.com

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast
700 Units per Month, aka 700 Donors Coming in Per Month: Robertson Blood Center

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 55:33


The folks from the Robertson Blood Center are back on the Great Big Podcast to discuss blood donations, how to schedule a blood drive, and to let people know about the changing eligibility to actually donate (we're looking at the people who lived in England during Mad Cow disease!). And of course, this is the first episode of the month which means it is time for Book & Movie of the Month.SUBMIT: FortHoodPAO@gmail.comFACEBOOK: /usagforthoodINSTAGRAM: @usagforthoodTWITTER: @usagforthoodAll music obtained, royalty free, through Filter by Songtradr: "Gun Metal Grey" - Delicious Allstars; "Learning By Doing" - Niklas Olovso; "Mountain High" - The Nerve Music; "Rocking The Beat" -  Marcus BresslerThis podcast is a production of U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood and Fort Hood Public Affairs.

Know your why Podcast
Mentoring in the short-term rental industry with Lucas Piper | Know your WHY #158

Know your why Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 51:07


Lucas lives in Austin, TX. His story includes graduating with a social work degree, working as a counselor with homeless youth, backpacking/volunteering in Central & South America for 1.5years and a half decade as a Director of Marketing in the healthcare industry. He eventually realized he could mix his two passions, helping people and traveling. June of 2021, Lucas left his W2 to launch a Vacation Rental Management Company (Five Star Vacation Home Rentals). Lucas is now able to help provide 5-star experiences and memories to travelers and families at 20 within Central Texas. Lucas is a leader in the short-term rental industry and loves mentoring and helping others on the path of financial freedom through real estate and vacation rentals. He is a competitor, competing nationally in a number of fitness comps. He is an adventurer, always looking for the next bucklist adventure. And most importantly, he is a family man.   Get to know more about Lucas: www.fivestarvhr.com IG: @fivestarvhr   If you want to know more about Dr. Jason Balara and the Know your Why Podcast: https://linktr.ee/jasonbalara Audio Track: Back To The Wood by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   Artist: http://audionautix.com/    Powered by www.podcastproducer.com 

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron
Central Texas Huddle 113022

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022


Central Texas Huddle 113022 made possible by as well as Stay tuned for all the great shows on the Lone Star Gridiron Sports Network. Contact the Central Texas High School Football Huddle Twitter @chrisdoelle, @lsgridiron Facebook ALL I NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED FROM MY TEXAS HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL COACH - Paperback, Ebook The AUTHORITY on […]

Texas Ag Today
Texas Ag Today - November 28, 2022

Texas Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 22:59


Texas sheep and goat herds were thinned out by drought. The Amarillo Farm and Ranch Show kicks off this week. A Texas vegetable producer was named to a USDA advisory committee. Central Texas is enjoying some cold and wet weather. We'll have those stories and more on this episode of Texas Ag Today.

Everyday Ironman Podcast
74 - Matt Bell

Everyday Ironman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 58:16


In this episode, we hear Matt Bell share is experience at Ironman 70.3 Waco a few weeks ago.Matt and others brave the cold and wet to tackle the Central Texas course. One that i personally raced the year before. I was even on site at the beginning of the day.Matt breaks the race down for us discipline by discipline and reveals what he race plans include for 2023.

Texas Brave and Strong Podcast
Hello Hico, Welcome Back!

Texas Brave and Strong Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 6:25


Some small Texas towns have prospered and grown during the decades. Others have boomed and then settled into obscurity. Hico in Hamilton County appeared to be in the sad, second category, but determined citizens in Hico are bringing Hico back. Increasingly it is on the list of small towns to visit in Texas and (in my opinion) for good reason. In 1856, a few years prior to the Civil War, the rush to Texas was on. That year, eight families arrived in covered wagons and settled on Honey Creek in the northern corner of Hamilton County. In 1860, John Rankin Alfred and his family, also traveling in covered wagons, rode into Central Texas and joined the Honey Creek settlement. Alfred started a small business selling goods he'd brought by wagon and engaged in the cattle business. When the community petitioned for a post office, Alfred became postmaster and named the now official (but not yet incorporated) town Hico (HY-koh), after his birthplace, Hico, in Calloway County, Kentucky. When the Texas Central Railroad (which was part of the famous Katy Railroad) was built two and a half miles away, like so many Texas towns, the citizens decided that if the community was to prosper, they needed to relocate the town adjacent to the rail line. So they moved. Ten years later, two major fires destroyed downtown's wooden buildings. The town rebuilt with big blocks of limestone. The move to the rail line proved to be a smart one. By 1883, Hico was incorporated and became a major center of Texas trade. Hico's grain market exploded. By the turn of the century, Hico was shipping more grain than any other location on the Texas Central rail line. By 1907, the cotton shipments through Hico were in the tens of thousands of bales. Business was good and downtown Hico boomed with almost one hundred businesses—from hotels and grocery stores to both a broom and a candy factory. An 1895 opera house, a theatre, and tented roller rink offered fun and entertainment. But by 1955, the trading boom—which had been fueled by train transportation—fizzled and the town's business and population declined. A situation aggravated by major interstate construction bypassing the community. But today, more than sixty-five years later, when one might have expected Hico to be a near ghost town, it is a thriving example of a historic small town creating a new history. From 2019 to 2020, the population grew by 12.5% to 1,780 people. Not a big town. but a growing one with lots to offer. Main street is lined with handsome, historic stone buildings from more than 100 years ago—some structures sport old fashioned ads painted on their sides — the billboards of the past. A walk down Main Street is a trip back in time. Except—these old fashioned buildings now house charming inns and restaurants, boutiques, and various shops. The newly restored 1896 Midland Hotel recreates the hospitality of the past in its fourteen guest rooms, while its Chop House restaurant serves up thoroughly up-to-date dishes with a flavor of Texas and the 1896 Saloon has drinks to help you “wet your whistle” as early Texans said. A Texas-history mystery also beckons in downtown Hico. Was a Hico resident named William Henry “Ollie” Roberts, known as Brushy Bill Roberts, none other than the outlaw Billy the Kid? Many believe that he was. Brushy Bill claimed that Pat Garrett, the man who took credit for shooting Billy the Kid, really shot another outlaw named Billy Barlow and that he, Billy the Kid, slipped into the night and vanished, becoming another miscreant GTT—“Gone to Texas.” The full story is an interesting one and there are lots of clues—from scars on Brushy Bill that match scars where it is known Billy the Kid was wounded, plus testimonials from other noted outlaws of the time that Brushy Bill was in fact Billy the Kid. Brushy Bill died in Hico in 1950 before he received the pardon he was hoping for from New Mexico's governor- a pardon promised..

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast
Happy Thanksgiving from the Fort Hood Garrison Command team!

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 61:13


Happy Thanksgiving from the Fort Hood Garrison Command team! This week's episode is a little different; Garrison Commander Col. Foster and Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Calvin Hall come on to talk about their Thanksgiving traditions and favorite foods. And then, listeners get to experience a 1st Cavalry Division Band Christmas concert. SUBMIT: FortHoodPAO@gmail.comFACEBOOK: /usagforthoodINSTAGRAM: @usagforthoodTWITTER: @usagforthoodAll music obtained, royalty free, through Filter by Songtradr: "Gun Metal Grey" - Delicious AllstarsThis podcast is a production of U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood and Fort Hood Public Affairs.

1 Star Rewind
Jen with Unshakable Milkshakes

1 Star Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 41:17


Cory talks to Jen from Unshakable Milkshakes! Their milkshakes are handcrafted with a lot of love and a little magic. Unshakeable Milkshakes is anything but a classic shake bar, they feature a wide variety of insanely fun milkshakes and treats so tasty it's incredible. Located in Waco Texas at Union Hall, where you'll find us making shakes that look so crazy good you won't know which one to order. Great for birthdays, vacation treats, rewards, special occasions, or any time you just want to add a little fun to your day! All of their proceeds from making ridiculously good milkshakes go towards Sunshine Recovery House and directly helping women recovering from drug and alcohol addiction right here in Central Texas. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Austin Real Estate Investing
Nico Salazar - Full Time Austin Real Estate Investor

Austin Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 33:28


Nico Salazar is originally from Miami and has been a full time real estate investor in Austin for the past 5 years. His extensive portfolio includes 25 rental units, 10 flips, and 11 wholesales! Check out Nico on Instagram: @Stormventure The Moorhead Team is excited to bring you information about investing in real estate in the Central Texas area! More information can be found at our website at www.themoorheadteam.com and our YouTube page The Moorhead Team. We're always aiming to bring you great free content about investing in real estate in Austin, TX!

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do
recruitAbility CEO Nad Elias

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 28:44


This episode is co-produced with the Austin Technology Council. ATC is a 30 year old association focused on promoting and facilitating growth of technology companies in Central Texas. Over the past three decades the business ecosystem in Austin has changed, and ATC is actively changing, too. Learn more at https://AustinTechnologyCouncil.org. Today we chat with Nad Elias, CEO at recruitAbility. His story of working in the recruiting business for nearly 25 years, and his commitment to growing his team and culture will inspire you.   About Nad Elias Nad Elias has been in the search recruitment industry for 20+ years. Recognized as one of the top 50 recruiters in Texas, he is known for working with and advising companies on their talent acquisition and retention strategies, consistently delivering on-target results, and building high-performing teams. Nad founded recruitAbility with the purpose-driven mission to make the lives of everyone they connect with better. Nad's career has spanned all aspects of employer and people development. He's trained, lead, and developed recruiting organizations serving various industries while always focusing on the value-added services they provide when it's done right. His experience includes running executive searches and managing nationwide projects with companies ranging in size from start-ups to the Fortune 500. He began his career out of college in the recruiting industry, and it's all he's ever known. Austin is home to Nad and his family. A University of Texas graduate, he is the incoming President of the Central US Entrepreneurs Organization (EO). He has been a finalist for Austin's best CEO's by the Austin Business Journal for the last 2 years and has lead recruitAbility to one of Austin's best places to work the last 4 out of 5 years. When he's not following the active lifestyles of his two kids, Nad plays and coaches basketball and enjoys a round of golf whenever he can fit it in! About recruitAbility  recruitAbility is a tech enabled consulting firm in the recruiting industry that partners with business leaders to strategically grow their organizations. We set out to reimagine recruiting by building a process and platform that helps our clients find and retain the right people. We help our clients grow through our direct hire, contract, and managed recruiting solutions. HTTPS://thomsinger.com/podcast/recruitability  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

MVP Business
Running a Hardware Store and Supporting A Community With Christy Degenhart

MVP Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 34:01


Tad and Christy Degenhart don't just own the local hardware store, they take care of their Central Texas community. Keeping a well-oiled machine of happy employees comes easily to this couple, and they do their best to support the rest of the Wimberley community as much as they can. Christy joins Steph Silver to share how they used their ACE Hardware franchise to give back to the people, particularly after the 2015 floods devastated this area. They did not only donate money, time, hard work, and hardware, but they also spent countless hours feeding those whose homes were lost or in complete disrepair. Christy also shares tips for aspiring female entrepreneurs, striking the best work-life balance, and hiring the most responsible people for your team.

PLOW & HOSE Gardening in Central Texas
11-20-22 FINALLY--Feel like Fall! Planting onions and Keep Your Leaves

PLOW & HOSE Gardening in Central Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 38:06


The weather finally matches the season! The cold and damp and dark days have Julie rethinking things, but she's excited about harvesting sweet potatoes, planting onions and she really, REALLY, wants you to keep leaves out of the landfill. SPONSOR OFFER Save 15% on COVER CROP SEEDS at TrueLeafMarket.com using promo code PH15. Offer expires 12.31.22 Some restrictions apply.

Secular Sexuality
Secular Sexuality 09.46 11-17-2022 with Christy Powell and JP Cardenas

Secular Sexuality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 87:25


Should you ever have the chance to join us here at the Atheist Community of Austin's Free Thought Library in Central Texas you'll likely hear one of our favorite bits of local slang- ya'll know the one I mean. And, as we like to say, ya'll means all ya'll. Joining Christy this week live IN STUDIO is LPC Associate JP Cardenas, health at every size therapist and fat liberation activist, eager to set the record straight on body positivity, BMI and possibly a little TMI on bodies of all sorts and sizes. Join us by phone, internet or in person with your calls and questions and find out what's turning us on this week on SecX!

Austin Real Estate Investing
David Lecko - DealMachine CEO & Real Estate Investor

Austin Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 21:24


David Lecko is originally from St. Louis and currently lives in Austin. David is the CEO of DealMachine, an app that helps real estate investors get more deals for less money with software for lead generation. David has been investing for 7 years and his portfolio includes 9 long-term rental properties.  For more info, check him out here: Instagram - @dealmachineapp Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/c/DealMachine dealmachine.com The Moorhead Team is excited to bring you information about investing in real estate in the Central Texas area! More information can be found at our website at www.themoorheadteam.com and our YouTube page The Moorhead Team. We're always aiming to bring you great free content about investing in real estate in Austin, TX!

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast
The Best Part of My Day Involves Soldiers: 2ABCT, 1st Cavalry Division

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 24:00


This week's episode of the Great Big Podcast features the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Commander as he is here to discuss how his time back at Fort Hood is going and the upcoming holidays. Plus, we brought back Blair from the Fort Hood Sentinel for Traveling Soldier a week early. SUBMIT: FortHoodPAO@gmail.comFACEBOOK: /usagforthoodINSTAGRAM: @usagforthoodTWITTER: @usagforthoodAll music obtained, royalty free, through Filter by Songtradr: "Gun Metal Grey" - Delicious Allstars; "Learning By Doing" - Niklas OlovsoThis podcast is a production of U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood and Fort Hood Public Affairs.

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron
Central Texas Huddle 111722

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022


Central Texas Huddle 111722 made possible by as well as Stay tuned for all the great shows on the Lone Star Gridiron Sports Network. Contact the Central Texas High School Football Huddle Twitter @chrisdoelle, @lsgridiron Facebook ALL I NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED FROM MY TEXAS HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL COACH - Paperback, Ebook The AUTHORITY on […]

Texas Ag Today
Texas Ag Today - November 14, 2022

Texas Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 22:58


The nation's first bale of cotton has sold to fund scholarships in the Rio Grande Valley. If you're in the dairy business, high feed costs are a challenge right now. The Texas Beef Council is working to strengthen beef's position among culinary chefs. Central Texas is finally enjoying some good rainfall. We'll have those stories and more on this episode of Texas Ag Today.

Song of the Day – KUTX
Half Dream: “Roses”

Song of the Day – KUTX

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 3:55


With the autumnal onset of dreary, drippy weather here in Central Texas, this past weekend was kind of a wash for live events; at KUTX, we ended up postponing our final Rock the Park performance of 2022 a full week. But if you’re not as easily deterred by the elements, you might’ve made your way […]

The Higherside Chats
John Bush | Live Free Academy, The Techno-Fascism Era, & Sovereign Life Design

The Higherside Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 88:19


***Click here to join THC+ and get full uninterrupted 2 hour episodes, a dedicated Plus RRS feed, lifetime forum access, merch discounts, & other bonuses like free downloads of THC music.*** See detailed sign up options down below. About Today's Guest: John Bush is the owner of Live Free Academy & Brave Botanical, as well as the Co-Founder of the Freedom Cell Network. He has been a radical activist and entrepreneur for 20+ years,  who now lives on a ten acre intentional community in Central Texas with his two kiddos and his lovely fiancé and business partner Rebecca. He got his start in activism questioning 9/11 and opposing the expansion of the police and surveillance state. John launched Live Free Academy to educate and empower free people in their exit and build efforts. His ultimate goal is to creation of a sovereign community of self governing liberty lovers that are no longer dependent on the state and free to live their lives in peace and harmony with one another and the earth. John's Links: The free "Great Financial Reset Response Webinar" for THC listeners: livefree.academy/thc Get a free ounce of Kratom from Brave Botanicals: mybravebotanicals.com/freeounceofkratom Join The Greater Reset Activation: thegreaterreset.org Join The Freedom Cells Network: freedomcells.org THC Links: Website Proper MeetUps Calendar THC T-shirts & Merch Store  Leave a voicemail for the Joint Session Bonus Shows Leave us an iTunes review THC Communities:  Telegram Subreddit THC Plus Sign-Up Options: Subscribe via our website for a full-featured experience: thehighersidechats.com/plus-membership Subscribe via Patreon, including the full Plus archive, a dedicated RSS feed, & payment through Paypal. To get a year of THC+ by cash, check, or money order please mail the payment in the amount of $96 to: Greg Carlwood PO Box: 153291 San Diego, CA 92195 Cryptocurrency If you'd like to pay the $96 for a year of THC+ via popular Cryptocurrencies, transfer funds and then send an email to support@thehighersidechats.com  with transaction info and your desired username/password. Please give up to 48 hours to complete. Bitcoin: 1AdauF2Mb7rzkkoXUExq142xfwKC6pS7N1 Ethereum: 0xd6E9232b3FceBe165F39ACfA4843F49e7D3c31d5 Litecoin: LQy7GvD5Euc1efnsfQaAX2RJHgBeoDZJ95 Ripple: rnWLvhCmBWpeFv9HMbZEjsRqpasN8928w3 Solana: FvsBazMY9GAWuWqh5RH7musm9MPUw7a5uF6NVxxhNTqi Doge: D7ueXbfcKfhdAWrDqESrFjFV6UxydjsuCC Monero: 4ApmFHTgU72QybW194iJTZHZb6VmKDzqh5MDTfn9sw4xa9SYXnX5PVDREbnqLNLwJwc7ZqMrYPfaVXgpZnHNAeZmSexCDxM

missio Dei: Falcon
Straight Talk Leads to a Straight Walk (Galatians 2:11-21)

missio Dei: Falcon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 42:15


Sermon Outline From Hypocrisy to HumilityFrom Works to FaithFrom Death to Life Table Discussion Have you ever had a conversation about not walking in line with the truth of the gospel? How did it go?What do you think is your "plus" to the gospel?What does it mean to you that Jesus not only took away your sins, but gave you his righteousness? **This sermon was preached by Lucas Turner, a former partner of missio Dei: Falcon, currently on mission in Central Texas as a College and Young Adult Minister at a Baptist church.

Austin Real Estate Investing
Naaman Taylor - Real Estate Investor

Austin Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 48:18


Naaman Taylor is from Cleveland and a full time real estate investor with 2+ years of real estate experience. Naaman has completed 60+ deals in flips & wholesale! For more about Naaman, check him out here: www.thenaamantaylor.com Instagram: @naamantaylorinvestor TikTok: @naamantaylorinvestor The Moorhead Team is excited to bring you information about investing in real estate in the Central Texas area! More information can be found at our website at www.themoorheadteam.com and our YouTube page The Moorhead Team. We're always aiming to bring you great free content about investing in real estate in Austin, TX!

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast
Wanting to Serve Again: Veterans Day and Scholarship Fund

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 59:07


This week's Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast tells the stories of two veterans, their path to joining the Army, and how it has shaped their worlds since that decision day. Additionally, the Fort Hood Scholarship Fund is on the show to announce that the application period is open starting Nov. 14. SUBMIT: FortHoodPAO@gmail.comFACEBOOK: /usagforthoodINSTAGRAM: @usagforthoodTWITTER: @usagforthoodAll music obtained, royalty free, through Filter by Songtradr: "Gun Metal Grey" - Delicious Allstars; "Learning By Doing" - Niklas OlovsoThis podcast is a production of U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood and Fort Hood Public Affairs.

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron
Central Texas Huddle 110922

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022


Central Texas Huddle 110922 made possible by as well as Stay tuned for all the great shows on the Lone Star Gridiron Sports Network. Contact the Central Texas High School Football Huddle Twitter @chrisdoelle, @lsgridiron Facebook ALL I NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED FROM MY TEXAS HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL COACH - Paperback, Ebook The AUTHORITY on […]

The BG Podcast
Discussing the CHIPS Act with Larry Smith, Chairman, Tokyo Electron US Holdings Inc.

The BG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 14:17


Today's episode (169) features Larry Smith, Chairman of Austin-based Tokyo Electron US Holdings Inc. Part of an ongoing series on the CHIPS and Science Act passed in August, Larry and Bingham Group CEO A.J. discuss its impact on the Austin and Central Texas. The bipartisan bill includes more than $50 billion in incentives for manufacturers of semiconductors, or chips, to build domestic semiconductor plants. RELATED BG Podcast EPISODES: Ep. 161 // The passage of the CHIPS and Science Act w/Ed Latson, CEO, Austin Regional Manufacturers Association: https://www.bgmediagp.com/bgpodcast/episode161-5s646-yklns-jnkkt-crr4n-82aty Ep.164 // Discussing the CHIPS Act and Mexico Incentives with Sergio Chavez-Moreno: https://www.bgmediagp.com/bgpodcast/episode164-bfh63 Ep. 166 // Discussing the CHIPS Act and Austin's Semiconductor Ecosystem with Tyson Tuttle: https://www.bgmediagp.com/bgpodcast/episode166-bfh63-ylpt5-4mz6w NEWS LINKS: 'Texas really started the whole revolution' | State continues to lead the US semiconductor chip industry (KVUE, 9.9.2022): https://www.kvue.com/article/money/economy/boomtown-2040/manufacturing/chips-101-semiconductor-chip-shortage-central-texas-samsung/269-db1ac000-c0a9-40f1-9a69-075647d6cc55 ABOUT THE BINGHAM GROUP, LLC The Bingham Group, LLC is a Austin lobbying firm serving businesses, nonprofits and trade associations. Austin and Austin Metro lobbying and advocacy, along with Texas lobbying and advocacy are our largest service areas, covering municipal governments and the legislative and executive branches of Texas government. Check our Service Deck -> www.binghamgp.com/servicedeck We are a HUB/MBE-certified Austin lobbying firm. Follow us on LinkedIn for content updates and the BG Reads: www.linkedin.com/company/binghamgp CONTACT US at: info@binghamgp.com FOLLOW US: Facebook -> www.facebook.com/binghamgp Instagram -> www.instagram.com/binghamgroup Twitter -> twitter.com/binghamgp PART OFTHE BG MEDIA NETWORK Released by: BG Media Group for The Bingham Group, LLC (www.binghamgp.com)

Austin Next
Rise of the Rest with Steve Case

Austin Next

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 38:58


Steve Case is one of America's best-known and most accomplished entrepreneurs and philanthropists. Case co-founded AOL in 1985 and under his leadership and vision, AOL became the largest and most valuable Internet company of its time. Moving beyond AOL, Case formed Revolution, a DC based investment firm focused on innovation beyond the coasts. On today's episode, we discuss his new book, their investments in Central Texas, and why Austin might be different than the rest.Episode LinksSteve Case TwitterRevolutionRise of the Rest: How Entrepreneurs in Surprising Places are Building the New American DreamSponsorsCheck out all of the sponsors mentioned hereAustin Next LinksAustin Next WebsiteAustin Next TwitterAustin Next LinkedInMichael Scharf LinkedInJason Scharf LinkedInPodcast Production Services by EveryWord MediaOur music is “Tech Talk” by Kevin MacLeod. Licensed under Creative Commons 4.0 License

Make It Rain: Multifamily Real Estate Investing for Millennials
184. Dave Leon | Building A Portfolio While Working in Tech

Make It Rain: Multifamily Real Estate Investing for Millennials

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 43:13


Dave was born and raised in the Northeast where his first job was actually delivering newspapers at 5am regardless of the snow, sleet, or sun. Since those early days, Dave made the transition South and has fully embraced the learning community & technology environment of Central Texas. Dave currently resides in Austin with his family.Dave attended Hofstra University earning a Bachelor of Business Administration with a concentration in Banking and Finance, Series 7 & 63 (expired), SCORE Certified Mentor, and countless Business and Leadership seminar certifications.Dave worked on Wall Street specializing as a Mortgage-backed securities broker, Municipal bond analyst, and Fixed Income portfolio management. He has been in enterprise corporate sales & executive relationship management, is a Real Estate investor, start-up business consultant, peer mentor, leadership coach, and podcast guest.Dave's LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/daveleon/ | Dave's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/casaleongroup/For more info, check us out at makeitraincapital.com.Welcome to Make It Rain: Multifamily Real Estate Investing for Millennials!  We're Daisy and Luc, two millennials who love multifamily investing.  With every episode, whether we're discussing a special topic or have on an amazing guest, the goal is to provide education and resources for anyone interested in investing in multifamily real estate, especially if you're a millennial.  We're excited to chat with you about the what's, the why's, the how's, the who's.  The best way to show support is to share it with anyone who might benefit from it and leave us an awesome review. Check out our website at makeitraincapital.com for more goodies.  Take action on your financial future TODAY!

Austin Real Estate Investing
Househacking with Jordan Moorhead & Conner Olsen

Austin Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 27:47


Your host, Jordan Moorhead is a real estate agent and investor in Austin. He owns 29 investment properties and has been passively investing in apartment syndications. Conner Olsen is a real estate agent, investor, and house hacker in Austin. He runs 4 AirBnB's in Austin and a cabin in the Smoky Mountains. He is continuing his path to financial freedom by adding to his investment portfolio. The Moorhead Team is excited to bring you information about investing in real estate in the Central Texas area! More information can be found at our website at www.themoorheadteam.com and our YouTube page The Moorhead Team. We're always aiming to bring you great free content about investing in real estate in Austin, TX!  

Baring It All
How Lisa Copeland Became A CEO In A Male-Dominated Industry And Built A Thriving Real Estate Business

Baring It All

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 47:08


How did Lisa Copeland become a CEO in a male-dominated industry and build a thriving real estate business? CEO Lisa Copeland joins us today to talk about the real estate market and how she has become a successful CEO and Business Owner of Exp Realty in Austin, TX. Lisa talks about her past in the automotive industry, the judgments of working as a woman in a male-dominated industry, and how she branched into the real estate world. Lisa is full of powerful tips on how to have a successful company and help others succeed. Tune in today to learn more about helping others win so you can win every time!   IN THIS EPISODE: [2:46] Lisa discusses how she got started in her industry.  [8:08] What was/is Lisa's experience as a woman in the car industry? [20:57] What is the 10X experience?  [28:53] How did Lisa shift from automotive to real estate?  [36:20] Why is real estate such a great industry to get into? [42:42] What is Lisa most proud of? KEY TAKEAWAYS: Build an infrastructure of people that you trust for advice.  Women need to stand up for each other and root for and support each other.  Play the long game, and take the high road. Be in it for the good of the company, the team, and the partners. If you help other people win, you will win every time.   Real Estate has no ceiling. You have the opportunity to make as much money as you want to make as long as you put the work into it.  RESOURCE LINKS: Lisa Copeland's Website Schedule a meeting with Lisa Lisa Copeland's Blog  Lisa's Media Kit  Baring it All Website BIO: Whether you've decided to settle, sell, or invest in Central Texas real estate, you deserve a level of service that only an expert can provide. My name is Lisa Copeland, and I have "Reinvented The Art of Real Estate." A licensed agent and experienced mortgage industry professional with more than 25 years of experience, myself and my team will help you navigate the complex Central Texas market and accomplish your goals. As our client, you will benefit from all of the attention and guidance you'd hope for during such a personal endeavor, along with our innovative and proven business model. Our keen intuition on what motivates people to buy/ sell, combined with strong negotiation strategies, continues to produce happy clients, repeat business, and plenty of referrals. We are always grateful for new opportunities to meet friends, family, and neighbors of past clients—and the chance to turn their real estate dreams into reality, as well. Before transitioning to real estate full-time, Lisa founded Austin Mortgage Associates in 2000. As CEO of the company, she personally originated and funded over $150 million dollars in residential mortgages comprised of Conventional, FHA, VA, and construction loans. Lisa is a seasoned real estate investor and land developer and has built custom-spec homes. Over the course of two and a half decades in the industry, she has brought all types of transactions to closing—everything from simple residential home sales to highly challenging business investments. And today, she and her team continue to take great pride in their ability to facilitate win-win deals and delight our customers.

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast
We Don't Want Our Military Families to Go Hungry: Food Care Center Killeen

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 39:47


This week, the director of the Food Care Center Killeen comes in to discuss the food bank, how people can take advantage of the organization (especially around Thanksgiving), and how people can give back. And of course, this is the first episode of the month which means it is time for Book & Movie of the Month.If you want to sign up for the distribution event, you can do so here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fort-hood-area-military-family-drive-thru-food-distribution-registration-440384751647SUBMIT: FortHoodPAO@gmail.comFACEBOOK: /usagforthoodINSTAGRAM: @usagforthoodTWITTER: @usagforthoodAll music obtained, royalty free, through Filter by Songtradr: "Gun Metal Grey" - Delicious Allstars; "Learning By Doing" - Niklas Olovso; "Mountain High" - The Nerve Music; "Rocking The Beat" -  Marcus BresslerThis podcast is a production of U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood and Fort Hood Public Affairs.

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do
The Future of Search with Madhu Basu

Cool Things Entrepreneurs Do

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 27:05


This episode is co-produced with the Austin Technology Council. ATC is a 30 year old association focused on promoting and facilitating growth of technology companies in Central Texas. Over the past three decades the business ecosystem in Austin has changed, and ATC is actively changing, too. Learn more at https://AustinTechnologyCouncil.org. Today we chat changes in the world of "search" with Madhu Basu from Unnanu. In this episode we talk about how the right tech brings more opportunities, and how he sees "search" as broken. About Madhu Basu   Madhu has been an Austinite for over 23 years, living in Austin metropolis. He is the CEO and Founder of Unnanu, a technology startup from Austin that helps businesses by utilizing a patented contextual weighted keyword search. Also, the founder and CEO of PMCS Services, provides IT consulting, staffing, and solutions services for over 16 years.   He also co-founded three more businesses previously. Madhu is the former President of a non-profit organization that focuses on community services and awareness within the Austin sub-continent Indian community. Madhu is married to Sheela and has two children, Charita and Praneel. About Unnanu   Unnanu technology will help get relevant information to people or businesses faster. We put forth effort to find data, media, or content in a business-driven society where people can get the advantage of services by businesses investing in society and people by creating jobs, healthy living, and support. We currently provide a simple solution for businesses to have resumes scored to be able to find the best candidate and a complete hiring platform with an integrated JobBoard, ATS, and OnBoard solution. We built a disruptive technology to bring highly qualified individuals to companies, and we want to make their hiring process seamless, effective, and efficient. Unnanu offers users a plethora of highly useful features like in-app messaging, offers, referrals, an on-boarding process, and even the ability to conduct interviews right within the app. Also, the ability to compare new opportunities and offers side by side so that you can make your next career move with confidence.  Our approach is seamless, effective, and simple. It is much faster than traditional job boards and job sites. Unnanu is headquartered in Austin, Texas, with more offices to be open in the near future. https://thomsinger.com/podcast/Madhu-Basu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
155: Sustainable Vineyard Management Across Different Climates

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 39:01


As a vineyard advisor across the United States, Fritz Westover, Viticulturist at Westover Vineyard Advising and host of the Virtual Viticulture Academy, has the opportunity to see a lot of different vineyards, varieties, diseases and climates. Much of his work in recent years is in Texas. This large state about the size of France has a number of challenges including rain that is not seasonal, Pierces Disease, late spring and fall freezes, hail, and poor water quality. Fritz and Craig, both former staffers with Vineyard Team, discuss a variety of practices that impact the long-term sustainability of a vineyard including leaching salts, why irrigation systems are important in wet climates, and the number one way to manage disease. References: 110: How to Develop a New Vineyard Site 121: Regenerative Agriculture (Rebroadcast) 137: The Pierce's Disease and Glassy-winged Sharpshooter Board Instagram @westoverviticulture SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 | Use code PODCAST for $50 off Twitter @WestoverVit Vineyard Underground Podcast Virtual Viticulture Academy Westover Vineyard Advising Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org.   Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  Our guest today is Fritz Westover viticulturist with Westover Vineyard Advising and the virtual viticulture Academy. Is that right?   Fritz Westover  0:10  That's correct, Craig.   Craig Macmillan  0:11  He's got some other things in the in the works that we'll maybe talk about a little bit later. Fritz and I have known eachother for a long time. And actually, we had the same job   Fritz Westover  0:19  That we did that we did that we did.   Craig Macmillan  0:21  He is based in Texas, lives in Houston. But he works in all parts of the country. You're you're all over the place. What different states do you work in in these days?   Fritz Westover  0:30  Yeah, Craig, thanks, again, for having me on the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast, love to be here. Actually, it's my second time. So this is really an honor to get to get invited back. I didn't screw it up too bad the first time. So I appreciate that. You know, to answer your question, I work primarily in Texas, that's where I'm currently office in Houston. Got a great airport. So I do go to other parts of the country. The second largest area working would be Georgia, primarily in the north mountains of the state of Georgia, I also do some consulting a little bit in some of the states in between Louisiana, Alabama, and some virtual advising that I've started doing, where I'm actually, you know, on site to see the site to understand it, but I'm not there on a frequent visitation basis, like I am, in, let's say, Texas, or Georgia. So those are the primary areas I'm working. And they have a lot of things that overlap. And they have a lot of differences. So the cool part is I get to see a lot of different scenarios, varieties, climate and challenges.   Craig Macmillan  1:26  So let's, let's start with Texas, obviously, we're very interested in sustainability, and sustainable approaches to problems, roadblocks, obstacles, issues, and every region that I'm familiar with anywhere, they have different sustainability issues and hurdles, you know, you say like, oh, here, we're doing this in a sustainable way to do it. And these other people, people are like ah that't not going to work for us. So they're trying to find a different way. So in the case of Texas, which I understand is now not just the hill country, it's quite a broad spectrum of climates and soils and whatnot. What are some of the challenges that Texas growers and these different regions are facing?   Fritz Westover  2:03  Yeah, great question. And, you know, if you look at Texas, it's a state roughly the size of France. So there's a lot of different growing regions in Texas, anywhere from the Gulf Coast region to which is you know, the eastern part of North Texas. Closer to Oklahoma, there's grapes grown that far north and Texas to hill country, which is outside of Austin, Fredericksburg, San Antonio, that's probably where the majority of wineries are, and also a large concentration of vineyards. And then the majority by far of grapes grown in Texas are grown on the High Plains region, which is West Texas, or northwest on the High Plains. That's about 3000 to 4000 feet above sea level. So we have a lot large range and climate and topography and rainfall. I mean, we can get 40 inches in East Texas a year and 10 inches in West Texas a year. And we haven't had that much unless Texas this year, there's been a drought that's affected growers,   Craig Macmillan  2:58  How much of that rain is during the growing season?   Fritz Westover  3:00  Okay, so in Texas, the rain can come at any time. It's not necessarily seasonal. So we don't have the luxury of saying, hey, you know, harvest is done, we should be getting some rain. Now let's plant a cover crop, and let the soil profile fill for the winter. In fact, sometimes we have to irrigate in the wintertime to keep our profile moist. In other times, it's raining, right at harvest or right before harvest or right at bloom when you don't want rain necessarily in a vineyard setting. But in terms of sustainability, if you start on the east part of Texas, and that's our example we're using now we have severe Pierce's Disease there. So there are only certain hybrids of wine grape that are resistant or tolerant Pierce's disease that you can grow there. So if you're growing those varieties, it's almost like here's this disease is not an issue, right. So you've kind of found a way around that. But then you get into the hill country more in Central Texas and we're growing vinifera there anything from Bordeaux varieties to Spanish or Portuguese varieties, Italian varieties are growing there as well. And so Pierce's Disease is a big issue with those varieties. And so is the erratic weather patterns, like seasonal rain, hail, things like that. I think the best example, though, would be to just jump right up to the high plains, because I can look back at my consulting in the last four years. And one year, we had a terrible, devastating late spring freeze. And that happens frequently, maybe two or three out of every five years, we have sites getting hit by late spring freeze, and it takes out a majority of the crop. So now you see these orchard right or other types of fans going up. And those are there for when we have, you know, a radiational freeze, we can we can hopefully skirt through that. So you put these expensive fans up, you solve the problem. And then the next year, you think you've got that you get through the freeze, there's no freeze at all late spring, right? And then all of a sudden, you're just at the point where you finish shoot thinning all of your vines and everything's perfect and set for the year. And then it hails and then you get a hailstorm takes up all of all of your crop for the year and set you back another year. So then what are we doing? We're putting up helmets and a lot of vineyards in West Texas now. So you put up the hill net And that solves with a physical barrier, the hill issue. So now you got the fans for the late spring freeze. You've got the netting for the hail, which also can protect from birds and other things. We're using that year round. So the next year comes up, we don't get away spring freeze, we don't get a hail. What we had instead was this freeze in the fall and early fall freeze, where it got down in October, late October, just after harvest got down into the 20s, which doesn't seem like it should do a lot of damage. But I mean, it will if vines are not cold hardy and ready for it. It's devastating. I wrote a little bit about that and wine business monthly for an article a few months ago and summarized it. But the summary here is that it wholesale killed vines, took vines down to the graft knocked out cordons, and there's a lot of retraining that needs to be done. So now the question is, okay, what's the variety of grape we can plant that's late bud burst right to get past the spring freeze late spring freeze that harvest early. So we had time to harden off for the winter and not get hit by that early fall freeze. And, you know, is bulletproof and doesn't get hit by hail? Right. That'd be nice. But that's,   Craig Macmillan  6:03  I was gonna say it's hail resistant. I can't wait to see the plant breeding on that one.   Fritz Westover  6:07  Yeah,right. Oh, by the way, consumers have to love the wine made from it, and it has to be a good yielder. Okay, is that too much to ask Craig?   Craig Macmillan  6:14  No,? the plant breeding community can take care of that I'm I'm concerned.   Fritz Westover  6:19  I hope you're right. We could use it. I'd like to get invited to their to their planning meeting, I can give them some input. Those are some examples. But you know, Pierce's Disease, water is a big thing. Just like in California, we you know, we have limited water supplies in certain areas of the state, I'm sure you'll you'll want to touch on that. And, you know, its water quality, too, is an issue in some areas. But the really the erratic changes in climate that we see from year to year, it's, there's, you know, there's always a surprise, if you don't like the weather, just wait an hour, and it'll change.   Craig Macmillan  6:51  I'm glad you brought that up. Because I am a big believer in if you plant the right plant in the right place. That's how you address a lot of sustainability issues. So for instance, California, what we've done is we planted lots and lots of Chardonnay in areas that are like perfect, prone for powdery mildew, you know, it's 75 or 80, every single day year round. There's coastal fog is just designed to have disease and you look at it and you're like, Oh man, what maybe we shouldn't be doing that we could cut our chemical load down and we weren't planting this plant in this environment. But the problem is it makes great wine wine quality, that's where you want to be, you know, and so there's some tension there. I am very interested in this variety selection piece. So for instance, I understand that I don't know in detail in Texas, I don't really do grow vinifera you mentioned but they also grow alleles hybrid. So things like Marechal Foch I think it's pronounced, Frontenac or sac showing my my lack of knowledge. Are those working out viticulturally and then are they also working out from a wine quality standpoint of wineries buying these making products that people are buying because that would be like this, your solution is finding varieties that are going to tolerate. Can you turn that around then into a product. How's that going?   Fritz Westover  8:07  to be exact in Texas, there's there are not a lot of hybrid vineyards, it's mostly vinifera. However, if you go to the Gulf Coast region, that is where we do, we do grow primarily Pierce's Disease tolerant hybrid. So that would be blanc Du Bois or Lenoir. And then there's some of the Andy Walker, Dr. Andy Walker, UC Davis, PD tolerant that 98% 97% vinifera varieties that are just now being planted. I mean, we're just at the pioneering stages for those in both Texas and in Georgia, where we have high PD or Pierce's disease pressure, the blanc Du Bois, the Lenoir, the things that have been growing for 25 years now or more have established a market and it took that time to do it. Right. So really, the question is, as these new varieties and the new breeding programs come out with grapes that have tolerance to Pierce's disease, or tolerance to cold, or tolerance to whatever it might be rootstocks that tolerate nematodes and salt, you know, that's, that's a rootstock issue. But when it comes to the variety of the thing that we're putting in the glass that we make the wine from these newer ones, are not quite as proven. So we're gonna have to have this learning curve of where they're best suited, because here's the thing. You take this variety of grape, that's mostly vinifera, and it happens to be have the single gene resistance for Pierce's disease. So you say okay, great, that's gonna work for now, let's put it in the vineyard in the gulf coast of Texas or West Georgia, or South Carolina or whatever, Alabama, you name it, wherever there's Pierce's disease in the southeast, and that's all good, and well, it probably won't die from Pierce's disease, but it's still going to get powdery mildew, which other hybrids are very resistant to, it's still going to get downy mildew, which we have various levels of resistance to it's still going to get black rot, it's going to get phmompsis and then it's all that all the trunk diseases. So I mean, you you think about hard places to grow grapes. It's like when I moved to California back in 2013 to work with the Vineyard Team I thought, man, how am I gonna help these grammars in California, you know, they've been doing this for so long, but they have problems just like anywhere else. In fact, I would argue I almost cringe at the say it, they have less problems. You know, the first as far as diversity of pathogens, at least, let's just say it's safe to say that than we do here east of the Rockies just because of those diseases that I've mentioned. Here, you solve one problem, and then you have five other problems that pop up that you didn't anticipate, and you then need to solve. So there's there's going to be, oh, five to 10 years before we know which of the UC Davis Any Walker selections are going to thrive in all these new environments that growers have not been growing grapes for very long and because of Pierce's disease, and now all of a sudden, you say, sure, you can grow grapes now, but there's a but but no one's done it yet. No one's done it yet. And you're gonna be a pioneer.   Craig Macmillan  10:50  You're a visionary, or you're a crazy person, you know, depends on which way it goes.   Fritz Westover  10:54  Those crazy people, they help the next person learn what didn't work and what not to do.   Craig Macmillan  10:59  Just what we're talking about Pierce's Disease, Pierce's Disease has turned out everywhere to be a very difficult thing to manage in a sustainable fashion. First of all, why don't you tell us what Pierce's Disease is?   Fritz Westover  11:10  I'm so glad you asked Craig, I was gonna say we should probably talk about what Pierce's Disease is.   Craig Macmillan  11:14  I think our listeners are probably pretty sophisticated.   Fritz Westover  11:17  I think so too. I think so too. But here's for that new vineyard manager fresh out of a place that doesn't have Pierce's Disease. It is a bacterial pathogen, and it's Xylella fastidiosa is the name of the pathogen, and it's transmitted vectored I should say, and transmitted into the vineyard from native grape vines. But the vector itself is the most famous is the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter. These were introduced to California many years ago and became the target of a large campaign to eradicate Glassy Winged Sharpshooter. But there's other xylem feeding insects that can also transmit this disease. So basically, an insect feeds on a wild grape that has tolerance to this bacteria and the bacteria are then moved into the vineyard. When the insect then flies into the vineyard and Glassy Winged Sharpshooters can fly a mile or more, they fly into the vineyard and they feed on the the xylem of that the nifer a vine that's susceptible and they transmit this bacteria into the xylem. It's a xylem limited bacteria that kind of clogs the veins like gives the vine a little bit of a plumbing issue. And there's toxins produced by it that cause symptoms like leaf scorch. leaf blades fall off leaving matchstick petals or petals attached to the vine, there's uneven maturation of the paradigm. And then there could be fruit shrivel. So I usually look for two or three of those symptoms before we rogue vines and pull them out of the vineyard, there's no cure for the disease, you have to pull the vines out so it doesn't spread, either replant or deal with the missing teeth, so to speak out in the vineyard. So it's a very big problem in the southeastern United States, you need cold weather to kill both the bacteria populations. Also, I guess, really just the insect vectors, they're also affected by these cold temperatures. So we found that, you know, you get south of pretty much North Carolina, Georgia, these areas are kind of in that transition where a good cold winter or two in a row will knock it back. But a warm winter to it starts coming back out in the vineyards. And so we see it even in the north Georgia mountains almost as far as Tennessee, it's it's really something that's that's moved around and found its niche. It's kind of working in the background, they're waiting for the right conditions.   Craig Macmillan  13:26  So what kinds of things are growers doing in these high pressure areas? And there's super high pressure areas in California as well, because of riparian areas where the insects hanging out, what are people doing? What are people trying, I can think of a couple of things that you could try. But I'd like to know what people are actually doing.   Fritz Westover  13:39  The most obvious we already talked about as growing tolerant varieties that Pierce's disease might infect, but it doesn't move around in his island and cause vine death, like it would to vinifera. So growers are used if they're growing vinifiera, or susceptible grape varieties, there's the possibility to use insecticides to control the vector. So you're a medical imidicloprid based products that are designed for either a spray, or most notably through injection through irrigation. And that's going to give a little bit more longer residual activity to deter the feeding. So the really, the plan is to know when those vectors are coming in. And there could be about 30 to 40 vectors in the southeastern United States. It's not like California that's got one or two major vectors, we've got, you know, 30 at any given time, so the pressure is really high in comparison. And so those insecticides would need to be time for peaking when the populations come in. And then you got to make sure you're careful about pre harvest intervals and things like that. So there's knockback sprays. There's the soil application that's done. These are not restricted use products, but they're certainly conventional products. They're not organic. Some of my growers who are trying to spray less conventional will use products like surround which is a kaolin clay and there's been some reported efficacy on on his island feeding insects. It disturbs them and they don't like to crawl around in the clay also I have some revers using that in hot hot climates also just to keep some shade or sunscreen on the grapes in the fruit late in the season too. But you know, correct when it rains during the growing season, you could put kaolin clay up one day, and it rains off after an inch of rain three days later. So we have those challenges too. And then of course, you know, there's there's trap crops you could consider. But I haven't seen anyone really successful using that just elimination of host grape vines near the vineyard, just trying to make the habitat less thriving for both the vectors and for the bacteria that live inside the wild grape vines. So we put a lot of focus on looking at the surrounding environment in addition to what we're doing in the vineyards.   And so people can actually go into those areas and rogue out host plants are ones that are popular host plants.   If you own the property and there's some muscadine grapes wild muscadine or rotundifolia growing in the woods, and it's right next to the vineyard on a fence line growing along the fence line. That's probably not a good idea. So yeah, you would want to go in and rogue those vines that are around the perimeter at the very least.   Craig Macmillan  16:02  What about setback well Glassy Winged Sharpshooter, this clearly isn't going to work? And I don't know if that's the primary, you said you had like 3040 factors. But when ideally it was been kicked around was not planting close to habitat. So leaving large barriers, now you're losing land as a result of that. Sure, or people tried that. And we didn't get exposed to that?   Fritz Westover  16:21  Yeah, sure. When you're when you're choosing a site for a vineyard, Craig, you're always looking to distance yourself from any problems, whether it be a floodplain, or possible vectors of disease, or host plants. So sure, but the idea is that eventually, an insect that can fly a mile is going to find the vineyard, you just need to know the symptoms, know what to look for, and be proactive at removing it. And testing for it. If you need to test I've gotten to the point where I can look at it visually, and I don't need to do testing anymore, which might McGregor's love, because it saves the money. But occasionally, we test to just validate that because every new girl I work with, we always do a test to show Yes, this is absolutely positive, we see the symptoms, and we've tested it. And now we're comfortable with calling that by because there are other things that can look like Pierce's Disease. And you know, we always talk about these as educators, you don't just talk about the problem you talk about, what are the things that it could possibly be, you know, when someone sees a leaf scorch, you know, well, it could be drought, it could be wind, it could be heat stress, you know, you could lose the leaf and have a matchstick pedal. If you have deer going to your vineyard eating leaves, they leave matchstick petiole symptoms, right. But that's only one of the four key symptoms. So yeah, we're going to be looking for the symptoms, and we're going to be roguing. And we're also going to be distancing, and we're also going to be trying to rogue the problem from the surrounding environment.   Craig Macmillan  17:38  So you got a lot of options, rather than just trying to spray yourself out of it. Yes, we've got a lot of tools, and they're not all chemical. There's cultural practices. Vigilance is always again, probably one of the key pieces to any pest management issue in any sustainability issue. I want to shift gears and talk about water. You know, my career has been strictly in California, where it doesn't rain. It does, like it doesn't rain   Fritz Westover  18:03  It Just doesn't rain as much as you want it to exactly when you want it to right.   Craig Macmillan  18:08  It's actually raining outside right now, we're almost done with harvest, but not quite. I heard early. And usually we get rain. This is like a record rain right now. Not a lot, but enough, but a lot of these other places in the United States, they get some rain, I was talking to somebody the other day about using undermined vegetation as a way of managing the increases in the water from the rains and trying to, you know, kind of have a plant help you out. And to get this dried out a little bit. You mentioned that like in Texas, for instance, if I understood correctly, you know, rain can come in any time. How do you manage that when in terms of like disease pressure or find bigger things like that? What What can you do? Is there anything that you can do that any management strategies for that kind of thing?   Fritz Westover  18:47  Sure that you know, Craig, there's lots of management strategies and they all start at dormant pruning, just like you know, you know, any good vineyard management starts with pruning, to get the right spacing of your shoots and positioning. And then it goes into your thinning and other practices that we all know and love and viticulture, and if you keep on top of that, and can create a microclimate and when we say microclimate, we mean the real scientific microclimate that area right around the grape cluster, right? Not the site, not the misoclimate, like commonly is called the microclimate. But, but that area, right?   Craig Macmillan  19:21  I've given up on that. By the way. It's same thing I was trained and it's like it's not microclimate. It's a misclimate. It's a music climate. And now I'm just like, whatever.   Fritz Westover  19:28  Yeah, after a while you get kind of worn down. It's like trying to describe the difference between grape varietals and grape variety. Because, you know, yes. Oh, yeah, that drives you crazy as a plant person. So it's been I feel like I'm taking crazy pills. It's a variety of grape varietals. That's the wine. So we digress. We digress. We digress. I have to remind me the question now, Craig, you'll have to remind me.   Craig Macmillan  19:50  You get rain at different times of the year. Yeah, some of it during the growing season. This creates its own kind of management problems. What kinds of things can you do and I know it's going to depend on the storm and what's out there and when it happens, but I have no experience with this. I'm very interested in you just pray. I mean...   Fritz Westover  20:08  Well, let me give you an example. Yeah, the northern Georgia grape growers this year had over 50 inches of rain from bud burst. And they're in their inversion, the pasteurization, they're at 18 to 20 bricks, maybe two weeks away from harvest, they've had over 50 inches of rain during the season at random times, sometimes raining for five to seven days in a row, sometimes raining for 10 days in a row. And I was just there visiting all the vineyards looking at dissecting and reverse engineering all of their spray programs there canopy management, there are some venues I walked into that were completely clean. I mean, no fungal disease, no downy mildew, no powdery mildew, maybe a little bird pecking here and there. And then there were some that were absolutely devastated. And so you know, why? Why was that the case? Well, I talked about, you know, good canopy management pruning, it starts at the beginning of the season, you know, when you're working in an environment that absolutely has a high fungal disease pressure, which is the number one thing all other overlying factors aside that we talked about, like Pierce's Disease, or freeze or climate, if you have the right variety match to the right side, but you've just got to control these fungal diseases that grow in the leaves and fruit. It's all about the timing on the applications. And this is true, whether you're a conventional or an organic grower, or whatever you may practice, yeah, it doesn't matter. I mean, you have probably less modes of action as an organic grower because your products are not moving systemically into the plant or into the vine itself. So your reliance on maybe even more spraying, because context sprays like a lot of organic products, or they can get washed off. So what we really hone in on is the critical period for your disease, which is two weeks before Bloom to about six weeks after fruit set. And what we find is if you can control disease on the fruit and the majority of the foliage, and when I say the majority, I mean those bottom leaves all the way up to the top of your VSP wires, if you're doing vertical, shoot those first 10 leaves on the shoot, if you can get those through to verasion, and you can get the fruit through verasion and keep it clean, it'll typically stay clean, and the leaves will have this oncogenic or resistance to disease at that point, they get more leathery, right, they get more harder to infect by a lot of these fungal diseases. So if you can get to that point, you can kind of pull back a little bit and get to the end of the season. Well, timed sprays just before bloom, right after fruit set, keeping in mind matching the product to the disease, right? If we're trying to control detritus, we want to hit that before bloom, and right after fruit set, and then probably again, right before a bunch closure. And if we have challenging conditions from verasion to harvest, we might need another spray from verasion to harvest. And again, conventional or organic, whatever that product is, the timing is still the same. I think what the growers who are most successful have been able to do is really not drop the ball during that critical period, that eight week period, they learn the modes of action of all of their products. Is this systemic? Is it contact, how much rain will wash this off before I have to go out and apply it again, the number one question I get from new growers is, why would I spray right before the rain isn't the rain is going to wash the product off. And the whole point of having that product on before the rain, we always explain it so that it protects the plant tissue or the grapes throughout that wet period. So that an infection doesn't get established. Because once you have an infection in the vineyard established, it is so much harder to go in and eradicate you've got to use different strategies for that. And it cost more. And that disease can linger all the way through harvest, causing loss and leaf area that's going to cause delays and ripening possible quality issues and fruit, you name it. So that's really where I think the successful grower, the one who you know does all the things you're supposed to do in a sustainability program, for example, to keep good records, track the weather data, record how much rain you get, and when and then just be proactive about about the spray program not reacting always. And coming in after after you see an issue or after it's been raining already.   Craig Macmillan  24:04  Now, if I am in an area where I'm getting rain during the growing season, do I still need to irrigate?   Fritz Westover  24:11  Okay, so good question. And, you know, I always recommend vineyards in areas that don't reliably get their 20 to 30 inches of rain in a calendar year, which is, you know, common in the East Coast, for example, that they put in irrigation and I get some kickback from some growers thinking gosh, it rains here, I just want to turn off the irrigation and take the water and we were planting cover crops to remove water from the system. But the irrigation system is not just there for when you're establishing the vines. That's the number one thing if you have a drought year, the year you plant, you could be in trouble. It's a lot of work to water those vines. Number two, you're going to be able to put fertilizer out through drip irrigation system. So whether it be organic or conventional, again, doesn't matter. There's lots of products that are designed to go out and your drip irrigation and that's one of the most efficient ways to deliver a small amount of a product or fertilizer to a vine in a very precise and measured way, which will save costs in the long run and create less runoff and pollution, if you're targeting the grapes, so, so in terms of sustainability, that's really a big tool in my book, and I wish more growers would consider putting in irrigation early in the process. And especially if you're in a Pierce's Disease, high risk area, and you're growing vinifera, then that is one of the major ways to deliver some of our best control measures for Pierce's Disease.   Craig Macmillan  25:30  I'm going to put an irrigation obviously, I'm going to be drawing on some groundwater, groundwater quality varies infinitely from place to place. What are some of the experiences that you've had that caused viticultural issues down the line with different kinds of water quality problem? And were there things to do to improve those because again, well, I had a vineyard once where we were, we had a magnesium problem, we were watering off of a municipal watering system, which was great drinking water. Wonderful. Well, one day I get the report, and the magnesium level in the water was through the roof, not a threat to people, but I was just making a brick, right to the watering more and watering more and watering more, and it was just getting worse. What kinds of things have you seen? And what could you kind of do about it?   Fritz Westover  26:13  Yeah, it's a really good question. As you know, I'm familiar with the a lot of the problems on the central coast there where were you and I both worked, you know, in terms of getting into some Paleolithic waters, that earthquakes now have changed your your water quality and your site that was very good before that occurrence happened. So you have boron, you have high salts, sodium and other salts as well in Texas. And I'll come here because this is the area I live in work in the most, we see issues that are pretty similar. We see boron being high. In some areas, certain aquifers and water sources are high and boron, we see high SAR sodium absorption ratio, that you know, if your SAR levels above six or seven, and you're relying on irrigation water, you're gonna see issues in the leaves, saltburn and decline of the vines, and we can hit 20 or 30 on a SAR in some areas of North Texas. And I've seen in drought years, this was a drought year for Texas. This is a real I mean, it rained in October, November of 2021. And then didn't rain in parts of Texas until about a month ago. And so right now, as we're recording this, we're in September. So until really about variation, no rain. So if you didn't have good quality water, and you're relying 100% on your irrigation and didn't have any rain in the wintertime to flush out salts or leach boron or other things that are a problem that build up in the soil, especially from frequent shallow irrigations. It was a problem. So boron symptoms were showing on leaf margins. So some growers were trying to capture rainwater to alleviate their irrigation issues. But if it didn't rain, that approach did not work. So they're trying to do longer irrigation set so that they don't build up salts in the shallow part of the soil. So that's one strategy, using the wheats leaching fraction, for example, that to push water below, or occasionally do very long sets. And I know, you know, sounds counterintuitive. We have bad water, less water more with it. And with water more, right, yeah, but the thing is, you need to push the salts down below the root zone, if you can, and watering on long sets can do that. So that was the strategy through you know, there's really no solution that I'm aware of for high boron levels, I wish there was one that was reliable, and that that someone could present to me for the salts, we use the irrigation strategy that I just mentioned, to try to push it down below the root zone as much as possible. But there's really beyond that not a whole lot you can there's course there's some soil amendments, I shouldn't say there's nothing some growers tried to displace sodium with gypsum or calcium additions, or by adding organic matter to the soil to try and bind it up or you know, and still have other cations available on the cat on exchange. Some growers are injecting acid using acid injection to try to help with nutrient uptake that sodium sometimes is blocking. There's other things that go well beyond even my understanding of all the chemistry behind it. But I think it's fair to say that the growers who have the worst problems and have that proactive kind of frame of mind have been have been doing some of these things to try and combat it. But really what they're doing Craig is they're saying why isn't it raining? Like it usually does. That solves the problem for me. And it just hasn't happened in the past year here. And it's not to say we won't get back on the normal pattern. We'll just have to see.   Craig Macmillan  29:18  We're running out of time. Unfortunately, we could go on forever. Lok forward to seeing you here in the future. We have the Sustainable Ag Expo. It's put on by Vin, your team coming up in November and you are going to be here for that I believe you're presenting Yes. Yeah. hoping we can connect. I don't see why we can't in just a couple of sentences again, thinking like you're on stage. What one piece of advice would you give to a grape grower in the realm of how to improve the sustainability or how to farm a sustainability as sustainable as possible? And what's your one piece of advice?   Fritz Westover  29:51  But wait, we're not on the stage here. This is a podcast Craig This is one of the largest stages you can get without actually being looking someone in the eye right? This isn't acing who invented this stuff. It's true. So so when I am at Sustainable Ag Expo, my talk is going to be about the long term view on sustainability, it's going to be about things that you can do from the beginning onward, moving the needle a little bit on on some of the fine points that we tend to overlook on a daily basis, because we're focusing on more big picture stuff. So my focus for anyone who wants to start off, and they know that they want to be doing things the right way, 10 years down the road, and they want things to be a little easier for them, it goes back to what you and I've been talking about earlier, the beginning of our conversation, choosing the right varieties, making sure your site selection is all going to work out if you don't have the expertise to do that, you should really find someone who specializes in that, you know, I've drawn upon soil scientists that come out and look at sites and map sites, on projects that I'm working on, you know, we need to bring the team together that can make the right decisions from day one, and choosing your varieties and your rootstocks and making sure your vineyard design is done in a way where you reduce erosion and foresee some of the issues that are going to come up the other thing that that I'll touch on quite a bit at the Sustainable Ag Expo is the the smaller detail things after the vines go in the ground, how we train our first and second year vines, where we make the cuts on those vines for die back and proper healing and preventing infection by by diseases that want to get into our trunks early on and establish and then all the way through to the young vine care. What are some of the things that I see growers making mistakes on that we could be overcoming. And it's really I don't want to say to viticulture 101 because it downplays the importance of it a little bit, when you make it sound. So basic the challenge is, sometimes we know what we need to be doing. But we have trouble conveying that to the workforce that we're using to the contract labor that we're using to our own team. And so I'm going to talk a little bit about a combination of those things about what's important, what shouldn't be overlooked, and how we can make sure we don't overlook it and put a team in place to get it done. Because the establishment will just umbrella that term with the vineyard establishment that first three to five years of getting your cordons developed. Or if you're in a cane pruning system, establishing your renewal zone and, and everything else. I'm super excited about it. I'd be lying to you to say that my talk is ready as of today. But I've got it outlined in my in my mind, and I've got the ideas already in my head that I clearly would love to share.   Craig Macmillan  32:22  And hopefully that will spread. Where can people find out more about you what you do?   Fritz Westover  32:27  Well, I'm available on social media through Westover Viticulture, on Facebook and on Instagram. And as you know, I also do an online vineyard advising and education community that I snuck you into, to kind of see behind the scenes on that and that is known as virtual viticulture Academy. That's really where I share all of my information with growers who are not necessarily my clients that I consult for on a one on one basis. You know, you have all this information, you want to share it with other growers. I know that's my passion is helping growers. And I've been doing that for my whole career. So through Virtual Viticulture Academy, I have a way to get together with that community. For this, those who join and answer their questions in the vineyard and share some of the trials and tribulations the what works and what doesn't work, and give some direct feedback to a community of growers. And what's awesome about that Craig is we didn't just do Virtual Viticulture Academy because of the pandemic. We're in our fifth year, you know, a lot of people went virtual and went online and found new innovative and creative ways to reach their audience, whether it's a grape grower or winemaker in this industry. We've been doing that for five years. And when the pandemic came on, and we weren't visiting sites as much or doing things in person, we just kept on going and kept on teaching and trying to try to make an impact. And just like the Vineyard Tam has been doing with all their great online programs. So so that's one of the things that I've been working on there. And then I'd really letting the cat out of the bag here a little bit. But I think by the time this podcast is released, I'll also be releasing a podcast known as Vineyard Underground podcast. And that's going to be just where I hang out like this and share information through the ear buds about grape growing very similar to what you're you're doing there. Our goal is to have some quick wins that growers can take back to the vineyard. Some practical advice for the everyday grower. Well, we'll get into the science of grape growing but we really want to focus on the how to interviewing growers and getting down into the dirt a little bit into the underground, where things get a little bit hidden and overlooked.   Craig Macmillan  34:26  That's awesome. Our guest today has been Fritz Westover viticulturist with Westover Vineyard Advising, of course, the Virtual Viticulture Academy, and the upcoming Vineyard Underground podcast. Thanks so much for taking the time. This has been really fun. There's going to be links to all the things that he's mentioned in our notes regarding this, this little show here and we hope that you check them out tons of great stuff. One thing that Fritz does really well is communicate to the world. He's got he's got the Twitter, he's got the Instagram, he's got the Facebook, he's got the website really easy to find really great information super useful. We really appreciate everything that you're doing. I think one of the things I just want to say personally is that you know, to the public Fritz has been a an asset to the viticulture community throughout the United States in a way that I can't think of very many other people have been just speaking personally, I really appreciate that because you people who are really passionate about it and are really knowledgeable about it, and here's the piece that are willing to go out, who are willing to get on a plane or willing to get in a truck and really go out and meet one on one with people and then stay connected, whether it's virtual or otherwise, I think is really fantastic. And so you should be applauded for that.   Fritz Westover  35:38  Thank you, Craig, so much for having me and thanks to the vineyard team as well.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

The Real Estate Zone Radio Show - Austin / Central Texas Real Estate
The Real Estate Zone Radio Show –11/01/22 Broadcast The Latest Real Estate Zone Radio Show!

The Real Estate Zone Radio Show - Austin / Central Texas Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 43:58


Listen to the Real Estate Zone radio show from November 1st, 2022, with hosts John McClellan and Kevin Bown. Stay on top of latest news and up-to-date analysis on how recent events are currently affecting the general and local Central Texas real estate market. Last Radio show for awhile, but the podcast will live on! Stay tuned for more details.

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron
Central Texas Huddle 110122

Audio – Lone Star Gridiron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022


Central Texas Huddle 110122 made possible by as well as Stay tuned for all the great shows on the Lone Star Gridiron Sports Network. Contact the Central Texas High School Football Huddle Twitter @chrisdoelle, @lsgridiron Facebook ALL I NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED FROM MY TEXAS HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL COACH - Paperback, Ebook The AUTHORITY on […]

The Dive Table
#34 The Reef of Horrors, Vol. 1

The Dive Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 60:43


Listeners beware!  The stories you are about to hear might make your masks fog up and your regulators free flow, so just make sure you're not scuba diving while listening.  As we head into the fall season here in Central Texas, the sun is getting lower and the water is getting cooler, and in this episode the guys discuss some "chilling" moments they've had throughout their scuba careers.  Some of them are preventable, and some of them, Dun dun dunnnnnn.....are not!  No amount of preparation can prevent some of these "horrific" moments from happening...but most of them you can. Enjoy and Happy Halloween!   One or more of the sound effects in this episode were provided by: Pixabay www.pixabay.com The Dive Table www.thedivetable.com Fish Dive Surf, Inc. www.fishdivesurf.com Gardner Underwater www.gardnerunderwater.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/daniel-porter73/message If you enjoyed this episode and want to be a part of this growing community, you can join us in a couple of ways: Subscribe to the podcast so you get notified when new episodes drop; Leave a rating wherever you listen to your podcasts; Send the link to the show; thedivetable.com to a dive buddy, your dive team, or your last scuba instructor. Share your thoughts with us by leaving us a voicemail here on our website or say howdy. Also visit us at, www.fishdivesurf.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/daniel-porter73/message

Crime Pays But Botany Doesn't
West Texas October

Crime Pays But Botany Doesn't

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 94:07 Very Popular


In this episode, we rant about creepy lights in the sky and Elon Musk, the Conflict Algorithm (™), creating habitat in your ugly front yard, Sticky Plants in San Diego County, Montezuma Cypress in Central Texas, making love to Tucker Carlson's Neckfat, doin' PAHT with Al Scorch, Fall Blooming Composites, etc

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast
Appreciate That You Have Two Feet on the Ground: Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Fort Hood's Great Big Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 43:32


October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This week's episode of the podcast features a 3d Cavalry Regiment soldier who battled breast cancer himself, as well as a radiologist from the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center to talk about the medical aspect of breast cancer. Plus, it is the end of the month which means Blair from the Fort Hood Sentinel is back to discuss Traveling Soldier.SUBMIT: FortHoodPAO@gmail.comFACEBOOK: /usagforthoodINSTAGRAM: @usagforthoodTWITTER: @usagforthoodAll music obtained, royalty free, through Filter by Songtradr: "Gun Metal Grey" - Delicious Allstars; "Learning By Doing" - Niklas OlovsoThis podcast is a production of U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood and Fort Hood Public Affairs.

Texas Ag Today
Texas Ag Today - October 27, 2022

Texas Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 22:56


The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released a friendly Cattle on Feed report. Robotic milking systems have made their way to Texas. Texas High Plains Congressman Ronny Jackson is looking forward to working on the next farm bill. Pastures in Central Texas are so dry, one rancher says golf could be played there. We'll have those stories and more on this episode of Texas Ag Today.

Austin Real Estate Investing
Jeremy Knight - Real Estate Agent & Investor

Austin Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 32:10


Jeremy Knight is a full time real estate agent with The Knight Group and has been investing for 8 years. His portfolio includes 5 properties and 2 flipped properties.  For more about Jeremy, check him out online: www.austinknighthomes.com youtube.com/jeremyaknight Instagram - @therealjeremyknight The Moorhead Team is excited to bring you information about investing in real estate in the Central Texas area! More information can be found at our website at www.themoorheadteam.com and our YouTube page The Moorhead Team. We're always aiming to bring you great free content about investing in real estate in Austin, TX!

The Real Estate Zone Radio Show - Austin / Central Texas Real Estate
The Real Estate Zone Radio Show –10/25/22 Broadcast The Latest Real Estate Zone Radio Show!

The Real Estate Zone Radio Show - Austin / Central Texas Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 43:58


Listen to the Real Estate Zone radio show from October 25th, 2022, with hosts John McClellan and Kevin Bown. Stay on top of latest news and up-to-date analysis on how recent events are currently affecting the general and local Central Texas real estate market.

Hugh Hewitt podcast
Ed Morrissey Guests Hosts and Talks with Christian Toto of HollywoodInToto.com

Hugh Hewitt podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 21:43


Ed Morrissey, host of ‘The Ed Morrissey Show Podcast” and Managing Editor at HotAir.com, fills in for Hugh from Central Texas. Ed covers the news of the morning with audio clips, and talks with Christian Toto, Editor of HollywoodInToto.com, author of “Virtue Bombs".See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Real Estate Zone Radio Show - Austin / Central Texas Real Estate
The Real Estate Zone Radio Show –10/18/22 Broadcast The Latest Real Estate Zone Radio Show!

The Real Estate Zone Radio Show - Austin / Central Texas Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 43:12


Listen to the Real Estate Zone radio show from October 18th, 2022, with hosts John McClellan and Kevin Bown. Stay on top of latest news and up-to-date analysis on how recent events are currently affecting the general and local Central Texas real estate market.

Austin Real Estate Investing
PJ Kaminer - Real Estate Broker & Investor

Austin Real Estate Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 40:31


PJ Kaminer was born & raised in St. Louis, MO and has been a proud Austinite since moving here in 2009 to go to UT. PJ is the Managing Director at Texsun Holdings, a vertically integrated private equity firm focused on multifamily. Texsun currently owns about 3,000 units. For more about PJ, check him out on Instagram - @pjkam! The Moorhead Team is excited to bring you information about investing in real estate in the Central Texas area! More information can be found at our website at www.themoorheadteam.com and our YouTube page The Moorhead Team. We're always aiming to bring you great free content about investing in real estate in Austin, TX!

Conversations with Big Rich
Rufus Racings Chip MacLaughlin on Laughter, Living, and Loss

Conversations with Big Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 76:34 Transcription Available


Humor is how you get through the tough stuff.  Chip MacLaughlin of Rufus Racing shares memories of early KOH, racing with friends, making memories, and Zandy Willems. This is life and how we live it. Thanks, Chip for a beautiful reminder.6:25 – we built a lot of fences, dug a lot of holes9:44 – I got pulled out by four train cars17:25 – oh, by the way, it has to float 21:33 – I sold the buggy, then you called and said I had a spot at Hammers26:06 – the Crawling Chaos guys out of Central Texas were my first race friends37:38 – don't be afraid to ask somebody questions46:17 – we were meant to be together49:08 – almost all males get prostate cancer, the majority die before they know55:36 – we did it with humor, and I think we helped some other people57:13 – the whole point of the team was, let's go make some memories and find friends1:08:08 – my last words to Zandy while I was standing in the spotter stand at Crandon…We want to thank our sponsors Maxxis Tires and 4Low Magazine.www.maxxis.comwww.4lowmagazine.com Be sure to listen on your favorite podcast app.Support the show

Contain Podcast
First Part of Ep. 130 - Operation Appleseed: Dispatch from a 3D Printed Permaculture Commune

Contain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 20:32


This is the First Part, full episode here I went to a permaculture/black swan commune/additive manufacturing gun compound in Central Texas to interview one of its members, CAD gun engineer/designer Tom. 'Most people aren't worth spending any time with' 'The position is technological terrorism...engaging with techne to make certain regulations moot' Doing the work actually existing nanobusiness grindset 100

The CI Morning Breakdown Austin
CI Conversations: Leander Mayor Christine DeLisle

The CI Morning Breakdown Austin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 25:01


On this installment of "CI Conversation," guest host Connor McGovern talks with Christine DeLisle, the mayor of Leander, Texas. DeLisle offers her perspective on what drew her to the suburbs in Central Texas, the fulfillment she finds in public service and her priorities for her next two years in office.

It's All Me
The BTS of Life Off-The-Grid with Arielle Crawford

It's All Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 41:57


We're going off-the-grid! Join us on this episode of the It's All Me podcast, as Gervase sits down with modern day cowgirl Arielle Crawford to discuss what it's truly like to live off grid in today's world. Gervase and Arielle dive deep into Arielle's reason for and journey to living off-the-grid, the stories we tell ourselves that leave us feeling disempowered as women, the power of community, and how living off the land can help you heal.   In this episode Gervase and Arielle dive into:   [03:15] Arielle's journey to off grid living and the harsh reality of all-in sustainability  [14:00] The pattern of “needing a man” and how it disempowers women [19:25] Off-the-grid community and the idea of circularity [26:45] Why Arielle believes getting your hands dirty can be the antidote to depression [30:52] How living your values can help you call in a life of integrity and healing Arielle Crawford is a homesteader and rancher in Central Texas. Before fulfilling her dream of living off grid, she was working in sustainable fashion in New York. She received her MBA from FIT, where she teaches Sustainable Manufacturing. Arielle launched her eponymous label in 2018 after 10 years experience in the fashion industry. After hitting a ceiling with sustainability in the big city, she decided to make the leap and move to Hill Country, where she practices off-grid living, natural building, and land stewardship. In addition to being a badass woman, Arielle is now a zero-waster and climate lobbyist for CCL, where she leads the Fashion Industry Action Team.   Guest Info Connect with Arielle Crawford on Instagram: @TheRealnessPerserve Work with Gervase Apply to work with Gervase by booking a Soul Shift Intensive: https://gervasekolmos.podia.com/1-1-coaching-intensive  Download your free gift, the Trust Yo'self hypnosis track: https://bit.ly/3xKuaPv    Follow Gervase Connect with Gervase on Instagram: www.instagram.com/gervasekolmos Visit her website: https://www.gervasekolmos.com/

The Southern Fork
Regan Meador: Southold Farm + Cellar (Fredericksburg, TX)

The Southern Fork

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 37:37


Sitting high atop a hill with a view of the scrubby brush and low oaks of the rolling landscape of Central Texas, Southold Farm + Cellar seems a long way from Long Island, NY. But less than 10 years ago, that's where this winery was located, with wines from winemaker Regan Meador filling the glasses of New York City and getting celebrated in hotspots ranging from Gramercy Tavern to Roberta's in Brooklyn. After repeated zoning struggles, Regan and his wife and co-owner Carey, relocated the operation out to Fredericksburg, TX, and Regan, a Texas native, began learning how to graft his thoughtful style of winemaking with what nature hands out in this region. What has resulted is some of the most exciting wine to come out of the state yet, interpreting the unique landscape, soil, and weather conditions into a sense of place in every sip. It's dynamic, it's interesting, and of course delicious to drink.

Toucher & Rich
Hocus Pocus Will ‘Unleash Hell On Your Kids' // The Stack - 10/6 (Hour 4)

Toucher & Rich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 42:34


(00:00) A Central Texas mom warns other parents about ‘Hocus Pocus 2′ and how the Disney movie ‘You unleash hell on your kids'. (16:02) Wallach is missing the show tomorrow because Mr. Hotshot is calling a Celtics preseason game. (26:33) THE STACK   CONNECT WITH TOUCHER & RICH Twitter: @Toucherandrich | @fredtoucher | @KenGriffeyRules Instagram: @Toucherandrichofficial | @fredtoucher Twitch: twitch.tv/thesportshub 98.5 The Sports Hub: Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram