Podcasts about Django

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Best podcasts about Django

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Latest podcast episodes about Django

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place
I Promise, It's Just My Internet

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 67:26


In this episode, Django retreats into himself like a turtle, Roman wears his bathrobe (again), and Jeff keeps getting distracted by his football cards. What more can you ask from the premier pop culture and comic book podcast in the Pacific Northwest? Also! Send in questions for our 300-episode spectacular next week!0:02:45 - Well Welcome Wellmer!0:08:30 - Immortal X-Men #110:15:00 - Batman: One Bad Day: Bane #10:23:42 - Wasp #10:29:11 - Batman: Fortress #80:32:35 - Old Dog #30:38:55 - Nightwing #1000:46:32 - The Punisher #90:51:10 - The New Champion of Shazam #40:53:16 - Avengers: Forever #130:57:27 - It's Lonely At the Centre of the EarthSPOILERS! Tread carefully dear listener, because we're going to talk about what happened in these books. So maybe pause this, read your books, and come back. We'll still be here!And an enormous thank you, as always, to Andrew Carlson for editing this mess into something listenable.Subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you like to get your podcasts.Email in questions at jeff@thecomicsplace.com! We love hearing from you and there's a good chance we will read it on air!You can also join the Comics Place Discord here: https://discord.gg/rW8EBftHx8Follow Django on TikTok: @prettygoodtiktokvideos

Data Engineering Podcast
Safely Test Your Applications And Analytics With Production Quality Data Using Tonic AI

Data Engineering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 45:40


Summary The most interesting and challenging bugs always happen in production, but recreating them is a constant challenge due to differences in the data that you are working with. Building your own scripts to replicate data from production is time consuming and error-prone. Tonic is a platform designed to solve the problem of having reliable, production-like data available for developing and testing your software, analytics, and machine learning projects. In this episode Adam Kamor explores the factors that make this such a complex problem to solve, the approach that he and his team have taken to turn it into a reliable product, and how you can start using it to replace your own collection of scripts. Announcements Hello and welcome to the Data Engineering Podcast, the show about modern data management Truly leveraging and benefiting from streaming data is hard - the data stack is costly, difficult to use and still has limitations. Materialize breaks down those barriers with a true cloud-native streaming database - not simply a database that connects to streaming systems. With a PostgreSQL-compatible interface, you can now work with real-time data using ANSI SQL including the ability to perform multi-way complex joins, which support stream-to-stream, stream-to-table, table-to-table, and more, all in standard SQL. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/materialize (https://www.dataengineeringpodcast.com/materialize) today and sign up for early access to get started. If you like what you see and want to help make it better, they're hiring (https://materialize.com/careers/) across all functions! Data and analytics leaders, 2023 is your year to sharpen your leadership skills, refine your strategies and lead with purpose. Join your peers at Gartner Data & Analytics Summit, March 20 – 22 in Orlando, FL for 3 days of expert guidance, peer networking and collaboration. Listeners can save $375 off standard rates with code GARTNERDA. Go to dataengineeringpodcast.com/gartnerda (https://www.dataengineeringpodcast.com/gartnerda) today to find out more. Your host is Tobias Macey and today I'm interviewing Adam Kamor about Tonic, a service for generating data sets that are safe for development, analytics, and machine learning Interview Introduction How did you get involved in the area of data management? Can you describe what Tonic is and the story behind it? What are the core problems that you are trying to solve? What are some of the ways that fake or obfuscated data is used in development and analytics workflows? challenges of reliably subsetting data impact of ORMs and bad habits developers get into with database modeling Can you describe how Tonic is implemented? What are the units of composition that you are building to allow for evolution and expansion of your product? How have the design and goals of the platform evolved since you started working on it? Can you describe some of the different workflows that customers build on top of your various tools What are the most interesting, innovative, or unexpected ways that you have seen Tonic used? What are the most interesting, unexpected, or challenging lessons that you have learned while working on Tonic? When is Tonic the wrong choice? What do you have planned for the future of Tonic? Contact Info LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/adam-kamor-85720b48/) @AdamKamor (https://twitter.com/adamkamor) on Twitter Parting Question From your perspective, what is the biggest gap in the tooling or technology for data management today? Closing Announcements Thank you for listening! Don't forget to check out our other shows. Podcast.__init__ (https://www.pythonpodcast.com) covers the Python language, its community, and the innovative ways it is being used. The Machine Learning Podcast (https://www.themachinelearningpodcast.com) helps you go from idea to production with machine learning. Visit the site (https://www.dataengineeringpodcast.com) to subscribe to the show, sign up for the mailing list, and read the show notes. If you've learned something or tried out a project from the show then tell us about it! Email hosts@dataengineeringpodcast.com (mailto:hosts@dataengineeringpodcast.com)) with your story. To help other people find the show please leave a review on Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/data-engineering-podcast/id1193040557) and tell your friends and co-workers Links Tonic (https://www.tonic.ai/) Djinn (https://djinn.tonic.ai/?signup) Django (https://www.djangoproject.com/) Ruby on Rails (https://rubyonrails.org/) C# (https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/tour-of-csharp/) Entity Framework (https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/tour-of-csharp/) PostgreSQL (https://www.postgresql.org/) MySQL (https://www.mysql.com/) Oracle DB (https://www.oracle.com/database/) MongoDB (https://www.mongodb.com/) Parquet (https://parquet.apache.org/) Databricks (https://www.databricks.com/) Mockaroo (https://www.mockaroo.com/) The intro and outro music is from The Hug (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/The_Freak_Fandango_Orchestra/Love_death_and_a_drunken_monkey/04_-_The_Hug) by The Freak Fandango Orchestra (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/The_Freak_Fandango_Orchestra/) / CC BY-SA (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)

All Of The Above (AOTA) Radio - A Journey through High Quality Music
“ALL OF THE ABOVE RADIO” – EPISODE 434 – SUNDAYS 2AM – 4AM PST ON 90.7FM – KPFK LOS ANGELES

All Of The Above (AOTA) Radio - A Journey through High Quality Music

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 116:25


Welcome to another cloud, taking you up, up & away into All Of The Above. Django up to his unusual antics, manipulating the sonic airwaves in rare form as he often does. Perculators on full blast as we rain down these jams. We suggest you take a heavy dose at high volumes… Thank you forREAD MORE

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #546 - Cruise Gooseman and the Everlasting Knob-Gobbler

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 188:19


A seemingly naive and devout middle-aged man finds his way in the underground world of supernatural fighter plane films. On Episode 546 of Trick or Treat Radio we are joined once again by MZ, he mustn't regret his decision to return full time… yet. This week we discuss the film Candy Land, a slasher flick from writer/director John Swab! We also talk about the career of Ruggero Deodato and the indelible mark he left on cinema, the unbearable responsibility of watching a film in one sitting, and we have our latest film pitch! So grab your favorite religious murder weapon, look for the wretched hive of scum and villainy at the Mos Eisley rest stop, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Nicolas Winding Reppin', Copenhagen Cowboy, remembering Ruggero Deodato, more than cannibals, Eli Roth, Evil Dead Rise, dangerous filmmaking, David Hess, Sergio Leone, Deodato Holocaust, Midnight Pulp, The Barbarians, Cut and Run, Body Count, Michael Berryman, Richard Lynch, greetings from Chile, time zones are weird, black olives in chili, Renfield, watching movies in one sitting, Captain Fantastic, Vigo Mortensen, DSO, “six soft”, Sneaker Pimps, chloroform, Top Gun: Maverick, Tom Foose, Val Kilmer, Iron Eagle, Cobra Kai, Freddie Mercury, Kenny Loggins, Turbulence III, Superman IV: The Quest For Peace, Sidney J. Furie, pitching a supernatural fighter plane film, Firefox, Clint Eastwood, Long Kiss Goodnight, Diggstown, RIP Lisa Marie Presley, Elvis, Austin Butler, Patreon Takeover, EF Contentment, Blood In Blood Out, Enemy Mine, B. Brian Blair, Candy Land, Eden Brolin, John Swab, Let Me Make You A Martyr, William Baldwin, Bloodrayne, Uwe Boll, Piedmont St, Turn the Page, Long Jeanne Silver, sex workers, shlub ‘em if you got ‘em, snowballs, religious cults, Guinevere Turner, Owen Campbell, Olivia Luccardi, rest stops, crystal statues, Boogie Nights, Kids, The Everlasting Nob-Gobbler, Dave Mustaine, Metallica, This Old Murder Weapon, Matt Frewer, exploitation, rim jobs in the iron pit, Mad Heidi, The Rocky Overhang, Sergio Martino, Sergio Corbucci, Django, Franco Nero, The Visitor, and more than just cannibals.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show

Perfectly Acceptable Podcast by Comics Place

We're back at it again! Hopping into the new year fresh and rejuvenated, but with a smaller week of comic books than normal. Due to the small week, we've got a small group of just Jeff and Django - so prepare for some good friends poking fun at each other, while also discussing the books that actually came in last week (while shaking our collective fists at Marvel). Jump in and see what's in store!0:04:04 - Well Welcome Wellmer!0:10:32 - Deathgasm #10:13:13 - Parker Girls #40:14:52 - Trojan #10:22:09 - Spy Superb #10:29:20 - Dark Crisis on Infinite Earths #70:35:03 - Batman #1310:41:00 - Dark Knights of Steel #90:44:50 - Gotham City: Year One #40:48:27 - The Riddler #20:48:57 - The Joker: The Man Who Stopped Laughing #40:52:09 - Mosely #1SPOILERS! Tread carefully dear listener, because we're going to talk about what happened in these books. So maybe pause this, read your books, and come back. We'll still be here!And an enormous thank you, as always, to Andrew Carlson for editing this mess into something listenable.Subscribe to us on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you like to get your podcasts.Email in questions at jeff@thecomicsplace.com! We love hearing from you and there's a good chance we will read it on air!You can also join the Comics Place Discord here: https://discord.gg/rW8EBftHx8Follow Django on TikTok: @prettygoodtiktokvideos

Stories from the Hackery
Ameena Mashaikh - Web Development Cohort 58

Stories from the Hackery

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 5:56


Ameena Mashaikh graduated with full time Web Development Cohort 58. My name is Ameena Mashaikh and I am a software developer with experience in Javascript, React, Python, and Django!

Cultpix Radio
Cultpix Radio Ep.59 - Secrets of 2022 Revealed and Exclusive 2023 Preview

Cultpix Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 49:53


Django and Smut welcome Kitty back to the Cultpix Studio to look back (slapping alert) in 2022 and ahead to 2023. We start off with what we did over the holiday, mainly the Christmas and Swedish films that were posted, plus a shout out to our three last pod guests: Jimmy, Adrian and Lisa. We go around the proverbial table to pick out personal favourites from the past year, whether film, theme week, podcast guests, event or other. We do an In Memoria of some of the Cultpix greats that passed away in the past year, including funny/sexy Kitten Natividad, "Cannibal Holocaust" director Ruggero Deodato, Tim Lucas' wife, muse and partner Donna and even Olivia Newton John. There is self-congratulation galore as we note how Cultpix has grown over 150% in the past year, even as the like of N****ix lost 500,000 members in UK alone. We count down the top ten most watched film on Cultpix in 2022, all of them with a sexy theme, with a fierce battle for the top medal position between Danish erotica compilation and Swedish erotica compilation, but the winner is a film that 'gives porn a good name.'We look at the top films that people find on Cultpix from sites like Letterboxd, JustWatch and PlayPilot, including "Anita - Swedish Nymphet" (1972), Fleischer Studio's "Superman" serial (1941-1943), and Leni Riefenstahl's "Triumph of the Will" (1935). There is also a good story abput how that last one ended up published on DVD and on Cultpix. A special mention to our biggest fans and members on social media and IRL - would you believe we get letters sent to us? And you won't guess what's in them. A special mention of members Tightsbury, Lee Bailes, Karen R, Dr Retro, John Corbyn, Cousin H, Disapproving Swede and many more. Looking ahead to 2023 we already have lots of theme weeks and films lined up. We will have more theme weeks with Herschel Gordon Lewis and Doris Wishman.  Films from Japan's Daiei studio (NB: Scandinavia only), including Gamera - gigantic flying, fire-breathing turtle; Daimajin – a giant stone statue comes to life; and Zatoichi the blind masseur, gambler and sword fighter. There will be more films by the extremely productive Swedish director Arne Mattsson, who single-handedly started the myth of 'Swedish Sin' with his film "One Summer of Happiness" (1951). We will feature All Channel Films (NB: USA only): Theme week 1: 7 80's horror/slasher/gore films. Theme week 2: A mixed bag of cult movies from 1969-1991, including classics like I Drink Your Blood (1970) and three Vice Academy comedies – basically Police Academy ripoffs. We also have Czech classics (wonderful films from the 60's; vampires, sci-fi and fantasy) and more films from Hungary (Hungarian westerns!!!). That's just a little taster of things to come on Cultpix. It's going to be a fun 2023. Please be sure to get in touch with us, because unlike most DJs, we DO take requests. 

Daishi X Curiosity Daily
Reviews: Django Unchained - LIED TO YOU I just saw this film and I confess that I am completely satisfied. I am not an admirer of Tarantino

Daishi X Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 5:07


David Bombal
#411: 2023 Path to Master Programmer (for free)

David Bombal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 19:50


This is your FREE path to becoming a master programmer! Use the links below to learn Python, C, Django, PostgreSQL and web programming for free! :) // Menu // 00:00 - Intro 01:24 - Dr Chuck's Courses 02:24 - Path to Master Programmer 07:00 - Path to Master Programmer Languages 10:41 - How to Get the Courses 14:24 - How Python Changed the World 15:42 - Do You Need a Degree? 18:01 - Financial Aid 19:39 - Conclusion // Previous video // Computer Science isn't programming: https://youtu.be/z3o6yEzcnLc Best programming language ever: https://youtu.be/aQ_XTBmCXS8 // C for Everybody Course // Free C Programming Course https://www.cc4e.com/ Free course on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XteaW... // C book Audio by Dr Chuck // https://www.cc4e.com/podcast // Python for Everybody // Python for Everybody: https://www.py4e.com/ Python for Everybody on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://youtu.be/8DvywoWv6fI Free Python Book: http://do1.dr-chuck.com/pythonlearn/E... Dr Chuck's Website: https://www.dr-chuck.com/ Free Python Book options: https://www.py4e.com/book // Django for Everybody // Django for Everybody: https://www.dj4e.com/ Django for Everybody for on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://youtu.be/o0XbHvKxw7Y // PostgreSQL for Everybody // PostgreSQL for Everybody: https://www.pg4e.com/ PostgreSQL for Everybody on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flRUu... // Web Applications for Everybody // YouTube: https://youtu.be/xr6uZDRTna0 Web Applications for Everybody: https://www.wa4e.com/ Web Applications for Everybody on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuXyS... // Books // The C Programming Language by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie (the 1984 Second Ed and 1978 First Ed): https://amzn.to/3G0HSkU // MY STUFF // https://www.amazon.com/shop/davidbombal // SOCIAL // Discord: https://discord.com/invite/usKSyzb Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/davidbombal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidbombal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidbombal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidbombal.co TikTok: http://tiktok.com/@davidbombal YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/davidbombal // Dr Chuck Social // Website: https://www.dr-chuck.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/drchuck/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/csev Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/instructor/d... c rust c vs rust c course free c course Python C Django SQL PostgreSQL PHP MySQL jQuery CSS best programming language python python course python for beginners master programmer dr chuck dr chuck master programmer python mentorship google code interview google interview computer science python best course dr chuck python dr chuck python course learn to code software development software developer computer science software engineer software engineering how to learn programming free python course free python course online free python class free python tutorial free python training how to learn to code coding tutorials how to code learning to code learn to code for free learn to code python python jobs coding bootcamp google code interview python for beginners python full course python tutorial python projects python basic tutorial python programming python interview questions python course python basics open source #python #javascript #drchuck

David Bombal
#412: Best Programming Language Ever? (Free Course)

David Bombal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 44:31


Is this the best programming language ever created? How did it change the world in 1978 and affect developments such as the Apple M1? // Menu // 00:00 - Intro 00:46 - Dr Chuck's Courses 02:18 - C Program 04:40 - C Programming vs Rust Programming 06:58 - C Programming Language Book 08:52 - CC4E.com / Fair Use 13:01 - Amazon 18:58 - Learning Different Languages 24:58 - Garbage Collection 27:40 - C Programming Language Backstory 36:12 - Power PC to Intel 42:13 - Why You Need Master Programmer 42:57 - Did C Change the World? // Previous video // Computer Science isn't programming: https://youtu.be/z3o6yEzcnLc // C for Everybody Course // Free C Programming Course https://www.cc4e.com/ Free course on YouTube (freeCodeCamp): https://youtu.be/j-_s8f5K30I // C book Audio by Dr Chuck // https://www.cc4e.com/podcast // Python for Everybody // Python for Everybody: https://www.py4e.com/ Python for Everybody on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://youtu.be/8DvywoWv6fI Free Python Book: http://do1.dr-chuck.com/pythonlearn/E... Dr Chuck's Website: https://www.dr-chuck.com/ Free Python Book options: https://www.py4e.com/book // Django for Everybody // Django for Everybody: https://www.dj4e.com/ Django for Everybody for on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://youtu.be/o0XbHvKxw7Y // PostgreSQL for Everybody // PostgreSQL for Everybody: https://www.pg4e.com/ PostgreSQL for Everybody on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flRUu... // Web Applications for Everybody // YouTube: https://youtu.be/xr6uZDRTna0 Web Applications for Everybody: https://www.wa4e.com/ Web Applications for Everybody on Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/specializati... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuXyS... // Books // The C Programming Language by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie (the 1984 Second Ed and 1978 First Ed): https://amzn.to/3G0HSkU // MY STUFF // https://www.amazon.com/shop/davidbombal // SOCIAL // Discord: https://discord.com/invite/usKSyzb Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/davidbombal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/davidbombal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidbombal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidbombal.co TikTok: http://tiktok.com/@davidbombal YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/davidbombal // Dr Chuck Social // Website: https://www.dr-chuck.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/drchuck/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/csev Coursera: https://www.coursera.org/instructor/d... c rust c vs rust c course free c course best programming language python python course python for beginners master programmer dr chuck dr chuck master programmer python mentorship google code interview google interview computer science python best course dr chuck python dr chuck python course learn to code software development software developer computer science software engineer software engineering how to learn programming free python course free python course online free python class free python tutorial free python training how to learn to code coding tutorials how to code learning to code learn to code for free learn to code python python jobs coding bootcamp google code interview python for beginners python full course python tutorial python projects python basic tutorial python programming python interview questions python course python basics open source #c #rust #drchuck

They Had Fun
If You're Bored It's Cause You're Boring... with Corwin Kilvert

They Had Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 24:27


On this week's episode, Eleven Madison Park alum and hospitality professional, Corwin Kilvert, tells us about his wedding at City Hall, followed by lunch at The Odeon, dinner at Carbone, and drinks at the Django! What a perfect NYC day!Check out Corwin on InstagramHave fun like CorwinDonate to ROARfind us at They Had Fun & on Instagram

NBN Book of the Day
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

NBN Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/book-of-the-day

New Books in Sociology
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Anthropology
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in French Studies
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

New Books in European Studies
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books Network
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Dance
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in Music
Siv B. Lie, "Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France" (U Chicago Press, 2021)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:20


Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021) shows how relationships between racial identities, jazz, and national belonging become entangled in France. Jazz manouche—a genre known best for its energetic, guitar-centric swing tunes—is among France's most celebrated musical practices of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It centers on the recorded work of famed guitarist Django Reinhardt and is named for the ethnoracial subgroup of Romanies (also known, often pejoratively, as “Gypsies”) to which Reinhardt belonged. French Manouches are publicly lauded as bearers of this jazz tradition, and many take pleasure and pride in the practice while at the same time facing pervasive discrimination. Jazz manouche uncovers a contradiction at the heart of France's assimilationist republican ideals: the music is portrayed as quintessentially French even as Manouches themselves endure treatment as racial others. In Django Generations: Hearing Ethnorace, Citizenship, and Jazz Manouche in France (U Chicago Press, 2021), Siv B. Lie explores how this music is used to construct divergent ethnoracial and national identities in a context where discussions of race are otherwise censured. Weaving together ethnographic and historical analysis, Lie shows that jazz manouche becomes a source of profound ambivalence as it generates ethnoracial difference and socioeconomic exclusion. As the first full-length ethnographic study of French jazz to be published in English, this book enriches anthropological, ethnomusicological, and historical scholarship on global jazz, race and ethnicity, and citizenship while showing how music can be an important but insufficient tool in struggles for racial and economic justice. Adam Bobeck is a PhD candidate in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. His PhD is entitled “Object-Oriented Azadari: Shi'i Muslim Rituals and Ontology”. For more about his work, see www.adambobeck.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

A Year In Horror
1969 (Part 3)

A Year In Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 99:03


It's a truly long journey this one, part 1 of 4 in fact. I am going to give you the time codes below so if you don't want spoilers then, please, avert your eyes.You can now support A Year in Horror via the Patreon.Theme Music by Max Newton& Lucy Foster.Email the podcast at ayearinhorror@gmail.comDon't bother following the podcast on Facebook. But feel free to...Follow me on Twitter.Follow me on Instagram.Follow me on Letterboxd.Below are the timecodes for all the different segments and my guest links. Feel free to let me know where you think I got it wrong or right and of course stay safe out there & I'll see you next month.0.34 - Django the Bastard6.37- The Oblong Box14.51 - The Mad Room24.37 - Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed31.02 - What Ever Happened to Aunt Alice39.37 - The Laughing Woman48.57 - The Horrors of Malformed Men (w/ Marc Canale)1.35.04 - Outro

Software Sessions
Victor Adossi on Yak Shaving

Software Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 110:47


Victor is a software consultant in Tokyo who describes himself as a yak shaver. He writes on his blog at vadosware and curates Awesome F/OSS, a mailing list of open source products. He's also a contributor to the Open Core Ventures blog. Before our conversation Victor wrote a structured summary of how he works on projects. I recommend checking that out in addition to the episode. Topics covered: Most people should use Dokku or CapRover But he uses Kubernetes anyways Hosting a Database in Kubernetes Learning technology You don't really know a thing until something goes wrong History of Frontend Development Context from lower layers of the stack and historical projects Good project pages have comparisons to other products Choosing technologies Language choice affects maintainability Knowing an ecosystem Victor's preferred stack Technology bake offs Posting findings means you get free corrections Why people use medium instead of personal sites Victor VADOSWARE - Blog How Victor works on Projects - Companion post for this episode Awesome FOSS - Curated list of OSS projects NimbusWS - Hosted OSS built on top of budget cloud providers Unvalidated Ideas - Startup ideas for side project inspiration PodcastSaver - Podcast index that allows you to choose Postgres or MeiliSearch and compare performance and results of each Victor's preferred stack Docker - Containers Kubernetes - Container provisioning (Though at the beginning of the episode he suggests Dokku for single server or CapRover for multiple) TypeScript - JavaScript with syntax for types. Victor's default choice. Rust - Language he uses if doing embedded work, performance is critical, or more correctness is desired Haskell - Language he uses if correctness and type system is the most important for the project Postgresql - General purpose database that's good enough for most use cases including full text search. KeyDB - Redis compatible database for caching. Acquired by Snap and then made open source. Victor uses it over Redis because it is multi threaded and supports flash storage without a Redis Enterprise license. Pulumi - Provision infrastructure with the languages you're already using instead of a specialized one or YAML Svelte and SvelteKit - Preferred frontend stack. Previously used Nuxt. Search engines Postgres Full Text Search vs the rest Optimizing Postgres Text Search with Trigrams OpenSearch - Amazon's fork of Elasticsearch typesense meilisearch sonic Quickwit JavaScript build tools Babel SWC Webpack esbuild parcel Vite Turbopack JavaScript frameworks React Vue Svelte Ember Frameworks built on top of frameworks Next - React Nuxt - Vue SvelteKit - Svelte Astro - Multiple Historical JavaScript tools and frameworks Underscore jQuery MooTools Backbone AngularJS Knockout Aurelia GWT Bower - Frontend package manager Grunt - Task runner Gulp - Task runner Related Links Dokku - Open source single-host alternative to Heroku Cloud Native Buildpacks - Buildpacks created by Heroku and Pivotal and used by Dokku CapRover - An open source PaaS-like abstraction built on top of Docker Swarm Kelsey Hightower's tweet about being cautious about running databases on Kubernetes Settling the Myth of Transparent HugePages for Databases Kubernetes Container Storage Interface (CSI) Kubernetes Local Persistent Volumes Longhorn - Distributed block storage for Kubernetes Postgres docs Postgres TOAST Everything I've seen on optimizing Postgres on ZFS Kubernetes Workload Resources Kubernetes Network Plugins Kubernetes Ingress Traefik Kubernetes the Hard Way (Setting up a cluster in a way that optimizes for learning) How does TLS work Let's Encrypt Cert manager for Kubernetes Choose Boring Technology A Linux user's guide to Logical Volume Management Docker networking overview Kubernetes Scheduler Tauri - Build desktop applications with web technology and Rust ripgrep - CLI tool to recursively search directory for a regex pattern (Meant to be a rust replacement for grep) angle-grinder / ag - CLI tool to parse and process log files written in rust Object.observe ECMAScript Proposal to be Withdrawn Ruby on Rails - Ruby web framework Django - Python web framework Laravel - PHP web framework Adonis - JavaScript NestJS - JavaScript What is a NullPointerException, and how do I fix it? Mastodon Clap - CLI argument parser for Rust AWS CDK - Provision AWS infrastructure using programming languages Terraform - Provision infrastructure with terraform language URL canonicalization of duplicate pages and the use of the canonical tag - Used by dev.to to send google traffic to the original blogpost instead of dev.to Transcript You can help edit this transcript on GitHub. [00:00:00] Jeremy: This episode, I talk to Victor Adossi who describes himself as a yak shaver. Someone who likes trying a whole bunch of different technologies, seeing the different options. We talk about what he uses, the evolution of front end development, and his various projects. Talking to just different people it's always good to get where they're coming from because something that works for Google at their scale is going to be different than what you're doing with one of your smaller projects. [00:00:31] Victor: Yeah, the context. Of course in direct conflict with that statement, I definitely use Google technology despite not needing to at all right? Like, you know, 99% of people who are doing like people like to call it indiehacking or building small products could probably get by with just Dokku. If you know Dokku or like CapRover. Are two projects that'll be like, Oh, you can just push your code here, we'll build it up like a little mini Heroku PaaS thing and just go on one big server, right? Like 99% of the people could just use that. But of course I'm not doing that. So I'm a bit of a hypocrite in that sense. I know what I should be doing, but I'm not doing that. I am writing a Kubernetes cluster with like five nodes for no reason. Uh, yeah, I dunno, people don't normally count the controllers. [00:01:24] Jeremy: Dokku and CapRover, I think those are where it's supposed to create a heroku like experience I think it's based off of the heroku buildpacks right? At least Dokku is? [00:01:36] Victor: Yeah Buildpacks has actually been spun out into like a community thing so like pivotal and heroku, it's like buildpacks.io, they're trying to build a wider standard around it so that more people can get involved. And buildpacks are actually obviously fantastic as a technology and as a a process piece. There's not much else like them and you know, that's obvious from like Heroku's success and everything. I know Dokku uses that. I don't know that Caprover does, but I haven't, I haven't really run Caprover that much. They, they probably do. Like at this point if you're going to support building from code, it seems silly to try and build your own buildpacks. Cause that's what you will do, eventually. So you might as well use what's there. Anyway, this is like just getting to like my personal opinions at this point, but like, if you think containers are a bad idea in 2022, You're wrong, you should, you should stop. Like you should, you should stop. Think about it. I mean, obviously there's not, um, I got a really great question at an interview once, which is, where are containers a bad idea? That's probably one of the best like recent interview questions I've ever gotten cause I was like, Oh yeah, I mean, like, you can't, it can't be perfect everywhere, right? Nothing's perfect everywhere. So it's like, where is it? Uh, and of course the answer was networking, right? (unintelligible) So if you need absolute performance, but like for just about everything else. Containers are kind of it at this point. Like, time has born it out, I think. So yeah, I always just like bias at taking containers at this point. So I'm probably more of a CapRover person than a Dokku person, even though I have not used, I don't use CapRover. [00:03:09] Jeremy: Well, like something that I've heard with containers, and maybe it's changed recently, but, but something that was kind of holdout was when people would host a database sometimes they would oh we just don't wanna put this in a container and I wonder if like that matches with your thinking or if things have changed. [00:03:27] Victor: I am not a database administrator right like I read postgres docs and I read the, uh, the Postgres documentation, and I think I know a bit about postgres but I don't commit right like so and I also haven't, like, oh, managed X terabytes on one server that you are making sure never goes down kind of deal. But the stickiness for me, at least from when I've run, So I've done a lot of tests with like ZFS and Postgres and like, um, and also like just trying to figure out, and I run Postgres in Kubernetes of course, like on my cluster and a lot of the stuff I found around is, is like fiddly kernel things like sort of base kernel settings that you need to have set. Like, you know, stuff like should you be using transparent huge pages, like stuff like that. But once you have that settled. Containers are just processes with name spacing and resource control, right? Like, that's it. there are some other ins and outs, but for the most part, if you're fine running a process, so people ran processes, right? And they were just completely like unprotected. Then people made users for the processes and they limited the users and ran the processes, right? Then the next step is now you can run a process and then do the limiting the name spaces in cgroups dynamically. Like there, there's, there's sort of not a humongous difference, unless you're hitting something very specific. Uh, but yeah, databases have been a point of contention, but I think, Kelsey Hightower had that tweet yeah. That was like, um, don't run databases in Kubernetes. And I think he called it back. [00:04:56] Victor: I don't know, but I, I know that was uh, was one of those things that people were really unsure about at first, but then after people sort of like felt it out, they were like, Oh, it's actually fine. Yeah. [00:05:06] Jeremy: Yeah I vaguely remember one of the concerns having to do with persistent storage. Like there were challenges with Kubernetes and needing to keep that storage around and I don't know if that's changed yeah or if that's still a concern. [00:05:18] Victor: Uh, I'd say that definitely has changed. Uh, and it was, it was a concern, depending on where you were. Mostly people who are running AKS or EKS or you know, all those other managed Kubernetes, they're just using EBS or like whatever storage provider is like offering for storage. Most of those people don't actually have that much of a problem with, storage in general. Now, high performance storage is obviously different, right? So like, so you'll, you're gonna have to start doing manual, like local volume management and stuff like that. it was a problem, because obviously CSI (Kubernetes Container Storage Interface) didn't exist for some period of time, and like there was, it was hard to know what to do for if you were just running a Kubernetes cluster. I think a lot of people were just using local, first of all, local didn't even exist for a bit. Um, they were just using host path, right? And just like, Oh, it's on the disk somewhere. Where do we, we have to go get it right? Or we have to like, sort of manage that. So that was something most people weren't ready for, especially if you were just, if you weren't like sort of a, a, a traditional sysadmin and used to doing that stuff. And then of course local volumes came out, but I think they still had to be, um, pre-provisioned. So that's sysadmin stuff that most people, you know, maybe aren't, aren't necessarily ready for. Uh, and then most of the general solutions were slow. So like, I used Longhorn (https://longhorn.io) for a long time and Longhorn, Longhorn's great. And super easy to set up, but it can be slower and you can have some, like, delays in mount time. it wasn't ideal for, for most people. So yeah, I, overall it's true. Databases, Databases in Kubernetes were kind of fraught with peril for a while, but it wasn't for the reason that, it wasn't for the fundamental reason that Kubernetes was just wrong or like, it wasn't the reason most people think of, which is just like, Oh, you're gonna break your database. It's more like, running a database is hard and Kubernetes hasn't solved all the hard problems. Like, cuz that's what Kubernetes does. It basically solves a lot of problems in a very generic way. Right. So it just hadn't solved all those problems yet at this point. I think it's got decent answers on a lot of them. So I, I mean, I don't know. I I do it. Don't, don't take what I'm saying to your, you know, PM meeting or your standup meeting, uh, anyone who's listening. But it's more like if you could solve the problems with databases in the sense before. You could probably solve 'em on Kubernetes now with a good understanding of Kubernetes. Cause at the end of the day, it's all the same stuff. Just Kubernetes makes it a little easier to, uh, do it dynamically. [00:07:50] Jeremy: It sounds like you could do it before, but some of the, I guess the tools or the ways of doing persistent storage were not quite there yet, or they were difficult to use. And so that was why people at the start were like, Okay, maybe it's not a good idea, but, now maybe there's some established practices for how you should run a database in Kubernetes. And I, I suppose the other aspect too is that, like you were saying, Kubernetes is its own thing. You gotta learn Kubernetes and all its intricacies. And then running a database is also its own challenge. So if you stack the two of them together and, and the path was not really clear then maybe at the start it wasn't the best idea. Um, uh, if somebody was going to try it out now, was there like a specific resource you looked at or a specific path to where like okay this is is how I'm going to do it. [00:08:55] Victor: I'll just say what I normally recommend to everybody. Cause it depends on which path you wanna go right? If you wanna go down like running a database path first and figure that out, fill out that skill tree. Like go read the Postgres docs. Well, first of all, use Postgres. That's the first tip there. But like, read those documents. And obviously you don't have to understand everything. You won't understand everything. But knowing the big pieces and sort of letting your brain see the mention of like a whole bunch of things, like what is toast? Oh, you can do compression on columns. Like, you can do some, some things concurrently. Um, you know, what ALTER TABLE looks like. You get all that stuff kind of in your head. Um, and then I personally really believe in sort of learning by building and just like iterating. you won't get it right the first time. It's just like, it's not gonna happen. You're get, you can, you can get better the first time, right? By being really prepared and like, and leave yourself lots of outs, but you kind of have to like, get it out there. Do do your best to make sure that you can't fail, uh, catastrophically, right? So this is like, goes back to that decision to like use ZFS as the bottom of this I'm just like, All right, well, I, I'm not a file systems expert, but if I. I could delegate some of that, you know, some of that, I can get some of that knowledge from someone else. Um, and I can make it easier for me to not fail catastrophically. For the database side, actually read documentation on Postgres or the whatever database you're going to use, make sure you at least understand that. Then start running it like locally or whatever. Again, Docker use, use Docker locally. It's, it's, it's fine. and then, you know, sort of graduate to running sort of more progressively, more complicated versions. what I would say for the Kubernetes side is actually similar. the Kubernetes docs are really good. they're very large. but they're good. So you can actually go through and know all the, like, workload, workload resources, know, like what a config map is, what a secret is, right? Like what etcd is doing in this whole situation. you know, what a kublet is versus an API server, right? Like the, the general stuff, like if you go through all that, you should have like a whole bunch of ideas at least floating around in your head. And then once you try and start setting up a server, they will all start to pop up again, right? And they'll all start to like, you, like, Oh, okay, I need a CNI (Container Networking) plugin because something needs to make the services available, right? Or something needs to power the ingress, right? Like, if I wanna be able to get traffic, I need an ingress object. But what listens, what does that, what makes that ingress object do anything? Oh, it's an ingress controller. nginx, you know, almost everyone's heard of nginx, so they're like, okay. Um, nginx, has an ingress control. Actually there's, there used to be two, I assume there's still two, but there's like one that's maintained by Kubernetes, one that's maintained by nginx, the company or whatever. I use traefik, it's fantastic. but yeah, so I think those things kind of fall out and that is almost always my first way to explain it and to start building. And tinkering iteratively. So like, read the documentation, get a good first grasp of it, and then start building yourself because you'll, you'll get way more questions that way. Like, you'll ask way more questions, you won't be able to make progress. Uh, and then of course you can, you know, hop into slacks or like start looking around and, and searching on the internet. oh, one of the things that really helped me out early learning Kubernetes was, Kelsey Hightower's, um, learn Kubernetes the hard way. I'm also a big believer in doing things the hard way, at least knowing what you're choosing to not know, right? distributing file system, Deltas, right? Or like changes to a file system over the network is not a new problem. Other people have solved it. There's a lot of complexity there. but if you at least know the sort of surface level of what the thing does and what it's supposed to do and how it's supposed to do it, you can make a decision on, Oh, how deep am I going to go? Right? To prevent yourself from like, making a mistake or going too deep in the rabbit hole. If you have an idea of the sort of ecosystem and especially like, Oh, here, like the basics of how I can use this thing, that's generally very good. And doing things the hard way is a great way to get a, a feel for that, right? Cause if you take some chunk and like, you know, the first level of doing things the hard way, uh, or, you know, Kelsey Hightower's guide is like, get a machine, right? Like, so, like, if you somehow were like, Oh, I wanna run a Kubernetes cluster. but, you know, I don't want use necessarily EKS and you wanna learn it the hard way. You have to go get a machine, right? If you, if you're not familiar, if you run on Heroku the whole time, like you didn't manage your own machines, you gotta go like, figure out EC2, right? Or, I personally use, hetzner I love hetzner, so you have to go figure out hetzner, digital ocean, whatever. Right. And then the next thing's like, you know, the guide's changed a lot, and I haven't, I haven't looked at it in like, in years, actually a while since I, since I've sort of been, I guess living it, but it's, it's like generate certificates, right? So if you've never dealt with SSL and like, sort of like, or I should say TLS uh, and generating certificates and how that whole dance works, right? Which is fascinating because it's like, oh, right, nothing's secure on the internet, except that we distribute root certificates on computers that are deployed in every OS, right? Like, that's a sort of fundamental understanding you may not go deep enough to realize, but if you are fascinated by it, trying to do it manually would lead you down that path. You'd be like, Oh, what, like what is this thing? What is a CSR? Like, why, who is signing my request? Right? And it's like, why do we trust those people? Right? And it's like, you know, that kind of thing comes out and I feel like you can only get there from trying to do it, you know, answering the questions you can. Right. And again, it takes some judgment to know when you should not go down a rabbit hole. uh, and then iterating. of course there are people who are excellent at explaining. you can find some resources that are shortcuts. But, uh, I think particularly my bread and butter has been just to try and do it the hard way. Avoid pitfalls or like rabbit holes when you can. But know that the rabbit hole is there, and then keep going. And sometimes if something's just too hard, you're not gonna get it the first time. Like maybe you'll have to wait like another three months, you'll try again and you'll know more sort of ambiently about everything else. You get a little further that time. that's how I feel about that. Anyway. [00:15:06] Jeremy: That makes sense to me. I think sometimes when people take on a project, they try to learn too many things at the same time. I, I think the example of Kubernetes and Postgres is pretty good example, where if you're not familiar with how do I install Postgres on bare metal or a vm, trying to make sense of that while you're trying to into is probably gonna be pretty difficult. So, so splitting them up and learning them individually, that makes a lot of sense to me. And the whole deciding how deep you wanna go. That's interesting too, because I think that's very specific to the person right because sometimes you wanna go a little deeper because otherwise you don't understand how the two things connect together. But other times it's just like with the example with certificates, some people they may go like, I just put in let's encrypt it gives me my cert I don't care right then, and then, and some people they wanna know like okay how does the whole certificate infrastructure work which I think is interesting, depending on who you are, maybe you go ahh maybe it doesn't really matter right. [00:16:23] Victor: Yeah, and, you know, shout out to Let's Encrypt . It's, it's amazing, right? think Singlehandedly the most, most of the deployment of HTTPS that happens these days, right? so many so many of like internet providers and uh, sort of service providers will use it right? Under the covers. Like, Hey, we've got you free SSL through Let's Encrypt, right? Like, kind of like under the, under the covers. which is awesome. And they, and they do it. So if you're listening to this, donate to them. I've done it. So now that, now the pressure is on whoever's listening, but yeah, and, and I, I wanna say I am that person as well, right? Like, I use, Cert Manager on my cluster, right? So I'm just like, I don't wanna think about it, but I, you know, but I, I feel like I thought about it one time. I have a decent grasp. If something changes, then I guess I have to dive back in. I think it, you've heard the, um, innovation tokens idea, right? I can't remember the site. It's like, um, do, like do boring tech or something.com (https://boringtechnology.club/) . Like it shows up on sort of hacker news from time to time, essentially. But it's like, you know, you have a certain amount of tokens and sort of, uh, we'll call them tokens, but tolerance for complexity or tolerance for new, new ideas or new ways of doing things, new processes. Uh, and you spend those as you build any project, right? you can be devastatingly effective by just sticking to the stack, you know, and not introducing anything new, even if it's bad, right? and there's nothing wrong with LAMP stack, I don't wanna annoy anybody, but like if you, if you're running LAMP or if you run on a hostgator, right? Like, if you run on so, you know, some, some service that's really old but really works for you isn't, you know, too terribly insecure or like, has the features you need, don't learn Kubernetes then, right? Especially if you wanna go fast. cuz you, you're spending tokens, right? You're spending, essentially brain power, right? On learning whatever other thing. So, but yeah, like going back to that, databases versus databases on Kubernetes thing, you should probably know one of those before you, like, if you're gonna do that, do that thing. You either know Kubernetes and you like, at least feel comfortable, you know, knowing Kubernetes extremely difficult obviously, but you feel comfortable and you feel like you can debug. Little bit of a tangent, but maybe that's even a better, sort of watermark if you know how to debug a thing. If, if it's gone wrong, maybe one or five or 10 or 20 times and you've gotten out. Not without documentation, of course, cuz well, if you did, you're superhuman. But, um, but you've been able to sort of feel your way out, right? Like, Oh, this has gone wrong and you have enough of a model of the system in your head to be like, these are the three places that maybe have something wrong with them. Uh, and then like, oh, and then of course it's just like, you know, a mad dash to kind of like, find, find the thing that's wrong. You should have confidence about probably one of those things before you try and do both when it's like, you know, complex things like databases and distributed systems management, uh, and orchestration. [00:19:18] Jeremy: That's, that's so true in, in terms of you are comfortable enough being able to debug a problem because it's, I think when you are learning about something, a lot of times you start with some kind of guide or some kind of tutorial and you follow the steps. And if it all works, then great. Right? But I think it's such a large leap from that to something went wrong and I have to figure it out. Right. Whether it's something's not right in my Dockerfile or my postgres instance uh, the queries are timing out. so many things that could go wrong, that is the moment where you're forced to figure out, okay, what do I really know about this not thing? [00:20:10] Victor: Exactly. Yeah. Like the, the rubber's hitting the road it's uh you know the car's about to crash or has already crashed like if I open the bonnet, do I know what's happening right or am I just looking at (unintelligible). And that's, it's, I feel sort a little sorry or sad for, for devs that start today because there's so much. Complexity that's been built up. And a lot of it has a point, but you need to kind of have seen the before to understand the point, right? So I like, I like to use front end as an example, right? Like the front end ecosystem is crazy, and it has been crazy for a very long time, but the steps are actually usually logical, right? Like, so like you start with, you know, HTML, CSS and JavaScript, just plain, right? And like, and you can actually go in lots of directions. Like HTML has its own thing. CSS has its own sort of evolution sort of thing. But if we look at JavaScript, you're like, you're just writing JavaScript on every page, right? And like, just like putting in script tags and putting in whatever, and it's, you get spaghetti, you get spaghetti, you start like writing, copying the same function on multiple pages, right? You just, it, it's not good. So then people, people make jquery, right? And now, now you've got like a, a bundled set of like good, good defaults that you can, you can go for, right? And then like, you know, libraries like underscore come out for like, sort of like not dom related stuff that you do want, you do want everywhere. and then people go from there and they go to like backbone or whatever. it's because Jquery sort of also becomes spaghetti at some point and it becomes hard to manage and people are like, Okay, we need to sort of like encapsulate this stuff somehow, right? And like the new tools or whatever is around at the same timeframe. And you, you, you like backbone views for example. and you have people who are kind of like, ah, but that's not really good. It's getting kind of slow. Uh, and then you have, MVC stuff comes out, right? Like Angular comes out and it's like, okay, we're, we're gonna do this thing called dirty checking, and it's gonna be, it's gonna be faster and it's gonna be like, it's gonna be less sort of spaghetti and it's like a little bit more structured. And now you have sort of like the rails paradigm, but on the front end, and it takes people to get a while to get adjusted to that, but then that gets too heavy, right? And then dirty checking is realized to be a mistake. And then, you get stuff like MVVM, right? So you get knockout, like knockout js and you got like Durandal, and like some, some other like sort of front end technologies that come up to address that problem. Uh, and then after that, like, you know, it just keeps going, right? Like, and if you come in at the very end, you're just like, What is happening? Right? Like if it, if it, if someone doesn't sort of boil down the complexity and reduce it a little bit, you, you're just like, why, why do we do this like this? Right? and sometimes there's no good reason. Sometimes the complexity is just like, is unnecessary, but having the steps helps you explain it, uh, or helps you understand how you got there. and, and so I feel like that is something younger people or, or newer devs don't necessarily get a chance to see. Cause it just, it would take, it would take very long right? And if you're like a new dev, let's say you jumped into like a coding bootcamp. I mean, I've got opinions on coding boot camps, but you know, it's just like, let's say you jumped into one and you, you came out, you, you made it. It's just, there's too much to know. sure, you could probably do like HTML in one month. Well, okay, let's say like two weeks or whatever, right? If you were, if you're literally brand new, two weeks of like concerted effort almost, you know, class level, you know, work days right on, on html, you're probably decently comfortable with it. Very comfortable. CSS, a little harder because this is where things get hard. Cause if you, if you give two weeks for, for HTML, CSS is harder than HTML kind of, right? Because the interactions are way more varied. Right? Like, and, and maybe it's one of those things where you just, like, you, you get somewhat comfortable and then just like know that in the future you're gonna see something you don't understand and have to figure it out. Uh, but then JavaScript, like, how many months do you give JavaScript? Because if you go through that first like, sort of progression that I, I I, I, I mentioned everyone would have a perfect sort of, not perfect but good understanding of the pieces, right? Like, why did we start transpiling at all? Right? Like, uh, or why did you know, why did we adopt libraries? Like why did Bower exist? No one talks about Bower anymore, obviously, but like, Bower was like a way to distribute front end only packages, right? Um, what is it? Um, Uh, yes, there's grunt. There's like the whole build system thing, right? Once, once we decide we're gonna, we're gonna do stuff to files before we, before we push. So there's grunt, there's, uh, gulp, which is like grunt, but like, Oh, we're gonna do it all in memory. We're gonna pipe, we're gonna use this pipes thing to make sure everything goes fast. then there's like, of course that leads like the insanity that's webpack. And then there's like parcel, which did better. There's vite there's like, there's all this, there's this progression, but how many months would it take to know that progression? It, it's too long. So they end up just like, Hey, you're gonna learn react. Which is the right thing because it's like, that's what people hire for, right? But then you're gonna be in react and be like, What's webpack, right? And it's like, but you can't go down. You can't, you don't have the time. You, you can't sort of approach that problem from the other direction where you, which would give you better understanding cause you just don't have the time. I think it's hard for newer devs to overcome this. Um, but I think there are some, there's some hope on the horizon cuz some things are simpler, right? Like some projects do reduce complexity, like, by watching another project sort of innovate so like react. Wasn't the first component, first framework, right? Like technically, I, I think, I think you, you might have to give that to like, to maybe backbone because like they had views and like marionette also went with that. Like maybe, I don't know, someone, someone I'm sure will get in like, send me an angry email, uh, cuz I forgot you Moo tools or like, you know, Ember Ember. They've also, they've also been around, I used to be a huge Ember fan, still, still kind of am, but I don't use it. but if you have these, if you have these tools, right? Like people aren't gonna know how to use them and Vue was able to realize that React had some inefficiencies, right? So React innovates the sort of component. So Reintroduces the component based model component first, uh, front end development model. Vue sees that and it's like, wait a second, if we just export this like data object, and of course that's not the only innovation of Vue, but if we just export this data object, you don't have to do this fine grained tracking yourself anymore, right? You don't have to tell React or tell your the system which things change when other things change, right? Like you, you don't have to set up this watching and stuff, right? Um, and that's one of the reasons, like Vue is just, I, I, I remember picking up Vue and being like, Oh, I'm done. I'm done with React now. Because it just doesn't make sense to use React because they Vue essentially either, you know, you could just say they learned from them or they, they realize a better way to do things that is simpler and it's much easier to write. Uh, and you know, functionally similar, right? Um, similar enough that it's just like, oh they boil down some of that complexity and we're a step forward and, you know, in other ways, I think. Uh, so that's, that's awesome. Every once in a while you get like a compression in the complexity and then it starts to ramp up again and you get maybe another compression. So like joining the projects that do a compression. Or like starting to adopting those is really, can be really awesome. So there's, there's like, there's some hope, right? Cause sometimes there is a compression in that complexity and you you might be lucky enough to, to use that instead of, the thing that's really complex after years of building on it. [00:27:53] Jeremy: I think you're talking about newer developers having a tough time making sense of the current frameworks but the example you gave of somebody starting from HTML and JavaScript going to jquery backbone through the whole chain, that that's just by nature of you've put in a lot of time right you've done a lot of work working with each of these technologies you see the progression as if someone is starting new just by nature of you being new you won't have been able to spend that time [00:28:28] Victor: Do you think it could work? again, the, the, the time aspect is like really hard to get like how can you just avoid spending time um to to learn things that's like a general problem I think that problem is called education in the general sense. But like, does it make sense for a, let's say a bootcamp or, or any, you know, school right? To attempt to guide people through the previous solutions that didn't work, right? Like in math, you don't start with calculus, right? It just wouldn't, it doesn't make sense, right? But we try and start with calculus in software, right? We're just like, okay, here's the complexity. You've got all of it. Don't worry. Just look at this little bit. If, you know, if the compiler ever spits out a weird error uh oh, like, you're, you're, you're in for trouble cuz you, you just didn't get the. get the basics. And I think that's maybe some of what is missing. And the thing is, it is like the constraints are hard, right? No one has infinite time, right? Or like, you know, even like, just tons of time to devote to learning, learning just front end, right? That's not even all of computing, That's not even the algorithm stuff that some companies love to throw at you, right? Uh, or the computer sciencey stuff. I wonder if it makes more sense to spend some time taking people through the progression, right? Because discovering that we should do things via components, let's say, or, or at least encapsulate our functionality to components and compose that way, is something we, we not everyone knew, right? Or, you know, we didn't know wild widely. And so it feels like it might make sense to touch on that sort of realization and sort of guide the student through, you know, maybe it's like make five projects in a week and you just get progressively more complex. But then again, that's also hard cause effort, right? It's just like, it's a hard problem. But, but I think right now, uh, people who come in at the end and sort of like see a bunch of complexity and just don't know why it's there, right? Like, if you've like, sort of like, this is, this applies also very, this applies to general, but it applies very well to the Kubernetes problem as well. Like if you've never managed nginx on more than one machine, or if you've never tried to set up a, like a, to format your file system on the machine you just rented because it just, you know, comes with nothing, right? Or like, maybe, maybe some stuff was installed, but, you know, if you had to like install LVM (Logical Volume Manager) yourself, if you've never done any of that, Kubernetes would be harder to understand. It's just like, it's gonna be hard to understand. overlay networks are hard for everyone to understand, uh, except for network people who like really know networking stuff. I think it would be better. But unfortunately, it takes a lot of time for people to take a sort of more iterative approach to, to learning. I try and write blog posts in this way sometimes, but it's really hard. And so like, I'll often have like an idea, like, so I call these, or I think of these as like onion, onion style posts, right? Where you either build up an onion sort of from the inside and kind of like go out and like add more and more layers or whatever. Or you can, you can go from the outside and sort of take off like layers. Like, oh, uh, Kubernetes has a scheduler. Why do they need a scheduler? Like, and like, you know, kind of like, go, go down. but I think that might be one of the best ways to learn, but it just takes time. Or geniuses and geniuses who are good at two things, right? Good at the actual technology and good at teaching. Cuz teaching is a skill and it's very hard. and, you know, shout out to teachers cuz that's, it's, it's very difficult, extremely frustrating. it's hard to find determinism in, in like methods and solutions. And there's research of course, but it's like, yeah, that's, that's a lot harder than the computer being like, Nope, that doesn't work. Right? Like, if you can't, if you can't, like if you, if the function call doesn't work, it doesn't work. Right. If the person learned suboptimally, you won't know Right. Until like 10 years down the road when, when they can't answer some question or like, you know, when they, they don't understand. It's a missing fundamental piece anyway. [00:32:24] Jeremy: I think with the example of front end, maybe you don't have time to walk through the whole history of every single library and framework that came but I think at the very least, if you show someone, or you teach someone how to work with css, and you have them, like you were talking about components before you have them build a site where there's a lot of stuff that gets reused, right? Maybe you have five pages and they all have the same nav bar. [00:33:02] Victor: Yeah, you kind of like make them do it. [00:33:04] Jeremy: Yeah. You make 'em do it and they make all the HTML files, they copy and paste it, and probably your students are thinking like, ah, this, this kind of sucks [00:33:16] Victor: Yeah [00:33:18] Jeremy: And yeah, so then you, you come to that realization, and then after you've done that, then you can bring in, okay, this is why we have components. And similarly you brought up, manual dom manipulation with jQuery and things like that. I, I'm sure you could come up with an example of you don't even necessarily need to use jQuery. I think people can probably skip that step and just use the the, the API that comes with the browser. But you can have them go in like, Oh, you gotta find this element by the id and you gotta change this based on this, and let them experience the. I don't know if I would call it pain, but let them experience like how it was. Right. And, and give them a complex enough task where they feel like something is wrong right. Or, or like, there, should be something better. And then you can go to you could go straight to vue or react. I'm not sure if we need to go like, Here's backbone, here's knockout. [00:34:22] Victor: Yeah. That's like historical. Interesting. [00:34:27] Jeremy: I, I think that would be an interesting college course or something that. Like, I remember when, I went through school, one of the classes was programming languages. So we would learn things like, Fortran and stuff like that. And I, I think for a more frontend centered or modern equivalent you could go through, Hey, here's the history of frontend development here's what we used to do and here's how we got to where we are today. I think that could be actually a pretty interesting class yeah [00:35:10] Victor: I'm a bit interested to know you learned fortran in your PL class. I, think when I went, I was like, lisp and then some, some other, like, higher classes taught haskell but, um, but I wasn't ready for haskell, not many people but fortran is interesting, I kinda wanna hear about that. [00:35:25] Jeremy: I think it was more in terms of just getting you exposed to historically this is how things were. Right. And it wasn't so much of like, You can take strategies you used in Fortran into programming as a whole. I think it was just more of like a, a survey of like, Hey, here's, you know, here's Fortran and like you were saying, here's Lisp and all, all these different languages nd like at least you, you get to see them and go like, yeah, this is kind of a pain. [00:35:54] Victor: Yeah [00:35:55] Jeremy: And like, I understand why people don't choose to use this anymore but I couldn't take away like a broad like, Oh, I, I really wish we had this feature from, I think we were, I think we were using Fortran 77 or something like that. I think there's Fortran 77, a Fortran 90, and then there's, um, I think, [00:36:16] Victor: Like old fortran, deprecated [00:36:18] Jeremy: Yeah, yeah, yeah. So, so I think, I think, uh, I actually don't know if they're, they're continuing to, um, you know, add new things or maintain it or it's just static. But, it's, it's more, uh, interesting in terms of, like we were talking front end where it's, as somebody who's learning frontend development who is new and you get to see how, backbone worked or how Knockout worked how grunt and gulp worked. It, it's like the kind of thing where it's like, Oh, okay, like, this is interesting, but let us not use this again. Right? [00:36:53] Victor: Yeah. Yeah. Right. But I also don't need this, and I will never again [00:36:58] Jeremy: yeah, yeah. It's, um, but you do definitely see the, the parallels, right? Like you were saying where you had your, your Bower and now you have NPM and you had Grunt and Gulp and now you have many choices [00:37:14] Victor: Yeah. [00:37:15] Jeremy: yeah. I, I think having he history context, you know, it's interesting and it can be helpful, but if somebody was. Came to me and said hey I want to learn how to build websites. I get into front end development. I would not be like, Okay, first you gotta start moo tools or GWT. I don't think I would do that but it I think at a academic level or just in terms of seeing how things became the way they are sure, for sure it's interesting. [00:37:59] Victor: Yeah. And I, I, think another thing I don't remember who asked or why, why I had to think of this lately. um but it was, knowing the differentiators between other technologies is also extremely helpful right? So, What's the difference between ES build and SWC, right? Again, we're, we're, we're leaning heavy front end, but you know, just like these, uh, sorry for context, of course, it's not everyone a front end developer, but these are two different, uh, build tools, right? For, for JavaScript, right? Essentially you can think of 'em as transpilers, but they, I think, you know, I think they also bundle like, uh, generally I'm not exactly sure if, if ESbuild will bundle as well. Um, but it's like one is written in go, the other one's written in Rust, right? And sort of there's, um, there's, in addition, there's vite which is like vite does bundle and vite does a lot of things. Like, like there's a lot of innovation in vite that has to have to do with like, making local development as fast as possible and also getting like, you're sort of making sure as many things as possible are strippable, right? Or, or, or tree shakeable. Sorry, is is is the better, is the better term. Um, but yeah, knowing, knowing the, um, the differences between projects is often enough to sort of make it less confusing for me. Um, as far as like, Oh, which one of these things should I use? You know, outside of just going with what people are recommending. Cause generally there is some people with wisdom sometimes lead the crowd sometimes, right? So, so sometimes it's okay to be, you know, a crowd member as long as you're listening to the, to, to someone worth listening to. Um, and, and so yeah, I, I think that's another thing that is like the mark of a good project or, or it's not exclusive, right? It's not, the condition's not necessarily sufficient, but it's like a good projects have the why use this versus x right section in the Readme, right? They're like, Hey, we know you could use Y but here's why you should use us instead. Or we know you could use X, but here's what we do better than X. That might, you might care about, right? That's, um, a, a really strong indicator of a project. That's good cuz that means the person who's writing the project is like, they've done this, the survey. And like, this is kind of like, um, how good research happens, right? It's like most of research is reading what's happening, right? To knowing, knowing the boundary you're about to push, right? Or try and sort of like push one, make one step forward in, um, so that's something that I think the, the rigor isn't in necessarily software development everywhere, right? Which is good and bad. but someone who's sort of done that sort of rigor or, and like, and, and has, and or I should say, has been rigorous about knowing the boundary, and then they can explain that to you. They can be like, Oh, here's where the boundary was. These people were doing this, these people were doing this, these people were doing this, but I wanna do this. So you just learned now whether it's right for you and sort of the other points in the space, which is awesome. Yeah. Going to your point, I feel like that's, that's also important, it's probably not a good idea to try and get everyone to go through historical artifacts, but if just a, a quick explainer and sort of, uh, note on the differentiation, Could help for sure. Yeah. I feel like we've skewed too much frontend. No, no more frontend discussion this point. [00:41:20] Jeremy: It's just like, I, I think there's so many more choices where the, the mental thought that has to go into, Okay, what do I use next I feel is bigger on frontend. I guess it depends on the project you're working on but if you're going to work on anything front end if you haven't done it before or you don't have a lot of experience there's so many build tools so many frameworks, so many libraries that yeah, but we [00:41:51] Victor: Iterate yeah, in every direction, like the, it's good and bad, but frontend just goes in every direction at the same time Like, there's so many people who are so enthusiastic and so committed and and it's so approachable that like everyone just goes in every direction at the same time and like a lot of people make progress and then unfortunately you have try and pick which, which branch makes sense. [00:42:20] Jeremy: We've been kind of talking about, some of your experiences with a few things and I wonder if you could explain the the context you're thinking of in terms of the types of projects you typically work on like what are they what's the scale of them that sort of thing. [00:42:32] Victor: So I guess I've, I've gone through a lot of phases, right? In sort of what I use in in my tooling and what I thought was cool. I wrote enterprise java like everybody else. Like, like it really doesn't talk about it, but like, it's like almost at some point it was like, you're either a rail shop or a Java shop, for so many people. And I wrote enterprise Java for a, a long time, and I was lucky enough to have friends who were really into, other kinds of computing and other kinds of programming. a lot of my projects were wrapped around, were, were ideas that I was expressing via some new technology, let's say. Right? So, I wrote a lot of haskell for, for, for a while, right? But what did I end up building with that was actually a job board that honestly didn't go very far because I was spending much more time sort of doing, haskell things, right? And so I learned a lot about sort of what I think is like the pinnacle of sort of like type development in, in the non-research world, right? Like, like right on the edge of research and actual usability. But a lot of my ideas, sort of getting back to the, the ideas question are just things I want to build for myself. Um, or things I think could be commercially viable or like do, like, be, be well used, uh, and, and sort of, and profitable things, things that I think should be built. Or like if, if I see some, some projects as like, Oh, I wish they were doing this in this way, Right? Like, I, I often consider like, Oh, I want, I think I could build something that would be separate and maybe do like, inspired from other projects, I should say, Right? Um, and sort of making me understand a sort of a different, a different ecosystem. but a lot of times I have to say like, the stuff I build is mostly to scratch an itch I have. Um, and or something I think would be profitable or utilizing technology that I've seen that I don't think anyone's done in the same way. Right? So like learning Kubernetes for example, or like investing the time to learn Kubernetes opened up an entire world of sort of like infrastructure ideas, right? Because like the leverage you get is so high, right? So you're just like, Oh, I could run an aws, right? Like now that I, now that I know this cuz it's like, it's actually not bad, it's kind of usable. Like, couldn't I do that? Right? That kind of thing. Right? Or um, I feel like a lot of the times I'll learn a technology and it'll, it'll make me feel like certain things are possible that they, that weren't before. Uh, like Rust is another one of those, right? Like, cuz like Rust will go from like embedded all the way to WASM, which is like a crazy vertical stack. Right? It's, that's a lot, That's a wide range of computing that you can, you can touch, right? And, and there's, it's, it's hard to learn, right? The, the, the, the, uh, the, the ramp to learning it is quite steep, but, it opens up a lot of things you can write, right? It, it opens up a lot of areas you can go into, right? Like, if you ever had an idea for like a desktop app, right? You could actually write it in Rust. There's like, there's, there's ways, there's like is and there's like, um, Tauri is one of my personal favorites, which uses web technology, but it's either I'm inspired by some technology and I'm just like, Oh, what can I use this on? And like, what would this really be good at doing? or it's, you know, it's one of those other things, like either I think it's gonna be, Oh, this would be cool to build and it would be profitable. Uh, or like, I'm scratching my own itch. Yeah. I think, I think those are basically the three sources. [00:46:10] Jeremy: It's, it's interesting about Rust where it seems so trendy, I guess, in lots of people wanna do something with rust, but then in a lot of they also are not sure does it make sense to write in rust? Um, I, I think the, the embedded stuff, of course, that makes a lot of sense. And, uh, you, you've seen a sort of surge in command line apps, stuff ripgrep and ag, stuff like that, and places like that. It's, I think the benefits are pretty clear in terms of you've got the performance and you have the strong typing and whatnot and I think where there's sort of the inbetween section that's kind of unclear to me at least would I build a web application in rust I'm not sure that sort of thing [00:47:12] Victor: Yeah. I would, I characterize it as kind of like, it's a tool toolkit, so it really depends on the problem. And think we have many tools that there's no, almost never a real reason to pick one in particular right? Like there's, Cause it seems like just most of, a lot of the work, like, unless you're, you're really doing something interesting, right? Like, uh, something that like, oh, I need to, I need to, like, I'm gonna run, you know, billions and billions of processes. Like, yeah, maybe you want erlang at that point, right? Like, maybe, maybe you should, that should be, you know, your, your thing. Um, but computers are so fast these days, and most languages have, have sort of borrowed, not borrowed, but like adopted features from others that there's, it's really hard to find a, a specific use case, for one particular tool. Uh, so I often just categorize it by what I want out of the project, right? Or like, either my goals or project goals, right? Depending on, and, or like business goals, if you're, you know, doing this for a business, right? Um, so like, uh, I, I basically, if I want to go fast and I want to like, you know, reduce time to market, I use type script, right? Oh, and also I'm a, I'm a, like a type zealot. I, I'd say so. Like, I don't believe in not having types, right? Like, it's just like there's, I think it's crazy that you would like have a function but not know what the inputs could be. And they could actually be anything, right? , you're just like, and then you have to kind of just keep that in your head. I think that's silly. Now that we have good, we, we have, uh, ways to avoid the, uh, ceremony, right? You've got like hindley Milner type systems, like you have a way to avoid the, you can, you know, predict what types of things will be, and you can, you don't have to write everything everywhere. So like, it's not that. But anyway, so if I wanna go fast, the, the point is that going back to that early, like the JS ecosystem goes everywhere at the same time. Typescript is excellent because the ecosystem goes everywhere at the same time. And so you've got really good ecosystem support for just about everything you could do. Um, uh, you could write TypeScript that's very loose on the types and go even faster, but in general it's not very hard. There's not too much ceremony and just like, you know, putting some stuff that shows you what you're using and like, you know, the objects you're working with. and then generally if I wanna like, get it really right, I I'll like reach for haskell, right? Cause it's just like the sort of contortions, and again, this takes time, this not fast, but, right. the contortions you can do in the type system will make it really hard to write incorrect code or code that doesn't, that isn't logical with itself. Of course interfacing with the outside world. Like if you do a web request, it's gonna fail sometimes, right? Like the network might be down, right? So you have to, you basically pull that, you sort of wrap that uncertainty in your system to whatever degree you're okay with. And then, but I know it'll be correct, right? But and correctness is just not important. Most of like, Oh, I should , that's a bad quote. Uh, it's not that correct is not important. It's like if you need to get to market, you do not necessarily need every single piece of your code to be correct, Right? If someone calls some, some function with like, negative one and it's not an important, it's not tied to money or it's like, you know, whatever, then maybe it's fine. They just see an error and then like you get an error in your back and you're like, Oh, I better fix that. Right? Um, and then generally if I want to be correct and fast, I choose rust these days. Right? Um, these days. and going back to your point, a lot of times that means that I'm going to write in Typescript for a lot of projects. So that's what I'll do for a lot of projects is cuz I'll just be like, ah, do I need like absolute correctness or like some really, you know, fancy sort of type stuff. No. So I don't pick haskell. Right. And it's like, do I need to be like mega fast? No, probably not. Cuz like, cuz so I don't necessarily don't necessarily need rust. Um, maybe it's interesting to me in terms of like a long, long term thing, right? Like if I, if I'm think, oh, but I want x like for example, tight, tight, uh, integration with WASM, for example, if I'm just like, oh, I could see myself like, but that's more of like, you know, for a fun thing that I'm doing, right? Like, it's just like, it's, it's, you don't need it. You don't, that's premature, like, you know, that's a premature optimization thing. But if I'm just like, ah, I really want the ability to like maybe consider refactoring some of this out into like a WebAssembly thing later, then I'm like, Okay, maybe, maybe I'll, I'll pick Rust. Or like, if I, if I like, I do want, you know, really, really fast, then I'll like, then I'll go Rust. But most of the time it's just like, I want a good ecosystem so I don't have to build stuff myself most of the time. Uh, and you know, type script is good enough. So my stack ends up being a lot of the time just in type script, right? Yeah. [00:52:05] Jeremy: Yeah, I think you've encapsulated the reason why there's so many packages on NPM and why there's so much usage of JavaScript and TypeScript in general is that it, it, it fits the, it's good enough. Right? And in terms of, in terms of speed, like you said, most of the time you don't need of rust. Um, and so typescript I think is a lot more approachable a lot of people have to use it because they do front end work anyways. And so that kinda just becomes the I don't know if I should say the default but I would say it's probably the most common in terms of when somebody's building a backend today certainly there's other languages but JavaScript and TypeScript is everywhere. [00:52:57] Victor: Yeah. Uh, I, I, I, another thing is like, I mean, I'm, of ignored the, like, unreasonable effectiveness of like rails Cause there's just a, there's tons of just like rails warriors out there, and that's great. They're they're fantastic. I'm not a, I'm not personally a huge fan of rails but that's, uh, that's to my own detriment, right? In, in some, in some ways. But like, Rails and Django sort of just like, people who, like, I'm gonna learn this framework it's gonna be excellent. It most, they have a, they have carved out a great ecosystem for themselves. Um, or like, you know, even php right? PHP and like Laravel, or whatever. Uh, and so I'm ignoring those, like, those pockets of productivity, right? Those pockets of like intense productivity that people like, have all their needs met in that same way. Um, but as far as like general, general sort of ecosystem size and speed for me, um, like what you said, like applies to me. Like if I, if I'm just like, especially if I'm just like, Oh, I just wanna build a backend, Like, I wanna build something that's like super small and just does like, you know, maybe a few, a couple, you know, endpoints or whatever and just, I just wanna throw it out there. Right? Uh, I, I will pick, yeah. Typescript. It just like, it makes sense to me. I also think note is a better. VM or platform to build on than any of the others as well. So like, like I, by any of the others, I mean, Python, Perl, Ruby, right? Like sort of in the same class of, of tool. So I I am kind of convinced that, um, Node is better, than those as far as core abilities, right? Like threading Right. Versus the just multi-processing and like, you know, other, other, other solutions and like, stuff like that. So, if you want a boring stack, if I don't wanna use any tokens, right? Any innovation tokens I reach for TypeScript. [00:54:46] Jeremy: I think it's good that you brought up. Rails and, and Django because, uh, personally I've done, I've done work with Rails, and you're right in that Rails has so many built in, and the ways to do them are so well established that your ability to be productive and build something really fast hard to compete with, at least in my experience with available in the Node ecosystem. Um, on the other hand, like I, I also see what you mean by the runtimes. Like with Node, you're, you're built on top of V8 and there's so many resources being poured into it to making it fast and making it run pretty much everywhere. I think you probably don't do too much work with managed services, but if you go to a managed service to run your code, like a platform as a service, they're gonna support Node. Will they support your other preferred language? Maybe, maybe not, You know that they will, they'll be able to run node apps so but yeah I don't know if it will ever happen or maybe I'm just not familiar with it, but feel like there isn't a real rails of javascript. [00:56:14] Victor: Yeah, you're, totally right. There are, there are. It's, it's weird. It's actually weird that there, like Uh, but, but, I kind of agree with you. There's projects that are trying it recently. There's like Adonis, um, there is, there are backends that also do, like, will do basic templating, like Nest, NestJS is like really excellent. It's like one of the best sort of backend, projects out there. I I, I but like back in the day, there were projects like Sails, which was like very much trying to do exactly what Rails did, but it just didn't seem to take off and reach that critical mass possibly because of the size of the ecosystem, right? Like, how many alternatives to Rails are there? Not many, right? And, and now, anyway, maybe let's say the rest of 'em sort of like died out over the years, but there's also like, um, hapi HAPI, uh, which is like also, you know, similarly, it was like angling themselves to be that, but they just never, they never found the traction they needed. I think, um, or at least to be as wide, widely known as Rails is for, for, for the, for the Ruby ecosystem, um, but also for people to kind of know the magic, cause. Like I feel like you're productive in Rails only when you imbibe the magic, right? You, you, know all the magic context and you know the incantations and they're comforting to you, right? Like you've, you've, you have the, you have the sort of like, uh, convention. You're like, if you're living and breathing the convention, everything's amazing, right? Like, like you can't beat that. You're just like, you're in the zone but you need people to get in that zone. And I don't think node has, people are just too, they're too frazzled. They're going like, there's too much options. They can't, it's hard to commit, right? Like, imagine if you'd committed to backbone. Like you got, you can't, It's, it's over. Oh, it's not over. I mean, I don't, no, I don't wanna, you know, disparage the backbone project. I don't use it, but, you know, maybe they're still doing stuff and you know, I'm sure people are still working on it, but you can't, you, it's hard to commit and sort of really imbibe that sort of convention or, or, or sort of like, make yourself sort of breathe that product when there's like 10 products that are kind of similar and could be useful as well. Yeah, I think that's, that's that's kind of big. It's weird that there isn't a rails, for NodeJS, but, but people are working on it obviously. Like I mentioned Adonis, there's, there's more. I'm leaving a bunch of them out, but that's part of the problem. [00:58:52] Jeremy: On, on one hand, it's really cool that people are trying so many different things because hopefully maybe they can find something that like other people wouldn't have thought of if they all stick same framework. but on the other hand, it's ... how much time have we spent jumping between all these different frameworks when what we could have if we had a rails. [00:59:23] Victor: Yeah the, the sort of wasted time is, is crazy to think about it uh, I do think about that from time to time. And you know, and personally I waste a lot of my own time. Like, just, just rec

The Brothers Grim Punkcast
The Brothers Grim Punkcast #374

The Brothers Grim Punkcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023


Episode 374...  Bring in the new year with plenty of righteous punk finds on Bandcamp. Tons of bands still putting out solid new stuff at the end of December. Put in your new ear bluetooth devices and fire up the smart devices for pure punk pleasure. Enjoy!Download and stream here (iTunes and Google Podcasts as well):BROS GRIM 374!!!!!Airing Wednesdays 7pm PST on PUNK ROCK DEMONSTRATION & Fridays 7pm PST on RIPPER RADIO.Send us stuff to brothersgrimpunk@gmail.com.Punker's delight...Hammond IN DARKNESS 1:28 DJINN “ST” Toronto Haunted 2:07 S.H.I.T. Demo 2023 Stockton Toxic By Britney Spears 1:46 SISSYFIT Resist - Sabotage - Disrupt Olympia Crunchwrap Supreme 1:53 Spitpuddle TAX SEASON Night Doctor (bkgrd) 2:49 The Upsetters  Return of Django IN Life cage 1:41 Use Of Force Criminal Grip Finland Blackout 0:52 Occüpied Blackout Jax FL I Hate My Friends 1:49 Smells Like Paint Scraped up MS Policy 1:39 Dragged Dragged Letterbombs - Bitter and alone. 1:25 Distro.cefalia Letterbombs / Empatía - Split. No Time Recs STRAIGHT UP 0:34 BIG FACE DEMO [NTR 316] ego death (bkgrd) 4:35 NIHILISTIC FIT ABSOLUTE DISCIPLINE Boston Architects of Despair 1:41 Innocent Architects of Despair Total Peace Phoenix The Vessel 1:06 Art TP005: One Road Rash 1:42 Survivors Will Be Shot Again Terror Invasion BOMB DC 0:41 RUBBISH AMERICAN HARDCORE 10 TRACK DEMO Back to the Grindstone 1:48 Nuclear Armed Hogs Nuclear Armed Hogs/G.N.P. split EP Angie 1:19 The Hi-Fives Welcome To My Mind The B-Team - Hot Heather (bkgrd) 2:42 RTTB.Records Tales From The Pop Punk World Volume 2 Soundtrack to the End of the World 2:08 Guttermouth New Car Smell - EP New World For Them 2:53 Revulsion Ever Get The Feeling of Utter... Radical Change Recs Buying Time 1:15 Substance Fade Out Dystopic Scene 2:17 Triage POWER BEAT 7" Secret Nation 2:31 Crocodile Skink A Compilation of 38 Tracks Recorded 1990-1997_Tribal War Asia Records Rock 'n' Roll Television - New Wave Sci-Fi (bkgrd) 3:08 RTTB.Records Tales From The Pop​ Punk​ ​World Volume 1 Remnants 3:00 NOFX The Longest Line [EP] Lament 2:06 Dishell Teutonic Beat D-beat noise attack 1:56 Final Slum War D-beat Noize Attack Still Continues 2012-2013 - Tape Media-evil 2:21 VISIONS OF WAR The lost tapes 2002 " A bottle too far" re-noised Philly What We Deserve 1:44 ICD10 Pleasure For Everyone Italy Damaged Life 0:54 Wah'77 High Hopes Glad To Be Alive 2:47 Subhumans Unfinished Business

Welofi
N95 // weloficast 177 [Megapolis FM]

Welofi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 65:03


EN: N95 - Moscow based dj and producer, who's tracks identified as juke, footwork, ghettotech, electro and house. He has begun his activity since 2019 from soft lo-fi house till more fast and breaking rythems. His mix for Weloficast combines the energy of a creative path and gradually from calm and gentle compositions, wave after wave, tries to swing to more sharp and groove tracks. RU: N95 - московский диджей и продюсер работающий в таких направлениях как juke, footwork, ghettotech, electro и house. Начал свою деятельность в 2019 году с лёгкого лоу-фай хауса постепенно уходя к более быстрым и ломаным ритмам. Данный микс сочетает в себе энергию творческого пути и постепенно от спокойных и нежных композиций, волна за волной, старается раскачать к более резким и грувовым трекам.

The Church of Tarantino
Django Unchained 10th Anniversary Special

The Church of Tarantino

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 136:25


In 1858, slavery is rampant and the Civil War is imminent. A slave named Django teams up with bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz to hunt down the South's most notorious and wanted criminals, with the promise of winning his freedom. After a long and successful winter of tracking down wanted men and honing vital hunting skills, Django and Dr. Schultz devise a plan to rescue and free Django's wife, Broomhilda, whom he lost to the slave trade long ago. His quest leads him to an infamous Mississippi plantation known as Candyland and its brutal proprietor, Calvin Candie. If their plan is to succeed they must stay one step ahead of Calvin and his treacherous organization. So join the Reverend Scott K and his panel of bounty hunters, Shon Wheeler (CEO Scare Flair Records/Host of Splatterhouse Podcast), and Steve Smith (Host of The Way Past Cool Podcast/Co-Host of The Cheeky Basterds Podcast), as they sit down to discuss, dissect and reminisce about Tarantino's most financially successful films ever, Django Unchained, as it celebrates it's 10th Anniversary. Check out the panel's podcasts & follow them on their socials: Shon Wheeler: Listen to the Splatterhouse Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/38MSH4gnr6BU0uSrw3SuT7?si=bb155e1a67d5404b Follow the Splatterhouse Podcast on their Socials: Facebook: @Splatterhousepodcast Instagram: @the_splatterhouse_podcast Twitter: @SplatterPodcast Steve Smith: FB & Instagram - @ixnayray Twitter - @IxnayrayWPC Listen to The Way Past Cool Podcast: mixcloud.com/ixnayray Listen to The Cheeky Basterds Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-cheeky-basterds-podcast/id1642499584 The Cheeky Basterds Podcast Socials: Facebook & Instagram: @CheekyBasterdsPodcast Twitter: @CheekyBasterds Cyn Electric: Website: mycrazy88.com Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/my-crazy-88-ep/1640846586 Song: https://music.apple.com/us/album/love-song-of-vengeance/1640846586?i=1640846587 Socials: FB @cynelectric official Instagram & Twitter @cynelectric Become a member of The Church of Tarantino by following us on our socials: Facebook: @ChurchOfTarantino Instagram: @TheChurchOfTarantino Twitter: @TheChurchOfQTPod --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thechurchoftarantino/message

Hot Topics!
White Actor in a Slavery Movie

Hot Topics!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 92:18


Welcome to Hot Topics! Gabrielle Crichlow talks to guest Laura Cayouette about being a White actor in a slavery movie, particularly in the 2012 movie "Django Unchained."Who is Laura Cayouette?Best known as Leonardo DiCaprio's sister in Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained," Laura has acted in over 60 movies and TV shows including Now You See Me, True Detective and Friends. She's currently recurring on Oprah Winfrey and Ava Duverney's Queen Sugar. Laura is also the author of 8 books including Know Small Parts: An Actor's Guide to Turning Minutes into Moments and Moments into a Career with a foreword by Richard Dreyfuss and endorsements from Kevin Costner, Lou Diamond Phillips, Reginald Hudlin, and more. Writing Unblocked: How I Went From Writing 1 Book In 20 years To 5 Books in 4 Years helps writers of all skill levels tell their stories and create their projects. Laura Cayouette earned her Master's Degree in creative writing and English literature at the University of South Alabama. She's taught both English and acting/directing at various universities.You can find Laura Cayouette:On the web: https://lauracayouette.com/On her blog: https://latonola.wordpress.com...On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura...On Twitter: https://twitter.com/KnowSmallP...On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/l...On Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/lato...Laura is an author! Check out her catalog on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Laura-C...=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1493786646&sr=8-1&fbclid=IwAR2Bng17MxMY5lHCTXqGMN6Mf9G5po1yHkvibtXRgbBaKdUBJoqwFWOJdl8Laura also has an e-book called "Writing Unblocked: How I went from writing 1 book in 20 years to 5 books in 4 years." Purchase it here: https://lauracayouette.samcart...Laura also has an e-course called "Creating Characters." Purchase it here: https://lauracayouette.samcart...Laura gave us a coupon code: get 20% off the sales price of her e-book and e-course when you use the code HOTTOPICSPODCASTWatch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/-X-KwmXzlDw**********************************************Follow A Step Ahead Tutoring Services:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/astep...Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aste...Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ASATS2... YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@astepaheadtutorigservicesEventbrite: https://astepaheadtutoringserv...Visit our website: https://www.astepaheadtutoring...Sign up for our Hot Topics! text list: https://tapit.us/pZRwv8 OR text the code HOTTOPICS to (917) 764-3975Sign up for our tutoring text list: https://tapit.us/cipPJOSign up for our tutoring email list: https://squareup.com/outreach/...Listen to "Hot Topics!" on audio: https://www.astepaheadtutoring...Support us:Cash App: https://cash.app/$ASATS2013PayPal: https://paypal.me/ASATS2013Venmo: https://venmo.com/u/ASATS2013Zelle: https://astepaheadtutoringserv...:: Original episode aired on October 5, 2022 ::

Discover the Horror
Episode 33 - 2022 Wrap-Up

Discover the Horror

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 115:27


Just like we did last year, in Episode 7, we're going through the best films that we watched for the first time in 2022. Doesn't mean they came out in the last 12 months, but they were all watched for the first time this year, therefore we consider them new movies. We each go through our Top Three Favorites that we watched, as well as go through some of the titles that actually did come out in 2022. We also want to say thanks to everyone that has continued to listen to us over this last year. We love the feedback and always welcome more! So send us an email, leave a comment here, or on our website, DiscovertheHorror.com, or on Facebook or Instagram, and let us know what you think, did you agree with us, think we're crazy? No matter what, we want to hear! Make sure you have a pen and notepad before you hit play, because I'm guessing you're going to have a few titles that you are going to want to seek out after listening to this. Ready? Let's do this! Here are the films mentioned in this episode: All the Moons (2020), Antlers (2021), The Bad Seed (1956), Barbarian (2022), Beast (2022), Beyond the Darkness (1979), Black Emanuelle (1975), Bodies, Bodies, Bodies (2022), Caligula and Messalina (1981), Caligula: The Untold Story (1982), Crimes of the Future (2022), The Cursed (2021), Dark Glasses (2022), The Deeper You Dig (2019), The Devil's Nightmare (1979), Devil's Wedding Night (1973), Django (1966), Errementari (2017), Firestarter (2022), Goodnight Mommy (2022), Halloween Ends (2022), Hellbender (2021), Hellraiser (2022), The House at the End of Time (2013), House of Darkness (2022), Jeepers Creepers: Reborn (2022), Justine (1969), Lady Frankenstein (1971), Lady Morgan's Vengeance (1965), The Lair (2022), Let the Right One In (2008), Men (2022), Monstrous (2022), Night's End (2022), Nope (2022), Orphan: First Kill (2022), Pearl (2022), Pray for the Devil (2022), The Reef (2010), The Reef: Stalked (2022), The Requin (2022), The Ritual (2017), The Sadness (2022), Satan's Slaves 2: Communion (2022), Scream (2022), Shark Bait (2022), Smile (2022), Speak No Evil (2022), Studio 666 (2022), Terrified (2017), Terrifier (2016), Terrifier 2 (2022), Terror Train (2022), They/Them (2022), The Third Eye (1966), The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2022), Umma (2022), V/H/S/99 (2022), The Watcher (2022), X (2022)

All Of The Above (AOTA) Radio - A Journey through High Quality Music
“ALL OF THE ABOVE RADIO” – EPISODE 426 – SUNDAYS 2AM – 4AM PST ON 90.7FM – KPFK LOS ANGELES

All Of The Above (AOTA) Radio - A Journey through High Quality Music

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 116:22


Its a bird, its a plane, noooo its Django!!! Spinning records to twist your mind at high speeds, its another gang of bangers selected specifically for sophisticated earlobes. Let us take you into the stratosphere once again as we explore what lies above the clouds. That's why we call this show – All Of TheREAD MORE

Death By DVD
Death By DVD's Wild Wild Western Corbucci Christmas Special : The Great Silence

Death By DVD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 160:25


Those sleigh bells are jingling, they are ring-ting-tingling! It's time for the DEATH BY DVD 2022 Christmas special! Can you feel the death in the air? The weather outside is frightful and there is nothing more delightful than PAIN! We discuss one of the most iconic "spaghetti" westerns, filled with pain, sorrow, suffering AND SNOW! It's perfect for Christmas. Join Harry-Scott & Linus Fitness-Centre for a fun filled holiday special all about Sergio Corbucci's THE GREAT SILENCEsubscribe today for updates on new episodes, merch discounts and more at www.deathbydvd.comHEY, while you're still here.. have you heard...DEATH BY DVD PRESENTS : WHO SHOT HANK? The first of its kind (On this show, at least) an all original narrative audio drama exploring the murder of this shows very host, HANK THE WORLDS GREATEST! Explore WHO SHOT HANK, starting with the MURDER!  A Death By DVD New Year Mystery  WHO SHOT HANK : PART ONE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART TWO  WHO SHOT HANK : PART THREE  WHO SHOT HANK : PART FOUR  WHO SHOT HANK PART 5 : THE BEGINNING OF THE END WHO SHOT HANK PART 6 THE FINALE : EXEUNT OMNES